Connect with us

Business

Tesla Autopilot ‘encourages drivers to relinquish too much control’, says NCAP

Published

on

tesla autopilot encourages drivers to relinquish too much control says ncap

The results of the world’s first comprehensive test of different car makers’ driver assistance systems has been revealed today.

The safety tests, developed and carried out by Euro NCAP and Thatcham Research on features that allow cars to steer themselves and control their speed, saw pioneer Tesla only score a ‘moderate’ rating, as while it aced the safety element its Autopilot technology ‘encourages users to relinquish too much control’. 

The tests of elements such as lane-keeping assist and adaptive cruise control are the first of their kind and were designed to give a clearer indication to car buyers about the systems available, how they supplement driving and if they’re any good.

Overall, Mercedes’ assistance technology came out on top in a review of 10 vehicles from different manufacturers, with Tesla’s Model 3 the sixth best performer in the first batch of results, despite starring in certain elements of the assessment.

Autopilot criticised: A world's first comparative test of vehicle makers' driver assistance features found that Tesla performed well for safety but was wrongly encouraging owners to relinquish too much control to the car

Autopilot criticised: A world’s first comparative test of vehicle makers’ driver assistance features found that Tesla performed well for safety but was wrongly encouraging owners to relinquish too much control to the car

These are the 10 cars that have first been subject to the new test. The Mercedes came out on top, while Peugeot and Renault scored the lowest ratings

These are the 10 cars that have first been subject to the new test. The Mercedes came out on top, while Peugeot and Renault scored the lowest ratings

The Tesla Model 3 scored just 36 out of 100 when assessed on its ability to maintain a driver’s focus on the road.

‘The big ‘self-driving’ sell in its marketing material, combined with the high performing assistance, encourages the driver to relinquish too much control,’ testers said about the US vehicle. 

However, it gained the highest marks for performance and ability to respond to emergencies, receiving an overall score of 131 and a rating of ‘moderate’.

The new tests will be independent from Euro NCAP’s crash safety ratings, which score cars on how well they perform in a variety of shunts. 

However, each model reviewed still gets a mark, which is based on three scoring categories covering how well its driver assistance systems work, how they react when a driver intervenes to take back control and how accurately the technology is marketed to customers. 

Each car is then given an overall score out of 200 and a grade of Very Good, Good, Moderate, or – the lowest – Entry.  

The Tesla Model 3 scored 131 out of 200 in the Assisted Driver Grading, which earned it a 'moderate' rating, because it encourages people to allow the car to drive

The Tesla Model 3 scored 131 out of 200 in the Assisted Driver Grading, which earned it a ‘moderate’ rating, because it encourages people to allow the car to drive

How Euro NCAP rates driver assistance systems in its new test 

Cars are tested across three criteria:

• Vehicle Assistance

How effective are the speed assistance, steering assistance and adaptive cruise control systems which work together to control the vehicle’s speed and steering?

· Driver Engagement

How accurate is the carmaker’s marketing material? How effectively does the car monitor the driver to ensure they are engaged with the driving process? How easy is it for the driver to interact with the assisted system? How clearly does the car communicate assisted status?

· Safety Back-up

How well does the car protect the driver in an emergency – this could be a system failure, when the driver becomes unresponsive, or if the car is about to collide with another vehicle? What happens when there is a loss of sensor input?

Cars are given a mark out of 100 in each of these three categories. 

The most important of these is the Safety Back-up score, which is added to a model’s lowest from the Vehicle Assistance or Driver Engagement categories. 

33852904 8793835 image m 8 1601550184501

These marks lead to an overall score out of 200, which earns each vehicle one of the following ratings:

· Very good (> 160 points)

· Good (> 140 points)

· Moderate (> 120 points)

· Entry (> 100 points)

The Assisted Driver Grading has been launched due to the ‘significant potential for car makers to overstate the capability of their current assisted driving technology and for motorists to misuse it,’ say safety experts.

Such a comment hints at the spate of videos – mainly from the US – showing Tesla owners sleeping or drinking at the wheel while using the Autopilot function.

‘Confusion around the limitations of these systems has resulted in serious road collisions – and deaths,’ Thatcham Research said.

The rating comes after the UK Government in August issued a call for evidence to support the use of Automated Lane Keeping Systems (ALKS) on motorways from next year.

The technology automatically keeps cars in their lane on motorways without the driver steering.

Ministers are examining whether vehicles fitted with ALKS should be allowed to use it at speeds of up to 70mph on some of the country’s busiest roads.

If given the green light, it will be the first time motorists can legally take their hands off the wheel for extended periods while the car to takes over responsibility for driving.

