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New York man suffering from a heart attack was afraid to go to ER for fear of catching coronavirus

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A New York man who suffered a heart attack earlier this year was afraid to go to the emergency room over fears of falling ill with the novel coronavirus.

Two weeks ago, Deepak Gulati, 71, who lives in Manhattan, was suffering from horrible chest pain, swearing and was unable to breathe.

He tried to sleep it off but the pain kept getting worse. However, Gulati didn’t want to go to the ER because he was worried about contracting COVID-19, the disease caused by the virus.

After pressure from his wife and cardiologist, he caved and his sought care. It turns out his pain was from a massive heart attack and had he waited a few hours longer, he would have died.

Now, Gulati is sharing his story with DailyMail.com to encourage others not to delay  seeking urgent medical attention because it could mean the difference between life and death.

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Deepak Gulati, 71, from New York City, began feeling tightness in his chest on June 18. Pictured: Gulati being examined by Dr Annapoor Kini, a cardiologist at The Mount Sinai Hospital

Deepak Gulati, 71, from New York City, began feeling tightness in his chest on June 18. Pictured: Gulati being examined by Dr Annapoor Kini, a cardiologist at The Mount Sinai Hospital

It continued over the next two days and progressed to severe pain, sweating and being unable to breathe. Pictured: Gulati being examined by Dr Annapoor Kini

It continued over the next two days and progressed to severe pain, sweating and being unable to breathe. Pictured: Gulati being examined by Dr Annapoor Kini

Deepak Gulati, 71, from New York City, began feeling tightness in his chest on June 18. It continued over the next two days and progressed to severe pain, sweating and being unable to breathe. Pictured, left and right: Gulati being examined by Dr Annapoor Kini, a cardiologist at The Mount Sinai Hospital

Gulati did not want to go to the emergency room because he was afraid of contracting coronavirus, but his wife and cardiologist finally convinced him. Pictured: Gulati (far left) with his wife (second from left) and two daughters after his heart attack

Gulati did not want to go to the emergency room because he was afraid of contracting coronavirus, but his wife and cardiologist finally convinced him. Pictured: Gulati (far left) with his wife (second from left) and two daughters after his heart attack

Gulati did not want to go to the emergency room because he was afraid of contracting coronavirus, but his wife and cardiologist finally convinced him. Pictured: Gulati (far left) with his wife (second from left) and two daughters after his heart attack

Gulati says that before this incident occurred, he had had no health issues, let alone heart troubles. 

On Thursday night, June 18, he started feeling tightness in his chest. When he still felt it the next day, his wife called her colleague at The Mount Sinai Hospital, Dr Annapoorna Kini.

Kini, who is a professor of cardiology and Interventional Director of the Structural Heart Program at Mount Sinai School of Medicine, told Gulati to come see her at 1pm on Monday, June 23.

‘Well, I didn’t make it that far,’ Gulati joked.

On Saturday morning, he was walking uphill – after going on a morning stroll – when he felt tightness in his chest and started sweating. Gulati tried to sleep it off.

‘I woke up close to 7pm.’ he said.

‘I went and sat in the living room and had a sip of water and suddenly that tightness in my chest came back, but this time, it didn’t just come back. I found I couldn’t breathe.

‘It’s like an iron fist clamping around your lungs.’

Doctors discovered Gulati was suffering from a heart attack called a STEMI, in which there is a complete blockage in an artery leading to the heart. Pictured: Kini performing a procedure on Gulati

Doctors discovered Gulati was suffering from a heart attack called a STEMI, in which there is a complete blockage in an artery leading to the heart. Pictured: Kini performing a procedure on Gulati

Doctors discovered Gulati was suffering from a heart attack called a STEMI, in which there is a complete blockage in an artery leading to the heart. Pictured: Kini performing a procedure on Gulati 

Cardiologist Dr Annapoorna Kini told Gulati that if he had waited just two more hours to go to the hospital, he would have died. Pictured: Gulati (center) with Kini (far left) and members of Mount Sinai's cardiology team

Cardiologist Dr Annapoorna Kini told Gulati that if he had waited just two more hours to go to the hospital, he would have died. Pictured: Gulati (center) with Kini (far left) and members of Mount Sinai's cardiology team

Cardiologist Dr Annapoorna Kini told Gulati that if he had waited just two more hours to go to the hospital, he would have died. Pictured: Gulati (center) with Kini (far left) and members of Mount Sinai’s cardiology team

Gulati’s wife wanted him to go to the emergency room, but he was hesitant.

