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Why missing milestones during coronavirus lockdown could be causing more harm than you realise

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why missing milestones during coronavirus lockdown could be causing more harm than you realise

More Australians are turning 50 than any other age in 2020, with 338,081 people marking a half century of life due to the baby and migration boom of those born between 1970 and 1971.

But social distancing restrictions and border closures caused by the COVID-19 pandemic has meant hundreds of thousands of those 50th birthday celebrations never took place – one of them Annette Densham’s epic round the world adventure.

Ms Densham, from the Gold Coast in Queensland, had a calendar jam-packed with memorable events including a week in Bali, a month-long tour of Mexico, 50 live music concerts and a New Year’s cruise around the South Pacific.

Coronavirus put a line through all of that, leaving Ms Densham and others like her more strained, anxious and upset than they had imagined they would be.

Clinical psychologist and behavioural expert Jaimie Bloch says there’s a reason for that.

Sydney psychologist Jaimie Bloch (pictured) believes the emotional distress of missing important life events has far-reaching consequences that are not always immediately obvious

Sydney psychologist Jaimie Bloch (pictured) believes the emotional distress of missing important life events has far-reaching consequences that are not always immediately obvious

Sydney psychologist Jaimie Bloch (pictured) believes the emotional distress of missing important life events has far-reaching consequences that are not always immediately obvious

Ms Bloch believes the emotional distress of missing important life events has far-reaching consequences that are not always immediately obvious.

‘As humans we spend a lot of time dedicated to working hard,’ the Sydney practitioner told Daily Mail Australia.

‘We often use the anticipation and planning of milestones as a way to manage stress by having something to look forward to, to work hard towards and to have as a well-deserved reward.’

Queensland woman Annette Densham (pictured left) had a calendar jam-packed with memorable events to mark her milestone 50th birthday before the outbreak of COVID-19

Queensland woman Annette Densham (pictured left) had a calendar jam-packed with memorable events to mark her milestone 50th birthday before the outbreak of COVID-19

Queensland woman Annette Densham (pictured left) had a calendar jam-packed with memorable events to mark her milestone 50th birthday before the outbreak of COVID-19

But the constraints of travel bans, border closures and social distancing has disrupted those plans to an extent that has never been seen before.

‘These changes have created a range of emotions like grief, loneliness, sadness, disappointment, anger, frustration and anxiety, which is not just experienced by the person whose milestone it was but their loved ones looking forward to the event too,’ Ms Bloch said.

To offset the disappointment, Pizza Hut is giving away $1,000 to 50 people who have missed their 50th birthday due to the COVID-19 crisis as part of its ‘Missed Milestones’ campaign.

How to cope with missing milestone during COVID-19

1. ‘Double celebrate’

Traditionally celebrations occur around the date of the milestone, but this doesn’t mean that milestones are restricted to a celebration time limit. 

Be open minded to having multiple celebrations for your milestone. This may look like having a virtual party during this pandemic and scheduling an actual party at a later date when it’s safe to do so. 

2. Get creative

There is no rule book about how to celebrate a special occasion! We have all been stuck in this traditional idea of having big gatherings, but these big gatherings can be impersonal. 

Embrace the shift this year and get creative. This may look like a fun virtual party. You can still get all dressed up, blast the music, have speeches and engage in activities even virtually! 

3. Make the effort and appreciate the effort

If you know someone who is celebrating a special occasion this year, like turning 50, make extra effort. Things look different this year so it’s not enough to just call and wish someone happy birthday. 

Help organise a special gift or be part of a car parade party in the street. These small gestures of care and love will be more meaningful than a big party.

Source: Clinical psychologist and behavioural expert Jaimie Bloch

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More Australians are turning 50 than any other age in 2020, with 338,081 people marking a half century of life due to the baby and migration boom of those born between 1970 and 1971 (stock image)

More Australians are turning 50 than any other age in 2020, with 338,081 people marking a half century of life due to the baby and migration boom of those born between 1970 and 1971 (stock image)

More Australians are turning 50 than any other age in 2020, with 338,081 people marking a half century of life due to the baby and migration boom of those born between 1970 and 1971 (stock image)

Pizza Hut’s chief marketing officer Chet Patel said he hopes the giveaway will bring joy to Australians during extraordinarily challenging times.

‘Missed Milestones aims to show Aussies a bit of love and generosity, recognising those who have been impacted personally this year,’ he told Daily Mail Australia.

As a brand that’s been ‘stitched into the fabric of Australian society’ for five decades and is celebrating its own 50th anniversary in 2020, Mr Patel felt it was only right that the restaurant give back to loyal customers who are doing it tough.

‘Hopefully, the lucky recipients will get to spend the money and celebrate in a way that is more memorable than they would have initially imagined,’ he said.

To be in with a chance to win, simply enter the details of the person you wish to nominate and describe in 50 words or less why they deserve to be one of the 50 Australians to receive $1,000 each.

Online entries are now open on Pizza Hut’s website, with winners announced on Friday, October 2.