While this proposed technology is Level 3 autonomy (on a scale from Level 0 to full automation at Level 5 – see infographics below), the new grading is for assistance systems that are deemed Level 2.

Director of Research, Matthew Avery, said these are systems that are already allowed on our roads to assist the driver – but do not replace them.

However, he warned there is a high level of confusion among drivers about how they can and should be used. 

‘Unfortunately, there are motorists that believe they can purchase a self-driving car today,’ Mr Avery explained.

‘This is a dangerous misconception that sees too much control handed to vehicles that are not ready to cope with all situations.

‘Clarity is therefore required to make sure drivers understand the capability and performance of current assisted systems. 

‘It’s crucial today’s technology is adopted safely before we take the next step on the road to automation. There are safety and insurance implications that must be considered seriously.’

Currently, the highest level of vehicle autonomy being used on UK roads is Tesla's Autopilot, which is classified as Level 2

Currently, the highest level of vehicle autonomy being used on UK roads is Tesla’s Autopilot, which is classified as Level 2

If given the green light, Automated Lane Keep Systems (ALKS) will be the first instance of Level 3 vehicle autonomy in the UK

If given the green light, Automated Lane Keep Systems (ALKS) will be the first instance of Level 3 vehicle autonomy in the UK

Experts behind the Assisted Driver Grading said it has been launched due to the 'significant potential for car makers to overstate the capability of their current assisted driving technology and for motorists to misuse it'

Experts behind the Assisted Driver Grading said it has been launched due to the ‘significant potential for car makers to overstate the capability of their current assisted driving technology and for motorists to misuse it’

How did cars and their systems rate? 

The Mercedes GLE emerged as the strongest performer across all three criteria, while the BMW 3-Series was just two points behind. Both vehicles achieved a ‘very good’ grading.

The Ford Kuga’s results showed a ‘good’ grading is possible for a mid-class vehicle, thanks to its combination of Vehicle Assistance and Safety Back-up. 

The entry-level Renault Clio and Peugeot 2008 offer effective systems, but lack emergency assist capability which would have boosted their grading. 

‘The first batch of results show some car makers have developed robust assisted driving systems and that’s good to see. But there are also significant gaps in capability on other vehicles,’ Avery added. 

The top performer in the first round of tests was the Mercedes-Benz GLE SUV. Researchers said it 'keeps the driver engaged with plenty of clear communication regarding the assistance offered and 'provides really useful assistance, but not so much that drivers will believe the car can drive itself'

The top performer in the first round of tests was the Mercedes-Benz GLE SUV. Researchers said it ‘keeps the driver engaged with plenty of clear communication regarding the assistance offered and ‘provides really useful assistance, but not so much that drivers will believe the car can drive itself’

The Tesla Model 3 was the best for vehicle assistance and safety back-up but lost ground for over selling what its ‘Autopilot’ system is capable of, while actively discouraging drivers from engaging

‘For instance, the Tesla Model 3 was the best for vehicle assistance and safety back-up but lost ground for over selling what its ‘Autopilot’ system is capable of, while actively discouraging drivers from engaging when behind the wheel.

‘Tesla should however be recognised for its ability to update vehicles ‘Over the Air’. 

‘Two years ago, it’s safety back-up results would not have been market leading. 

‘This unique capability has seen it move the safety game on, across its whole fleet of vehicles.’ 

What Thatcham Research said about the first 10 cars rated

Audi Q8 – Very Good (162)

‘A high-end vehicle, with a high level of vehicle assistance and well-balanced driver engagement. The first of our ‘very good’ performers.’

BMW 3 Series – Very Good (172)

‘Gets a ‘very good’ rating, with one of the best scores in safety back-up testing. The only vehicle to feature a Driver Monitoring System, which although relatively basic, is increasingly important for driver engagement. BMW is ahead of the game in fitting this technology, which will be essential to the safe introduction of Automated Driving.’

Ford Kuga – Good (152)

‘Its vehicle assistance is not quite as strong as some of the other cars tested, but the driver engagement is good, as were the safety back-up systems, earning it a ‘good’ rating overall.’

Mercedes GLE – Very Good (174)

‘Our overall top scorer with consistently high scores across all testing categories. Keeps the driver engaged with plenty of clear communication regarding the assistance offered. Provides really useful assistance, but not so much that drivers will believe the car can drive itself.’

Nissan Juke – Moderate (124)

‘Another small SUV with quite impressive performance. The ProPilot name is not ideal, but it still has good driver engagement and safety back-up systems for the price-point.’

Peugeot 2008 – Entry (101)

‘The small SUV category is one of the fastest growing in the market, so although the system is not quite as sophisticated as those fitted to the more expensive models tested, it’s good to see that buyers at lower price points can still reap some of the safety and comfort benefits of Assisted Driving.’

