Connect with us

Latest Stories

Angela Merkel warns Germany is heading for ‘disaster’ as coronavirus hits new daily highs in Europe

Published

on

angela merkel warns germany is heading for disaster as coronavirus hits new daily highs in europe

Angela Merkel has warned Germany is heading for ‘disaster’ after regional leaders refused to sign off on her tough new coronavirus measures amid surging cases in Europe.

Coronavirus deaths almost doubled today in Italy and at least nine countries on the continent saw their highest ever daily infection tallies on Thursday.

Merkel lost her temper with state leaders at late-night talks on Wednesday, telling them: ‘What we’ve agreed is not enough to ward off disaster.’

It came after they agreed to restrictions including an 11pm curfew for bars and restaurants, 10 person limits and compulsory use of masks in busy outdoor areas. 

It comes as  Bosnia and Herzegovina, Croatia, Czech Republic, Germany, Italy, Poland, Slovakia, Slovenia and Switzerland recorded their highest ever daily case tallies on Thursday. 

Angela Merkel has announced new curbs on places where infections are above 35 per 100,000, and tightened rules in places above 50 infections per 100,000. But she lost her temper with state leaders on Wednesday night after they refused to back even tougher measures. 'What we’ve agreed is not enough to ward off disaster,' the Chancellor told them

Angela Merkel has announced new curbs on places where infections are above 35 per 100,000, and tightened rules in places above 50 infections per 100,000. But she lost her temper with state leaders on Wednesday night after they refused to back even tougher measures. 'What we’ve agreed is not enough to ward off disaster,' the Chancellor told them

Angela Merkel has announced new curbs on places where infections are above 35 per 100,000, and tightened rules in places above 50 infections per 100,000. But she lost her temper with state leaders on Wednesday night after they refused to back even tougher measures. ‘What we’ve agreed is not enough to ward off disaster,’ the Chancellor told them

34417254 8842493 image a 1 1602744526067

34417254 8842493 image a 1 1602744526067

 

34417256 8842493 image a 2 1602744530378

34417256 8842493 image a 2 1602744530378

 

Bosnia and Herzegovina, Croatia, Czech Republic, Germany, Italy, Poland, Slovakia, Slovenia and Switzerland recorded their highest ever daily infection tallies on Thursday

Bosnia and Herzegovina, Croatia, Czech Republic, Germany, Italy, Poland, Slovakia, Slovenia and Switzerland recorded their highest ever daily infection tallies on Thursday

Bosnia and Herzegovina, Croatia, Czech Republic, Germany, Italy, Poland, Slovakia, Slovenia and Switzerland recorded their highest ever daily infection tallies on Thursday

Deaths from the virus have also begun rising, though are still far below their first-wave peak as better testing uncovers more mild cases, and better treatment improves survival rates

Deaths from the virus have also begun rising, though are still far below their first-wave peak as better testing uncovers more mild cases, and better treatment improves survival rates

Deaths from the virus have also begun rising, though are still far below their first-wave peak as better testing uncovers more mild cases, and better treatment improves survival rates

Coronavirus cases have been rising across Europe and are now above the first-wave peak in most countries. The Netherlands and Czech Republic have emerged as the continent's new infection hotspots, with Germany, Italy, and lockdown-free Sweden faring best

Coronavirus cases have been rising across Europe and are now above the first-wave peak in most countries. The Netherlands and Czech Republic have emerged as the continent's new infection hotspots, with Germany, Italy, and lockdown-free Sweden faring best

Coronavirus cases have been rising across Europe and are now above the first-wave peak in most countries. The Netherlands and Czech Republic have emerged as the continent’s new infection hotspots, with Germany, Italy, and lockdown-free Sweden faring best

Germany's main index, the DAX, dipped well below two percent on Thursday

Germany's main index, the DAX, dipped well below two percent on Thursday

Germany’s main index, the DAX, dipped well below two percent on Thursday

Paris' CAC 40 was rocked by the developments on the continent today

Paris' CAC 40 was rocked by the developments on the continent today

Paris’ CAC 40 was rocked by the developments on the continent today

London's FTSE 100 Index took a similar blow on Thursday amid rising coronavirus infections

London's FTSE 100 Index took a similar blow on Thursday amid rising coronavirus infections

London’s FTSE 100 Index took a similar blow on Thursday amid rising coronavirus infections

Increased testing capacities mean that it is impossible to compare these figures to the first wave in the spring but the continent is experiencing increased hospitalisations and deaths. 

