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Boris Johnson urges staff to get to the office as City’s biggest firms will only bring 40% back

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boris johnson urges staff to get to the office as citys biggest firms will only bring 40 back

Prime Minister Boris Johnson today urged workers to return to the office from coronavirus lockdown – after some of the country’s biggest firms said only 40 per cent would return from home. 

Some companies, including accountancy giant Deloitte and law firm Slaughter and May have allowed employees back, but others have been reluctant to act. 

It could spell disaster for High Street shops – already on their knees from buyers staying away during the pandemic – and strangle the economy.

And other smaller businesses, including cafes and restaurants, could find themselves starved of customers from a lack of footfall from office blocks.

Prime Minister Boris Johnson urged again today ‘People should start to think about getting back to work’.

MP Andrew Bridgen also warned ‘The alternative to companies bringing people back in is bankruptcy and bankruptcy of others that rely on them.’

Among the major buildings currently under construction in the capital are 1 Undershaft (highlighted red, left) and the Diamond (highlighted red, right)

Among the major buildings currently under construction in the capital are 1 Undershaft (highlighted red, left) and the Diamond (highlighted red, right)

Among the major buildings currently under construction in the capital are 1 Undershaft (highlighted red, left) and the Diamond (highlighted red, right)

Easing of the lockdown led to the 30 biggest employers in the City of London telling police they only intend to bring a maximum of 40 per cent of their workforce back.

The reluctance to return was also backed by a new survey of 1,251 senior company managers that showed half of them would continue to let staff work from home.   

Remote working – complete with its Zoom conference calls – has been judged a success by some businesses, who are now questioning the need for huge office buildings. 

While Goldman Sachs has let staff return to its London headquarters only 600 of its 6,000 strong workforce took up the offer.

It is at odds with Prime Minister Boris Johnson’s remarks on Friday and today telling people they should start getting back to work.

He told reporters during a visit to the London Ambulance Service: ‘What I want to see is people, who have been working from home for a long time, now talking to their employers, talking to their places of work, about the steps that have been taken and looking to come back to work in a safe way.  

Prime Minister Boris Johnson, pictured today with CEO London Ambulance Service Garrett Emmerson, said workers needed to get back to the office

Prime Minister Boris Johnson, pictured today with CEO London Ambulance Service Garrett Emmerson, said workers needed to get back to the office

Prime Minister Boris Johnson, pictured today with CEO London Ambulance Service Garrett Emmerson, said workers needed to get back to the office

Chains left in lurch without lunchtime rush 

Business leaders called for more clarity from ministers yesterday over when millions of white-collar workers can return to their offices.

They claim working from home is damaging the economy, with High Street retailers such as Pret A Manger and Upper Crust slashing thousands of jobs after takings were hammered by the absence of employees buying food on their lunch breaks.

Boots also said footfall had ‘dramatically reduced’ as it announced plans to cut 4,000 jobs.

James Reed, of the recruitment firm Reed, said retailers had become ‘collateral damage’, adding: ‘Businesses need greater clarity over when workers could come back to offices.’

Shobi Khan, chief executive of the London offices landlord Canary Wharf Group, said: ‘There is no problem going to Spain, Italy or France, but heaven forbid you go to the office.’

Edwin Morgan, of the Institute of Directors, said: ‘Offices play a key role in the surrounding economy. City centre firms, particularly in food and hospitality, rely heavily on commuter custom.’

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‘I think that’s got to be the key thing. Where businesses have made a huge effort to make the workplace safe I do think people should start to think about getting back to work but provided we all continue to follow the precautions.’

And MP Mr Bridgen, a businessman himself, told the MailOnline there was no plan B to bringing people back into work. 

He agreed workers not coming back into offices would spell problems for others, like cafes and restaurants, who rely on their footfall.

Mr Bridgen added: ‘The alternative to companies bringing people back in is bankruptcy and bankruptcy of others that rely on them.

‘These are very strange decisions for company directors to take.

‘Quite apart from that, if companies don’t bring people back, they risk other people coming in filling gaps they have left.’

The High Street has been left in peril by the ravages of coronavirus and the pandemic’s lockdown.

It has seen British shoppers head online to shop, putting a feared 250,000 jobs at risks.

