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Half of Americans diagnosed with COVID-19 don’t know how they got it 

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Less than half of Americans diagnosed with coronavirus knew they had come into contact with someone who had tested positive, a new Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) report reveals. 

The CDC’s interviews with 350 people tested for COVID-19 at academic medical centers across the US is among the first in the country to examine exposures outside of group-living settings like prisons. 

It reveals damning risk factors. Only 17 percent of people who tested positive and were able to work remotely amid the pandemic – the rest of those infected had to continue going to their places of work. 

And, echoing the findings of previous studies, that those who got sick enough to be hospitalized were more likely to have lower incomes and to be Hispanic or black. 

Public health officials have underlined the importance of not only testing, but contact tracing, to combatting the spread of coronavirus and lawmakers, eager to reopen their states, want to. know where people are getting sick. But a CDC study found that less than half of 350 covid-positive Americans knew they'd come into contact with someone with coronavirus (file)

Public health officials have underlined the importance of not only testing, but contact tracing, to combatting the spread of coronavirus and lawmakers, eager to reopen their states, want to. know where people are getting sick. But a CDC study found that less than half of 350 covid-positive Americans knew they'd come into contact with someone with coronavirus (file)

Public health officials have underlined the importance of not only testing, but contact tracing, to combatting the spread of coronavirus and lawmakers, eager to reopen their states, want to. know where people are getting sick. But a CDC study found that less than half of 350 covid-positive Americans knew they’d come into contact with someone with coronavirus (file) 

So far, more than 2,683,000 Americans have caught coronavirus. 

Test availability has improved dramatically in the US, with between 400,000 and 600,000 tests being run a day in June, compared to about 200,000 to 400,000 tests a day in May, according to tracking by 1point3acres.com.  

But in the rush to test as many people as possible for coronavirus as quickly as possible, the second portion of the public health initiative to control the virus’s spread – contact tracing – may have fallen to the wayside.   

States have struggled to hire contact tracers, who will be key to identifying groups that may be on the cusp of burgeoning outbreaks.  

In the CDC’s report, contact tracing was done for all 350 positive patients. 

Only 46 percent of those patients were aware of coming into contact with a COVID-19 patient. 

Of those who knew they’d interacted with an infected person, 45 percent said their covid-positive contact was a family member. 

More than a third of the patients reported having a co-worker sick with coronavirus. 

Only 10 percent reported seeing a covid-positive friend, and 19 percent had contacts in other categories, consisting mostly of healthcare or long-term care facilities and a few who reported contact with neighbors, clients or inmates. 

Perhaps surprisingly, coronavirus infection was not much more common among those who went to the grocery store once or more times a week compared to among those who shopped for food once or more a week. 

About a third of the people who tested positive said they never went to the grocery store, 28 percent went out for groceries 34 percent, and 27 percent of them said. they went to the grocery store two to three times a week. 

Only about two percent of those who tested positive went to the store on a daily basis. 

The majority of people diagnosed with coronavirus and surveyed by phone (59 percent) had to go to work outside their homes every day during the two weeks prior to their positive tests. 

Nineteen percent of people who were infected went to work two to three times a week, three percent went to their workplaces just once a week and 19 percent were employed but never had to work outside their homes. 

Only 17 percent of people who tested positive were able to telework, and a quarter of people infected worked in healthcare settings. 

‘A majority of COVID-19 patients reported working during the 2 weeks preceding illness, and few had the ability to telework, underscoring the need for enhanced measures to ensure workplace safety,’ the CDC authors wrote. 

A disproportionate number of these people were black or Hispanic, and recent research suggests that the more frequently someone is exposed to coronavirus – vis a vis leaving their homes – the more likely they are to contract coronavirus and become more severely ill.  

Across the country, Americans are returning to work. The CDC published a list of recommendations for businesses to limit the risk of viral spread in their stores, restaurants or offices, but these ‘considerations’ are unenforceable and it’s not clear if employers are acting on them. 

During a Tuesday Senate hearing where infectious disease specialist Dr Anthony Fauci and CDC Dr Robert Redfield, Utah Senator Mitt Romney pressed the public health officials for ‘data on where people get infected,’ pleading that they tell Americans whether they can safely see one another outdoors. 

The new report, published the same day, makes an effort to answer answer that question, but its findings also point to just how difficult it is pinpoint the exact time, place and person that led to a transmission. 

‘Fewer than one half of patients were aware of recent close contact with someone with COVID-19, highlighting a need for increased screening, case investigation, contact tracing, and isolation of infected persons during periods of community transmission,’ the CDC authors wrote. 

‘This finding suggests that ensuring social distancing and more widespread use of cloth face coverings are warranted.’ 

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Health

Coronavirus England: Death rates vary massively in hospitals

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Coronavirus death rates vary massively across NHS hospitals in England, according to shocking data.

Eight out of 10 infected patients have died in one hospital in the South West — but just 12.5 per cent succumbed to the illness in a London trust. 

The data, seen by The Guardian, showed more than half of Covid-19 patients have died at least 11 hospital trusts across the country.

Data from a study presented to government scientists last month showed the death rate for hospitalised patients is 28 per cent across the UK, on average.

But information being sent to senior doctors, which the NHS denies is official, shows that this varies wildly between hospitals.

Twenty-six NHS trusts had death rates lower than a quarter — between 12.5 per cent and 25 per cent. But rates were higher at the remaining 109.

Experts said the huge disparity in death rates did not necessarily mean patients were getting worse care, but that it could be a consequence of the population in the area or the number of patients they had treated. 

Older people are more likely to die from coronavirus and some regions have far more older people — the average age in the South West, for example, is eight years higher than it is in London.  

NHS England said it did not produce the data — which the newspaper said had been adjusted for age — and say they appear to be ‘experimental’.

For comparison, the national death rate for everyone who tests positive — not only  hospital patients — is 4.2 per cent in the US, 4.6 per cent in Germany, and 15.5 per cent in the UK. The infection itself is thought to kill around 1 per cent of all cases — but not everyone who catches the virus gets spotted.