Italy recorded another 83 deaths, a rise of almost double the 43 fatalities on Wednesday, though still far fewer than at the height of the pandemic when a daily peak of more than 900 fatalities was reached.

The European markets took a hit, dipping by more than two percent, as fears grew over the impacts of further lockdown restrictions.  

Germany, which logged a record of 6,638 cases, reported 33 new deaths on Thursday which is triple the figure recorded a week ago, though still less than its European neighbours.

But Merkel said: ‘If you ask me what it is that worries me, it’s the exponential rate of increase. We have to stop that. Otherwise this won’t end well.’ 

She noted that neighbouring European countries were having to take ‘very drastic measures.’ 

France has reported more than 100 deaths per day on average this week, the UK 110, and Spain 160.     

This week has seen the Netherlands close bars and restaurants, and the Czech Republic shut down schools.

The Czech Health Ministry confirmed more than 9,500 new virus cases on Wednesday, over 900 more than the days-old previous record.

The government announced Thursday that the military will set up a virus hospital at Prague’s exhibition centre.

The staff of civil protection prepare the beds for the field hospital for possible COVID-19 patients in Turin, Italy, on Thursday

The staff of civil protection prepare the beds for the field hospital for possible COVID-19 patients in Turin, Italy, on Thursday

The staff of civil protection prepare the beds for the field hospital for possible COVID-19 patients in Turin, Italy, on Thursday

34443496 8844857 image a 18 1602787281034

34443496 8844857 image a 18 1602787281034

34443494 8844857 image a 17 1602787276400

34443494 8844857 image a 17 1602787276400

The Czech Republic has the highest infection rates in Europe, with comparable figures in the worst-hit regions of Britain, France and Spain

The Czech Republic has the highest infection rates in Europe, with comparable figures in the worst-hit regions of Britain, France and Spain

The Czech Republic has the highest infection rates in Europe, with comparable figures in the worst-hit regions of Britain, France and Spain 

‘We have to build extra capacity as soon as possible,’ Czech Prime Minister Andrej Babis said. ‘We have no time. The prognosis is not good.’

The governor of the German state of Bavaria said his region has received a request to treat Czech COVID-19 patients.

In France, which reported over 22,000 new infections Wednesday, President Emmanuel Macron put 18 million residents in nine regions, including Paris, under a 9pm curfew starting Saturday.

France will deploy 12,000 police officers to enforce the curfew and will spend an additional 1 billion euros ($1.2 billion) to help businesses hit by the new restrictions.

‘Our compatriots thought this health crisis was behind us,’ Prime Minister Jean Castex said. ‘But we can’t live normally again as long as the virus is here.’

Daily cases in the Czech Republic reached a record 9,544 today after the country's relative success in the spring gave way to a massive second wave in the autumn

Daily cases in the Czech Republic reached a record 9,544 today after the country's relative success in the spring gave way to a massive second wave in the autumn

Daily cases in the Czech Republic reached a record 9,544 today after the country’s relative success in the spring gave way to a massive second wave in the autumn 

The Czech Republic recorded 66 new deaths today, and unlike in most of Western Europe the daily death rate is higher than during the first wave of the pandemic

The Czech Republic recorded 66 new deaths today, and unlike in most of Western Europe the daily death rate is higher than during the first wave of the pandemic

The Czech Republic recorded 66 new deaths today, and unlike in most of Western Europe the daily death rate is higher than during the first wave of the pandemic 

Just as Macron’s government tackles the resurgence of infections, French police on Thursday searched the homes of a former prime minister, the current and former health ministers and other top officials in an investigation into the government’s pandemic response.

It was triggered by dozens of complaints over recent months, particularly over shortages of masks and other equipment.

Aurelien Rousseau, director of the Paris region’s public health agency, said nearly half of its intensive care beds are now occupied by coronavirus patients, with other hospital beds filling rapidly too.

‘It’s a kind of spring tide that affects everybody simultaneously,’ Rousseau said. ‘We had a blind spot in our tracking policies. It was the private sphere, festive events.’ 