‘I said: “No, that place is full of coronavirus, I don’t want to be there. It’s full of people passing coronavirus to other people,”‘ he said.

Gulati is not the only one who feels that way.

A new report from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention last week found that ER visits for heart attacks fell by nearly a quarter from pre-pandemic levels.

But scientists have warned that not seeking immediate care for severe health problems could result in hospitalization, or even death. 

Kini feels the same way.

I told him he was likely having a heart attack and “You have to go to the emergency room”,’ she told DailyMail.com. 

‘Otherwise he would be making excuses to stay home.’    

It turns out that Gulati was suffering from an ST segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI heart attack).

Also known as a ‘widow-maker heart attack,’ it’s the same type that famed actor and director Kevin Smith suffered in February 2018. 

STEMI heart attacks occur when the left anterior descending artery, which carries blood to the heart, becomes almost or completely blocked. 

Gulati had a stent placed in his heart, has no heart damage, and was told he should be back to normal in just six weeks. Pictured: Gulati (center) with his wife (left) and Kini (right)

Gulati had a stent placed in his heart, has no heart damage, and was told he should be back to normal in just six weeks. Pictured: Gulati (center) with his wife (left) and Kini (right)

Gulati had a stent placed in his heart, has no heart damage, and was told he should be back to normal in just six weeks. Pictured: Gulati (center) with his wife (left) and Kini (right)

Without emergency care, it’s almost always fatal. 

However, if medical professions are able to open up the artery within the first few hours of blockage, survival odds increase and risk of muscle damage decrease.

A 2018 study found that about 77 out of every 100,000 people suffer a STEMI heart attack.  

‘[Dr Kini] told me that if I waited two more hours, I would have been dead,’ Gulati said.

‘She should change her name to “Angel in disguise.” I can’t praise her enough.’

Within an hour of arriving at The Mount Sinai Hospital, he was having a stent inserted. 

He added that the emergency room was almost empty and that it had been split in two, one side to treat COVID-19 patients, and the other side for non-COVID patients.

Kini says that Gulati has no heart damage because he arrived at the hospital on time and, within six weeks, he should be back to normal.

She wants Americans to know that emergency rooms are safe.. 

‘I know the pandemic is still out there and that there’s a scare of a second wave coming…but all precautions are being taken in every hospital,’ Kini said.

‘If someone has any medical issue, especially relating to the heart, don’t wait at home. People need to see their regular doctor for checkups; their blood pressure may be out of control or their diabetes may be out of control.’

Gulati concurs and says being afraid of seeking urgent medical care is not worth losing your life over.

‘If you’re sitting at home and, for any reason, you start getting a cold, hard sweat like I did and you start sweating profusely and you start getting tightness in chest. go to your nearest emergency room,’ he said.

‘Because death could only be two hours away.’

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Man, 18,  reveals how loss of aunt from COVID-19 inspired him to train as 111 call-handler

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An 18-year-old has revealed how the loss of his aunt, 56, from coronavirus inspired him to train as a 111-call assessor to help the NHS at this time of crisis in Paramedics: Britain’s Lifesavers.

Tonight’s episode of the Channel 4 show follows university student Ollie, from the West Midlands, as he tries to squeeze five weeks of 111 call handler training into just a fortnight.

Explaining the personal reason why he wants to volunteer, an emotional Ollie explains: ‘Throughout my fundamental growing years I’ve always wanted to be caring and give something back.’

‘I think what happened to auntie Kate made me realise that actually, how can you be more helpful to families who are going through this?’ 

Ollie, 18, from the West Midlands, reveals how the loss of his aunt from coronavirus inspired him to train as a 111-call assessor to help the NHS at this time of crisis in tonight's episode of Channel 4's Paramedics: Britain’s Lifesavers

Ollie, 18, from the West Midlands, reveals how the loss of his aunt from coronavirus inspired him to train as a 111-call assessor to help the NHS at this time of crisis in tonight's episode of Channel 4's Paramedics: Britain’s Lifesavers

Ollie, 18, from the West Midlands, reveals how the loss of his aunt from coronavirus inspired him to train as a 111-call assessor to help the NHS at this time of crisis in tonight’s episode of Channel 4’s Paramedics: Britain’s Lifesavers

The university student says that what happened to his auntie Kate (pictured), aged 56, made him want to help others

The university student says that what happened to his auntie Kate (pictured), aged 56, made him want to help others

The university student says that what happened to his auntie Kate (pictured), aged 56, made him want to help others 

Ollie was meant to be doing his A-levels this summer, but they were cancelled due to the Covid-19 outbreak, 

‘My auntie Kate had a cold a week or so before we went into lockdown and it all got pretty serious,’ he says. 