Renault Clio – Entry (105)

‘Great to see an entry-level Supermini with a system that gives a generally good amount of vehicle assistance and safety back-up, if required. Although the systems available at the premium end of the market offered more assistance, the Renault Clio has a well-balanced system that successfully keeps the driver engaged.’

Tesla Model 3 – Moderate (131)

‘Many aspects of the Model 3 are exemplary; its vehicle assistance is the best we saw in testing and it also aced the safety back-up element. However, it achieves a ‘moderate’ rating for poor driver engagement, with a design philosophy that is very much about the vehicle doing the driving. That would be appropriate for an automated vehicle – but this is vehicle assistance. The big ‘self-driving’ sell in its marketing material, combined with the high performing assistance, encourages the driver to relinquish too much control.’

Volvo V60 – Moderate (120)

‘A high level of vehicle assistance and good, well-balanced driver engagement. It’s a shame, but the vehicle platform and technology have aged quickly and are no longer state of the art.’

VW Passat – Moderate (137)

‘A moderate performer, offering solid safety back-up systems and a good balance between vehicle assistance and driver engagement. Very close to a ‘good’ rating.’

SAVE MONEY ON MOTORING

This post first appeared on dailymail.co.uk

Continue Reading
Advertisement
Click to comment

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Business

I paid Voyage Prive £245 for hotel transfers that never arrived. Where’s my refund?

Published

on

By

i paid voyage prive 245 for hotel transfers that never arrived wheres my refund

On 27 August, my husband and I booked a holiday to Crete for 31 August with Voyage Prive.

Due to the transfer time to our hotel, which was 90 minutes, and because of the pandemic, we opted for private transfers at a cost of £245 as we thought it was the safest option.

On arrival at Heraklion Airport late in the evening we discovered that the transfer did not materialise and we had to find our own way to our hotel.

Unsurprisingly, the return transfer didn’t materialise either and we are still awaiting a refund for our transfer costs to and from the airport. How can we get a refund?

You were left waiting for a car transfer in Crete that never arrived - leaving you to pay for a taxi

You were left waiting for a car transfer in Crete that never arrived - leaving you to pay for a taxi

You were left waiting for a car transfer in Crete that never arrived – leaving you to pay for a taxi

Grace Gausden, This is Money, replies: You booked your holiday through Voyage Prive which describes itself as a private club that specialises in premium holidays at the best prices.

While it is a members only website, anyone can sign up and join for free.

The firm started in France and has now expanded with its ‘unique flash sales concept’ to have over 44million members worldwide with offices in France, UK, Italy, Spain, Germany, Switzerland, Belgium and the Netherlands.

Despite describing itself as a luxury travel agent, your experience has left you wondering whether it really is.

Being stranded abroad at an airport in the evening is not the ideal start to any holiday – especially one taken in the midst of a pandemic.

Having paid hundreds of pounds to be taken to your hotel, and a total of £2,781 for the holiday, you were frustrated to learn that there was no transfer waiting for you after you got off your flight.

You said you could not reach Voyage Prive via the ’emergency contact number’ that was emailed to you only days before, as it was switched off.

Instead you had to pay for a taxi to the hotel yourself and reported this the next day via email to Voyage Prive, also asking about your return transfer.

You eventually received an email response saying it would investigate. 

However, no return transfer ever came to pick you up at the end of your holiday and you, again, had to pay for a taxi to travel to the airport.

Voyage Prive say it specialises in luxury holidays on its members only website (Pictured: Crete)

Voyage Prive say it specialises in luxury holidays on its members only website (Pictured: Crete)

Voyage Prive say it specialises in luxury holidays on its members only website (Pictured: Crete)

After contacting Voyage Prive again when you got home, the firm said it cannot advise until it receives a response from their supplier as to what has gone wrong.

That was two months ago and you still haven’t received an update. You have now reported the incident to ABTA which states Voyage Prive have a further 56 days to respond.

To add insult to injury, you received an email from the agent marked ‘do not send to client’ that was clearly sent to you in error.

Inside it detailed the nature of your complaint, explaining the customer service agent had already claimed you are not entitled to a refund of any sort as the transfer operator had said it was not going to return any money.

The operator claims that the transfer car was actually there and you just didn’t see it, which you say is impossible as you were at the desk in the airport asking where the transport was.

We attempted to contact Voyage Prive, but there is a distinct lack of contact details.

There is no phone number or email address easily found on their website and instead, the travel agent directs people to a FAQ section.

Customers have said they have been unable to contact Voyage Prive on the phone or by email

Customers have said they have been unable to contact Voyage Prive on the phone or by email

Customers have said they have been unable to contact Voyage Prive on the phone or by email

If your query is not answered there then you are left with no further options to resolve your issue.