Hospitals across the country have varying death rates from coronavirus, according to secret NHS data (stock image)

Hospitals across the country have varying death rates from coronavirus, according to secret NHS data (stock image)

Hospitals across the country have varying death rates from coronavirus, according to secret NHS data (stock image)

The NHS data showed that two of the five hospital trusts with the highest death rates were in the South West — one with 80 per cent and another with 62 per cent.

Specific trusts were not named in the report, The Guardian said, and were referred to only by the region they were in.

Other hospitals where more than half of patients were dying included one in the North West (68 per cent), the East of England (60 per cent) and one in London (54 per cent).

Three of the hospitals with the lowest death rates were in London — with 12.5, 14 and 15 per cent — along with one in the Midlands (13 per cent) and one in the South East (15 per cent). 

Dr Alison Pittard, chief of the Faculty of Intensive Care Medicine, told the newspaper: ‘That is a huge variation, a huge range. 

‘I’m surprised at the degree of variation. A spread between 12.5 per cent and 80 per cent is quite stark.’

She added: ‘We know that poorer communities and BAME communities have a higher risk of mortality, so if a trust is in an area of higher-risk individuals you would expect that trust’s Covid-related mortality rate to be higher.’

The exact factors that have played into some NHS trusts having significantly higher death rates are not clear.

The ethnicity of patients in a NHS trust’s area, how wealthy they are and their general health are all contributing factors.

HOW DO OFFICIAL DEATH RATES COMPARE BY REGION? 

Public Health England publishes weekly reports which show the total number of people who have been diagnosed, and the total number of deaths, in each region.

These should include all hospital patients but also include people who have tested positive and died outside of hospital.

This is how the regions break down: 

  1. London (19.8%)
  2. West Midlands (19.6%)
  3. East of England (18.6%)
  4. South West (16%)
  5. South East (15.9%)
  6. North East (15.6%)
  7. North West (15.4%)
  8. East Midlands (14.8%)
  9. Yorkshire & The Humber (13%) 
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Data has shown non-white people, those in poorer areas and people with existing health conditions are all more likely to die if they catch Covid-19.

Hospitals with small numbers of patients may also have an artificially high death rate because an increase of one could push the average up significantly.  

The NHS data gives a breakdown of 135 major hospital trusts around the country and calculated how many of the diagnosed patients died, to get a rate of death.

It is not publicly available, however, so it is unknown whether some regions’ hospitals were suffering significantly more fatalities than others. 

NHS England denied that it had produced the data.

It said in a statement: ‘We do not recognise these figures, which appear to be experimental analysis of unverified data, but there is now a wide range of published data on the role that health inequalities, including pre-existing conditions and other health factors, have played when it comes to the impact of Covid, including from the ONS and PHE.

‘The NHS is accelerating work to tackle health inequalities, and will shortly be providing local services with a range of actions they should build in to their plans for the coming months.’ 

Public Health England publishes weekly data showing how deaths break down by region, which shows that London has the highest overall death rate for all patients.

In the capital 19.8 per cent of people — not necessarily all admitted to hospital — have died of the virus, compared to 19.6 per cent in the West Midlands and 18.6 per cent in the East of England.

The lowest regional death rate has been in Yorkshire and The Humber, where 13 per cent of people officially diagnosed have died.

The other regions had death rates of 16 per cent in the South West, 15.9 per cent in the South East, 15.6 per cent in the North East, 15.4 per cent in the North West and 14.8 per cent in the East Midlands.

Separate regional data from Public Health England shows that London has the highest death rate among people who have officially tested positive for Covid-19. There, 19.8 per cent of patients have died

Separate regional data from Public Health England shows that London has the highest death rate among people who have officially tested positive for Covid-19. There, 19.8 per cent of patients have died

Separate regional data from Public Health England shows that London has the highest death rate among people who have officially tested positive for Covid-19. There, 19.8 per cent of patients have died

Government papers published last week after being presented to officials in June showed that the average hospital death rate has been just over a quarter across the UK. 

A study of 64,066 hospital patients with Covid-19 in the UK found that 28 per cent of them – more than one in four – die with the disease.

Deaths were higher for people admitted to intensive care, of whom 35 per cent succumbed to the disease, and even higher for those who had to be put onto ventilators – 42 per cent.

The COVID-19 Clinical Information Network (CO-CIN), comprised of university experts from around the UK, presented the results to SAGE – the Scientific Advisory Group for Emergencies – on June 22.

The study had found people spend an average of nine days in hospital if they are admitted with coronavirus, or catch it while on a ward.

Some 16 per cent of patients require high-flow oxygen therapy to help them breathe.

The most common symptoms for hospital patients are coughs (63 per cent), fever (62 per cent) and shortness of breath (61 per cent) – but a worrying one in 16 people (6 per cent) claimed to have had no symptoms at all, the study found.

