Connect with us

Business

L&G threatens firms in bid to avoid ‘climate catastrophe’

Published

on

lg threatens firms in bid to avoid climate catastrophe

Britain’s biggest asset manager has stepped up its war on climate change, warning hundreds of firms it will sell their shares if they fail to meet green targets.

Under its expanded climate impact pledge, Legal & General will use a traffic-light system to grade businesses on their efforts to become more environmentally-friendly.

The investor, which manages £1.2 trillion of savers’ cash, previously promised to engage with 80 of the world’s worst polluters. 

Climate change war: Under its expanded climate impact pledge, Legal & General will use a 'traffic light system' to grade businesses on their efforts to become environmentally-friendly

Climate change war: Under its expanded climate impact pledge, Legal & General will use a ‘traffic light system’ to grade businesses on their efforts to become environmentally-friendly

But its latest move will see the programme grow to cover more than 1,000 companies – ratcheting up pressure on them to take action to cut carbon emissions.

L&G yesterday revealed it has already written to 500 firms given ‘red lights’, urging them to change course.

It is understood that UK companies given several red lights include insurer Admiral, airline Easyjet and Primark-owner Associated British Foods. 

L&G said those that fail to take action will face ‘sanctions’, including votes against their motions at shareholder meetings and the potential sale of shares.

L&G previously ditched shares in oil giant ExxonMobil, insurer Metlife and China Construction Bank over their failure to meet its climate change targets, which are based on those from the 2015 Paris Agreement.

Michelle Scrimgeour, L&G Investment Management’s boss, said: ‘The world is heading for a climate catastrophe, which could devastate our environment, society and economy. 

As a major global asset manager, and responsible investor, we have much to contribute in this mission on behalf of our clients.’

The 1,000-plus companies being monitored by L&G have been drawn from 15 sectors and are responsible for 60 per cent of all greenhouse emissions by listed businesses.

L&G’s move comes after other major investors such as Blackrock and Norway’s sovereign wealth fund this year also pledged to take a tougher approach to climate change.

This post first appeared on dailymail.co.uk

Continue Reading
Advertisement
Click to comment

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Business

We’re going to court, say lawyers in Neil Woodford fight

Published

on

By

were going to court say lawyers in neil woodford fight

One of the five firms looking to obtain compensation for investors who lost money in the break-up of investment fund Woodford Equity Income is set to launch a multi-million pound class action in the courts by the end of the year. 

The Mail on Sunday understands that litigation specialist Harcus Parker is likely to be the first to press the ‘go’ button, with a claim against Link – the fund’s ‘authorised corporate director’ (ACD). It is understood to be ‘further down the track’ than rivals RGL Management, Nelsons, Slater and Gordon and Leigh Day. 

The view of Harcus is that Link failed in its duties as ACD to safeguard the interests of the fund’s 300,000 investors, leading to the abrupt closure of the £3.5billion fund in June last year when it was unable to meet a multimillion pound redemption request from a key investor. 

Looking for justice: Many investors in Neil Woodford's fund have been left with losses of up to 50 per cent.

Looking for justice: Many investors in Neil Woodford's fund have been left with losses of up to 50 per cent.

Looking for justice: Many investors in Neil Woodford’s fund have been left with losses of up to 50 per cent.

Manager Neil Woodford was subsequently sacked by Link, the fund broken up and a majority of the assets disposed of with money being returned to investors. But many investors have been left with losses of up to 50 per cent. 

Harcus maintains Link did not ensure there was sufficient liquidity in the fund to meet investor redemptions – resulting in its sudden closure. Also, it says Link did not verify the valuation of some of the fund’s unquoted assets which were subsequently sold for a pittance as Woodford Equity Income was broken up. 

Finally, Link is accused of failing to make sure Neil Woodford ran the fund in accordance with its objectives – namely to provide investors with a mix of dividends and capital return from a portfolio of established UK companies. Instead, the fund was heavily invested in unquoted companies. 

On Friday, Harcus confirmed it has the necessary funding in place to launch its claim, has obtained favourable opinion from a leading Queen’s Counsel on the merits of its claim, and has set out its argument to Link in correspondence – a document The Mail on Sunday has seen.