Already John Lewis and Boots have announced closures, respectively threatening 1,300 and 4,000 livelihoods.

The PM and Chancellor Rishi Sunak are said to be extremely concerned about the damage empty offices are having on town centre shops and restaurants.

Sources have said civil servants have now been told to return to their desks to set an example to the public on how to get back to work.

A conference call with Whitehall chiefs saw Mr Johnson say they should come back as long as it could be done in a Covid-secure way.

He has also asked business and City chiefs, including Goldman Sachs boss Richard Gnodde, to order more staff back to base.

But the largest banks and firms are said to be concerned about issues with public transport for its staff, especially in London. 

Boris calls for staff to go back to work – as long as they can safely

Prime Minister Boris Johnson said on Friday workers should start returning to work.

He said: ‘I think everybody has sort of taken the ”stay at home if you can” – I think we should now say, well, ”go back to work if you can”.

‘Because I think it’s very important that people should try to lead their lives more normally.

‘I want to see more people feeling confident to use the shops, use the restaurants, and get back into work – but only if we all follow the guidance.’

Mr Johnson also hinted face coverings will be made compulsory in shops in a bid to reassure nervous customers.

He admitted that ‘the balance of scientific opinion seemed to have shifted’ over how effective makeshift masks can be.

The PM added: ‘I do think we need to be stricter in insisting people wear face coverings in confined spaces where they are meeting people they don’t normally meet.

‘We are looking at ways of making sure that people really do have face coverings in shops, for instance, where there is a risk of transmission.’ 

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Financial lobby group TheCityUK warned: ‘The main focus for businesses is the ability to provide a safe office environment for staff, as well as staff concerns around using public transport. 

‘While localised outbreaks remain a possibility, many firms will either take a slow and phased approach to returning to the office or continue to take a wait-and-see approach.’ 

Barclays chief executive Jes Staley said in April: ‘The notion of putting 7,000 people in a building may be a thing of the past.’

Last month JPMorgan said it was preparing to move employees back into its Canary Wharf headquarters by the end of this month.

But it said staff into the office would be put into three groups, with up to three quarters of total employees working from home for the next few months.

Management in other business hubs in cities including Birmingham, Manchester and Glasgow have also taken the same view.

Firms with a presence in Asia have also had their opinions formed by being hit by the pandemic earlier than Britain.

The big businesses’ fears is something smaller companies are also weighing over.

Lowri Tan, managing director of baby food brand Little Tummy, which pre-pandemic operated from an office in Soho, said her fledgling company would not be returning immediately.

She said: ‘The driving factor is definitely the money. As a small company, without having the fixed overheads and expenditure, it’s not a wise use of company resources when we know we can operate efficiently at home.’

Last week Ian Girling, chief executive of the Dorset Chamber of Commerce, said Ms Tan’s mindset was in lockstep with firms across the country.

How many jobs are at risk across the UK?

  • Accenture – 900
  • Airbus – 1,700 
  • Arcadia – 500
  • BA – 12,000 
  • Beales – 1,052 
  • Bentley – 1,000
  • Burger King – 1,600 
  • Casual Dining Group (Bella Italia, Cafe Rouge and Las Iguanas) – 1,900  
  • DHL at Jaguar Land Rover – 2,200 
  • EasyJet – 4,500
  • Go Outdoors – 2,400 
  • Harrods – 700
  • Harveys – 240 
  • Links – 350 
  • Mothercare – 2,500 
  • Oasis Warehouse – 1,800 
  • P&O Ferries – 1,100 
  • Pret a Manger – 1,330 
  • Ryanair – 3,000 
  • SSP Group (Upper Crust, Caffe Ritazza) – 5,000
  • Ted Baker – 160 
  • TM Lewin – 600
  • Tui – 8,000 
  • Victoria’s Secret – 800 at risk
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He said: ‘As a result of the pandemic businesses will have to think about all of their future working arrangements, and this could be a challenge for businesses juggling the need to have people in the office or working remotely from home.

‘Undoubtedly, remote working has worked extremely well for some businesses and there are opportunities for some firms to save money going forward.’

If workers do go back in they will be greeted with the ‘new normal’ in big offices of temperature tests on arrival and strict rules on wearing masks in common areas.