WHICH HOSPITAL TRUSTS HAVE HAD THE MOST COVID-19 DEATHS IN TOTAL? (NHS England data to July 13)
NHS trust name Total
ENGLAND 29,079
UNIVERSITY HOSPITALS BIRMINGHAM NHS FOUNDATION TRUST 960
BARTS HEALTH NHS TRUST 623
LONDON NORTH WEST UNIVERSITY HEALTHCARE NHS TRUST 608
PENNINE ACUTE HOSPITALS NHS TRUST 551
UNIVERSITY HOSPITALS OF DERBY AND BURTON NHS FOUNDATION TRUST 518
KING’S COLLEGE HOSPITAL NHS FOUNDATION TRUST 511
ROYAL FREE LONDON NHS FOUNDATION TRUST 486
LIVERPOOL UNIVERSITY HOSPITALS NHS FOUNDATION TRUST 468
MANCHESTER UNIVERSITY NHS FOUNDATION TRUST 437
IMPERIAL COLLEGE HEALTHCARE NHS TRUST 427
UNIVERSITY HOSPITALS OF LEICESTER NHS TRUST 424
EAST KENT HOSPITALS UNIVERSITY NHS FOUNDATION TRUST 419
BARKING, HAVERING AND REDBRIDGE UNIVERSITY HOSPITALS NHS TRUST 417
LEWISHAM AND GREENWICH NHS TRUST 411
SANDWELL AND WEST BIRMINGHAM HOSPITALS NHS TRUST 379
WEST HERTFORDSHIRE HOSPITALS NHS TRUST 368
FRIMLEY HEALTH NHS FOUNDATION TRUST 363
UNIVERSITY HOSPITALS OF NORTH MIDLANDS NHS TRUST 352
EAST SUFFOLK AND NORTH ESSEX NHS FOUNDATION TRUST 351
LEEDS TEACHING HOSPITALS NHS TRUST 333
MID YORKSHIRE HOSPITALS NHS TRUST 326
SOUTH TYNESIDE AND SUNDERLAND NHS FOUNDATION TRUST 325
CHELSEA AND WESTMINSTER HOSPITAL NHS FOUNDATION TRUST 308
BASILDON AND THURROCK UNIVERSITY HOSPITALS NHS FOUNDATION TRUST 305
NORTHAMPTON GENERAL HOSPITAL NHS TRUST 302
CROYDON HEALTH SERVICES NHS TRUST 300
ST GEORGE’S UNIVERSITY HOSPITALS NHS FOUNDATION TRUST 295
THE ROYAL WOLVERHAMPTON NHS TRUST 285
SHEFFIELD TEACHING HOSPITALS NHS FOUNDATION TRUST 285
LUTON AND DUNSTABLE UNIVERSITY HOSPITAL NHS FOUNDATION TRUST 282
WORCESTERSHIRE ACUTE HOSPITALS NHS TRUST 276
EPSOM AND ST HELIER UNIVERSITY HOSPITALS NHS TRUST 275
NOTTINGHAM UNIVERSITY HOSPITALS NHS TRUST 270
NORTH MIDDLESEX UNIVERSITY HOSPITAL NHS TRUST 267
THE DUDLEY GROUP NHS FOUNDATION TRUST 263
SURREY AND SUSSEX HEALTHCARE NHS TRUST 259
SOUTH TEES HOSPITALS NHS FOUNDATION TRUST 254
WRIGHTINGTON, WIGAN AND LEIGH NHS FOUNDATION TRUST 253
COUNTY DURHAM AND DARLINGTON NHS FOUNDATION TRUST 252
LANCASHIRE TEACHING HOSPITALS NHS FOUNDATION TRUST 247
SOUTHEND UNIVERSITY HOSPITAL NHS FOUNDATION TRUST 243
UNIVERSITY HOSPITALS COVENTRY AND WARWICKSHIRE NHS TRUST 238
WIRRAL UNIVERSITY TEACHING HOSPITAL NHS FOUNDATION TRUST 238
BLACKPOOL TEACHING HOSPITALS NHS FOUNDATION TRUST 237
NORTH WEST ANGLIA NHS FOUNDATION TRUST 234
GUY’S AND ST THOMAS’ NHS FOUNDATION TRUST 230
BRADFORD TEACHING HOSPITALS NHS FOUNDATION TRUST 230
WALSALL HEALTHCARE NHS TRUST 229
DONCASTER AND BASSETLAW TEACHING HOSPITALS NHS FOUNDATION TRUST 229
PORTSMOUTH HOSPITALS NHS TRUST 229
BOLTON NHS FOUNDATION TRUST 226
COUNTESS OF CHESTER HOSPITAL NHS FOUNDATION TRUST 224
BEDFORD HOSPITAL NHS TRUST 219
STOCKPORT NHS FOUNDATION TRUST 215
KETTERING GENERAL HOSPITAL NHS FOUNDATION TRUST 214
YORK TEACHING HOSPITAL NHS FOUNDATION TRUST 214
MID CHESHIRE HOSPITALS NHS FOUNDATION TRUST 212
TAMESIDE AND GLOSSOP INTEGRATED CARE NHS FOUNDATION TRUST 212
DARTFORD AND GRAVESHAM NHS TRUST 209
ST HELENS AND KNOWSLEY TEACHING HOSPITALS NHS TRUST 207
HULL UNIVERSITY TEACHING HOSPITALS NHS TRUST 204
NORTHUMBRIA HEALTHCARE NHS FOUNDATION TRUST 202
THE PRINCESS ALEXANDRA HOSPITAL NHS TRUST 201
EAST LANCASHIRE HOSPITALS NHS TRUST 200
THE ROTHERHAM NHS FOUNDATION TRUST 196
UNIVERSITY HOSPITAL SOUTHAMPTON NHS FOUNDATION TRUST 196
MID ESSEX HOSPITAL SERVICES NHS TRUST 194
GLOUCESTERSHIRE HOSPITALS NHS FOUNDATION TRUST 194
ASHFORD AND ST PETER’S HOSPITALS NHS FOUNDATION TRUST 189
