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My plumber has refused to service my old boiler. Do I need to replace it?

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my plumber has refused to service my old boiler do i need to replace it

My boiler is 28 years-old and works fine, so I was surprised when the plumber who usually services it refused this year because it is too ancient.

It’s a Potterton boiler, which I have had serviced every year since 1992, and my gas bill for the past 11 months was around £1,300. I live in a four-bedroom detached house. 

Do I really need to replace a working boiler, or is he just trying to get more money out of me to install a costly new one?

Having a boiler replaced can be very costly, especially if there are currently no issues with it

Having a boiler replaced can be very costly, especially if there are currently no issues with it

Having a boiler replaced can be very costly, especially if there are currently no issues with it

Grace Gausden, This is Money, replies: It is good to hear you have had your boiler serviced every year.

This is important as a plumber can tell you if there are any impending issues and will also ensure it continues to run smoothly.

As you have been consistently on top of this, you were surprised when your plumber decided this year he would not service your boiler as he believed it to be too old.

The average boiler usually lasts around 15 years, while you have had yours for almost double that.

However, as you have noticed no issues with it, you’re not keen to replace it – at great expense – as you don’t see the need to.

Your plumber may not have wished to service it as it can often be difficult to find the parts for an older boiler should anything go wrong.

In some cases trying to repair a boiler of that age would be the same cost, if not more expensive, than installing a new one altogether.  

Another important thing to consider is that your gas bills are incredibly high.

In fact they are nearly double what they should be, even though you are in a large, detached home. 

Many households will be watching their energy bills as people continue to work from home

Many households will be watching their energy bills as people continue to work from home

Many households will be watching their energy bills as people continue to work from home

To rectify this, it is worth using price comparison sites to see if you can save money by switching supplier.

It would also be advisable to contact your energy supplier to see if you can negotiate lower bills, explaining that you believe you are paying over the odds.

You have said that you are ‘liberal’ with the heating but not excessive, suggesting that the bills are still much higher than they could be.

Victoria Arrington of Energy Helpline replies: There are many potential reasons why an older boiler may not be as easy to service. For instance, parts may be costly or even completely unavailable.

What stood out to me was your gas bill, which at £1,300 for 11 months seems quite high, based on average usage and the size of your property.

Even for costly standard variable tariffs, the average gas bill in a typical home is £455. And on a bargain tariff, the average gas bill is £363 – around £1,000 less than your annual bill.

If your 28-year-old boiler is inefficient compared to more modern models, it may be part of the reason why you have a much higher bill than average.

A newer boiler may be an investment up front, but over time the savings on bills may make up for that cost many times over.

Customers are likely to have limited choices if their boiler is more than 15 years old

Customers are likely to have limited choices if their boiler is more than 15 years old

Customers are likely to have limited choices if their boiler is more than 15 years old

Andy Kerr, co-founder of smart home systems installer, BOXT, replies: Many companies now refuse to work on older boilers as the law places a burden on the last gas engineer working on the appliance to ensure it is safe to use.

In addition to this, when servicing a gas boiler an engineer is only allowed to only use new or suitably refurbished parts. With old boilers it is now very difficult, if not impossible, to get new or even refurbished parts. 

For the last 15 years or so all new domestic boilers installed in the UK have been high efficiency condensing boilers and these use very different parts to the old non-condensing designs.

It’s not just older boilers that some engineers refuse to work on because of the inherent risk of them being unsafe, engineers will often refuse to attend newer models with inherent risks.

If at the point of service it is found that your boiler is immediately dangerous, if parts cannot be sourced immediately the boiler will be turned off immediately.

A proactive replacement is often a very sensible choice with an old boiler as, if your old boiler does fail during winter and the parts are unavailable, it could be weeks before a replacement boiler can be fitted. A proactive replacement allows you to keep the continuity of a working system.

As new condensing boilers are much more efficient than old non-condensing ones, even with a gas bill of £1,300 for 11 months you are likely to save upwards of 25 per cent off you heating bills by fitting a new boiler. 

A typical new boiler costs between £1,500 to £3,000 depending on your circumstances and which new boiler you select. 

So in the worst case your new boiler will have likely paid for itself within ten years and with significantly reduced carbon emissions. 

Will Owen, energy expert at Uswitch, replies: You will have limited choices if your boiler is more than 15 years old as some insurers won’t extend boiler cover to older models that are more likely to develop problems.

Typically it’s recommended to change your boiler every 15 years as an older boiler has to work harder to heat your home.