Banks of hand sanitiser dispensers will also be a familiar site on most walls, as employers look to stamp out any chance of infection.

Accountancy firm PwC has reopened all its UK offices and chairman Kevin Ellis believes it will have more than just an impact on work rate.

He told the Guardian: ‘Bringing people together safely is important for teams, good for communities and good for the economy.

‘There is also a mental health benefit for many.

‘I see value in people being back in the office.’

The government’s website still has guidance saying employees should still work from home if they can and it suits the needs of the business.

But on Friday Mr Johnson said in a Q&A with the public, dubbed People’s PMQs, indicated a possible shift from the advice.

He said: ‘I want people to be back to work as carefully as possible.

Boris Johnson said on Friday he wanted people to start going back into work

Boris Johnson said on Friday he wanted people to start going back into work

Boris Johnson said on Friday he wanted people to start going back into work

‘It’s very important that people should be going back to work if they can now.

‘I think everybody has sort of taken the ‘stay at home if you can’ advice – I think we should now say, well, ‘go back to work if you can’.

‘Because I think it’s very important that people should try to lead their lives more normally.’

‘I wanted to see more people feeling confident to use the shops, use the restaurants, and get back into work – but only if we all follow the guidance.’

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Secret diary of the Queen’s first confidante Alathea Fitzalan Howard

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secret diary of the queens first confidante alathea fitzalan howard
Alathea Fitzalan Howard ecame a close friend of Princess Elizabeth and her sister Margaret, visiting them often at Windsor Castle, and enjoying parties, balls, picnics and celebrations with the Royal Family and other members of the Court

Alathea Fitzalan Howard ecame a close friend of Princess Elizabeth and her sister Margaret, visiting them often at Windsor Castle, and enjoying parties, balls, picnics and celebrations with the Royal Family and other members of the Court

Alathea Fitzalan Howard ecame a close friend of Princess Elizabeth and her sister Margaret, visiting them often at Windsor Castle, and enjoying parties, balls, picnics and celebrations with the Royal Family and other members of the Court

Alathea Fitzalan Howard was sent to live with her grandfather, Viscount Fitzalan of Derwent, at Cumberland lodge in Windsor Great Park during World War II after her parents separated. 

There she became a close friend of Princess Elizabeth and her sister Margaret, visiting them often at Windsor Castle, and enjoying parties, balls, picnics and celebrations with the Royal Family and other members of the Court. 

1940 

Sunday, January 21 

LiLibet [Princess Elizabeth, aged 13 and living with her family at Royal Lodge in Windsor] rang up to ask me to skate. She, [Princess] Margaret and the King picked me up in the car and we drove to the lake. Queen came down and watched. Played hockey with about six other people — policemen and chauffeurs etc from Royal Lodge. Great fun. Lilibet is so much nicer by herself than at Guides. 

Wednesday March 20 

[At] Royal Lodge we all dragged an old garden cart down to the rubbish heap below the vicarage and filled it with old iron etc and dragged it back to the garden (the detective helping)! then we played charades indoors. Margaret’s rather silly but she’s very sweet. Lilibet’s stopped wearing socks. Crawfie [governess Marion Crawford] kissed me goodbye! Heavenly day. 

Monday, May 6 

The princesses came to tea today. Nasty damp day but we went out and played in the garden till about six, then came in and did two charades, which were great fun. Friday, may 10 Hitler invaded Holland and Belgium at 3am! 

Tuesday, May 14 

The princesses have moved to Windsor [Castle] for greater safety. Somehow it does feel lonely to know they’re not next door.  

Friday, June 7 

Lilibet and Margaret and Crawfie met me at the door and we walked down to the guardroom for tea with some officers. enormous tea — cakes galore, ices, cherries, with which we had competitions. once Lilibet and I looked at each other and nearly laughed. Lilibet and Margaret for the first time (that I’ve seen) weren’t dressed alike. 

Monday, June 17 

Heard that France has given in, so now we are left to face Germany alone. Naturally if we are beaten we must all hope for death as our only release. 