It added: ‘The claim is going ahead and we expect to file soon on behalf of several thousand clients.’ Some 15,000 investors have expressed an interest in supporting the claim, of which 3,000 have gone on to become Harcus clients. Their numbers will be boosted when Harcus goes ahead with the claim – aggrieved investors can join it up until a deadline set by the court (woodfordclaim.com). The action is being run on a no-win, no-fee basis. 

Harcus’s move will be welcomed by Woodford investors because the litigation expert has past history in mounting successful actions. It pursued Link’s predecessor Capita Financial Managers in the courts over its role in the collapse of the Arch Cru funds – and is believed to have forced Capita into agreeing an out-of-court settlement in 2015. 

Interestingly, the Queen’s Counsel opinion sought on Link is the same as the lead counsel used in Arch Cru – Nick Vineall QC. Capita’s duties at Arch Cru were broadly the same as those for Link on Woodford Equity Income. 

Investors will need to be patient. Once launched, the class action would take at least 18 months to get to trial. Any judgment either way could then take between two and three months to be made, so if Harcus is successful, compensation is unlikely to be paid before the end of 2022. Harcus’s intervention aside, there is still the possibility of regulatory intervention in the Woodford debacle. The Financial Conduct Authority has been looking into the circumstances surrounding the closing of the high profile fund for the past 17 months – and continues to do so. According to Peter Sleep, a fund manager with Seven Investment Management, investors who are hoping for compensation through FCA intervention will probably need to have the ‘patience of a saint’. 

He says that regulatory action against Capita Financial Managers (now Link) for its role in the liquidation of the Connaught Income Fund took five years to bubble to the surface. 

The result was a £66million payment to investors (from Capita) who lost money in the failed fund – plus a public censuring for Capita. 

There are similarities between Connaught Income and Woodford Equity Income – in terms of the failure of the authorised corporate director (Capita in Connaught’s case, Link’s in Woodford’s) to adequately monitor the fund. 

But as Sleep says: ‘Nothing is ever exactly the same, but there may be other issues the FCA uncovers with Woodford Equity Income. The wheels of justice turn slowly and I can only imagine that Covid is throwing sand in those wheels today.’ 

On Friday, the FCA said the investigation into the suspension of Woodford Equity Income was a ‘priority matter’. It added: ‘There’s a strong team working on it full time and we’re looking to complete it as soon as we possibly can.’ It confirmed Link was part of its work. Although Harcus’s focus is on Link, other litigation companies have targeted wealth manager Hargreaves Lansdown which, up until the day Woodford Equity Income was closed, had promoted the fund as a ‘best buy’ – in the process generating millions of pounds of revenue for itself. This is despite having concerns over the increasingly illiquid nature of the fund.

CASE STANDS ‘HIGH CHANCE OF SUCCESS’ 

Alan Miller, chief investment officer of asset manager SCM Direct, has closely followed the debacle over funds managed by Neil Woodford, left. 

Indeed, he was one of the first to predict that many of the investments in the Woodford Equity Income fund were grossly overvalued and near worthless. 

He raised his concerns directly with the Financial Conduct Authority – and has been proved right. He says any class actions stand ‘a very high chance of success’ – adding: ‘I think there will be substantial claims against both Hargreaves Lansdown and Link, ironically not against Mr Woodford or his business Woodford Investment Management.’ 

There is also the possibility of an institutional claim being launched against Link – backed by pension funds which invested in Woodford Equity Income. 

Harcus Parker is looking into this, but it is tricky because of the reluctance of many institutional investors to get involved in litigation which they consider ‘messy and vulgar’. 

One expert believes Hargreaves Lansdown should join such a claim so that investors in its own-branded managed funds – some of which were heavily invested in Woodford – have a chance to recover a slice of their losses. 

On Friday, Link and Hargreaves Lansdown were both invited to comment on the prospect of litigation. 

They declined the opportunity.

