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Bitcoin price: Why has it reached its highest price for nearly three years?

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bitcoin price why has it reached its highest price for nearly three years

A surging appetite for bitcoin since the end of September has seen the price of the cryptocurrency soar to levels last seen in January 2018, with one of America’s largest banks even suggesting it could prove an alternative to gold. 

At one point on Wednesday, it almost touched the $14,000 barrier – but despite a slight dip since, it has risen from $10,500 a coin at the end of last month to around $13,000 today, or £10,000 

The steep climb in the price since mid-October means the cryptocurrency has risen 87 per cent in value earlier this week compared to last year, with the total value of the 18.5million coins in circulation now $243billion.

The price of Bitcoin has hit more than $13,000, the highest it has been since January 2018

The price of Bitcoin has hit more than $13,000, the highest it has been since January 2018

The price of Bitcoin has hit more than $13,000, the highest it has been since January 2018 

Even though Britain’s financial regulator announced at the start of October it would ban the sale of cryptocurrency-related derivatives to casual investors from next January over the potential harm they posed, the cryptocurrency has received a string of positive headlines which have helped spur investor confidence.

Last Wednesday PayPal said from next year US customers would be able to buy, hold and sell bitcoin within its app and use it to make payments for a fee, rather than simply using PayPal as a way of funding purchases from the likes of Coinbase.

Even though those who were paid this way would see it converted back into regular money, the news saw bitcoin shoot up in value by around $800 in a day, according to figures from Coindesk.

Glen Goodman, an expert and author of the book The Crypto Trader, called the news ‘a really significant vindication of Bitcoin from mainstream finance.’

Meanwhile Twitter founder and chief executive Jack Dorsey’s payments company Square announced it had bought $50million worth of coins earlier in October.

While many investors continue to see bitcoin simply as a speculative asset to try and make money on, crypto enthusiasts were likely buoyed to see more possible instances where it could actually be used as a payment method in the future.

Bitcoin's price is always volatile but it has been on an upward trajectory since a mass sell-off in global stock markets in mid-March

Bitcoin's price is always volatile but it has been on an upward trajectory since a mass sell-off in global stock markets in mid-March

Bitcoin’s price is always volatile but it has been on an upward trajectory since a mass sell-off in global stock markets in mid-March

Analysts at JP Morgan suggested a fortnight ago on the back of the news from PayPal and Square that the ‘potential long-term upside for bitcoin is considerable’, and that it could even compete ‘more intensely with gold as an alternative currency’ due to its greater popularity among younger users.

The analysts added that: ‘Cryptocurrencies derive value not only because they serve as stores of wealth but also due to their utility as means of payment. 

‘The more economic agents accept cryptocurrencies as a means of payment in the future, the higher their utility and value.’

The comparison with gold, even though the FCA described cryptocurrencies as having ‘extreme volatility’, is also likely another reason for the rise in bitcoin’s price since global stock markets fell dramatically in mid-March.

PayPal's announcement that customers from next year would be able to make payments in bitcoin - even if they were converted back into real money - led to the price shooting up

PayPal's announcement that customers from next year would be able to make payments in bitcoin - even if they were converted back into real money - led to the price shooting up

PayPal’s announcement that customers from next year would be able to make payments in bitcoin – even if they were converted back into real money – led to the price shooting up

Gold is seen as a store of value due to its finite nature, while the 21million coin cap on bitcoin may ‘appeal to some investors as they see Government deficits balloon’, Russ Mould, investment director at AJ Bell said.

Central banks across the world have been pumping money into their economies as they seek to support governments and businesses through the coronavirus pandemic by keeping borrowing costs low, which some fear will lead to rampant inflation and a decline in currencies like the dollar.

Goodman added he felt the prices has ‘been largely driven by the money-printing narrative, with central banks – particularly the US Federal Reserve – expanding the money supply to counteract the effect of coronavirus on the economy.

‘The dollar has been depreciating as a consequence, and a lot of investors – and even companies – are starting to hedge their dollar holdings by diversifying into “hard currencies” like gold and Bitcoin.’

There were more UK searches for bitcoin ahead of its halving in May, even though it had less of an impact on the price

There were more UK searches for bitcoin ahead of its halving in May, even though it had less of an impact on the price

There were more UK searches for bitcoin ahead of its halving in May, even though it had less of an impact on the price

This cocktail of good news stories and action by central banks has meant that bitcoin has massively outperformed the slight price rise seen ahead of its ‘halving’ in May, which cut the reward for digitally mining bitcoin and constricting its supply.