Tuesday, July 2 

I went to the York Hall for a rehearsal of the concert on Saturday. Lilibet will tap dance in ‘An Apple For the teacher’ (she’s the teacher). Margaret is in it too. they both play the piano on the stage and then Margaret is the Dormouse in the Mad Hatter’s tea Party. it’s very good, but everyone I’ve met says it’s making them much too cheap. they really shouldn’t do it. they ought to get up little plays of their own with their friends but not dance with all the evacuees like this. 

Saturday, July 13 

Crawfie was in a bad mood. I think she’s rather cross because I borrowed her purse last week for the programme money and now can’t remember what i have done with it. the princesses were rather cross too, because Lilibet played the piano badly and the curtain fell on Margaret’s head!

Thursday, August 15 

We all drew outside. Afterwards, i tidied as usual in Lilibet’s room and she told me her silk stockings cost eight and six. typical! 

Sunday, August 25 

I went to bed about ten and was in the middle of praying when three terrible explosions shook my windows. We all went down to the cellar amid more bombs and guns. 

Tuesday, August 27 

Biked to the Castle with hiking things. We were divided into two [Guides] groups with Lilibet and me in charge. We made a fire and cooked sausages on sticks. 

Monday, September 23 

Biked to the Castle for tea. We all listened to the King’s speech on the wireless in the nursery and knitted. 

Tuesday, October 1 

At nine o’clock [a] time bomb went off [nearby]. I lay in speechless horror watching my walls rock violently from side to side. i know that people in the future will read about this war and look upon it in horror as comparable only to the French or Russian Revolutions and they will pity the generation whose youth was wasted by it. 

Princess Elizabeth (pictured left) reads to her sister Princess Margaret and Jane the corgi by a window in Windsor Castle. Princess Elizabeth is the future Queen Elizabeth II of England.

Princess Elizabeth (pictured left) reads to her sister Princess Margaret and Jane the corgi by a window in Windsor Castle. Princess Elizabeth is the future Queen Elizabeth II of England.

Princess Elizabeth (pictured left) reads to her sister Princess Margaret and Jane the corgi by a window in Windsor Castle. Princess Elizabeth is the future Queen Elizabeth II of England.

Saturday, November 9

[Alathea was staying at the castle for the weekend.] I played a French game with L and M and Monty [French governess Mrs Montaudon-Smith], then we all had lunch with the K and Q and household. then L and M, Crawfie and I went out in the rain and messed about till the Queen joined us, when we gave some scarves to some soldiers, then unblocked a stream. M pushed me into some barbed wire, tearing my good stocking! us three had tea with the K and Q and afterwards played [card game] Racing Demon with the Queen. At seven L and i went to our baths. L and i had supper in our night things in the nursery. At about eight, L and I and Bobo [nursery maid Margaret MacDonald] walked down to their shelter, miles away. L and M sleep on two bunks on top of each other (M on top) and Mrs Knight [nanny] on a bed in the same room. I was put in an adjoining room. M made us laugh a lot. The K and Q looked in on me to say good night. 

Sunday, November 10 

Came up from the shelter at a quarter to eight and dressed. Lunch 1.15. Two Eton boys came, the Spencer boy [later Earl Spencer, father of Princess Diana] and another. L and I had to make conversation to [sic] them! Afterwards L, M and I went for a long walk in the Home Park with the K and Q and ran into the Archbishop of Canterbury. tea with them and cards with the Q again after. She was very chatty to me. I simply love her. bath then supper. Marched down to the shelter again complete with apples, clocks, books, etc! I left the door open to talk and I went into [the princesses’] room twice to get something and they came into mine when an emergency [light] came on in my room. M made me die with laughter by asking me if I thought L and her and myself were pretty! We went to sleep after the news, about 9.15, as we bring the wireless down. 

Monday, November 11 

We Got up soon after 7.30 and went upstairs through miles of icy cold corridors and staircases. Lovely cheerful nursery breakfast. In that Castle, with its gilded rooms and red corridors, there is an atmosphere of happy family life that I myself have never known. 

Sunday, November 17 

I do want more than anything in the world to be a lady-in-waiting when i grow up, but I should like always to be Lilibet’s friend whatever happens. 

Tuesday, December 3 

Lilibet’s hair is worse now that it is curled than before, I think, because she’s got it in little flat curls close to her head all round the back, very tight in front. 