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Victoria COVID-19 numbers: State records 14 new cases and eight deaths

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Victoria has recorded 14 new COVID-19 cases and eight deaths in the past 24 hours, as the state moves closer to the easing of restrictions. 

The number of cases originating from an unknown source are down from Thursday, the Department of Health and Human Services said on Friday morning. 

Despite the drop in cases Melbourne will not take ‘massive steps’ out of its lingering lockdown as Victorian Premier Daniel Andrews moved to temper expectations ahead of a much-anticipated announcement on Sunday.

Victoria has recorded 14 new coronavirus cases in the last 24 hours to Friday (Pictured are ADF personnel manning  a Princes Highway checkpoint outside Melbourne)

Victoria has recorded 14 new coronavirus cases in the last 24 hours to Friday (Pictured are ADF personnel manning  a Princes Highway checkpoint outside Melbourne)

Victoria has recorded 14 new coronavirus cases in the last 24 hours to Friday (Pictured are ADF personnel manning  a Princes Highway checkpoint outside Melbourne) 

On Thursday, the state reported  2 new cases have been diagnosed since yesterday, with the total number of COVID-19 cases in Victoria now at 20,105. 

Of the known cases 67 are being treated in hospital while eight are in intensive care being treated with ventilators. 

The city’s crucial 14-day COVID-19 case average plummeted to 26.7 on Thursday, below the 30-50 threshold needed to trigger to the next stage of normalisation.

Despite a day earlier indicating some restrictions could be eased quicker than planned, Mr Andrews was talking down the prospect of major changes to Melbourne’s lockdown. 

‘Sunday will not be a day of massive steps,’ he told reporters on Thursday.

‘The roadmap does not speak to that. It is not a day when we essentially throw the doors open.’

Pictured are ADF troops and police patrolling Melbourne during the second wave of the virus

Pictured are ADF troops and police patrolling Melbourne during the second wave of the virus

Pictured are ADF troops and police patrolling Melbourne during the second wave of the virus 

Under the metropolitan Melbourne roadmap announced on September 6, proposed changes include a staged return to school for some students and an allowance for pubic gatherings of five people from two households.

Victoria recorded just 12 new cases on Thursday, dropping the city’s rolling average by 2.7.

Mr Andrews said the figures were still ‘too much’ to skip to ‘step three’ a month early.

He expects the state government and health authorities to settle on the new rules on Saturday night before publicly confirming the package.

It came as Mr Andrews stands by beleaguered Health Minister Jenny Mikakos after the Health Workers Union called for her dismissal.

Ms Mikakos appeared before the inquiry into Victoria’s botched hotel quarantine scheme on Thursday, with the premier scheduled to be grilled on Friday.  

This post first appeared on dailymail.co.uk

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New South Wales: Coronavirus restrictions to be eased further

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new south wales coronavirus restrictions to be eased further

Massive changes are on the way for weddings, schools and community sport in New South Wales as the state takes another step in easing strict COVID-19 rules.

Dancing at weddings will be allowed from Friday, however, the dancefloor will be limited to just 20 people in the bridal parties. Previously, only the bride and groom were allowed to dance. 

Interschool activities will resume on Saturday – again under COVID-safe rules – and more than one parent will be allowed to watch from the sidelines while practising social distancing. No carpooling is allowed.

School choirs, musical ensembles, camps and excursions will resume in Term 4, as will school sports.

Dancing at weddings will be allowed from Friday, however, the dancefloor will be limited to just 20 people from the bridal parties. Previously, only the bride and groom were allowed to dance

Dancing at weddings will be allowed from Friday, however, the dancefloor will be limited to just 20 people from the bridal parties. Previously, only the bride and groom were allowed to dance

Dancing at weddings will be allowed from Friday, however, the dancefloor will be limited to just 20 people from the bridal parties. Previously, only the bride and groom were allowed to dance

Interschool activities will resume on Saturday - again under COVID-safe rules - and more than one parent will be allowed to watch from the sidelines while practising social distancing

Interschool activities will resume on Saturday - again under COVID-safe rules - and more than one parent will be allowed to watch from the sidelines while practising social distancing

Interschool activities will resume on Saturday – again under COVID-safe rules – and more than one parent will be allowed to watch from the sidelines while practising social distancing

Year 6 formals and graduations are back on and high school formals will be permitted after the HSC, while kindergarten orientation and Year 7 transitions will be allowed under COVID-safe rules.

Under the changes, entertainment facilities can increase capacity to 50 per cent and function centres hosting corporate meetings will be allowed to cater for up to 300 people, up from 150, from next week.

‘For workers across the full spectrum of the performing arts – from box office staff to ushers, from technicians and roadies to the artists – this change means more jobs,’ Minister for the Arts Don Harwin said on Friday.

‘For audiences, it means we can soon enjoy the experiences we have all missed so much during the pandemic.’

Tourism Minister Stuart Ayres said the relaxation of restrictions on corporate events will boost business for function centres.