ROYAL BERKSHIRE NHS FOUNDATION TRUST 186
OXFORD UNIVERSITY HOSPITALS NHS FOUNDATION TRUST 181
MEDWAY NHS FOUNDATION TRUST 180
SALFORD ROYAL NHS FOUNDATION TRUST 178
UNIVERSITY COLLEGE LONDON HOSPITALS NHS FOUNDATION TRUST 175
GEORGE ELIOT HOSPITAL NHS TRUST 174
SHREWSBURY AND TELFORD HOSPITAL NHS TRUST 169
UNIVERSITY HOSPITALS OF MORECAMBE BAY NHS FOUNDATION TRUST 169
THE HILLINGDON HOSPITALS NHS FOUNDATION TRUST 165
EAST AND NORTH HERTFORDSHIRE NHS TRUST 164
KINGSTON HOSPITAL NHS FOUNDATION TRUST 164
HAMPSHIRE HOSPITALS NHS FOUNDATION TRUST 161
NORTH CUMBRIA INTEGRATED CARE NHS FOUNDATION TRUST 159
CALDERDALE AND HUDDERSFIELD NHS FOUNDATION TRUST 156
UNIVERSITY HOSPITALS BRISTOL NHS FOUNDATION TRUST 151
SOUTHPORT AND ORMSKIRK HOSPITAL NHS TRUST 149
THE QUEEN ELIZABETH HOSPITAL, KING’S LYNN, NHS FOUNDATION TRUST 148
BARNSLEY HOSPITAL NHS FOUNDATION TRUST 148
HOMERTON UNIVERSITY HOSPITAL NHS FOUNDATION TRUST 147
BRIGHTON AND SUSSEX UNIVERSITY HOSPITALS NHS TRUST 147
EAST CHESHIRE NHS TRUST 143
UNITED LINCOLNSHIRE HOSPITALS NHS TRUST 141
NORTH TEES AND HARTLEPOOL NHS FOUNDATION TRUST 140
WARRINGTON AND HALTON TEACHING HOSPITALS NHS FOUNDATION TRUST 136
GATESHEAD HEALTH NHS FOUNDATION TRUST 135
CHESTERFIELD ROYAL HOSPITAL NHS FOUNDATION TRUST 132
MAIDSTONE AND TUNBRIDGE WELLS NHS TRUST 131
BUCKINGHAMSHIRE HEALTHCARE NHS TRUST 130
GREAT WESTERN HOSPITALS NHS FOUNDATION TRUST 125
CAMBRIDGE UNIVERSITY HOSPITALS NHS FOUNDATION TRUST 124
SHERWOOD FOREST HOSPITALS NHS FOUNDATION TRUST 124
NORFOLK AND NORWICH UNIVERSITY HOSPITALS NHS FOUNDATION TRUST 123
NORTH BRISTOL NHS TRUST 119
NORTHERN LINCOLNSHIRE AND GOOLE NHS FOUNDATION TRUST 118
JAMES PAGET UNIVERSITY HOSPITALS NHS FOUNDATION TRUST 117
SOUTH WARWICKSHIRE NHS FOUNDATION TRUST 117
THE NEWCASTLE UPON TYNE HOSPITALS NHS FOUNDATION TRUST 116
WESTERN SUSSEX HOSPITALS NHS FOUNDATION TRUST 113
WHITTINGTON HEALTH NHS TRUST 111
AIREDALE NHS FOUNDATION TRUST 108
MILTON KEYNES UNIVERSITY HOSPITAL NHS FOUNDATION TRUST 104
ROYAL SURREY COUNTY HOSPITAL NHS FOUNDATION TRUST 97
EAST SUSSEX HEALTHCARE NHS TRUST 91
HARROGATE AND DISTRICT NHS FOUNDATION TRUST 81
UNIVERSITY HOSPITALS PLYMOUTH NHS TRUST 81
WEST SUFFOLK NHS FOUNDATION TRUST 79
THE ROYAL BOURNEMOUTH AND CHRISTCHURCH HOSPITALS NHS FOUNDATION TRUST 67
ROYAL UNITED HOSPITALS BATH NHS FOUNDATION TRUST 66
ROYAL CORNWALL HOSPITALS NHS TRUST 65
WYE VALLEY NHS TRUST 56
SALISBURY NHS FOUNDATION TRUST 56
ROYAL BROMPTON & HAREFIELD NHS FOUNDATION TRUST 49
POOLE HOSPITAL NHS FOUNDATION TRUST 48
KENT COMMUNITY HEALTH NHS FOUNDATION TRUST 47
ROYAL DEVON AND EXETER NHS FOUNDATION TRUST 46
NORTH EAST LONDON NHS FOUNDATION TRUST 44
SOMERSET NHS FOUNDATION TRUST 43
ISLE OF WIGHT NHS TRUST 39
TORBAY AND SOUTH DEVON NHS FOUNDATION TRUST 39
BIRMINGHAM COMMUNITY HEALTHCARE NHS FOUNDATION TRUST 37
GLOUCESTERSHIRE HEALTH AND CARE NHS FOUNDATION TRUST 34
NORFOLK COMMUNITY HEALTH AND CARE NHS TRUST 28
WORCESTERSHIRE HEALTH AND CARE NHS TRUST 28
CORNWALL PARTNERSHIP NHS FOUNDATION TRUST 26
YEOVIL DISTRICT HOSPITAL NHS FOUNDATION TRUST 26
ANGLIAN COMMUNITY ENTERPRISE CIC – FRYATT HOSPITAL 25
DORSET COUNTY HOSPITAL NHS FOUNDATION TRUST 24
OXFORD HEALTH NHS FOUNDATION TRUST 23
ROYAL PAPWORTH HOSPITAL NHS FOUNDATION TRUST 22
LEICESTERSHIRE PARTNERSHIP NHS TRUST 21
NORTHERN DEVON HEALTHCARE NHS TRUST 21
BERKSHIRE HEALTHCARE NHS FOUNDATION TRUST 20
THE ROYAL MARSDEN NHS FOUNDATION TRUST 19
LIVERPOOL HEART AND CHEST HOSPITAL NHS FOUNDATION TRUST 19
SUSSEX COMMUNITY NHS FOUNDATION TRUST 18