THE FOUR OTHER FIRMS TAKING LEGAL ACTION  

RGL MANAGEMENT: RGL’s main target is Hargreaves Lansdown although it is still looking ‘very seriously at adding Link to the claim’. Like Harcus, it has sought opinion from Queen’s Counsel on the merits of any claim and the response has been ‘excellent’. 

On Friday, James Hayward, RGL chief executive, said: ‘We have over 1,000 claimants and this is before a formal marketing campaign has begun. In all reality, we won’t issue a claim before next year.’ 

Hayward admitted his company might not be the first to issue a claim, but he pointed to the fact that ‘nobody had beaten them’ to mounting a class action against Yorkshire and Clydesdale banks for their mis-selling of business loans in the 2000s. ‘We have the expertise and the gravitas,’ he added. rglmanagement.com/woodford-litigation 

LEIGH DAY: Like Harcus Parker, Leigh Day believes a case against Link presents the best way forward. It told The Mail on Sunday it is in the ‘final stage of preparation’ ahead of launching its case. Any action would be based on a no-win, no-fee basis with fees capped at 30 per cent of any compensation received. 

Kamran Vojdani, a solicitor in the consumer law team at Leigh Day, said: ‘The time to get the case ready reflects the size, complexity and developing nature of this matter. In addition, we want to make sure everything is in place to take the claim through trial so we don’t have to disappoint clients later on.’ 

He added that it was ‘separately considering potential claims against Hargreaves Lansdown’. consumerlawclaims.leighday. co.uk

NELSONS: This firm is looking to issue claims against both Link and Hargreaves Lansdown – as well as advising some investors on additional claims against their independent financial advisers who recommended the Woodford fund to them. On Friday, partner Cathryn Selby said: ‘We have been gathering evidence for the claims that are proceeding – as well as investigating new potential claims as people affected continue to come forward. 

‘We are in the process of finalising the claims so anyone looking to pursue a claim should act quickly as we anticipate issuing formal letters of claim before the end of the year.’ nelsonslaw.co.uk/ woodford-fund-claim

SLATER AND GORDON: It is following RGL in pursuing Hargreaves Lansdown. On Friday. Gareth Pope, Slater and Gordon’s principal lawyer, said: ‘We consider that investors have a viable claim against Hargreaves Lansdown and we are committed to holding them accountable for the losses investors have suffered. 

‘Slater and Gordon has formed a team of barristers and expert advisers and is in the process of creating a group action against Hargreaves Lansdown to enable all investors to reclaim their investment plus other losses suffered.’ slatergordon.co.uk  

#fiveDealsWidget .dealItemTitle#mobile {display:none} #fiveDealsWidget {display:block; float:left; clear:both; max-width:636px; margin:0; padding:0; line-height:120%; font-size:12px} #fiveDealsWidget div, #fiveDealsWidget a {margin:0; padding:0; line-height:120%; text-decoration: none; font-family:Arial, Helvetica ,sans-serif} #fiveDealsWidget .widgetTitleBox {display:block; float:left; width:100%; background-color:#af1e1e; } #fiveDealsWidget .widgetTitle {color:#fff; text-transform: uppercase; font-size:18px; font-weight:bold; margin:6px 10px 4px 10px; } #fiveDealsWidget a.dealItem {float:left; display:block; width:124px; margin-right:4px; margin-top:5px; background-color: #e3e3e3; min-height:200px;} #fiveDealsWidget a.dealItem#last {margin-right:0} #fiveDealsWidget .dealItemTitle {display:block; margin:10px 5px; color:#000; font-weight:bold} #fiveDealsWidget .dealItemImage, #fiveDealsWidget .dealItemImage img {float:left; display:block; margin:0; padding:0} #fiveDealsWidget .dealItemImage {border:1px solid #ccc} #fiveDealsWidget .dealItemImage img {width:100%; height:auto} #fiveDealsWidget .dealItemdesc {float:left; display:block; color:#004db3; font-weight:bold; margin:5px;} #fiveDealsWidget .dealItemRate {float:left; display:block; color:#000; margin:5px} #fiveDealsWidget .footerText a:hover{text-decoration: underline;} #fiveDealsWidget .footerSmall{font-size:10px; padding-top:10px;} @media (max-width: 635px) { #fiveDealsWidget a.dealItem {width:19%; margin-right:1%} #fiveDealsWidget a.dealItem#last {width:20%} } @media (max-width: 560px) { #fiveDealsWidget #desktop {display:none;} #fiveDealsWidget #mobile {display:block!important} #fiveDealsWidget a.dealItem {background-color: #fff; height:auto; min-height:auto} #fiveDealsWidget a.dealItem {border-bottom:1px solid #ececec; margin-bottom:5px; padding-bottom:10px} #fiveDealsWidget a.dealItem#last {border-bottom:0px solid #ececec; margin-bottom:5px; padding-bottom:0px} #fiveDealsWidget a.dealItem, #fiveDealsWidget a.dealItem#last {width:100%} #fiveDealsWidget .dealItemContent, #fiveDealsWidget .dealItemImage {float:left; display:inline-block} #fiveDealsWidget .dealItemImage {width:35%; margin-right:1%} #fiveDealsWidget .dealItemContent {width:63%} #fiveDealsWidget .dealItemTitle {margin: 0px 5px 5px; font-size:16px} #fiveDealsWidget .dealItemContent .dealItemdesc, #fiveDealsWidget .dealItemContent .dealItemRate {clear:both} }