Poland registered a record of nearly 9,000 new cases on Thursday. Masks have been required outdoors since Saturday and strict limits have been imposed on the size of gatherings. 

Portugal moved to restrict social gatherings to a maximum of five people, while preparing to make masks mandatory outdoors and to impose fines on those disregarding the rules.

Even Sweden, which has chosen a much-debated approach of keeping large parts of society open, raised the prospect of tougher restrictions.

‘Too many don’t follow the rules,’ Prime Minister Stefan Lofven said. ‘If there is no correction here, we must take sharper measures.’ He didn’t elaborate.

In Germany, Bavaria’s outspoken governor, Markus Soeder, hammered home the importance of taking action now, arguing that ‘everything that comes later will cost more.’

‘I’ll even go so far as to say that Europe’s prosperity is at stake,’ he said. 

This post first appeared on dailymail.co.uk

Continue Reading
Advertisement
Click to comment

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Latest Stories

Finnair is selling business class meals in a local supermarket

Published

on

By

finnair is selling business class meals in a local supermarket

Finland’s national carrier, Finnair, has started selling its business class meals in a supermarket to prevent job cuts at its catering unit due to Covid-19.

The airplane meals have quickly turned into a hit, Finnair said, with 1,600 meals sold within days at the supermarket, which is located near Finnair’s main hub – Helsinki Airport. It plans to sell in more outlets.

‘There are redundancies and layoffs going on already at Finnair and we are trying our best to find new innovative ways,’ head of Finnair Kitchen Marika Nieminen told Reuters.

Finnair has started selling its business class meals in a supermarket to prevent job cuts at its catering unit due to Covid-19. Pictured is the carrot and cheese mousse starter (€5.90) and smoked char main €12.90

Finnair has started selling its business class meals in a supermarket to prevent job cuts at its catering unit due to Covid-19. Pictured is the carrot and cheese mousse starter (€5.90) and smoked char main €12.90

Finnair has started selling its business class meals in a supermarket to prevent job cuts at its catering unit due to Covid-19. Pictured is the carrot and cheese mousse starter (€5.90) and smoked char main €12.90

The meals are currently being sold at the K-Citymarket Tammisto in the city of Vantaa. 

For €5.90 (£5.36/$6.97) customers can buy the roasted carrot and blue cheese mousse with hazelnuts starter. 

There are two main dishes on offer, a smoked char with chanterelle risotto and beef with teriyaki-radish sauce, spring onion and rice. Both are €12.90 (£11.71/$15.24). 

The two main course options are available throughout the week from Monday to Sunday, with the appetiser available from Friday to Sunday. The menu will change every two weeks. 

‘We have had very much positive feedback from our customers and this product has become one of the best-selling products in our store,’ Kimmo Sivonen, a shopkeeper at the supermarket said. 

While Mika, a customer at the store, added: ‘In this desperate remote work environment this is a small, nice taste of normal life.’  

Finnair says it plans to introduce new dishes, including reindeer meat from Finnish Lapland and Japanese-style pork shoulder, for supermarkets. 

Finnair Kitchen head of product development, Juha Stenholm, said the food’s high quality justified the relatively high price for a packed takeaway meal.

Finnair, Finland's national carrier, said last Tuesday it would cut around 700 jobs by March 2021

Finnair, Finland's national carrier, said last Tuesday it would cut around 700 jobs by March 2021

Finnair, Finland’s national carrier, said last Tuesday it would cut around 700 jobs by March 2021

‘Our unit is focusing on business class food so … premium raw materials,’ he said. 

In 2017, the airline stopped outsourcing its catering services by buying LSG Sky Chefs, a company that operated at Finland’s main airport, from a Lufthansa subsidiary and renamed it Finnair Kitchen.

A year later, Finnair Kitchen produced some 12,000 meals a day, but the numbers collapsed when the Covid-19 pandemic hit air travel.

Finnair said last Tuesday it would cut around 700 jobs by March 2021. 

This post first appeared on dailymail.co.uk

Continue Reading

Latest Stories

Coronavirus UK: Student fined £6,600 for failing to quarantine

Published

on

By

coronavirus uk student fined 6600 for failing to quarantine

A student has been fined £6,600 after being caught breaching self-isolation rules by posting a picture of herself eating out on Instagram. 