Although data from Google Trends suggests this led to far more searches for bitcoin in the UK than has been seen over the last month, the price did not touch $10,000 until late July, two months after the event.

However, even if enthusiasts are increasingly excitable about bitcoin’s future as a payment method, it is possible that a lot of the interest is still being driven by gamblers, speculators and those hoping the price will simply keep going up.

Some 47 per cent of people surveyed by the Financial Conduct Authority in a report published in July said they had never used cryptocurrency for anything, with £260 bought on average largely ‘as a gamble that could make or lose money’.

And even JP Morgan’s analysts cautioned that in ‘the near term, bitcoin looks rather overbought and vulnerable to profit taking’.

If you do buy into bitcoin 

Find out how bitcoin and the blockchain works, so that you have some understanding of the system, the ledger, the major players and the public and private key elements.

Remember bitcoin yields nothing and its main source of value is scarcity. Most bitcoin activity is trading not investing. 

Research coin wallets, the digital vaults where cryptocurrency is held, and consider security carefully. Bitcoins have been stolen before, understand how this happened.

Be prepared for extreme volatility. The price can move by 20 per cent in one day and you could easily lose half of your cash in a far quicker time that investing in the stock market.

Consider how you would cash in any gains. There are reports that this has proved hard for some people. A time of market stress could lead to people being locked in and unable to trade.

Read our guide to How to be a successful investor, which looks at the far less high octane world of long-term investing and how to make it a success. 

What is bitcoin?

The digital currency that most will be familiar with is free from government interference and can be shared instantly online. It doesn’t rely on trusting one central monetary authority.

The underlying technology is blockchain, a financial ledger maintained by a network of computers that can track the movement of any asset without the need for a central regulator. 

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Bitcoin price: Why has it fallen 12.5% in a day?

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Bitcoin’s seemingly unstoppable surge towards an all-time high and a $20,000 price tag went into reverse as holders tried to cash in their gains for a profit.

The price of the cryptocurrency plummeted more than 12 per cent over the last 24 hours from a peak of $19,374 a coin on Wednesday to $16,858, according to figures from Coindesk.

Fellow cryptocurrencies like ethereum and ripple have also plunged in price over the last 24 hours, while bitcoin’s fall was its sharpest since the start of September.

Bitcoin plunged by more than 12% in the last 24 hours just as it looked set to hit an all-time high

Bitcoin plunged by more than 12% in the last 24 hours just as it looked set to hit an all-time high

Bitcoin plunged by more than 12% in the last 24 hours just as it looked set to hit an all-time high

It had looked set to break its all-time high of around $19,500, set in December 2017, driven by a series of good news stories, endorsements from institutional investors and continued money printing by central banks. 

The fact the price of the cryptocurrency had risen from just under $8,000 in January to the verge of $20,000 a coin without serious interest from casual investors had led some to argue the boom this time around was here to stay for a while yet.

This is Money has previously reported on the factors driving the cryptocurrency’s rise, including endorsements by the likes of PayPal and JP Morgan, which said it could possibly compete with gold as an alternative store of value. 

However, this positivity has been somewhat dented by the sudden plunge in the bitcoin price, which appeared to be the result of a massive sell-off by high net worth holders of the cryptocurrency.

The sharp drop is yet more proof of the cryptocurrency’s volatility and why This is Money warns casual investors looking to buy into it that they need to do their research and be careful beforehand.

According to bitcoin analysts Glassnode, the number of investors holding at least 1,000 bitcoin reached an all-time high this week, with the concentration of large sums of the cryptocurrency in the hands of a small number of investors giving them a significant influence on the market.

Another analyst, Ki Young Ju, wrote on the social media platform Twitter that these holders of large sums of bitcoin had sold off their holdings, causing the price to fall.

Bitcoin has been on a tear since the end of the summer and is still massively up on where it was at the start of this year

Bitcoin has been on a tear since the end of the summer and is still massively up on where it was at the start of this year

Bitcoin has been on a tear since the end of the summer and is still massively up on where it was at the start of this year 

And one of the most well-known cryptocurrency exchanges, Coinbase, said traders were being hit by connectivity issues as they tried to make purchases or sell-off their holdings. The San Francisco-based exchange said it had found and fixed the problem.