This could be due to many holiday companies removing their phone numbers from their website at the start of the coronavirus pandemic to avoid overwhelming the system as so many people were calling to try and get a refund or change their booking. 

This is Money managed to find a customer relations email address for Voyage Prive which we contacted multiple times but are yet to receive a response.

As you have taken the issue to ABTA, a trade association for tour operators and travel agents, it may be able to help you resolve the issue as Voyage Prive is an ABTA member.  

An ABTA spokesperson replies: If you have a dispute with an ABTA member, which you have been unable to resolve with them, you can register a complaint on abta.com. 

The majority of these complaints are then resolved with ABTA’s assistance. 

However, there will always be particularly intractable cases, where deadlock has been reached between the customer and the ABTA Member. 

For theses cases ABTA offers an independently operated online arbitration scheme, which is faster the going the small claims court and also in the vast majority of cases, cheaper.

Grace Gausden, This is Money, adds: Those with issues with their travel agent are advised to contact the firm in the first instance before escalating the issue with ABTA. 

However, it seems you are not the only customer to take issue with Voyage Prive.  

When looking at reviews for the firm, many have taken to Google to share their complaints with the company receiving an average rating of just 1.7 stars.

On Trustpilot, it fairs a bit better with an average rating of 3.2 stars out of five. 

However, recent comments from customers suggest they are having a difficult time dealing with the travel agent.

Other customers have taken to social media to share their frustration at getting refunds and making contact with the company.

This reviewer said they have struggled to contact the firm after they closed the phone lines

This reviewer said they have struggled to contact the firm after they closed the phone lines

This reviewer said they have struggled to contact the firm after they closed the phone lines

Another review said they also have been unable to get a response from Voyage Prive

Another review said they also have been unable to get a response from Voyage Prive

Another review said they also have been unable to get a response from Voyage Prive

This Twitter user said they were unable to find any contact details for the online travel agent

This Twitter user said they were unable to find any contact details for the online travel agent

This Twitter user said they were unable to find any contact details for the online travel agent

One Twitter user said she wasn't even told her holiday was cancelled & found out on Facebook

One Twitter user said she wasn't even told her holiday was cancelled & found out on Facebook

One Twitter user said she wasn’t even told her holiday was cancelled & found out on Facebook

#fiveDealsWidget .dealItemTitle#mobile {display:none} #fiveDealsWidget {display:block; float:left; clear:both; max-width:636px; margin:0; padding:0; line-height:120%; font-size:12px} #fiveDealsWidget div, #fiveDealsWidget a {margin:0; padding:0; line-height:120%; text-decoration: none; font-family:Arial, Helvetica ,sans-serif} #fiveDealsWidget .widgetTitleBox {display:block; float:left; width:100%; background-color:#B11B16; } #fiveDealsWidget .widgetTitle {color:#fff; text-transform: uppercase; font-size:18px; font-weight:bold; margin:6px 10px 4px 10px; } #fiveDealsWidget a.dealItem {float:left; display:block; width:124px; margin-right:4px; margin-top:5px; background-color: #e3e3e3; min-height:200px;} #fiveDealsWidget a.dealItem#last {margin-right:0} #fiveDealsWidget .dealItemTitle {display:block; margin:10px 5px; color:#000; font-weight:bold} #fiveDealsWidget .dealItemImage, #fiveDealsWidget .dealItemImage img {float:left; display:block; margin:0; padding:0} #fiveDealsWidget .dealItemImage {border:1px solid #ccc} #fiveDealsWidget .dealItemImage img {width:100%; height:auto} #fiveDealsWidget .dealItemdesc {float:left; display:block; color:#e22953; font-weight:bold; margin:5px;} #fiveDealsWidget .dealItemRate {float:left; display:block; color:#000; margin:5px} #fiveDealsWidget .dealFooter {display:block; float:left; width:100%; margin-top:5px; background-color:#e3e3e3 } #fiveDealsWidget .footerText {font-size:10px; margin:10px 10px 10px 10px;} @media (max-width: 635px) { #fiveDealsWidget a.dealItem {width:19%; margin-right:1%} #fiveDealsWidget a.dealItem#last {width:20%} } @media (max-width: 560px) { #fiveDealsWidget #desktop {display:none} #fiveDealsWidget .widgetTitleBox {background-color:#e3e3e3; } #fiveDealsWidget .widgetTitle {color:#000} #fiveDealsWidget #mobile {display:block!important} #fiveDealsWidget a.dealItem {background-color: #fff; height:auto; min-height:auto} #fiveDealsWidget a.dealItem {border-bottom:1px solid #ececec; margin-bottom:5px; padding-bottom:10px} #fiveDealsWidget a.dealItem#last {border-bottom:0px solid #ececec; margin-bottom:5px; padding-bottom:0px} #fiveDealsWidget a.dealItem, #fiveDealsWidget a.dealItem#last {width:100%} #fiveDealsWidget .dealItemContent, #fiveDealsWidget .dealItemImage {float:left; display:inline-block} #fiveDealsWidget .dealItemImage {width:35%; margin-right:1%} #fiveDealsWidget .dealItemContent {width:63%} #fiveDealsWidget .dealItemTitle {margin: 0px 5px 5px; font-size:16px} #fiveDealsWidget .dealItemContent .dealItemdesc, #fiveDealsWidget .dealItemContent .dealItemRate {clear:both} }