Tuesday, December 21 

Lilibet did shortbread [at Guides], and I did bread pudding. Lilibet actually likes washing-up and does more of it than the rest of us put together! I much prefer needlework, which L hates! 

Alathea Fitzalan Howard documents her life after was sent to live with her grandfather, Viscount Fitzalan of Derwent, at Cumberland lodge in Windsor Great Park during World War II

Alathea Fitzalan Howard documents her life after was sent to live with her grandfather, Viscount Fitzalan of Derwent, at Cumberland lodge in Windsor Great Park during World War II

Alathea Fitzalan Howard documents her life after was sent to live with her grandfather, Viscount Fitzalan of Derwent, at Cumberland lodge in Windsor Great Park during World War II

1941 

Thursday, March 6 

Lilibet, M and i set off for the Red Drawing Room, where we were joined by three Grenadier officers. then all the RAF officers filed by, shaking hands with L. Lilibet finds making conversation very difficult, like me, but she did very well, as she had to stand by herself for over an hour talking to each one in turn. She insisted on bringing the dogs in because she said they were the greatest save to the conversation when it dropped!

Sunday, March 9 

L turned her hair under and asked me if i liked it and I said no. We played cards till lunch, then went outside. We laughed a great deal and had great fun spitting over a bridge into a stream, trying to hit leaves as they floated by! Crawfie is such fun; I don’t think Monty would approve of spitting! Didn’t get back till 4.30 and we got very giggly and silly at the end because we were so exhausted! Crawfie and I were walking slowly arm-in-arm down the steep slope from the terrace and L pushed us and we hurtled down and collapsed into a bush and laughed so much we couldn’t get up. 

Saturday, March 15 AnnabeL [daughter of Sir Cecil Newman] thinks Lilibet has an enormous chest! It is a great pity as it’ll be awful one day. 

Saturday, March 22 

We had dressed crab that the King and Queen had brought back live from Plymouth. Ate chocolates with the Queen afterwards, then we went out with Crawfie before tea with the K and Q. He asked me if I was ‘hair conscious’ too, as Lilibet is always fiddling about with her hair now. So i said, ‘Yes!’ the Queen asked me if i powdered my face. She is so sweet and kind and without being beautiful she has such irresistible charm one could not help loving her. She has won my unswerving adoration — oh, if only I had a mother like that. 

Thursday, April 3 Last lesson for this term [Alathea was sharing weekly drawing lessons with the princesses at Windsor Castle]. Afterwards, we played cards till tea. they said something about Philip, so I said, ‘Who’s Philip?’ Lilibet [aged 14] said, ‘He’s called Prince Philip of Greece’ and then they both burst out laughing. I asked why, knowing quite well! Margaret [ten] said, ‘We can’t tell you,’ but L said, ‘Yes, we can. Can you keep a secret?’ then she said that P was her ‘boy’. Monty asked me if i had one, and in the end, I told them it was Robert Cecil [guardsman at Windsor, and future Marquess of Salisbury], which amused L. M said she was so glad I had a ‘beau’! We all laughed terribly. I must say Lilibet is far more grown-up than I was two years ago. When I left, she said, ‘We part today the wiser for two secrets,’ and I biked home feeling very proud at being let into such a great secret, which I shall never betray. 

Wednesday, April 9 

Biked to Forest Gate and met the princesses [and three other friends]. We drove to a lovely part of the forest, where we stopped and went for a walk, picking primroses. Had tea on rugs, which we spread out under the trees. Lit a fire to warm ourselves by. I was very surprised that the princesses came by themselves without [nanny] Mrs Knight — I think it must have been about the first time; of course, they had a detective. Packed up and set off in the cars to look for the German plane shot down in the forest last night. took some time finding it, but when we did, it was well worth it. It was a huge thing, completely smashed, and we picked up bits as souvenirs. 

Tuesday, April 15 

Hugh Euston [Grenadier guardsman at Windsor Castle — also earl of Euston and descendant of Charles ii and his mistress Barbara Villiers] came to dinner and we had great fun. 

Monday, April 28 

Letter from Lilibet [who had turned 15 a week before] — very nice, quite long. it was signed ‘with love from Elizabeth’. I’m wondering whether one oughtn’t to begin calling her Princess now she’s older. 

