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17,000 elderly people were forced to sell home to pay for care costs in just one year

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17000 elderly people were forced to sell home to pay for care costs in just one year

More than 17,000 pensioners were forced to sell their homes to pay for social care last year, research by Money Mail reveals.

The shocking figure means that 330 elderly residents each week are taking the desperate step despite Boris Johnson’s promise to fix the social care funding crisis.

The calculations reveal the scale of the emergency, showing that the numbers forced to sell their hard-won homes have soared 45 per cent since 2000.

The shocking figure means that 330 elderly residents each week are taking the desperate step despite Boris Johnson¿s promise to fix the social care funding crisis [File photo]

The shocking figure means that 330 elderly residents each week are taking the desperate step despite Boris Johnson¿s promise to fix the social care funding crisis [File photo]

The shocking figure means that 330 elderly residents each week are taking the desperate step despite Boris Johnson’s promise to fix the social care funding crisis [File photo]

Last night campaigners called for urgent action and demanded a ‘national fund’ to pay for social care.

Morgan Vine, of charity Independent Age, said: ‘The pandemic is not a reason not to act – it is the reason why action has never been more vital.’

On his first day in No 10 in July 2019, Mr Johnson vowed to make social care a priority and end the crisis ‘once and for all’.

On his first day in No 10 in July 2019, Mr Johnson vowed to make social care a priority and end the crisis ¿once and for all¿. But he has since admitted action would be delayed and the coronavirus crisis has made immediate reform a remote possibility

On his first day in No 10 in July 2019, Mr Johnson vowed to make social care a priority and end the crisis ¿once and for all¿. But he has since admitted action would be delayed and the coronavirus crisis has made immediate reform a remote possibility

On his first day in No 10 in July 2019, Mr Johnson vowed to make social care a priority and end the crisis ‘once and for all’. But he has since admitted action would be delayed and the coronavirus crisis has made immediate reform a remote possibility

But he has since admitted action would be delayed and the coronavirus crisis has made immediate reform a remote possibility.

The cost of residential care has risen dramatically and now stands at more than £33,000 a year.

Anyone with more than £23,250 in funds, including their house value, is denied state help, leaving thousands having to sell their homes to pay soaring care bills.

The Daily Mail has campaigned to end this injustice for the families of those with dementia as well as other patients.

MoneyMail’s calculations, verified by Independent Age, are based on Department of Health data indicating that 30 per cent of those who pay for their residential care have to sell their homes.

The total was produced by comparing the numbers of self-funders in care provided by analysts Laing Buisson.

The research assumes the average stay is two-and-a-half years, as concluded in a study by the Personal Social Services Research Unit and Bupa.

It means around 350,000 elderly people are estimated to have sold their homes to pay for residential care since 1999.

Caroline Abrahams, director at charity Age UK, said: ‘When the threat from coronavirus finally recedes, Age UK will certainly be holding the Government to account on its promise to fix social care. The obvious solution is for us all to pay into a national fund, like we do with the NHS.’

She added: ‘Most people dread the idea of having to sell the family home to pay their care bills and the fact that this is the reality for substantial numbers is very sad.’

Mr Vine, head of policy at Independent Age, said: ‘These latest figures are a timely reminder of the need to fix the funding crisis that has plagued the social care system for decades, long before Covid-19.

Our family house since 1935 at risk

Lynne Holmes had hoped to honour one of her father Harry Garrod’s last wishes and pass their family home on to the next generation.

The three-bedroom house in Beckenham, south London, has belonged to them since 1935. 

Mrs Holmes, 63, recalls tales of how it sheltered her father and grandparents during the Second World War.

Her father, a former post office worker, died in November aged 92 and her mother Doris, 90, has dementia and is in a £1,100-a-week care home.

But their savings have run dry and they do not qualify for state support, leaving Mrs Holmes and her two siblings facing the heartbreak of having to sell the house.

‘My dad had been in that home since he was eight,’ she said. ‘We’ve had five generations enjoy family gatherings there.’

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‘When taking office, the Prime Minister promised to solve the crisis, including preventing people from having to sell their homes to pay for care.

‘Although he couldn’t have predicted the challenges we now face, we can all predict the long-term consequences of failing to keep his promise.’

Liz Kendall, Labour’s social care spokesman, said: ‘The Prime Minister said, on the steps to Downing Street, that he has a plan to fix the crisis in social care and that no one should have to sell their homes to pay for their care.

‘Yet we have seen neither sight nor sound of any long-term plan for reform.