‘It’s vitally important for the business community to back on its feet by being able to collaborate and share ideas in person once again,’ he said in a statement.

Premier Gladys Berejiklian on Thursday dangled the prospect of New Year’s Eve fireworks being held on Sydney Harbour this year to ‘offer people a glimmer of hope’.

Under the changes, entertainment facilities can increase capacity to 50 per cent and function centres hosting corporate meetings will be allowed to cater for up to 300 people, up from 150, from next week

Under the changes, entertainment facilities can increase capacity to 50 per cent and function centres hosting corporate meetings will be allowed to cater for up to 300 people, up from 150, from next week

Under the changes, entertainment facilities can increase capacity to 50 per cent and function centres hosting corporate meetings will be allowed to cater for up to 300 people, up from 150, from next week

The New South Wales premier said the state government will offer to pay for Sydney's New Year's Eve fireworks to make sure they go ahead

The New South Wales premier said the state government will offer to pay for Sydney's New Year's Eve fireworks to make sure they go ahead

The New South Wales premier said the state government will offer to pay for Sydney’s New Year’s Eve fireworks to make sure they go ahead

Gladys Berejiklian said the fireworks represent 2021 being a sign of home amid the coronavirus pandemic

Gladys Berejiklian said the fireworks represent 2021 being a sign of home amid the coronavirus pandemic

Gladys Berejiklian said the fireworks represent 2021 being a sign of home amid the coronavirus pandemic

But mass gatherings on the harbour foreshore won’t be allowed.

The changes come after the state recorded no new cases of community-spread COVID-19 for the third day in a row. 

There was just one case recorded in a returned traveller in hotel quarantine. 

NSW Health is treating 71 cases, with two patients in intensive care. None are on ventilators and the majority are in non-acute, out-of-hospital care.

There were 17,392 coronavirus tests conducted in the past 24-hour reporting period, compared with 16,759 in the previous 24.

Major changes to restrictions in NSW: 

Weddings:

From Friday, up to 20 people will be allowed onto the dance floor at weddings, provided they are part of the bridal party.

Schools:

Excursions and school camps will also resume in Term 4.

Up to five people will be allowed to sing in choirs, and there can now be an unlimited number of students in musical ensembles, subject to social distancing. 

Both parents will be allowed to watch games from the sidelines while practising social distancing. No carpooling is allowed. 

Year 6 formals and graduations are back on and high school formals will be permitted after the HSC, while kindergarten orientation and Year 7 transitions will be allowed under COVID-safe rules. 

Theatres, cinemas and concert venues:

Entertainment facilities can increase capacity to 50 per cent and function centres hosting corporate meetings will be allowed to cater for up to 300 people, up from 150, from next week. 

 

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This post first appeared on dailymail.co.uk

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How buying home in Australia is set to get easier with borrowers spared from listing spending habits

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how buying home in australia is set to get easier with borrowers spared from listing spending habits

Buying a home is set to get a lot easier with potential borrowers no longer needing to provide to the bank details of their everyday spending habits.

Treasurer Josh Frydenberg has announced an easing of mortgage and credit lending rules in a bid to spark an economy recovery from the coronavirus recession.

Under existing rules introduced in 2009, the onus is on the banks to scrutinise the daily spending of potential borrowers to determine if they are a reliable customer.

Mr Frydenberg said these rules had discouraged Australians from borrowing, despite interest rates being at a record-low of 0.25 per cent.

Buying a home is set to get a lot easier with potential borrowers no longer needing to provide the banks details of their everyday spending habits. Pictured is a stock image

Buying a home is set to get a lot easier with potential borrowers no longer needing to provide the banks details of their everyday spending habits. Pictured is a stock image

Buying a home is set to get a lot easier with potential borrowers no longer needing to provide the banks details of their everyday spending habits. Pictured is a stock image

‘The burden of regulation has been increasing and with it have come more obstacles for the consumer, making it harder to access credit,’ he said.

The Treasurer and Finance Minister Mathias Cormann are on Friday set to announce a scrapping of key elements of the National Consumer Credit Protection Act, which Kevin Rudd’s Labor government introduced in 2009 at the height of the Global Financial Crisis.

Prime Minister Scott Morrison’s Coalition government regards these 11-year-old responsible lending laws, designed to weed out unsuitable borrowers, as a risk in a slowing economy.

The government’s changes are set to put the onus on borrowers to tell the truth about their spending instead of forcing banks to heavily scrutinise their customers through intrusive questioning or third-party credit data groups.

Mr Frydenberg said the existing rules had made lenders ‘increasingly risk averse and overly conservative’. 

‘As a consequence, borrowers, irrespective of their financial circumstances, have faced an ever more intrusive, difficult and drawn-out approval process,’ he said.

In assessing loans, the big banks often obtain credit scores on potential borrowers from two main credit reporting agencies, Experian and Equifax.

These third-party agencies keep data on consumers for seven years and offer up scores, out of 1,000 and 1,200 respectively. 

This post first appeared on dailymail.co.uk

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