This post first appeared on dailymail.co.uk

Continue Reading

Business

My plumber has refused to service my old boiler. Do I need to replace it?

Published

on

By

my plumber has refused to service my old boiler do i need to replace it

My boiler is 28 years-old and works fine, so I was surprised when the plumber who usually services it refused this year because it is too ancient.

It’s a Potterton boiler, which I have had serviced every year since 1992, and my gas bill for the past 11 months was around £1,300. I live in a four-bedroom detached house. 

Do I really need to replace a working boiler, or is he just trying to get more money out of me to install a costly new one?

Having a boiler replaced can be very costly, especially if there are currently no issues with it

Having a boiler replaced can be very costly, especially if there are currently no issues with it

Having a boiler replaced can be very costly, especially if there are currently no issues with it

Grace Gausden, This is Money, replies: It is good to hear you have had your boiler serviced every year.

This is important as a plumber can tell you if there are any impending issues and will also ensure it continues to run smoothly.

As you have been consistently on top of this, you were surprised when your plumber decided this year he would not service your boiler as he believed it to be too old.

The average boiler usually lasts around 15 years, while you have had yours for almost double that.

However, as you have noticed no issues with it, you’re not keen to replace it – at great expense – as you don’t see the need to.

Your plumber may not have wished to service it as it can often be difficult to find the parts for an older boiler should anything go wrong.

In some cases trying to repair a boiler of that age would be the same cost, if not more expensive, than installing a new one altogether.  

Another important thing to consider is that your gas bills are incredibly high.

In fact they are nearly double what they should be, even though you are in a large, detached home. 

Many households will be watching their energy bills as people continue to work from home

Many households will be watching their energy bills as people continue to work from home

Many households will be watching their energy bills as people continue to work from home

To rectify this, it is worth using price comparison sites to see if you can save money by switching supplier.

It would also be advisable to contact your energy supplier to see if you can negotiate lower bills, explaining that you believe you are paying over the odds.

You have said that you are ‘liberal’ with the heating but not excessive, suggesting that the bills are still much higher than they could be.

Victoria Arrington of Energy Helpline replies: There are many potential reasons why an older boiler may not be as easy to service. For instance, parts may be costly or even completely unavailable.

What stood out to me was your gas bill, which at £1,300 for 11 months seems quite high, based on average usage and the size of your property.

Even for costly standard variable tariffs, the average gas bill in a typical home is £455. And on a bargain tariff, the average gas bill is £363 – around £1,000 less than your annual bill.

If your 28-year-old boiler is inefficient compared to more modern models, it may be part of the reason why you have a much higher bill than average.

A newer boiler may be an investment up front, but over time the savings on bills may make up for that cost many times over.

Customers are likely to have limited choices if their boiler is more than 15 years old

Customers are likely to have limited choices if their boiler is more than 15 years old

Customers are likely to have limited choices if their boiler is more than 15 years old

Andy Kerr, co-founder of smart home systems installer, BOXT, replies: Many companies now refuse to work on older boilers as the law places a burden on the last gas engineer working on the appliance to ensure it is safe to use.

In addition to this, when servicing a gas boiler an engineer is only allowed to only use new or suitably refurbished parts. With old boilers it is now very difficult, if not impossible, to get new or even refurbished parts. 

For the last 15 years or so all new domestic boilers installed in the UK have been high efficiency condensing boilers and these use very different parts to the old non-condensing designs.

It’s not just older boilers that some engineers refuse to work on because of the inherent risk of them being unsafe, engineers will often refuse to attend newer models with inherent risks.

If at the point of service it is found that your boiler is immediately dangerous, if parts cannot be sourced immediately the boiler will be turned off immediately.

A proactive replacement is often a very sensible choice with an old boiler as, if your old boiler does fail during winter and the parts are unavailable, it could be weeks before a replacement boiler can be fitted. A proactive replacement allows you to keep the continuity of a working system.

As new condensing boilers are much more efficient than old non-condensing ones, even with a gas bill of £1,300 for 11 months you are likely to save upwards of 25 per cent off you heating bills by fitting a new boiler. 