‘She isolated at home and as the lockdown progressed she just got worse and worse. We used the 911 service to try and find out some advice and a decision was taken she needed to go into hospital. At this point, we still didn’t know she had coronavirus. 

‘We thought it was just a bad chest infection that she was quite prone to. She sort of deteriorated along that week and then she slowly passed away in early April.’

Second year student Sam (pictured, with mum Kate and Paul), 21, hits the road ready to treat patients suffering from breathing difficulties, isolation related mental health issues and patients in care homes

Second year student Sam (pictured, with mum Kate and Paul), 21, hits the road ready to treat patients suffering from breathing difficulties, isolation related mental health issues and patients in care homes

Second year student Sam (pictured, with mum Kate and Paul), 21, hits the road ready to treat patients suffering from breathing difficulties, isolation related mental health issues and patients in care homes

Sam (pictured) admits that he doesn't feel 100% safe working on the frontline - despite having full PPE

Sam (pictured) admits that he doesn't feel 100% safe working on the frontline - despite having full PPE

Sam (pictured) admits that he doesn’t feel 100% safe working on the frontline – despite having full PPE 

‘I think it’s really hit hard my mum because she just wanted to be able to give her sister a kiss good bye but of course, you’re not allowed to.’

Ollie goes on to explain that the family had the funeral this week and that it was ‘horrible’ because only ten people were allowed in.

‘There’s 13-14 of us in our immediate family, and only 10 of us were allowed in the crematorium and it was juts ten chairs stressed out and it was more than 2m apart,’ he says. ‘It’s just horrible to see your family broken up – half there and half outside.’

The programme features exclusive access to West Midlands Ambulance Service at the peak of the Covid-19 pandemic in April.       

To deploy more ambulances onto the frontline, managers took the unprecedented step of asking university student paramedics to step forward and work on an ambulance with only a single qualified paramedic by their side. 

Speaking of safety on the frontline, Sam says: 'You can't be too safe. You can't be sure. It's dangerous. It's scary'

Speaking of safety on the frontline, Sam says: 'You can't be too safe. You can't be sure. It's dangerous. It's scary'

Speaking of safety on the frontline, Sam says: ‘You can’t be too safe. You can’t be sure. It’s dangerous. It’s scary’

Sam (pictured) is one of the university student paramedics who stepped up in a bid to deploy more ambulances onto the frontline

Sam (pictured) is one of the university student paramedics who stepped up in a bid to deploy more ambulances onto the frontline

Sam (pictured) is one of the university student paramedics who stepped up in a bid to deploy more ambulances onto the frontline

Second year student Sam, 21, hits the road ready to treat patients suffering from breathing difficulties, isolation related mental health issues and patients in care homes.  

During the episode, Sam can be seen on a call out alongside experienced paramedic Rich – and talks about his feelings of being on the frontline.

‘You can be rushing to put your masks and gloves on but you need to be sure your gloves are on properly and that the mask is fully covering your nose and mouth,’ he said.

‘Not making sure your PPE is right is what causes people to contract the virus and it’s those little mistakes that you end up taking home to your family and stuff and that’s a mistake we can’t really risk.’

And when asked by the cameraman whether he feels safe when he’s out there, Sam admits: ‘I’d say it/’s 50/50. I can’t say for sure, “Yes I feel safe.” The risk is always going to be there. You can’t be too safe. You can’t be sure. It’s dangerous. It’s scary.’

Paramedics: Britain’s Lifesavers, 9pm on Channel 4

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Coronavirus can damage the heart, study confirms

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Coronavirus patients can suffer irreversible heart damage as a result of their battle with the disease, a study of hospital patients has found.

More than half of infected patients who had heart scans while in hospital with Covid-19 showed abnormal changes to their organ.