Monday, may 5 

Letter from Sonia [daughter of eminent radiologist Dr Harold Graham Hodgson] saying she’s been to tea with the princesses and they talked about young men. L told her that she adored Hugh Euston, so S said that I did, too, so they laughed and laughed! L [also] told her that she had a beau but didn’t say who. 

Saturday, may 17 Walked to Royal Lodge and was met by the princesses. Said, ‘How do you do,’ to the K and Q who were sitting on a bench in the garden and soon after the K drove us back to Castle in his own open sports car, which was an exciting experience! The Q gave me her silk scarf to put over my head. If only she knew how much I adored her! 

Saturday, May 24 

Dancing [lesson]. Had biscuits and orange juice in nursery with the princesses. After tea the Q, the princesses and I played Racing Demon in her sitting room. I would gladly die for that family if there were a Revolution. 

Thursday, May 29 

Biked to drawing, which we had under the [Castle] terrace. M and I found it hard to stop talking! Monty asked me, ‘Admirez-vous Lord Euston?’ and I said, ‘oui.’ She said she thought so by the way I talked to him on Saturday! We all laughed terribly and M asked if he was my beau, knowing quite well he is!!! She’s very old for her age in those ways — indeed in most ways. 

Saturday, June 7 

After [dancing] class i changed in M’s room as she always bags me but L says i’m to go to hers next time! At lunch, i hoped Hugh e would sit next to me but he was put between the Q and Lilibet. M caught my eye and laughed! After lunch we went out with the K and Q. the K played golf, so we strayed off and presently it poured with rain and we rushed for the tunnel and had to remain there about half an hour as we had thin shoes and no coats. the Q was sweet and very chatty to me and we all sang. M asked me if I liked her, as she said she wasn’t sure!! How could one not like her? She’s inherited all her mother’s charm, more than L. 

Thursday, June 12 

BiKed to the Castle. I said I loved coming to tea. Margaret laughed and said, ‘She adores us,’ and made one of her enchanting faces!!! 

Friday, July 4 [Alathea had been invited to spend the weekend at the castle] At 4pm, Lilibet and I watched their new chameleon on the syringa [lilac] tree, then she and I and Crawfie walked down to Frogmore, where we punted on the lake. Rolled our stockings down to prevent tearing them. After tea we lay on the grass and talked and laughed. We had supper in our dressing gowns in nursery at eight, then L and I sat in her room and read and talked till bed. 

Saturday, July 5 

Breakfast in nursery. Messed about afterwards while Lilibet did lessons, then changed into my blue chiffon for dancing. At lunch, I sat next to Hugh e. [At] 4, we came in and got ready to go to Adelaide Cottage [home of Sir Jackie Philipps, commander of the Castle Company] with the officers. We had tea with the Philipps and three of the officers and after we played the usual games. 

Sunday, July 6 

After breakfast we sat about and also went for a little walk with Crawfie. L said nothing about me staying till Monday, so much against my secret hopes I had to resign myself to leaving this evening; L is funny in some ways — v. matter of fact and uncurious and above all untemperamental. but one can’t have everything. [After] church, we fed the chameleon and then to Frogmore with Crawfie and Monty pulling Margaret, who’d just got up, in a basket on wheels. Got into punt, and then found a nice place to eat our picnic lunch. Great fun — we drank ginger beer out of bottles! We lay out on a rug and talked and read. We had great fun getting back, what with Crawfie’s hat and two dogs falling into the water! 

Wednesday, July 23 

Arrived [at the castle for a dance] and was miserable at first because everyone had long white gloves [and] I should have liked to have worn them. We all filed through into the Red Drawing Room, shaking hands with the K and Q and the princesses. there were nearly 200 there. the Q danced all the ‘funny dances’ and looked lovely in a full frock of white tulle, covered with silver sequins and the princesses wore dresses rather the same as the Q, also from Hartnell, in white lacy stuff embroidered with pale blue marguerites, and they had flowers in their hair and at their waist. No Eton boys, for which I was glad, as we then only had the dashing young ‘cavaliers’ [officers]! I was terrified I wasn’t going to dance with Hugh e but then I met him at the buffet and he said, with that great charm of his, ‘oh, Alathea, I’ve been looking for you all the evening, we must have a dance!’ it wasn’t true but still!! He asked me how many times I danced with him and said she was rather hurt because he only had the first one with her because he was asked to and then not again. We said goodbye about 3.15[am] — P Margaret [aged ten] stayed up till the very end. 