A typical new boiler costs between £1,500 to £3,000 depending on your circumstances and which new boiler you select. 

So in the worst case your new boiler will have likely paid for itself within ten years and with significantly reduced carbon emissions. 

Will Owen, energy expert at Uswitch, replies: You will have limited choices if your boiler is more than 15 years old as some insurers won’t extend boiler cover to older models that are more likely to develop problems.

Typically it’s recommended to change your boiler every 15 years as an older boiler has to work harder to heat your home.

A new boiler will also be running on maximum efficiency which means it will be using less fuel to heat your home – which will help keep heating costs down.

Grace Gausden, This is Money, adds: You could of course try a different plumber, but you may still face the same problem.

To avoid costly call out fees and repairs, many households are encouraged to pay for boiler cover.

However, recent research has revealed that paying out monthly for the cover may not be worth it.

In fact, consumers are usually better off paying for repairs and services as and when they are needed, according to Which?.

It said that even if customers needed a typical boiler repair every year for 10 years, they could still end up around £2,000 better off typically than if they took out annual boiler cover. 

However, households should decide whether they would be able to afford repairs upfront should something happen to their boiler and they don’t have cover.  

‘My boiler has broken’: All your questions answered 

Many boilers invariably breakdown in the period when we rely on it most – and when we are likely to have less funds thanks to Christmas spending.

Households will want to get the issue sorted as quickly as possible, whether that be through their boiler cover or getting a plumber out.

To help you decide what to do next, This is Money put together a guide answering all your most commonly asked questions about getting it fixed or replaced – from how much it should cost to which model is best.

#fiveDealsWidget .dealItemTitle#mobile {display:none} #fiveDealsWidget {display:block; float:left; clear:both; max-width:636px; margin:0; padding:0; line-height:120%; font-size:12px} #fiveDealsWidget div, #fiveDealsWidget a {margin:0; padding:0; line-height:120%; text-decoration: none; font-family:Arial, Helvetica ,sans-serif} #fiveDealsWidget .widgetTitleBox {display:block; float:left; width:100%; background-color:#B11B16; } #fiveDealsWidget .widgetTitle {color:#fff; text-transform: uppercase; font-size:18px; font-weight:bold; margin:6px 10px 4px 10px; } #fiveDealsWidget a.dealItem {float:left; display:block; width:124px; margin-right:4px; margin-top:5px; background-color: #e3e3e3; min-height:200px;} #fiveDealsWidget a.dealItem#last {margin-right:0} #fiveDealsWidget .dealItemTitle {display:block; margin:10px 5px; color:#000; font-weight:bold} #fiveDealsWidget .dealItemImage, #fiveDealsWidget .dealItemImage img {float:left; display:block; margin:0; padding:0} #fiveDealsWidget .dealItemImage {border:1px solid #ccc} #fiveDealsWidget .dealItemImage img {width:100%; height:auto} #fiveDealsWidget .dealItemdesc {float:left; display:block; color:#e22953; font-weight:bold; margin:5px;} #fiveDealsWidget .dealItemRate {float:left; display:block; color:#000; margin:5px} #fiveDealsWidget .dealFooter {display:block; float:left; width:100%; margin-top:5px; background-color:#e3e3e3 } #fiveDealsWidget .footerText {font-size:10px; margin:10px 10px 10px 10px;} @media (max-width: 635px) { #fiveDealsWidget a.dealItem {width:19%; margin-right:1%} #fiveDealsWidget a.dealItem#last {width:20%} } @media (max-width: 560px) { #fiveDealsWidget #desktop {display:none} #fiveDealsWidget .widgetTitleBox {background-color:#e3e3e3; } #fiveDealsWidget .widgetTitle {color:#000} #fiveDealsWidget #mobile {display:block!important} #fiveDealsWidget a.dealItem {background-color: #fff; height:auto; min-height:auto} #fiveDealsWidget a.dealItem {border-bottom:1px solid #ececec; margin-bottom:5px; padding-bottom:10px} #fiveDealsWidget a.dealItem#last {border-bottom:0px solid #ececec; margin-bottom:5px; padding-bottom:0px} #fiveDealsWidget a.dealItem, #fiveDealsWidget a.dealItem#last {width:100%} #fiveDealsWidget .dealItemContent, #fiveDealsWidget .dealItemImage {float:left; display:inline-block} #fiveDealsWidget .dealItemImage {width:35%; margin-right:1%} #fiveDealsWidget .dealItemContent {width:63%} #fiveDealsWidget .dealItemTitle {margin: 0px 5px 5px; font-size:16px} #fiveDealsWidget .dealItemContent .dealItemdesc, #fiveDealsWidget .dealItemContent .dealItemRate {clear:both} }

This post first appeared on dailymail.co.uk

Continue Reading

Business

Government urged to change rules over disabled Child Trust Fund injustice

Published

on

By

government urged to change rules over disabled child trust fund injustice

The Government has failed to respond to proposals aimed at offering the families of thousands of disabled children a way to access locked Child Trust Fund savings for a month, despite the Prime Minister last week pledging to do everything he could to help.