One in eight had signs of ‘severe dysfunction’ in their heart and doctors couldn’t find any other explanation except the coronavirus.

In the UK around one in four people admitted to hospital with Covid-19 die of it but even survivors may be left with long-term illness, this research suggests.

The study, done by the British Heart Foundation, adds to concerns that coronavirus can cause widespread damage to the vital organs and leaves some ‘long-haulers’ with health problems that will last for months and even years after the infection. 

Long-term effects can include coughing, shortness of breath and reduced lung capcity, and there is also evidence the virus can affect the brain and kidneys. A lung doctor who helped treat Boris Johnson said the virus is ‘this generation’s polio’.

One British Heart Foundation researcher referred to Covid-19 as a ‘multi-system disease’ that can spread all round the body.

Scientists studied echocardiogram scans from hospital patients around the world and found abnormalities that could only have been caused by Covid-19, they said (stock image of heart scan)

Scientists studied echocardiogram scans from hospital patients around the world and found abnormalities that could only have been caused by Covid-19, they said (stock image of heart scan)

Scientists studied echocardiogram scans from hospital patients around the world and found abnormalities that could only have been caused by Covid-19, they said (stock image of heart scan)

Professor Mark Dweck, who is also a cardiologist at the University of Edinburgh, said: ‘Covid-19 is a complex, multisystem disease which can have profound effects on many parts of the body, including the heart.

‘Many doctors have been hesitant to order echocardiograms for patients with Covid-19 because it’s an added procedure which involves close contact with patients.

‘Our work shows that these scans are important – they improved the treatment for a third of patients who received them.’

The study looked at 1,216 patients in hospitals in 69 countries around the world who had been given heart scans.

Fifty-five per cent of them showed signs of damaging changes to their hearts which were affecting how well they pumped blood – and most of them had had healthy hearts before.

A further 13 per cent of the patients showed severe dysfunction in their heart, which likely raised their risk of death or of having permanent illness.

UK LAUNCHES STUDY OF COVID-19’S LONG-TERM EFFECTS 

Scientists in the UK will investigate the long-term effects of Covid-19 in a scientific study which launches this month.

The Department of Health has announced that up to 10,000 people will be involved in a study to look at how people who catch the coronavirus fare long-term.

Growing evidence suggests that even people who only get mildly sick may suffer long-lasting health effects including lung damage. 

The UK’s Scientific Advisory Group for Emergencies (SAGE) has warned that Covid-19 patients could be left with ‘extreme tiredness and shortness of breath for several months’. 

The study, led by researchers and doctors in Leicester, will look at how people’s mental health is affected by illness and whether factors like sex or ethnicity affect how well someone recovers from Covid-19.

Patients in the study, which will receive £8.4million in funding, will have medical scans, blood tests and lung samples so experts can look at how they are affected.

It comes as the NHS has announced it’s launched a long-term recovery service called ‘Your Covid Recovery’, which will offer online advice to the public and more specialised physio and mental health support to some patients from this summer. 

Chief Medical Officer, Professor Chris Whitty, said: ‘As well as the immediate health impacts of the virus it is also important to look at the longer-term impacts on health, which may be significant.

‘We have rightly focused on mortality, and what the UK can do straight away to protect lives, but we should also look at how Covid-19 impacts on the health of people after they have recovered from the immediate disease.’

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Doctors and researchers in other studies have found that the virus can cause blood clots to form in the lungs and other vital organs.

Clots can be severely damaging and even fatal if they travel to their heart, brain and lungs.

Coronavirus is thought to damage the heart and circulation system by triggering harmful internal swelling, called inflammation, which puts extra strain on the body.

The study was only done on patients who had their hearts scanned, meaning it is not clear how coronavirus affects the hearts of people who aren’t critically ill.

Heart scans are only generally given to people who doctors already suspect have a heart problem, so the proportion of those with serious issues is particularly high in this group.

Professor Dweck added: ‘Damage to the heart is known to occur in severe flu, but we were surprised to see so many patients with damage to their heart with Covid-19 and so many patients with severe dysfunction. 

‘We now need to understand the exact mechanism of this damage, whether it is reversible and what the long-term consequences of Covid-19 infection are on the heart.’

Professor Dweck and his colleagues said more coronavirus patients should have their hearts scanned so doctors can pick up on problems and treat them.

Because the scans – called echocardiograms – involve physical contact with a patient they are generally not done unless doctors suspect something is wrong.