Responding to the sudden drop, Glen Goodman, the author of the book The Crypto Trader, said: ‘When Bitcoin approached $20,000 in 2017, more people were queueing up to buy it than ever before.

‘Many of those buyers have been holding their investment – in varying degrees of misery – ever since.

‘The pressure now, not least from their long-suffering partners, is to sell and finally break even on their investments.

‘With their fingers hovering over the “sell” button, when the price started retreating slowly down to $19,000 and then $18,500, it led to a flurry of panic sellers grabbing their chance to break even, and those sellers caused the price to crash fast.’

However, he still said the long-term picture for the cryptocurrency was ‘very positive’, despite the possibility of ‘a lot more price volatility in the near future’.

He added: ‘This appears so far to be a healthy correction in a big bull market. In my opinion, only a fall to $10,000 would put that bullish narrative in question.’

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Just FOUR councils applied to use a new hedgehog warning road sign

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just four councils applied to use a new hedgehog warning road sign

A new traffic sign launched by the Department for Transport for councils to display on roads with high populations of hedgehogs, badgers, otters and other small animals has received a prickly response with just one per cent of authorities applying to use it.

The sign, unveiled last year, displays one of the spiky creatures in a red warning triangle and was designed to help preserve dwindling hedgehog numbers and reduce the number of people injured in collisions involving animals.

However, This is Money can exclusively reveal that all four councils who did apply to erect the signs were denied permission because they did not provide enough evidence to the DfT that they have a high concentration of the animals in their areas.

Prickly reaction: Just four councils have applied to the Department for Transport to use a hedgehog warning sign on roads that put the animals and drivers and riders at risk

Prickly reaction: Just four councils have applied to the Department for Transport to use a hedgehog warning sign on roads that put the animals and drivers and riders at risk

Prickly reaction: Just four councils have applied to the Department for Transport to use a hedgehog warning sign on roads that put the animals and drivers and riders at risk

Of the 343 councils that could have requested to display the signs on their roads, only Newcastle City Council, Middlesbrough Council, Surrey County Council and East Riding of Yorkshire Council applied, according to an Freedom of Information request by the AA.

All four subsequently had their applications denied, the DfT confirmed.

The department clarified that all four had ‘failed to evidence any concentrations of small animals habitually in the road, or provide any accident data’.

Councils and animal conservationists will query how they can feasibly provide evidence of hedgehogs being at risk on their roads. 

‘Rejection of the applications based on failing to provide adequate evidence conjures up all sorts of weird scenarios: council officers counting the bodies or sending off the evidence in jiffy bags,’ said an AA spokesman. 

He added: ‘Common sense suggests that, if cash-strapped councils are prepared to fork out the money for the signs and the manpower to erect them, there is probably the local need for them.’

The signs are to warn of small animals, including hedgehogs, badgers, otters and squirrels. Hedgehogs in particular are now on the Red List of endangered UK species

The signs are to warn of small animals, including hedgehogs, badgers, otters and squirrels. Hedgehogs in particular are now on the Red List of endangered UK species

The signs are to warn of small animals, including hedgehogs, badgers, otters and squirrels. Hedgehogs in particular are now on the Red List of endangered UK species

The decision to deny these authorities will has left the British Hedgehog Preservation Society bristling in frustration.

Hedgehog numbers have plummeted in recent years, halving in volume since 2000.

The animals now find themselves on the Red List of endangered UK species.  

Fay Vass, chief executive at the British Hedgehog Preservation Society, told This is Money: ‘We are disappointed that more authorities aren’t applying for the small mammal signs that feature a hedgehog and that the DfT are rejecting those that do. 

‘We know from interaction with the public that these signs would be very welcome in many areas where hedgehog road casualty counts are high. 

‘In the meantime, we produce a sign that can be purchased for display on private property, but we very much hope that the official signs will soon begin to be erected in the spirit they were intended. 

‘They are important to warn people that small animals might be on the road in that area, not only for the sake of the animal, but to help reduce risk for drivers too.’