Child Trust Fund providers and trade bodies handed the Ministry of Justice proposals last month which would let those with up to around £5,000 access money in cases where family members could prove they are ‘fit and proper’ to look after a disabled young person’s finances.

The proposals were devised after campaigners raised concerns that as many as 200,000 disabled young people could be locked out of their own savings as they are incapable of managing money, unless their families pay hundreds or even thousands of pounds in court fees.

Boris Johnson at Prime Minister's Questions last Wednesday was asked by Liberal Democrat leader Sir Ed Davey about the hundreds of thousands of disabled children locked out of CTFs

Boris Johnson at Prime Minister's Questions last Wednesday was asked by Liberal Democrat leader Sir Ed Davey about the hundreds of thousands of disabled children locked out of CTFs

Boris Johnson at Prime Minister’s Questions last Wednesday was asked by Liberal Democrat leader Sir Ed Davey about the hundreds of thousands of disabled children locked out of CTFs

But This is Money has been told the Government has failed to respond to the new proposals even though they were submitted a month ago, leaving individual Child Trust Fund providers unsure as to whether they are breaking the rules by allowing parents’ access to the money.

This is despite the fact Boris Johnson, responding to a question in Parliament last Wednesday from the Liberal Democrat leader Sir Ed Davey, said he would do ‘whatever I can to help in the particular case that he raises’.

Davey, whose own 12-year-old son John is also disabled and has a Child Trust Fund, had raised the case of an 18-year-old with a neurodegenerative condition who wanted to use his CTF money to buy a specially adapted tricycle but could not as he was locked out of his Child Trust Fund.

In a letter to the Prime Minister, the Lib Dem leader called for the Government to ‘urgently’ change the rules ‘to allow parents to access Child Trust Fund and Junior Isas where the child lacks the mental capacity to do it themselves.’

Currently, parents must make an application to the Court of Protection so that they can be appointed as a deputy for their child’s affairs, which can cost £365 plus up to £2,500 in solicitors’ fees. 

One mother who wrote to This is Money after we reported on the problems facing those affected last month said she felt her son, now 18, who has a genetic condition, was ‘being penalised for having a disability.’

The Ministry of Justice has failed to respond to proposals put forward by Child Trust Fund providers a month ago to try and help disabled children get access to their funds

The Ministry of Justice has failed to respond to proposals put forward by Child Trust Fund providers a month ago to try and help disabled children get access to their funds

The Ministry of Justice has failed to respond to proposals put forward by Child Trust Fund providers a month ago to try and help disabled children get access to their funds

The costs in many cases can wipe out the amount held in a trust fund, while campaigners fear up to 25,000 children a year, or 200,000 over the next decade, could have to go through the court system, leading to a huge backlog.

Andrew Turner, from West Sussex, who has a disabled son, said he was told it could ‘take up to a year’ to secure approval from the courts due to coronavirus delays.

The problem of accessing the money dates back to the launch of Child Trust Funds in 2005, even though the parents of disabled children were given extra money until 2011 by the Government. 

It also affects holders of Junior Isas, which replaced CTFs, and many parents were never told their child would never be able to access the money at 18.

Industry bodies are seeking to try and help partially solve the problem for many families by allowing them to access the funds without a court order, in cases where a CTF is worth up to around £5,000 and parents can prove that their child lacks mental capacity and that they are fit and proper to manage their finances on their behalf.

Sir Ed Davey wrote a letter to Boris Johnson in which he urged the Prime Minister to work with campaigners and enact proposals which would 'end this injustice' for disabled young people

Sir Ed Davey wrote a letter to Boris Johnson in which he urged the Prime Minister to work with campaigners and enact proposals which would 'end this injustice' for disabled young people

Sir Ed Davey wrote a letter to Boris Johnson in which he urged the Prime Minister to work with campaigners and enact proposals which would ‘end this injustice’ for disabled young people

Jon Lee, head of investments at the mutual One Family, which runs around a quarter of Child Trust Funds, said: ‘Industry bodies agreed new industry guidelines around a month ago and presented them via government to the Ministry of Justice and HMRC. 

‘These take a pragmatic and proportionate risk-based approach that will mean the court process can be avoided in a number of situations.’