But of the patients in the study, one in three had their treatment changed because of what medics picked up on the scans.

They were given heart failure drugs, for example, or had their fluid intake controlled more strictly. These changes in treatment may have saved lives, the scientists said.

People with heart disease are at a higher risk of dying if they catch the coronavirus than other people, data has shown – and research like this may shine a light on why.

If people’s hearts are already damaged, they may have less capacity to cope with and recover from further damage that the coronavirus can cause. 

Dr Sonya Babu-Narayan, associate medical director at the BHF, added: ‘Severe Covid-19 illness can result in damage to the heart and circulatory system. 

‘We urgently need to understand more about why this is happening so we can provide appropriate care – both short and long term.

‘This global study – carried out at the height of the pandemic – shows that we must be on the lookout for heart complications in people with Covid-19 so that we can adapt their treatment, if needed.’

The long-term effects of the virus are increasingly coming to light now that the virus has been around for months and millions of people have recovered.

The UK’s Department of Health has now launched a study into how people get affected in the long run amid concerns they might suffer from breathing problems and mental health issues.

In March, one doctor who helped treat Prime Minister Boris Johnson when he was intensive care with the virus, likened the illness to polio.

Professor Nicholas Hart, a lung doctor at St Thomas’ Hospital, said on Twitter: ‘Covid-19 is this generation’s polio. Patients have mild, moderate and severe illness.

‘Large numbers of patients will have physical, cognitive and psychological disability post critical illness that will require long-term management.

‘We must plan ahead.’

The BHF study was published in the European Heart Journal – Cardiovascular Imaging

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DR ELLIE CANNON: Just what is a healthy level of cholesterol these days?  

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I read in The Mail on Sunday that having very high HDL cholesterol is a worry, especially for middle-aged women like me.

My total cholesterol is 5.3 – and I have an HDL of 2.3. The ratio calculator online tells me this is healthy, but now I read that 2.3 is very high.

Also, could my high HDL be the reason for having a lipoma, and should I have it removed?

Our understanding about cholesterol has evolved over the past 20 years. Once, we were just concerned with total cholesterol, but now we are focused much more on sub-types of cholesterol, and how they contribute to increased risk of a heart attack.

Risk is a nuanced thing and many factors are at play – blood pressure, whether you’re overweight or smoke, your age and family history, as well as other illnesses you may suffer from, all contribute. Cholesterol isn’t the be-all-and-end-all but if you do have high overall cholesterol, and also raised levels of a sub-type called LDL cholesterol, sometimes called ‘bad’ cholesterol, you might be advised to take statins, which will lower it. HDL cholesterol was once thought to protect the heart, which is why it’s often called ‘good cholesterol’. And although it still does, it seems very high levels, above 1.4, are associated with a raised heart-attack risk.

Our understanding about cholesterol has evolved over the past 20 years. Once, we were just concerned with total cholesterol, but now we are focused much more on sub-types of cholesterol, and how they contribute to increased risk of a heart attack

Our understanding about cholesterol has evolved over the past 20 years. Once, we were just concerned with total cholesterol, but now we are focused much more on sub-types of cholesterol, and how they contribute to increased risk of a heart attack

Our understanding about cholesterol has evolved over the past 20 years. Once, we were just concerned with total cholesterol, but now we are focused much more on sub-types of cholesterol, and how they contribute to increased risk of a heart attack

This is based on new research and it’s not fully understood, but it is worth talking to your GP, showing them the article you mention. They might want to recalculate your risk, based on the new evidence.

Medication can’t lower HDL but there may be other steps worth taking, such as statins to lower LDL, tackling blood pressure, and lifestyle changes.

A lipoma is a benign, soft lump on the skin composed of fat – and this is unrelated to cholesterol. They are usually harmless, so doctors do not advise removing them unless they are unsightly or causing pain.

Life has left me utterly miserable. My GP suggested antidepressants but I don’t want to take them. Can you help?

It is not surprising that any of us would be feeling miserable right now. Not only has day-to-day life changed immeasurably, but the immense trauma, loss and uncertainty we have experienced nationally and individually since the start of the pandemic has, understandably, left huge emotional toll.

   

More from Dr Ellie Cannon for The Mail on Sunday…

Doctors are increasingly concerned about rising numbers of patients with symptoms of anxiety and depression – and those who actually make it as far as calling a doctor are probably just the tip of the iceberg.