‘This must be an absolute top priority for the Government. People who have worked hard and saved all their life have seen their savings wiped out.’

A Department of Health and Social Care spokesman said: ‘We have committed to end the injustice that some people have to sell their homes to finance care whilst others don’t. We know there is a need for a long-term solution and are looking at proposals.’

This post first appeared on dailymail.co.uk

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Disneyland Paris is closing TODAY as a result of France’s national lockdown

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disneyland paris is closing today as a result of frances national lockdown

Disneyland Paris will shut at the end of the day due to France‘s national lockdown, it has been announced. 

The park said that the decision had been made to adhere to government guidelines, but added that it hoped to be open for the festive season.

Disney said: ‘In line with the latest direction from the French authorities, Disneyland Paris will be closing end of day on October 29.  

Disneyland Paris will shut at the end of the day due to France 's national lockdown, it has been announced

Disneyland Paris will shut at the end of the day due to France 's national lockdown, it has been announced

Disneyland Paris will shut at the end of the day due to France ‘s national lockdown, it has been announced

Disneyland Paris had invested heavily in making the park Covid-secure

Disneyland Paris had invested heavily in making the park Covid-secure

Disneyland Paris had invested heavily in making the park Covid-secure 

 ‘In anticipation of celebrating the Christmas holiday season we will be taking reservations from December 19 – January 3 and hope to be open based on prevailing conditions and government guidance at that time. 

‘Disneyland Paris will be closed from January 4 through February 12. Please check back on the website for regular updates. If you have a booking with us during the above-mentioned periods, please check here for our latest commercial conditions.

‘We thank you for your continued loyalty and understanding during this difficult period.’

Earlier in the year, MailOnline Travel had a sneak peek of the park before it reopened on July 15, following France’s first lockdown.

Twelve miles of safety signage, about two miles of plexiglass and 2,000 hand-sanitising stations had been installed. 

Guests have been having socially distanced selfies with characters via ‘selfie spots’.  

Earlier in the year MailOnline Travel had a sneak peek of the park before it reopened on July 15 following France's earlier lockdown

Earlier in the year MailOnline Travel had a sneak peek of the park before it reopened on July 15 following France's earlier lockdown

Earlier in the year MailOnline Travel had a sneak peek of the park before it reopened on July 15 following France’s earlier lockdown 

It comes as Emmanuel Macron’s top scientific adviser said that his target of slashing France’s coronavirus infections to 5,000 a day is impossible to achieve in the month-long lockdown that was announced last night.

Professor Jean-Francois Delfraissy said France would ‘need more time’ to bring infections down from their current rate of nearly 40,000 a day, meaning the lockdown may have to continue beyond December 1.

‘By December 1, we will not be at 5,000 infections per day. I can tell that to you straight away today,’ the head of the government’s scientific advisory council said.

A masked cast member looks on during a press tour earlier this year

A masked cast member looks on during a press tour earlier this year

A masked cast member looks on during a press tour earlier this year

French schools will stay open but the stay-at-home measures for adults are as strict as in the spring, with written paperwork needed to go outside for shopping, medical care or one hour a day of exercise.     

Macron said a curfew in Paris and other major cities had failed to stem the tide of infections, claiming that 400,000 people would die of Covid-19 if drastic action were not taken. 

‘Our target is simple: sharply reducing infections from 40,000 a day to 5,000 and slowing the pace of admissions to hospital and intensive care,’ he said. 

Hospitals are already scrambling for intensive care beds and ‘no matter what we do, nearly 9,000 people will be in intensive care by mid-November,’ he said. 

The French leader called the new restrictions ‘heartbreaking’ but said he ‘could never stand by and see hundreds of thousands of our citizens die’.  

Bars, shops and restaurants are closing entirely again while France’s government is urging businesses to have employees work from home ‘five days a week’.  

Macron, 42, said some shops could be allowed to open in mid-November if the situation improves – but his scientific adviser’s warning raises the prospect of lockdown measures continuing up to Christmas.   

France’s current average is 39,700 cases per day, a figure which has more than doubled from 19,700 only a fortnight ago, with daily deaths also surging to nearly 250 per day.     

This post first appeared on dailymail.co.uk

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UK weather: Tail end of Hurricane Zeta will dump up to a foot of rain on Britain

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uk weather tail end of hurricane zeta will dump up to a foot of rain on britain

Remnants of a tropical hurricane barrelling over the Atlantic Ocean are set to drench parts of Britain with nearly a foot of rain in the next few days – prompting a ‘danger to life’ flood warning. 