The AA asked how councils could feasibly provide evidence that they have roads with high concentrations of small animals

The AA asked how councils could feasibly provide evidence that they have roads with high concentrations of small animals

The AA asked how councils could feasibly provide evidence that they have roads with high concentrations of small animals

The new traffic warning sign was launched in 2019 by former transport secretary Chris Grayling, including a bespoke announcement and plenty of fanfare around the sign. 

It was unveiled as the DfT said hundreds of people are injured every year in collisions involving animals in the road, claiming that 629 people were injured in accidents involving an animal in the road (excluding horses) and 4 people were killed in 2017 alone. 

Mr Grayling called on local authorities and animal welfare groups to identify accident and wildlife hotspots where the sign should be located.  

He said: ‘The new small mammal warning sign should help to reduce the number of people killed and injured, as well as helping our precious small wild mammal population to flourish.’ 

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Marcus Bank easy-access savings rate to fall to 0.5%

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Marcus is making another cut to its easy-access account as savings providers continue to slash rates on the back of brutal cuts by National Savings & Investments.

The UK savings arm of Goldman Sachs will cut its easy-access rate from 0.7 per cent to 0.5 per cent in just over a fortnight on 11 December, just two months after it cut the rate from 1.05 per cent.

It made that September cut, its deepest ever, just days after NS&I announced it was reducing rates on its easy-access accounts to as low as 0.01 per cent, and news of the latest rate reduction comes in the same week as those cuts were introduced.

Marcus has made the second cut to its easy-access account in the last 2 months. It will pay savers just 0.5% interest from 11 December

Marcus has made the second cut to its easy-access account in the last 2 months. It will pay savers just 0.5% interest from 11 December

Marcus has made the second cut to its easy-access account in the last 2 months. It will pay savers just 0.5% interest from 11 December

First Direct and HSBC also handed savers a cut of 1.75 percentage points on its regular saver earlier this week

It means Marcus’ account, which paid as much as 1.5 per cent for a year after it was launched in September 2018, now fails to beat inflation, which rose to 0.7 per cent last month.

The bank, which took in roughly £1billion a month from savers when it launched its then market-leading account two years’ ago, previously reduced its rates to 1.45 per cent and then 1.3 and 1.2 per cent in recent months, while it also removed the account from sale to new customers in June this year.

Rate cuts elsewhere saw savers pile into the account, but those lucky who were lucky to get in have now faced a succession of cuts themselves.

The quick-fire cut in just over two weeks’ time comes after it changed its terms and conditions last October to allow it to give customers just 14 days’ notice ahead of any rate cut, where before it let them know two months’ beforehand.

It hoovered in so much cash from UK savers that it had to close its doors in June to new customers – it had raked in £21billion, making it close to breaching banking rules. 

And Marcus, whose parent bank was bailed out by the US taxpayer during the last financial crisis in 2008, is not the only provider to hand savers a succession of bad news in the last few months.

When it announced its cut from 1.05 per cent to 0.7 per cent at the end of September, the best buy easy-access stood at 1.1 per cent and five highest-paying accounts paid an average of 1 per cent, according to Savings Champion.

Today, the best buy rate has dropped to 0.7 per cent and the top five average to 0.6 per cent, while easy-access rates overall pay as little as 0.21 per cent on average, according to separate analysis from Moneyfacts.

How savings rates have slumped since Marcus’ last cut
Date  Best buy easy-access rate  Top 5 easy-access average rate 
25 September 1.1% 1% 
26 November  0.7%  0.6% 
Source: Savings Champion 

Savings banks have been inundated with money since NS&I’s announcement of its rate reductions two months’ ago, filling up their books and requiring them to slash rates as a result.

Challenger bank Paragon, which removed its 0.65 per cent paying easy-access account from sale this week, said September was its busiest ever month as deposits flooded out of NS&I ‘at an unprecedented rate’.

This was even despite the fact that many people who tried to withdraw money from NS&I had, and continue to have, problems doing so.

Paragon Bank’s savings direct, Derek Sprawling, said he anticipated billions more pounds would continue to inundate the market as savers looked for the best rates, even if those rates were much lower than they had been previously.

Saga, which has its easy-access account provided by Marcus, has also cut its rate from 0.7 per cent to 0.5 per cent, although that comes with a 0.1 percentage point bonus which expires after a year.

James Blower, an advisor to savings banks and founder of The Savings Guru, said savings rates were ‘collapsing generally as the NS&I cuts take effect.’

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