It is vital that anyone feeling persistently low gets a proper assessment, so a diagnosis can be made. Depression is different to sadness or misery, and involves symptoms of mood or sadness but also changes in appetite, sleep, and thoughts. These things have an impact on daily life, work and relationships.

A GP can carry out initial consultation via video calls or phone.

Or you can cut out the middle man and refer yourself directly to a specialist in your area who offers psychological therapies.

If you search online for ‘IAPT services’ – IAPT stands for improving access to psychological therapies – the top hit should be the nhs.uk web page that allows you to refer.

Mental health treatment can involve medicine, but also psychotherapy and lifestyle changes. If medicine is not a choice for you, look at the two other options.

Free, NHS online therapy sessions for many areas of the country are available via iesohealth.com.

Doctors are increasingly concerned about rising numbers of patients with symptoms of anxiety and depression

Doctors are increasingly concerned about rising numbers of patients with symptoms of anxiety and depression

Doctors are increasingly concerned about rising numbers of patients with symptoms of anxiety and depression

There are some incredibly helpful mental health apps that I routinely recommend to patients. These are available to look at on the NHS apps library and are targeted to specific issues – for example Big White Wall for stress and anxiety, or Silvercloud which is an eight-week course for depression. Lifestyle measures sound simple but shouldn’t be underestimated. Walking daily, pushing yourself to exercise or finding a hobby, yoga or just conversations with a friend can have a tremendous impact on mood and feelings, even when the mental health problem is quite significant.

I am 76, and relatively fit, and until February was going to the gym up to three times a week. But then my hip starting hurting. A lot. An X-ray showed nothing wrong. What could it be?

Anyone aged over 76 will have some arthritis in the hips and knees, which may or may not show up on an X-ray. Other common hip pain comes from bursitis which is swelling from the fluid around the hip – known as trochanteric bursitis.

Your GP can arrange access to physiotherapy which is helpful for bursitis and can be sought at the moment remotely. Bursitis of the hip can be part of greater trochanteric pain syndrome, when the top of the thigh bone becomes irritated.

Avoid sitting cross-legged and do not sleep on the affected side, and it might improve matters.

I told Boris Johnson to be a mask model… now he is

I was on the news again last week talking about my favourite subject, masks – and the fact that leading politicians, despite telling us we should wear them, seem not to want to practise what they preach. 

Boris Johnson, Matt Hancock and Rishi Sunak had all been seen over the past fortnight out and about meeting the public, sometimes in close contact, not once wearing a mask. It wasn’t a good look, I argued. They need to be role models, as mask-wearing is a huge culture change for us Britons. Well, it seemed Boris was listening as on Friday he appeared, right, for the first time wearing a face covering. I hope the Cabinet follow his lead.

In other news, people have been asking where I get my cloth face coverings. They’re from the charity Binti, at bintiperiod.org. I might buy one for Boris.

Boris Johnson, Matt Hancock and Rishi Sunak had all been seen over the past fortnight out and about meeting the public, sometimes in close contact, not once wearing a mask. It wasn’t a good look, I argued, but now the PM has a been spotted with a mask

Boris Johnson, Matt Hancock and Rishi Sunak had all been seen over the past fortnight out and about meeting the public, sometimes in close contact, not once wearing a mask. It wasn’t a good look, I argued, but now the PM has a been spotted with a mask

Boris Johnson, Matt Hancock and Rishi Sunak had all been seen over the past fortnight out and about meeting the public, sometimes in close contact, not once wearing a mask. It wasn’t a good look, I argued, but now the PM has a been spotted with a mask

Has that mole changed? Get it checked now

I’ve been asked whether skin clinics are closed, by people worried about changes to a mole and have stressed that they should make a GP appointment without delay.

We are working differently, but are very much open, as are dermatology units. Most GP appointments will start on the phone and then, for a skin problem, we will either want to see photos or use a video consultation. If your GP is concerned, you can be referred. Many dermatology clinics are open for face- to-face appointments but it may be possible to have a more than adequate consultation remotely.

Signs of melanoma skin cancer include changes in shape, size or texture of a mole. One that looks very different to others around it can be a concern.

You are also more at risk over the age of 65, if you have fair skin and freckles, or if you have a member of your family with melanoma.

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