Met Office warnings have been issued from today until Sunday, covering Wales and North West England, with the worst-affected areas getting up to 250mm (10in) of rain between today and Saturday – which is also Halloween.

Further ‘significant’ rainfall is expected on Sunday, following a month which has already seen the UK’s wettest day since records began – when an average of 31.7mm (1.25in) of rain fell across the country on October 3. 

The deluge is coming from the remains of Hurricane Zeta, which is on its way north-east from the Gulf of Mexico. Flooding could potentially affect rivers within Wales, plus the Wye and Severn including downstream in England.

The conditions could see Wales and Cumbria break records for October rainfall – and the Met Office said homes and businesses could be flooded, while ‘fast flowing or deep floodwater is possible, causing a danger to life’.  

Saltburn Pier reflects off wet sand during sunrise today at Saltburn-by-the-Sea in Redcar and Cleveland, North Yorkshire

Saltburn Pier reflects off wet sand during sunrise today at Saltburn-by-the-Sea in Redcar and Cleveland, North Yorkshire

Saltburn Pier reflects off wet sand during sunrise today at Saltburn-by-the-Sea in Redcar and Cleveland, North Yorkshire

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34992508 8892165 image a 52 1603966057115

A calm and tranquil start to the day as paddleboarders enjoy a glide along the waters of the North Sea at Cullercoats today

A calm and tranquil start to the day as paddleboarders enjoy a glide along the waters of the North Sea at Cullercoats today

A calm and tranquil start to the day as paddleboarders enjoy a glide along the waters of the North Sea at Cullercoats today

Hurricane Zeta is barrelling over the Atlantic Ocean from the US and its remnants are set to drench parts of Britain

Hurricane Zeta is barrelling over the Atlantic Ocean from the US and its remnants are set to drench parts of Britain

Hurricane Zeta is barrelling over the Atlantic Ocean from the US and its remnants are set to drench parts of Britain

Met Office spokesman John Griffiths said: ‘The rain is going to affect areas of the country which were hit by flooding in February, some of which are still recovering.’

The first weather warning lasts between 9am today and the end of tomorrow, for heavy rain and gales. The worst areas on Wales and Cumbria are set to receive 100mm (4in) to 150mm (6in) of rain.

Elsewhere in the warning area high ground could receive 50mm (2in) to 80mm (3.2in), and 30mm (1.2in) to 40mm (1.6ins) could fall at lower levels.

A second warning lasts through Saturday, bringing up to another 100mm (4in) over the worst-affected hills and mountains, 60mm (2.4in) elsewhere on high ground and 25mm (1in) elsewhere. 

Today's weather

Today's weather

Today's weather

Today's weather

Heavy rainfall is expected to fall in Wales and North West England today, where weather warnings have been imposed (above)

Today's predicted rainfall

Today's predicted rainfall

Tomorrow's predicted rainfall

Tomorrow's predicted rainfall

Predicted rainfall maps for today (left) and tomorrow (right) show how downpours will be heaviest in western areas

Saturday's forecast

Saturday's forecast

Sunday's forecast

Sunday's forecast

The weekend is also expected to be a washout for many areas of Britain with further heavy rain especially in the West

The last warning covers through most of Sunday, when ‘prolonged spells of heavy rain are likely across Wales and northwest England’.

Fiery sunrise is a red alert before heavy rain arrives

It was a truly spectacular sunrise to warm the soul of anyone lucky enough to see it.

But the old adage ‘red sky in the morning, shepherd’s warning’ proved all too true as heavy rain soon spoiled the stunning view over Kilbarchan, Renfrewshire.

According to the Met Office, a red sunrise happens after areas of high pressure – and the good weather – have moved on towards the East.

Often, they mean a low-pressure front is following on behind – along with the wind and rain. So for shepherds and anyone else planning to spend time outdoors, they really are a red alert.

The sun rises over Kilbarchan in Renfrewshire yesterday morning before heavy rain soon spoiled the stunning view

The sun rises over Kilbarchan in Renfrewshire yesterday morning before heavy rain soon spoiled the stunning view

The sun rises over Kilbarchan in Renfrewshire yesterday morning before heavy rain soon spoiled the stunning view

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The Met Office said: ‘Homes and businesses could be flooded, causing damage to some buildings; fast flowing or deep floodwater is possible, causing a danger to life. Some communities may be cut off by flooded roads.’

Forecasters also warn of possible power cuts and transport delays and disruption. The problems could be exacerbated by fallen leaves blocking drains and gullies.