This post first appeared on dailymail.co.uk

Continue Reading

Business

John Sergeant says being a vicar’s son shaped his finances

Published

on

By

john sergeant says being a vicars son shaped his finances
Key move: John Sergeant took his pension at 55

Key move: John Sergeant took his pension at 55

Key move: John Sergeant took his pension at 55

The best money decision that broadcast journalist John Sergeant has ever made was buying his home in West London 40 years ago for £56,500. 

The large Victorian house has increased in value by a ‘ridiculous’ amount and is now worth well over £1million. 

The former TV political editor who starred in Strictly Come Dancing in 2008 spoke to DONNA FERGUSON from his home in Ealing where he lives with wife Mary, also aged 76. They have been married for 51 years. 

What did your parents teach you about money? 

Not to talk about it. My father was a vicar, so I grew up in a wonderful old vicarage. It was a large, lovely house but we had no money and, as vicar’s children, my siblings and I were very much in the public eye, which was annoying. We couldn’t be as riotous as we wanted to be. 

I had a happy childhood but I always knew we were poor. For example, we didn’t have a washing machine or a fridge and my mother cooked on a paraffin stove. There was no central heating and it was extremely cold in winter – I remember we had very thin curtains. We couldn’t even afford a turkey at Christmas – once, we had to kill one of my sister’s bantams. 

I suppose that as a result I have always been a bit frightened of money: getting it, keeping it and dealing with it. 

Did your parents pay for your education? 

At first I went to a local school. But after my parents split up, my father went to teach at Millfield in Somerset which was then the most expensive school in the country. I was allowed to attend for £100 a year. 

Have you ever struggled to make ends meet? 

Yes – when I was 23 and working in Liverpool as a reporter. It was my first proper job in journalism and I was paid £12 a week. You could live on that in those days, but things became more difficult when my girlfriend, who had no money, moved in. We had to rent another room in the house to give the impression we were not living together – which, of course, we were. Money was tight, but it didn’t matter. We were very happy together. Because I had been brought up poor, I was not frightened of poverty. 

Have you ever been paid silly money? 

Yes, when I did a Christmas advert for Marks & Spencer at the height of my fame after appearing on Strictly Come Dancing. I’m not going to say how much I was paid because it was grotesque, but it was the same amount as Stephen Fry and Joanna Lumley who were also in the advert. It was thousands of pounds for a day’s work. 

I was sensible and invested it in an Isa – a decision that stemmed from my fear of money. I certainly didn’t go round buying caviar and jumping into baths of champagne.

What is your biggest money mistake?

 I don’t think I’ve made any big money mistakes. At least I can’t recall any. If you’ve got my attitude to money and make an error you deliberately forget about it. 

What was the best year of your financial life? 