ESSEX PARTNERSHIP UNIVERSITY NHS FOUNDATION TRUST 17
EAST LONDON NHS FOUNDATION TRUST 17
DERBYSHIRE COMMUNITY HEALTH SERVICES NHS FOUNDATION TRUST 17
SOUTHERN HEALTH NHS FOUNDATION TRUST 17
DORSET HEALTHCARE UNIVERSITY NHS FOUNDATION TRUST 16
SHROPSHIRE COMMUNITY HEALTH NHS TRUST 15
THE ROYAL ORTHOPAEDIC HOSPITAL NHS FOUNDATION TRUST 15
NOTTINGHAMSHIRE HEALTHCARE NHS FOUNDATION TRUST 13
CITY HEALTH CARE PARTNERSHIP CIC – EAST RIDING COMMUNITY HOSPITAL 13
THE CHRISTIE NHS FOUNDATION TRUST 13
MIDLANDS PARTNERSHIP NHS FOUNDATION TRUST 12
NORTHAMPTONSHIRE HEALTHCARE NHS FOUNDATION TRUST 11
HERTFORDSHIRE PARTNERSHIP UNIVERSITY NHS FOUNDATION TRUST 10
CENTRAL LONDON COMMUNITY HEALTHCARE NHS TRUST 10
Royal Hospital for Neuro-Disability West Hill 10
THE WALTON CENTRE NHS FOUNDATION TRUST 10
HCA UK – The Wellington Hospital North Building 9
Hospital of St John & St Elizabeth – Hospital of St John & St Elizabeth 9
GREATER MANCHESTER MENTAL HEALTH NHS FOUNDATION TRUST 9
HERTFORDSHIRE COMMUNITY NHS TRUST 8
CUMBRIA, NORTHUMBERLAND, TYNE AND WEAR NHS FOUNDATION TRUST 7
TEES, ESK AND WEAR VALLEYS NHS FOUNDATION TRUST 7
PROVIDE – BRAINTREE COMMUNITY HOSPITAL 6
CENTRAL AND NORTH WEST LONDON NHS FOUNDATION TRUST 6
The London Clinic – 20 Devonshire Place 6
NORTH STAFFORDSHIRE COMBINED HEALTHCARE NHS TRUST 6
NHS NIGHTINGALE HOSPITAL NORTH WEST 6
PENNINE CARE NHS FOUNDATION TRUST 6
TAUNTON AND SOMERSET NHS FOUNDATION TRUST 6
THE ROBERT JONES AND AGNES HUNT ORTHOPAEDIC HOSPITAL NHS FOUNDATION TRUST 5
WILTSHIRE HEALTH & CARE – SAVERNAKE COMMUNITY HOSPITAL 5
ANGLIAN COMMUNITY ENTERPRISE CIC – CLACTON HOSPITAL 4
NHS NIGHTINGALE HOSPITAL LONDON 4
OXLEAS NHS FOUNDATION TRUST 4
ROYAL NATIONAL ORTHOPAEDIC HOSPITAL NHS TRUST 4
WEST LONDON NHS TRUST 4
LEEDS AND YORK PARTNERSHIP NHS FOUNDATION TRUST 4
ROTHERHAM DONCASTER AND SOUTH HUMBER NHS FOUNDATION TRUST 4
ALDER HEY CHILDREN’S NHS FOUNDATION TRUST 4
CHESHIRE AND WIRRAL PARTNERSHIP NHS FOUNDATION TRUST 4
VIRGIN CARE LTD – PAULTON MEMORIAL HOSPITAL 4
EAST COAST COMMUNITY HEALTHCARE – BECCLES HOSPITAL 3
LINCOLNSHIRE COMMUNITY HEALTH SERVICES NHS TRUST 3
MERSEY CARE NHS FOUNDATION TRUST 3
Central Surrey Health – WALTON COMMUNITY HOSPITAL 3
NORFOLK AND SUFFOLK NHS FOUNDATION TRUST 2
PROVIDE – ST PETERS HOSPITAL 2
HCA UK – London Bridge 2
HCA UK – The Princess Grace 2
SOUTH LONDON AND MAUDSLEY NHS FOUNDATION TRUST 2
DERBYSHIRE HEALTHCARE NHS FOUNDATION TRUST 2
BRADFORD DISTRICT CARE NHS FOUNDATION TRUST 2
Sheffield Health and Social Care NHS Foundation Trust 2
BMI Healthcare – Mount Alvernia 2
Oldercare (Haslemere) Limited – ST MAGNUS HOSPITAL 2
SOLENT NHS TRUST 2
VIRGIN CARE SERVICES LTD – SHEPPEY COMMUNITY HOSPITAL 2
LIVEWELL SOUTHWEST – MOUNT GOULD HOSPITAL 2
WESTON AREA HEALTH NHS TRUST 2
WILTSHIRE HEALTH & CARE – CHIPPENHAM COMMUNITY HOSPITAL 2
WILTSHIRE HEALTH & CARE – WARMINSTER COMMUNITY HOSPITAL 2
CAMBRIDGESHIRE AND PETERBOROUGH NHS FOUNDATION TRUST 1
Elysium Healthcare Limited 1
PROVIDE – HALSTEAD HOSPITAL 1
HCA UK – The Lister 1
LINCOLNSHIRE PARTNERSHIP NHS FOUNDATION TRUST 1
Ramsay Health UK – Nottingham Woodthorpe 1
HUMBER TEACHING NHS FOUNDATION TRUST 1
SHEFFIELD CHILDREN’S NHS FOUNDATION TRUST 1
NORTH WEST BOROUGHS HEALTHCARE NHS FOUNDATION TRUST 1
Central Surrey Health – WOKING COMMUNITY HOSPITAL 1
KENT AND MEDWAY NHS AND SOCIAL CARE PARTNERSHIP TRUST 1
Nuffield Health – Woking 1
VIRGIN CARE SERVICES LTD – LIVINGSTONE COMMUNITY HOSPITAL 1
Cygnet Health Care Limited 1
VIRGIN CARE LTD – ST MARTINS HOSPITAL 1