Heavy rain is also expected to fall elsewhere across the country today, Saturday and Sunday. The only respite is due to be tomorrow, when eastern, central and southern areas are set to be mostly dry and bright. 

According to Met Office figures, the wettest October on record for the entire country was 1903, when 225.9mm (8.9in) fell on average across the UK, 195.4mm (7.7in) in England and 321.5mm (12.7in) in Wales.

Cumbria’s wettest October was 1967, when 358mm (14.1in) fell. The county has already received 162mm (6.4in) so far this month.

Figures for October 1 to 27 this year show an average of 147.6mm (5.8in) of rain across the UK, 158.8mm (6.25in) in Wales and 121mm (4.7in) in England. 

Road operator Bear Scotland had already announced that the A83 at the Rest and be Thankful in Argyll – hit by a landslide in August – will remain closed overnight until late November.

This is because of fears of the risk of further movement in the mountain above the road. A diversionary route will be available from 6pm each night via the Old Military Road.

This post first appeared on dailymail.co.uk

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Puppy is born with GREEN fur in the Philippines and is named Wasabi

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puppy is born with green fur in the philippines and is named wasabi

A puppy has been born with green fur in the Philippines – two weeks after a similarly-coloured pooch named ‘Pistachio’ was born on an Italian farm.

Chona Lacsamana woke up to find her dog Mocha sleeping with a bundle of newborn pups inside their house in La Union province on 25 October.

The puppies were coloured black, white, brown, and Chona spotted an exceptional one which appeared to be light green.

Chona thought the puppy, which she has now named Wasabi, was stained from blood during birthing but then inspected the pooch to confirm its colour. 

The newborn puppy, now named Wasabi, was born in the Philippines earlier this month with a light-green coat despite its brothers and sisters being black, white, brown and spotted

The newborn puppy, now named Wasabi, was born in the Philippines earlier this month with a light-green coat despite its brothers and sisters being black, white, brown and spotted

The newborn puppy, now named Wasabi, was born in the Philippines earlier this month with a light-green coat despite its brothers and sisters being black, white, brown and spotted

Wasabi clambers to feed from her mother in La Union province in the Philippines. Chona Lacsamana, who owns the dog and her puppies, said she discovered the litter next to the mother on 25 October

Wasabi clambers to feed from her mother in La Union province in the Philippines. Chona Lacsamana, who owns the dog and her puppies, said she discovered the litter next to the mother on 25 October

Wasabi clambers to feed from her mother in La Union province in the Philippines. Chona Lacsamana, who owns the dog and her puppies, said she discovered the litter next to the mother on 25 October 

The puppies will not be put up for adoption because they are the mother’s first babies, Chona said.  

Chona added: ‘We will take care of the dog together with its siblings and mother. They are all special for us.’

The family named the dog ‘Wasabi’ after the green spicy condiment from Japan.

Dogs born with green fur are extremely rare and could only happen after the foetus comes in contact with a green pigment called ‘biliverdin’ while inside the womb. 

Wasabi clambers around his brothers and sisters. Chona said the puppies would not be put up for adoption as they are the mother's first babies

Wasabi clambers around his brothers and sisters. Chona said the puppies would not be put up for adoption as they are the mother's first babies

Wasabi clambers around his brothers and sisters. Chona said the puppies would not be put up for adoption as they are the mother’s first babies 

Despite their rarity, another puppy with a similar green coat was born on a farm in Sardinia just a few days before Wasabi was delivered.   

Italian farmer Cristian Mallocci could not believe his eyes when one of his eight dogs gave birth to the green-tinted puppy on the Mediterranean island.

The tiny dog, which he named Pistachio, was part of a five-strong litter. 

The rest of his siblings, as well as the puppies’ cross-breed mother, all have a white coat.  

The green puppy phenomenon

Puppies with green fur are an incredibly rare occurrence (Pistachio pictured)

Puppies with green fur are an incredibly rare occurrence (Pistachio pictured)

 Puppies with green fur are an incredibly rare occurrence (Pistachio pictured)

Puppies with green fur are an incredibly rare occurrence.

The tinting comes from a bile pigment called biliverdin which is found in the placenta of dogs.

Biliverdin dislodges as the puppy is born and mixes with the amniotic fluid which surrounds puppies in their mother’s womb.

If the levels of biliverdin are uncommonly high as it mixes with the fluid, it can stain the puppy’s coat. 

There are no known health risks involved with the phenomenon and the colour usually corrects itself within weeks of birth.

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This post first appeared on dailymail.co.uk

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