He said the mutual was currently following those guidelines itself, but that there had been no assurance from the Government ‘that there would be no challenges if this guidance was followed’, which he called ‘frustrating’.

But campaigners have also called for the law to be changed.

A petition started by the law firm Renaissance Legal has now received nearly 5,200 signatures, 700 of which have come since This is Money reported on the Child Trust Fund problems last month

A petition started by the law firm Renaissance Legal has now received nearly 5,200 signatures, 700 of which have come since This is Money reported on the Child Trust Fund problems last month

A petition started by the law firm Renaissance Legal has now received nearly 5,200 signatures, 700 of which have come since This is Money reported on the Child Trust Fund problems last month

Philip Warford, the managing director of law firm Renaissance Legal, which has been raising awareness of the problem since 2016, told This is Money that the current solution proposed by savings providers could leave behind those with pots bigger than £5,000 and whose CTF provider had not opted in, as well as the fact it was not legally binding.

His proposal, which was backed by Sir Ed Davey last week, would be to expand rules which let parents access money in cases where a child has less than six months to live, provided they get confirmation from a doctor, to cover those who lacked mental capacity.

In his letter to the Prime Minister, the Lib Dem leader said the two proposals ‘would make the process far quicker, simpler, cheaper and fairer for families with disabled children.

‘Crucially, they would mean families no longer have to go to court so their child can spend their own money.’

The Government has previously insisted the barriers are necessary to protect vulnerable children from being exploited.

This is Money has contacted the Ministry of Justice for comment.

#fiveDealsWidget .dealItemTitle#mobile {display:none} #fiveDealsWidget {display:block; float:left; clear:both; max-width:636px; margin:0; padding:0; line-height:120%; font-size:12px} #fiveDealsWidget div, #fiveDealsWidget a {margin:0; padding:0; line-height:120%; text-decoration: none; font-family:Arial, Helvetica ,sans-serif} #fiveDealsWidget .widgetTitleBox {display:block; float:left; width:100%; background-color:#B11B16; } #fiveDealsWidget .widgetTitle {color:#fff; text-transform: uppercase; font-size:18px; font-weight:bold; margin:6px 10px 4px 10px; } #fiveDealsWidget a.dealItem {float:left; display:block; width:124px; margin-right:4px; margin-top:5px; background-color: #e3e3e3; min-height:200px;} #fiveDealsWidget a.dealItem#last {margin-right:0} #fiveDealsWidget .dealItemTitle {display:block; margin:10px 5px; color:#000; font-weight:bold} #fiveDealsWidget .dealItemImage, #fiveDealsWidget .dealItemImage img {float:left; display:block; margin:0; padding:0} #fiveDealsWidget .dealItemImage {border:1px solid #ccc} #fiveDealsWidget .dealItemImage img {width:100%; height:auto} #fiveDealsWidget .dealItemdesc {float:left; display:block; color:#e22953; font-weight:bold; margin:5px;} #fiveDealsWidget .dealItemRate {float:left; display:block; color:#000; margin:5px} #fiveDealsWidget .dealFooter {display:block; float:left; width:100%; margin-top:5px; background-color:#e3e3e3 } #fiveDealsWidget .footerText {font-size:10px; margin:10px 10px 10px 10px;} @media (max-width: 635px) { #fiveDealsWidget a.dealItem {width:19%; margin-right:1%} #fiveDealsWidget a.dealItem#last {width:20%} } @media (max-width: 560px) { #fiveDealsWidget #desktop {display:none} #fiveDealsWidget .widgetTitleBox {background-color:#e3e3e3; } #fiveDealsWidget .widgetTitle {color:#000} #fiveDealsWidget #mobile {display:block!important} #fiveDealsWidget a.dealItem {background-color: #fff; height:auto; min-height:auto} #fiveDealsWidget a.dealItem {border-bottom:1px solid #ececec; margin-bottom:5px; padding-bottom:10px} #fiveDealsWidget a.dealItem#last {border-bottom:0px solid #ececec; margin-bottom:5px; padding-bottom:0px} #fiveDealsWidget a.dealItem, #fiveDealsWidget a.dealItem#last {width:100%} #fiveDealsWidget .dealItemContent, #fiveDealsWidget .dealItemImage {float:left; display:inline-block} #fiveDealsWidget .dealItemImage {width:35%; margin-right:1%} #fiveDealsWidget .dealItemContent {width:63%} #fiveDealsWidget .dealItemTitle {margin: 0px 5px 5px; font-size:16px} #fiveDealsWidget .dealItemContent .dealItemdesc, #fiveDealsWidget .dealItemContent .dealItemRate {clear:both} }

This post first appeared on dailymail.co.uk

Continue Reading

Trending

Copyright © 2020 DiazHub.