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Coronavirus: Sufferers describe symptoms MONTHS after infection

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Three coronavirus survivors in their twenties have revealed how they all still suffer from persistent fatigue, breathlessness and heart problems — even though it has been months since they were first diagnosed with the vicious disease.

In eye-opening accounts that prove Covid-19 is not just an illness that goes quietly and causes lasting damage, one 27-year-old woman who fought off the disease told how it constantly feels like there is a ‘slab of concrete on my chest’.

Another 21-year-old victim admitted she feels ‘like a fraud’ because her GP is baffled by her persistent shortness of breath, which occurs even when she sits still. 

And the third survivor — who believes he was struck down in January — is frustrated because there is not much he can do to tackle his heart rate, which has mysteriously sped up since his battle with suspected coronavirus. 

All of the victims now say the public must move away from the incorrect notion that ‘if you are not dead you are fine’, revealing their lives have been turned upside down by the virus, despite being fit and healthy.

Most coronavirus patients will recover within a fortnight, suffering a fever, cough and losing their sense of smell or taste for several days. 

However, evidence is beginning to show that the tell-tale symptoms of the virus can persist for weeks on end in ‘long haulers’ — the term for patients plagued by lasting complications. 

Affected patients have told how they struggle to complete everyday tasks, such as emptying the dishwasher, without feeling extremely tired and being left with a racing heart. 

British scientists have already launched an investigation into the long-term impacts of Covid-19 in search of answers to thousands of people’s problems, which has been referred to as ‘this generation’s polio’. 

Talya Varga, 27, said the shortness of breath she has experienced since having Covid-19 in April feels like a 'concrete slab on her chest'

Talya Varga, 27, said the shortness of breath she has experienced since having Covid-19 in April feels like a 'concrete slab on her chest'

Talya Varga, 27, said the shortness of breath she has experienced since having Covid-19 in April feels like a ‘concrete slab on her chest’  

Jack Lawrence, 21, says he has had symptoms ever since January. He particularly complains of a racing heart, for which he is having testing, with no obvious cause

Jack Lawrence, 21, says he has had symptoms ever since January. He particularly complains of a racing heart, for which he is having testing, with no obvious cause

Jack Lawrence, 21, says he has had symptoms ever since January. He particularly complains of a racing heart, for which he is having testing, with no obvious cause

Talya Varga, 27 – ‘It feels like there is a slab of concrete on my chest’

ARE THERE LONG-TERM SYMPTOMS OF COVID-19? 

Covid-19 is described as a short-term illness caused by infection with the novel SARS-CoV-2 coronavirus. Public health officials tend to say people will recover within two weeks or so. 

However it’s become increasingly clear that this is not the case for everyone, and that the two-week period is only the ‘acute illness’ phase.

Data from the COVID Symptom Study app, by King’s College London and health company Zoe, suggests one in ten people may still have symptoms after three weeks, and some may suffer for months.

For those with more severe disease, Italian researchers who tracked 143 people who had been hospitalised with the disease found almost 90 per cent still had symptoms including fatigue two months after first falling unwell.

The most common complaints were fatigue, a shortness of breath and joint pain – all of which were reported during their battle with the illness. 

Another study in Italy showed one in ten people who lose their sense of taste and smell with the coronavirus – now recognised as a key sign of the infection – may not get it back within a month.

The study, published in the journal JAMA Otolaryngology – Head and Neck Surgery, involved 187 Italians who had the virus but who were not ill enough to be admitted to hospital.

The UK’s Chief Medical Officer Professor Chris Whitty has said the longer term impacts of Covid-19 on health ‘may be significant’.

Support groups such as Long Covid have popped up online for those who ‘have suspected Covid-19 and your experience doesn’t follow the textbook symptoms or recovery time’.

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Talya Varga was a fit and healthy dancer who exercised regularly and cycled to work before she was struck with the coronavirus on April 1. 

‘In March I went on a trip to Australia and New Zealand, and 13 days after (Wednesday April 1), my symptoms started,’ she told MailOnline.

‘I had a sore throat and fever and quickly progressed into becoming short of breath. Even when resting it felt like I’d just done a 10km run. It was really hard to fill my lungs.’

The 27-year-old spent the next five weeks on bed rest and was sent an ambulance on two occasions because her breathing deteriorated so quickly.

The second time Ms Varga, from south west London, was rushed to hospital, doctors suspected she had pneumonia and a pulmonary embolism — a potentially life-threatening blood clot in her lungs. 

She said: ‘I was referred to a post-coronavirus clinic where a CT scan showed a lump in my right breast and a nodule near my heart. 

‘Fortunately these don’t look to be anything sinister and could just be scar tissue from the virus.’

Three months on and Ms Varga is still suffering symptoms, such as difficulty breathing which feels like ‘there is a slab of concrete’ on her chest.

She said: ‘This morning I woke up with pain in my ribs, chest and back and I am still having issues with my breathing. It like there is a slab of concrete on my chest.

‘I was in the low risk category and should have “bounced” back by now. The unknown is terrifying. 

‘The current treatment is painkillers, rest and vitamins. If you’re really lucky you are given an inhaler.

‘Some days I am in so much pain that I can feel every bone, muscle and organ in my body.

‘Many patients who are suffering with longer term effects of Covid-19 have no validation that their experience is a recognised condition. We have to move away from the notion that if you are not dead you are fine.’ 

Ms Varga was never given a coronavirus swab test at the height of her illness, and an antibody test came back negative.

However, there is a uncertainty around how long antibodies remain in the blood for. And not all people who have had Covid-19 develop antibodies, scientists say, using another line of the immune system’s defense first. 

Ms Varga said: 'I was in the low risk category and should have "bounced" back by now'

Ms Varga said: 'I was in the low risk category and should have "bounced" back by now'

Ms Varga said: ‘I was in the low risk category and should have “bounced” back by now’

During her illness, Ms Varga spent the next five weeks on bed rest and was sent an ambulance on two occasions because her breathing deteriorated so quickly

During her illness, Ms Varga spent the next five weeks on bed rest and was sent an ambulance on two occasions because her breathing deteriorated so quickly

During her illness, Ms Varga spent the next five weeks on bed rest and was sent an ambulance on two occasions because her breathing deteriorated so quickly

Jessica, 21 – ‘I feel like a fraud because my GP doesn’t recognise my symptoms’ 

Jessica first came down with the coronavirus symptoms after spending time with her friend, who also later developed the tell-tale signs.

MORE THAN HALF OF COVID-19 PATIENTS HAVE HEART ABNORMALITIES 

Coronavirus patients can suffer irreversible heart damage as a result of their battle with the disease, a study of hospital patients has found.

More than half of infected patients who had heart scans while in hospital with Covid-19 showed abnormal changes to their organ.

One in eight had signs of ‘severe dysfunction’ in their heart and doctors couldn’t find any other explanation except the coronavirus.

In the UK around one in four people admitted to hospital with Covid-19 die of it but even survivors may be left with long-term illness, this research suggests.