A new boiler will also be running on maximum efficiency which means it will be using less fuel to heat your home – which will help keep heating costs down.

Grace Gausden, This is Money, adds: You could of course try a different plumber, but you may still face the same problem.

To avoid costly call out fees and repairs, many households are encouraged to pay for boiler cover.

However, recent research has revealed that paying out monthly for the cover may not be worth it.

In fact, consumers are usually better off paying for repairs and services as and when they are needed, according to Which?.

It said that even if customers needed a typical boiler repair every year for 10 years, they could still end up around £2,000 better off typically than if they took out annual boiler cover. 

However, households should decide whether they would be able to afford repairs upfront should something happen to their boiler and they don’t have cover.  

‘My boiler has broken’: All your questions answered 

Many boilers invariably breakdown in the period when we rely on it most – and when we are likely to have less funds thanks to Christmas spending.

Households will want to get the issue sorted as quickly as possible, whether that be through their boiler cover or getting a plumber out.

To help you decide what to do next, This is Money put together a guide answering all your most commonly asked questions about getting it fixed or replaced – from how much it should cost to which model is best.

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Northern regions battle to host new National Infrastructure Bank

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northern regions battle to host new national infrastructure bank

The race is on across the north of England as leaders compete for their regions to become the seat of two economic hubs.

Rishi Sunak yesterday unveiled plans to set up a National Infrastructure Bank that will be based in the North.

The move comes on top of the Chancellor’s proposal to build a Treasury output in the region. 

Chancellor Rishi Sunak yesterday unveiled plans to set up a National Infrastructure Bank that will be based in the north

Chancellor Rishi Sunak yesterday unveiled plans to set up a National Infrastructure Bank that will be based in the north

Chancellor Rishi Sunak yesterday unveiled plans to set up a National Infrastructure Bank that will be based in the north

Northern leaders are now pushing the case for their areas to host the two hubs, with the North East and North West thought to be pushing particularly hard.

The infrastructure bank will fund projects that promise to help the UK reach its ‘net zero’ carbon targets by 2050 and its ‘levelling up’ agenda.

The plans were outlined as part of Sunak’s wider spending review, which laid out how the Government aims to repair the UK economy in the wake of the Covid crisis.

The bank will be up and running by next spring but Sunak did not say where it would be based or how much money it will have.

Conservative MP Jake Berry, former Northern Powerhouse minister and head of the Northern Research Group of MPs, said: ‘There’s likely going to be a lot of stiff competition from regions and leaders.

‘What’s important is that it’s being placed in the North, which shows a commitment by this Government to the region and the levelling up agenda – and a move away from Government jobs and departments focused almost entirely on London.

‘It is also good news when you consider the recent announcement that 22,000, well-paid civil service jobs will be moving out of London and the South East.’

The Chancellor has also promised to build a Treasury outpost in the North.

Designs for the ‘economic campus’ are thought to have been submitted for buildings in areas including Darlington and around Teesside, but a final location has not been confirmed. The plans are some of the firmest commitments yet that the Government will shift power out of London.

Pressing his case: Middlesbrough mayor  Andy Preston

Pressing his case: Middlesbrough mayor  Andy Preston

Pressing his case: Middlesbrough mayor  Andy Preston

Ministers have also promised to put £4billion towards a fund, which could back local projects in all regions.

While the competition to attract the bank and Treasury outpost will be fierce among MPs, mayors and councils, the race could also create friction if ministers opt to place them in major cities.

Ben Houchen, Conservative mayor for Tees Valley, which is a major hub for heavy industries, said: ‘It’s important that the Government takes the bold decision to base the bank outside of a northern city.

‘Having officials from the bank based outside one of our metropolitan centres will give them a new mindset and allow them to understand the whole country so much better and the different challenges our towns and villages face – which would not happen if the bank was set up in a city like Newcastle, Leeds or Manchester.’

Andy Preston, the independent mayor of Middlesbrough, said: ‘Levelling up is decades overdue so it is fantastic to finally see it being tackled. 

‘Middlesbrough has suffered more than anywhere from political neglect and incompetence. We deserve to host this new bank. 

‘The Government should invest in Middlesbrough now and I guarantee them a huge and positive return.’

Under Sunak’s plans, an additional £27billion will be spent next year on infrastructure such as roads, cycle paths, railway lines and power stations, in many areas tying in with the green strategy Prime Minister Boris Johnson announced last week.

The push is part of plans to plough £100billion into areas such as schools, hospitals and banks in total next year, and £600billion over the next five years. 