It was 2004, I think. I had just left ITN. I got a three-book deal, went on an after-dinner speaking tour and was asked to do a lot of topical programmes such as Have I Got News For You. You can be a serious journalist but once you start making jokes and silly remarks, that’s when you can really start making money.

The most expensive thing you have ever bought for fun? 

It was a silvery grey BMW Z3 sports car for more than £30,000. I bought it when I was 55 – which I later discovered is the average age people buy a sports car. 

It could do well over 100 miles an hour. I am not going to say whether I did more than 100 mph in it… but you can assume I did at one point. 

The best money decision you have made? 

Buying my home 40 years ago. It’s a lovely detached Victorian house in Ealing, West London, which cost £56,500. It’s gone up in value so much since then it’s ridiculous. It’s now worth well over £1million. 

Best foot forward: The former TV political editor starred in Strictly Come Dancing in 2008

Best foot forward: The former TV political editor starred in Strictly Come Dancing in 2008

Best foot forward: The former TV political editor starred in Strictly Come Dancing in 2008

Do you save into a pension? 

Not any more. I now receive my BBC pension, my ITV pension and my state pension. 

I started saving into a pension when I joined the BBC. The key decision I made was to buy extra years. I left the Corporation after 30 years but my pension is calculated as if I had been there 37 years. It is a final-salary, inflation-proof pension and I’ve been receiving it since I was 55, so for 21 years. 

At one point, we were all offered a 10 per cent salary increase to leave the BBC pension scheme. It never crossed my mind to accept it because my wife is a teacher and has a pension – and I thought I should have one, too. But I know people who took that offer and have regretted it ever since. 

Do you invest directly in the stock market? 

No, but I used to do regularly. I’m not keen on spending so I built up an Isa when I was earning lots of money. I stopped investing because when you get to my age, you realise you’re not immortal. I thought, I’m not going to live forever, why am I building up this fund? We haven’t had a mortgage on our house for years. I know I’ve got enough to keep me going. I like to be boring and sensible with my money and remove it from my thoughts.

What is the one luxury you treat yourself to? 

I like a £50 or £60 bottle of French red wine – a Burgundy or a claret. I don’t treat myself every day but it’s fun to open an expensive bottle when someone comes round. 

Even a £30 bottle is considerably better than a £15 one. The wine itself doesn’t have to be rare or terribly old or bought from a fancy shop. You can buy a decent bottle from a supermarket. 

If you were Chancellor, what would you do? 

I would increase the sugar tax. I think it’s a bit like smoking: if you can wean people off sugar, it will reduce obesity. At the moment, it’s so cheap for manufacturers to bung in some sugar. 

What is your number one financial priority? 

Making sure my home doesn’t fall down. It’s old and needs looking after.  

THIS IS MONEY PODCAST

This post first appeared on dailymail.co.uk

Continue Reading

Business

MIDAS SHARE TIPS: Gold miner hits rich seam of dividends

Published

on

By

midas share tips gold miner hits rich seam of dividends

Gold has been on a roll this year and every piece of bad news makes it look like a smarter investment. 

That’s because gold comes into its own when times are hard – and they are particularly grim right now. Gold also does well when interest rates are low – and they are at record lows in most parts of the world today. 

Buying gold outright or investing in Exchange Traded Funds offer direct exposure to the metal. But there is also the option of buying gold mining shares. 

Coining it: Chief executive Richard Gray in the mine which has already produced commemorative coins

Coining it: Chief executive Richard Gray in the mine which has already produced commemorative coins

Coining it: Chief executive Richard Gray in the mine which has already produced commemorative coins

MIDAS UPDATE: There’s even more gold in them thar SCOTTISH hills!

Some investors may find gold alluring but would prefer to keep their cash close to home, supporting businesses and fostering employment on these shores. Scotgold is an intriguing option for anyone falling into this bracket. 

The company is just weeks away from commercial gold production at the Cononish mine, located in the Loch Lomond and Trossachs National Park.

The mine is in place, the processing plant has been built and production will officially begin on November 30, with around 10,000 ounces of gold forecast for 2021. Mining for gold in the middle of a national park is far from easy and Scotgold has spent years working with environmentalists and planning authorities to ensure that its operations will not blight the landscape. 