The study, done by the British Heart Foundation, adds to concerns that coronavirus can cause widespread damage to the vital organs and leaves some ‘long-haulers’ with health problems that will last for months and even years after the infection.

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The 21-year-old, who didn’t want to reveal her full name, self-isolated at her parents’ home in Bath for two weeks with a temperature — which she says she still has.

Jessica, who is set to graduate from university this summer, told MailOnline: ‘My cough went away the same day it began, and didn’t return.  

‘After about a week of feeling unwell I started to develop chest pain and periods of severe shortness of breath, and after about three weeks I was sent to the hospital briefly because of an unusually high heart rate.

‘It was suggested at that point that I had had coronavirus, and that it had inflamed my heart and that I had pericarditis post-infection.’

Pericarditis – inflammation of the outer layers of the heart – causes chest pain and a high temperature. Pericarditis can be attributed to several factors, including viral infections.

Jessica, who studies in London, said: ‘After multiple check-ins with my doctor, I got some more blood tests last week which revealed that I am negative for antibodies, and that I have had glandular fever in the past.

‘It has been suggested I was already suffering with post viral fatigue from glandular fever, and that I then came down with coronavirus and that it has dragged on because of that, but that’s the frustrating thing – we have no idea.’

‘It does feel like “another day another symptom”. I have had a temperature throughout but also shortness of breath (even while sitting still, but always after any amount of exercise), chest pain, stomach pain, muscle aches, shivers, sweats, headaches, and slight trouble with taste and smell.

‘Generally at the moment though the featured symptom is extreme fatigue – all the time, with any amount of effort or energy.

‘If I do anything – empty the dishwasher, go on a dog walk, talk to a friend over Zoom, even watch a film – my temperature goes up and I need to sit down quietly without doing anything.’

Jessica admitted she feels ‘like a fraud’ because all of her symptoms are met with bewilderment by her GP. 

Jack Lawrence, 21 – ‘I can just about do my university work’ 

Jack Lawrence was first struck down by suspected coronavirus January 20 – weeks before the virus was first detected with testing in the UK.

Mr Lawrence said: 'The best way I'd describe coronavirus is it's like a normal virus but the symptoms and pain keeps doubling or tripling'

Mr Lawrence said: 'The best way I'd describe coronavirus is it's like a normal virus but the symptoms and pain keeps doubling or tripling'

Mr Lawrence said: ‘The best way I’d describe coronavirus is it’s like a normal virus but the symptoms and pain keeps doubling or tripling’

UK LAUNCHES STUDY OF COVID-19’S LONG-TERM EFFECTS 

Scientists in the UK will investigate the long-term effects of Covid-19 in a scientific study which launches this month.

The Department of Health has announced that up to 10,000 people will be involved in a study to look at how people who catch the coronavirus fare long-term.

Growing evidence suggests that even people who only get mildly sick may suffer long-lasting health effects including lung damage. 

The UK’s Scientific Advisory Group for Emergencies (SAGE) has warned that Covid-19 patients could be left with ‘extreme tiredness and shortness of breath for several months’. 

The study, led by researchers and doctors in Leicester, will look at how people’s mental health is affected by illness and whether factors like sex or ethnicity affect how well someone recovers from Covid-19.

Patients in the study, which will receive £8.4million in funding, will have medical scans, blood tests and lung samples so experts can look at how they are affected.

It comes as the NHS has announced it’s launched a long-term recovery service called ‘Your Covid Recovery’, which will offer online advice to the public and more specialised physio and mental health support to some patients from this summer. 

Chief Medical Officer, Professor Chris Whitty, said: ‘As well as the immediate health impacts of the virus it is also important to look at the longer-term impacts on health, which may be significant.

‘We have rightly focused on mortality, and what the UK can do straight away to protect lives, but we should also look at how Covid-19 impacts on the health of people after they have recovered from the immediate disease.’

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The 21-year-old said: ‘I thought it was a normal virus at first but it soon became the worst. It started with the tiniest cough. But I developed aches, pains, was flat out, had a sore throat that was agony and temperatures as high as 39C (102.2F).

‘It peaked after four days and then I thought I had recovered within a week.’

But on February 9, while at his home of Watford, the film student at Northampton University was rushed to A&E by his mother after he became breathless. 

He hadn’t experienced shortness of breath in the first week of his symptoms, which doctors believe only develops later.

Mr Lawrence had previously suffered a collapsed lung in 2017 as a result of a sudden and rare separate condition.

He had surgery to fix it and hasn’t had problems since. But because of his medical history, he was quickly seen by doctors for tests on his lungs.

He said: ‘They were looking for signs it had returned but found nothing. They said I had the back end of the virus.

‘I think at the time it was a fair assumption considering to their knowledge they didn’t know anything. I was pleased with that and that the X-ray was clear.’

Mr Lawrence was told he would recover but has not, despite it being four months since he was first struck down by the life-threatening disease. 

He is still being seen regularly at the Harefield Hospital in Hillingdon, which specialises in respiratory and heart conditions.

And Mr Lawrence is set to have an echocardiogram — a scan to look at the heart and nearby blood vessels for any abnormalities.  

According to research by the British Heart Foundation, coronavirus patients can suffer irreversible heart damage as a result of their battle with the disease.

A a study of hospital patients found more than half of infected patients who had heart scans showed abnormal changes to their organ, and one in eight had signs of ‘severe dysfunction’. 

Doctors say they couldn’t find any other explanation except the coronavirus.

Similarly, Mr Lawrence says tests so far have come back inconclusive for any other cause of his high heart rate and other symptoms.  

He said: ‘Each day I’m consistently very breathless and my heart rate is very fast, however the level of symptoms changes daily.’

Mr Lawrence added: ‘The best way I’d describe coronavirus is it’s like a normal virus but the symptoms and pain keeps doubling or tripling.

‘I can just about do my university work. I remember an assessment day at uni on February 24. I was so ill, I can’t describe. It was beyond the point of tiredness.