The Government, in rebounding from Covid, wants the UK to ‘build back better’ by improving motorways, laying better internet cables and building more wind farms.

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Taxpayer faces £40bn bill as cost of emergency loan schemes soar

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taxpayer faces 40bn bill as cost of emergency loan schemes soar

The taxpayer could be saddled with a £40billion bill as thousands of loans handed out under emergency government schemes turn sour.

The Treasury watchdog confirmed that losses under the Bounce Back loan scheme, the Coronavirus Business Interruption Loan Scheme (CBILS) and the larger CLBILS will be greater than feared.

In the worst-case scenario, the Office for Budget Responsibility (OBR) thinks the taxpayer could end up covering £40billion that companies fail to repay.

Loans burden: Treasury watchdog the Office for Budget Responsibility  has confirmed that losses under emergency business loan schemes will be far greater than first feared

Loans burden: Treasury watchdog the Office for Budget Responsibility  has confirmed that losses under emergency business loan schemes will be far greater than first feared

Loans burden: Treasury watchdog the Office for Budget Responsibility  has confirmed that losses under emergency business loan schemes will be far greater than first feared

This is much worse than the £33.7billion of losses the watchdog predicted as possible in July. 

Even under the OBR’s more moderate base-case scenario, losses will hit £29.5billion – £12.6billion more than was predicted. 

It comes as banking industry bosses warn that billions of pounds of Government money is being lost to fraudsters.

Virgin Money chief executive David Duffy said yesterday that his bank had decided to only hand out Bounce Back loans to existing customers in order to reduce fraud.

He added: ‘There is an environment out there where we know there’s been a lot of fraud, and what we’ve been very happy to do is lend to those customers who we have a relationship with and know.’

The Bounce Back loans, aimed at businesses with turnover of up to £200,000, involve banks carrying out few checks but come with a 100 per cent government guarantee.

The scheme has so far lent £42.2billion to 1.4m small companies. 

The Treasury was warned multiple times about the risk of fraud, but pushed ahead because it worried businesses were going to the wall during lockdown and desperately needed the cash.

Part of the reason that losses under the three emergency loan schemes are now expected to be higher is because the British Business Bank (BBB), which is administering the schemes, expects more businesses to go bust. 

The government-backed BBB estimates that a staggering 5 per cent to 20 per cent of the large businesses who have borrowed under CLBILS could default on their debt.

Less surprisingly, it thinks 10 per cent to 25 per cent of smaller CBILS borrowers and 35 per cent to 60 per cent of Bounce Back borrowers will become unable to pay back their debt. 

The Government has agreed to cover 80 per cent of any losses which lenders suffer under the CBILS and CLBILS schemes and 100 per cent of losses under the Bounce Back scheme.

The other reason why losses are higher is because the schemes have been extended.

When Prime Minister Boris Johnson imposed a second lockdown for England at the start of this month, Chancellor Rishi Sunak pushed back the deadline for applications under the three loan programmes from the end of November to the end of January, to help businesses stay afloat.

The OBR now thinks total borrowing under the three schemes could hit £87billion by the time they close, up from the £65.5bn which had been lent on November 15.

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Use British steel for £27bn infrastructure spree, industry chiefs urge

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use british steel for 27bn infrastructure spree industry chiefs urge

Industry chiefs have urged the use of British steel for infrastructure work.

Chancellor Rishi Sunak plans to spend an extra £27billion on projects next year, and billions more in coming years on roads, railways and power stations.

Huge volumes of raw materials will be needed and steel bosses want the Government to prioritise procuring metal from the UK, to create and sustain jobs and help repair the damage that Covid has wreaked.

Chancellor Rishi Sunak plans to spend an extra £27bn on projects next year, and billions more in coming years on roads, railways and power stations

Chancellor Rishi Sunak plans to spend an extra £27bn on projects next year, and billions more in coming years on roads, railways and power stations

Chancellor Rishi Sunak plans to spend an extra £27bn on projects next year, and billions more in coming years on roads, railways and power stations

UK Steel director general Gareth Stace said: ‘The huge levels of promised spending must now deliver the largest possible return fortaxpayers’ money by maximising the UK content of these major projects.’

It comes a week after Prime Minister Boris Johnson unveiled a green strategy to build eco-friendly homes, wind turbines and nuclear power plants.

Both plans could reinvigorate ‘foundation’ industries that produce the raw materials.

UK steel has struggled over the past few years and some firms, such as British Steel, have collapsed. 

The UK makes 7.3m tonnes of steel a year. Around 32,600 people work in the sector.

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