Chief executive Richard Gray experienced further delays this year too, as a particularly wet Scottish winter was followed almost immediately by a stringent lockdown. Now, however, the company is set fair. Local communities are on board, ecological concerns have been appeased and production is starting, as the gold price approaches record highs. 

The timing is fortuitous, so much so that Scotgold recently raised £3million on the stock market so it can expand more quickly over the next couple of years, more than doubling production to 23,000 ounces annually by 2022. 

Gray is also investing in exploration activities. Scotgold has mining rights over more than 700,000 acres of land stretching across the centre of Scotland. Early indications suggest that considerably more gold could be found along this terrain, enhancing Scotgold’s long-term production. 

In the near term, prospects are bright. Scotgold will export threequarters of its gold as concentrate to be refined overseas but the rest is smelted on site and refined as Scottish gold. Edinburgh-based jewellery firm Hamilton & Inches and Orkney designer Sheila Fleet have both worked with Scotgold in the past and are keen to take as much Scottish gold as they can, around 2,500 ounces next year. 

This will be turned into premium jewellery, with owners knowing that it contains gold produced in Scotland, according to the highest ethical and environmental standards. 

Depending on demand – and future production – Scotgold may gradually refine more of its gold locally, possibly at an industrial hub in Central Scotland, such as Grangemouth. 

Brokers SP Angel expect sales of around £9.6million next year, soaring to £22million in 2022. Costs are among the lowest in the industry so Scotgold is likely to be highly profitable, with profits of £3million forecast for 2021 tripling to £9million the following year.

Midas verdict: Midas recommended Scotgold a year ago, when the shares were 54p. They have more than doubled since then, to £1.19, as commercial production has moved ever closer. At this level, cautious investors may choose to sell a chunk of stock and bank some profit. 

But selling out completely would seem wrong. This is a rare British mining success story, which should deliver strong growth over the coming years. New investors, with a patriotic bent, may want to tuck a few shares away even after the recent strong performance. 

Traded on: AIM Ticker: SGZ Contact: scotgoldresources.com or 01838 400 306 

Many investors view these stocks with suspicion and choosing the right ones can be tricky. Some are at the exploration phase so they produce no revenue and eat up cash. Some are based in countries that are politically unstable or where the rule of law is open to interpretation. Many tend to overpromise and underdeliver. And sometimes, they just fall prey to bad luck. 

Yamana Gold strives to avoid these risks. Based in Canada, it has five operational mines, dotted round North and South America in areas with a strong history of gold mining and laws to protect and support it. 

The company has been listed in Toronto and New York for years but recently chose to join the London Stock Exchange too. The shares are £4.50 and deserve a closer look. 

Yamana has been headed since 2003 by Peter Marrone, a former lawyer and investment banker. After spending many years working with mining clients, he came across a gold mine for sale in Brazil back in the early 2000s. Interest was limited, Marrone secured a good price and that was the beginning of Yamana Gold. Today, the company is a £4.2billion business, with a 13-year history of dividend payments. 

The group still operates in Brazil but it has expanded into Chile and Argentina and owns a 50 per cent share in Canada’s largest gold mine, Canadian Malartic, in Quebec. 

Collectively, these assets produce around 880,000 of gold per year. Two sites produce silver as well, at a rate of about ten million ounces annually. Just this month, Marrone upgraded forecasts for 2020 and announced a chunky increase in the dividend, now expected to total 5.5p this year, more than double last year’s figure. Marrone also indicated that the dividend would be at least 8p in 2021, remaining at or above that level for the next three years, even if the gold price dips. 

The dividend declaration shows balance sheet resilience but it is also a sign of confidence in the future, underpinned by a well thought out growth strategy. 

First, Marrone and his team intend to increase production materially over the next two to three years, by expanding operations at Yamana’s Brazilian mine and processing more gold on the group’s two Chilean sites. 

In the longer term, the Canadian mine offers significant potential too. Currently, all the gold is mined from an open pit but recent exploration uncovered 11 million ounces underground, which should translate into annual production of at least 400,000 ounces by the late 2020s. 