‘I’ve been given a steroid inhaler. It doesn’t really do anything. I take multi vitamins and cut out processed food to counteract any inflammation. But there is not much I can do.’

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Florida has more coronavirus infections than all but eight countries

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Coronavirus case numbers continued to spike over the weekend as Florida shattered it’s previous record number of new infections in a single day on Sunday and surpassed all but eight countries worldwide for the greatest number of cases. 

More than 15,000 new positive coronavirus tests were reported on Sunday alone in the state, far outstripping the previous record of over 12,000 infections. 

Florida reported more than 12,000 new cases on Monday – more than all of Europe combined. 

Nearly 60,000 Americans tested positive in total on Sunday, although the daily death toll remained low, at 428, according to tracking by Johns Hopkins University. Both in hotspots like Florida, and nationwide, fatalities have turned slightly upward, but remain low as experts warn the spike in deaths may be yet to come.  

The sharp rise in cases in Florida comes as the state presses on with its reopening plan, including opening the gates to Disney World, which allowed tourists in for the first time in months over the weekend. 

Last week, the state hit a new high death toll, but its daily fatalities remain far lower than the numbers seen in New York when it was the pandemic’s epicenter. 

Despite that somewhat encouraging shift, the US remains the worst-hit country in the world, with more than 3.3 million coronavirus cases and more than 135,000 deaths.    

Florida smashed its previous record number of coronavirus cases on Sunday, reporting more than 15,000 new positive tests (far right; data for Monday not yet shown)

Florida smashed its previous record number of coronavirus cases on Sunday, reporting more than 15,000 new positive tests (far right; data for Monday not yet shown)

Florida smashed its previous record number of coronavirus cases on Sunday, reporting more than 15,000 new positive tests (far right; data for Monday not yet shown)  

Despite the steep rise in coronavirus cases in Florida, the number of daily deaths has continued to decline f

Despite the steep rise in coronavirus cases in Florida, the number of daily deaths has continued to decline f

Despite the steep rise in coronavirus cases in Florida, the number of daily deaths has continued to decline f

While newly diagnosed cases remain high in previous hotspots like Arizona and Texas, Florida is now indisputably the most concerning state in the nation. 

In Texas, where several counties saw their hospitals overwhelmed by coronavirus cases had fewer than 8,800 new cases diagnosed Sunday, compared to Florida’s 15,300. 

Similar patterns to those seen in Texas are emerging in Florida. Hospitals in Miami-Dade County are now approaching capacity as coronavirus threatens to flood the healthcare system.  

Stockpiles of remdesivir, the only antiviral drug shown to help coronavirus patients recover more quickly, are dwindling in Florida, leaving some hospitals in the state with no effective treatments for their patients. 

Despite the record-breaking rise in coronavirus cases, Florida beaches were crowded last weekend, with few masks in sight

Despite the record-breaking rise in coronavirus cases, Florida beaches were crowded last weekend, with few masks in sight

Despite the record-breaking rise in coronavirus cases, Florida beaches were crowded last weekend, with few masks in sight 

Last week, New York Governor Andrew Cuomo offered to send one day’s worth of the medication to Florida. 

The small shipment was enough to treat 280 patients and act as a stopgap for Florida on Saturday, while the state was awaiting the delivery of remdesivir from the federal government.  

Florida Governor Rick DeSantis said that he had personally secured the new supply of the antiviral from President Trump, after vehemently denying that the state needed assistance from New York. 

But doctors there tell a different story. 

‘It’s been very frustrating,’ Dr Eliot Godofsky, an infectious disease specialist in Bradenton, South Florida, told the Sun-Sentinel. 

‘Patients suffer and you just feel terrible.’ 

So far, nearly 4,300 Floridians have died of coronavirus, and its fatality rate has hovered just below 20 per 100,000 residents. 

Arizona's rapid increase in coronavirus cases has experts holding their breath for a subsequent rise in deaths

Arizona's rapid increase in coronavirus cases has experts holding their breath for a subsequent rise in deaths

Arizona’s rapid increase in coronavirus cases has experts holding their breath for a subsequent rise in deaths 

That’s below the rate seen in Arizona, where about 30 people per 100,000 residents have died of the virus. 

Massachusetts’s outbreak has been relatively under control, with less than 300 new cases diagnosed each day for all of July, but its fatality rate soared much higher than either Florida’s or Arizona’s, with 120 people dying per 10,000.

California’s death rate is comparable to Florida’s, with 17.6 coronavirus deaths per 100,000 residents, while hard-hit but populous Texas has only about 10 coronavirus deaths per 100,000. 

In part, the diverging patterns in cases and deaths – the steep rise in cases, but stable, relatively low number of deaths – across the nation and in many states reflects the massive ramp up of testing. 

North carolina is being eyed as an emerging coronavirus hotspot new daily infections and hospitalizations climb

North carolina is being eyed as an emerging coronavirus hotspot new daily infections and hospitalizations climb

North carolina is being eyed as an emerging coronavirus hotspot new daily infections and hospitalizations climb 

Idaho still has a low number of infections, but saw more than 400 new positive tests on Sunday. It has surpassed its previous peak of hospitalizations as well

Idaho still has a low number of infections, but saw more than 400 new positive tests on Sunday. It has surpassed its previous peak of hospitalizations as well

Idaho still has a low number of infections, but saw more than 400 new positive tests on Sunday. It has surpassed its previous peak of hospitalizations as well 

Florida is now testing several times more people for coronavirus each day than New York was at the height of its crisis. 

But experts warn that an uptick in fatalities may be yet to come, both in individual states like Florida and across the US. 

Estimates of lag times vary, but many experts have warned that mid-July could bring a rise in fatalities. 

Modelers have projected that by that same time, Florida may be seeing as many as 20,000 new cases a day. 

Emerging hotspots are also being closely watched as well. 

Louisiana has now surpassed its first case peak. On Sunday, more than 2,000 people there tested positive. 

North Carolina, too, is facing a growing crisis. It too saw more than 2,000 new cases on Sunday, and doctors are concerned that remdesivir may run out there too. 

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