Carys Ann Ingram, 22, failed to quarantine on arrival to Jersey from Manchester, visiting a restaurant, a friend’s house, and shopping, a court heard.

She was seen in the seafront area of First Tower of the island and then at El Tico restaurant in St Ouen’s Bay, where she shared a pictured to her social media.

Ingram flew into Jersey on a flight from Manchester to visit family on October 12 and failed to isolate until she had received a second negative test, which was due to be taken on day five.

Carys Ann Ingram, 22, failed to quarantine on arrival to Jersey from Manchester, visiting a restaurant, a friend's house, and shopping, a court heard

Carys Ann Ingram, 22, failed to quarantine on arrival to Jersey from Manchester, visiting a restaurant, a friend's house, and shopping, a court heard

Carys Ann Ingram, 22, failed to quarantine on arrival to Jersey from Manchester, visiting a restaurant, a friend’s house, and shopping, a court heard

Three days after arriving from the city, which at the time was an amber zone, she was caught shopping in St Helier in her first breach.

It was later found that someone sitting near her on the flight had tested positive, and so she was contacted and told she must self-isolate and would have to undergo a further test eight days after her arrival.

The authorities made a number of attempts to contact her at her home address but they got no answer.

The El Tico restaurant in St Ouen's Bay, where Ingram shared a pictured to her social media

The El Tico restaurant in St Ouen's Bay, where Ingram shared a pictured to her social media

The El Tico restaurant in St Ouen’s Bay, where Ingram shared a pictured to her social media

Locals and tourists in pavement cafes and artisan shops in Halkett Street by St Helier Central Market in Jersey, Channel Isles (before covid-19 times)

Locals and tourists in pavement cafes and artisan shops in Halkett Street by St Helier Central Market in Jersey, Channel Isles (before covid-19 times)

Locals and tourists in pavement cafes and artisan shops in Halkett Street by St Helier Central Market in Jersey, Channel Isles (before covid-19 times)

She was caught breaching the regulations four times – when out shopping, out for a meal at a restaurant, visiting a friend’s house, and not being at home when the enforcement team visited her. 

Ingram, of Salford was finally reached by phone by the Contact Tracing Team and subsequently arrested.

She pleaded guilty to two counts of breaching self-isolation regulations and was fined a total of £6,600, a fine of £600 for the first breach and £6000 for the subsequent three – with the alternative of 24 weeks imprisonment.

First Tower, Jersey, where Ingram was seen breaching the covid-19 quarantine rules

First Tower, Jersey, where Ingram was seen breaching the covid-19 quarantine rules

First Tower, Jersey, where Ingram was seen breaching the covid-19 quarantine rules

The Strategic Lead for Contact Tracing, Monitoring and Enforcement, Caroline Maffia, said: ‘It is regrettable that someone should endanger the health of other Islanders after being informed of the need to self-isolate.

‘This fine demonstrates that we will pursue prosecution for those found flouting the law. Anyone identified as a direct contact of a COVID positive person must understand the importance of following public health advice and abiding by the law.’

This post first appeared on dailymail.co.uk

Continue Reading

Latest Stories

Apple iPhone 12 drop test shows it’s ‘most durable smartphone ever’

Published

on

By

apple iphone 12 drop test shows its most durable smartphone ever

Apple’s new iPhone 12 boasts a Ceramic Shield that the tech giant says is ‘tougher than any smartphone glass’ – and Allstate put this claim to the test.

The American insurance company dropped both the iPhone 12 and iPhone 12 Pro on a rough sidewalk from six feet in the air.

The smartphones were landed face-down, back-down and side-down to see if the shield actually provides up to four times the drop protection, as Apple has stated.

The tests reveal that the improved display helped the iPhone 12 withstand the drop ‘significantly better’ than the iPhone 11 and Samsung Galaxy S20 families, and Allstate says the ‘iPhone 12 is the most durable smartphone’ they have tested.