There are plans for growth in Argentina as well, developing a low-cost copper and gold mine in a joint venture with international mining giants Glencore and Newmont. 

Companies that produce gold and other metals often talk about gold equivalent ounces. Yamana currently produces around a million gold equivalent ounces but Marrone’s expansion plans should take that number to 1.5 million over the next few years. Most of this growth will be organic, as the company is loath to splash out on acquisitions unless very clear opportunities emerge. 

The firm is consistently mindful of costs. Some gold miners embark on lavish spending sprees when the gold price is high. As a near 20-year veteran of the industry, Marrone knows better than that and all the firm’s plans are devised so they will work even if gold falls significantly from current levels.

Midas verdict: Gold miners have a reputation for recklessness and many failed enterprises would suggest there is some truth in that notion. Yamana Gold aims to be different, offering long-term growth, a conscientious approach to costs and a consistent dividend. At £4.50, the shares should prove rewarding. 

Traded on: Main market Ticker: AUY Contact: yamana.com or 001 416 815 0220 

#fiveDealsWidget .dealItemTitle#mobile {display:none} #fiveDealsWidget {display:block; float:left; clear:both; max-width:636px; margin:0; padding:0; line-height:120%; font-size:12px} #fiveDealsWidget div, #fiveDealsWidget a {margin:0; padding:0; line-height:120%; text-decoration: none; font-family:Arial, Helvetica ,sans-serif} #fiveDealsWidget .widgetTitleBox {display:block; float:left; width:100%; background-color:#af1e1e; } #fiveDealsWidget .widgetTitle {color:#fff; text-transform: uppercase; font-size:18px; font-weight:bold; margin:6px 10px 4px 10px; } #fiveDealsWidget a.dealItem {float:left; display:block; width:124px; margin-right:4px; margin-top:5px; background-color: #e3e3e3; min-height:200px;} #fiveDealsWidget a.dealItem#last {margin-right:0} #fiveDealsWidget .dealItemTitle {display:block; margin:10px 5px; color:#000; font-weight:bold} #fiveDealsWidget .dealItemImage, #fiveDealsWidget .dealItemImage img {float:left; display:block; margin:0; padding:0} #fiveDealsWidget .dealItemImage {border:1px solid #ccc} #fiveDealsWidget .dealItemImage img {width:100%; height:auto} #fiveDealsWidget .dealItemdesc {float:left; display:block; color:#004db3; font-weight:bold; margin:5px;} #fiveDealsWidget .dealItemRate {float:left; display:block; color:#000; margin:5px} #fiveDealsWidget .footerText a:hover{text-decoration: underline;} #fiveDealsWidget .footerSmall{font-size:10px; padding-top:10px;} @media (max-width: 635px) { #fiveDealsWidget a.dealItem {width:19%; margin-right:1%} #fiveDealsWidget a.dealItem#last {width:20%} } @media (max-width: 560px) { #fiveDealsWidget #desktop {display:none;} #fiveDealsWidget #mobile {display:block!important} #fiveDealsWidget a.dealItem {background-color: #fff; height:auto; min-height:auto} #fiveDealsWidget a.dealItem {border-bottom:1px solid #ececec; margin-bottom:5px; padding-bottom:10px} #fiveDealsWidget a.dealItem#last {border-bottom:0px solid #ececec; margin-bottom:5px; padding-bottom:0px} #fiveDealsWidget a.dealItem, #fiveDealsWidget a.dealItem#last {width:100%} #fiveDealsWidget .dealItemContent, #fiveDealsWidget .dealItemImage {float:left; display:inline-block} #fiveDealsWidget .dealItemImage {width:35%; margin-right:1%} #fiveDealsWidget .dealItemContent {width:63%} #fiveDealsWidget .dealItemTitle {margin: 0px 5px 5px; font-size:16px} #fiveDealsWidget .dealItemContent .dealItemdesc, #fiveDealsWidget .dealItemContent .dealItemRate {clear:both} }

This post first appeared on dailymail.co.uk

Continue Reading

Trending

Copyright © 2020 DiazHub.