Scroll down for videos 

The tests reveal that the improved display helped the iPhone 12 (pictured) withstand the drop ‘significantly better’ than the iPhone 11 and Samsung Galaxy S20 families, and Allstate says the ‘iPhone 12 is the most durable smartphone’ they have tested

The tests reveal that the improved display helped the iPhone 12 (pictured) withstand the drop ‘significantly better’ than the iPhone 11 and Samsung Galaxy S20 families, and Allstate says the ‘iPhone 12 is the most durable smartphone’ they have tested

The tests reveal that the improved display helped the iPhone 12 (pictured) withstand the drop ‘significantly better’ than the iPhone 11 and Samsung Galaxy S20 families, and Allstate says the ‘iPhone 12 is the most durable smartphone’ they have tested

Apple revealed the new iPhone 12 family on October 13 during an livestreamed event, saying the smartphones has a new design with rounded edges and a Ceramic Shield that ‘increase drop performance by four times.’

The shield adds more protection using a new high temperature crystallization step that grows nano-ceramic crystals within the glass matrix.

Allstate set out to see just how durable the new design is with a series of Breakability Drop Tests, which dropped the devices three different ways onto a sidewalk.

The iPhone 12 landed face-down for the first test, which caused a few small cracks and scuffed the edges.

Allstate dropped both the iPhone 12 and iPhone 12 Pro on a rough sidewalk from six feet in the air. The smartphones were landed face-down, back-down and side-down to see if the shield actually provides up to four times the drop protection, as Apple has stated

Allstate dropped both the iPhone 12 and iPhone 12 Pro on a rough sidewalk from six feet in the air. The smartphones were landed face-down, back-down and side-down to see if the shield actually provides up to four times the drop protection, as Apple has stated

Allstate dropped both the iPhone 12 and iPhone 12 Pro on a rough sidewalk from six feet in the air. The smartphones were landed face-down, back-down and side-down to see if the shield actually provides up to four times the drop protection, as Apple has stated

‘This is significantly better than both its predecessor, the iPhone 11, and the Samsung Galaxy S20,’ Allstate shared in a press release.

The iPhone 12 Pro, which is 25 grams heavier, cracked across the lower half when dropped in the same manner.

However, the device was still functioning as normal – and the insurance company said it still outperformed the iPhone 11 Pro.

The iPhone 12 landed face-down for the first test, which caused a few small cracks and scuffed the edges

The iPhone 12 landed face-down for the first test, which caused a few small cracks and scuffed the edges

The iPhone 12 landed face-down for the first test, which caused a few small cracks and scuffed the edges

The iPhone 12 Pro, which is 25 grams heavier, cracked across the lower half when dropped in the same manner

The iPhone 12 Pro, which is 25 grams heavier, cracked across the lower half when dropped in the same manner

The iPhone 12 Pro, which is 25 grams heavier, cracked across the lower half when dropped in the same manner

The next portion of the study dropped the smartphones back-down.

The iPhone 12 was ‘virtually unscathed,’ but the iPhone 12 resulting in loose glass because it is not designed with the shield on the rear.

‘The damage was not catastrophic, and the iPhone 12 Pro functionality did not appear to be impacted,’ Allstate shared.

The next portion of the study dropped the smartphones back-down. The iPhone 12 was ‘virtually unscathed

The next portion of the study dropped the smartphones back-down. The iPhone 12 was ‘virtually unscathed

The next portion of the study dropped the smartphones back-down. The iPhone 12 was ‘virtually unscathed

The iPhone 12 resulting in loose glass because it is not designed with the shield on the rear. ‘The damage was not catastrophic, and the iPhone 12 Pro functionality did not appear to be impacted,’ Allstate shared

The iPhone 12 resulting in loose glass because it is not designed with the shield on the rear. ‘The damage was not catastrophic, and the iPhone 12 Pro functionality did not appear to be impacted,’ Allstate shared

The iPhone 12 resulting in loose glass because it is not designed with the shield on the rear. ‘The damage was not catastrophic, and the iPhone 12 Pro functionality did not appear to be impacted,’ Allstate shared

The final experiment dropped the devices on their sides and both only suffered minor scuffing along the edges after hitting the rough sidewalk.

Jason Siciliano, vice president, and global creative director at Allstate Protection Plans, said: ‘The Ceramic Shield front is a huge improvement.’

‘That said, both phones were damaged when dropped on a sidewalk.

‘Given their hefty repair costs, we encourage everyone to use a protective case and treat their new iPhone 12 with the care you would give an expensive camera.’

This post first appeared on dailymail.co.uk

Continue Reading

Trending

Copyright © 2020 DiazHub.