Thursday, July 31 

Lilibet said she had something to show me and when I went into her room to tidy, she took a letter out of a drawer for me to read — it was to Colonel Legh from Hugh E thanking for the dance — she said she’d stolen it and was going to keep it! He’s got nice writing. S

Sunday, August 17 

Mummy and I went for a walk and began talking about Daddy, and she said she didn’t think she could go on living with him after the war. I listened with dry eyes and a heavy heart — somehow I wasn’t surprised. their temperaments differ too widely. but this has affected me deeply. I only wish that tradition demanded they should remain together and make the best they could of the wreck of their own unhappiness. 

Thursday, August 21 

Mummy and I had a conversation about me — she said i’m old fashioned in the ‘old-maidish’ way, which is awful (underlined). I went to bed in tears — life seemed to me so, so hopeless. 

Saturday, August 23 

Went to bed early tonight. oh, how I longed for Hugh to come to me — but this night and the next and many more, I must spend alone, until one day when that greatest desire of every girl will be satisfied. 

Friday, August 29 

Ming-Ming [her younger sister’s nanny, real name Miss Smith] suggested I should do a little mending for myself and I lost my temper and getting a needle I made long scratches on my arm till I drew blood — it relieved my feelings but still I could find no outlet for my pent-up, angry soul. 

Saturday, October 11 

Had tea with Libby Hardinge [daughter of Sir Alexander Hardinge, private secretary to George Vi). two sweet little boys were there — how I long to have a child of my own. I should love it to be Hugh’s too. L told me that he has left the Castle — my heart sank. I shall lose sight of him and he’s sure to marry someone else and meanwhile I’ve got nobody! Lilibet will be sad he’s gone too. 

Extracted from the Windsor diaries: A childhood With the Princesses by Alathea Fitzalan Howard, edited by Isabella Naylor Leyland, to be published by Hodder & Stoughton on October 8, £25. © Isabella Naylor Leyland 2020 to order a copy for £21.25 go to www.mailshop.co.uk/books or call 020 3308 9193. Free UK delivery on orders over £15. Offer price valid until 10/10/2020.

How her treasured diaries came to light 

Alathea came into my life in 1975, when I met my husband, Philip. She was his aunt, and I liked her immediately: she was composed, generous, forthright and loved to laugh. When she died in 2001 she left me her diaries, of which there are 64 and in her words ‘not one day’s exception from 1940!’ A year earlier, she had written: ‘My diaries must be preserved and published.’ Alathea Alys Gwendolen Mary Fitzalan Howard, born in 1923, was the elder daughter of Viscount Fitzalan of Derwent, and of Joyce Langdale, who later became Countess Fitzwilliam. Her mother had little interest in children and at the beginning of the war Alathea was sent to live with her rather staid grandfather and maiden aunt Magdalen. Hers was a lonely childhood and the diaries were her greatest friend. She wrote down all her hopes, fears and frustrations and could tell her diary what no one else knew: a perfect confidant. Her only other solace was the friendship she had with Princesses Elizabeth and Margaret. In adulthood the Queen kept up their friendship, and occasionally they would lunch together. In 2001 she was diagnosed with an advanced brain tumour. During a spell in hospital she received two bunches of flowers and I couldn’t resist looking at the cards to find out who had sent them. One was from Jools Holland, the other the Queen. Alathea died at our home, in what had always been her room, on March 5, 2001.

 Isabella Naylor Leyland

 

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The Secret Garden classic has been remade and can explore the stunning film locations

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the secret garden classic has been remade and can explore the stunning film locations

For over a century, Frances Hodgson Burnett’s The Secret Garden — about Mary Lennox, an orphan sent to live with her uncle, only to find a magical garden on his estate — has enchanted children. 

The latest film version with Colin Firth and Julie Walters will wow a new generation. 

Director Marc Munden used some of Britain’s idyllic locations to create a magical world. 

And you can visit them, too . . . 

The Laburnum Arch in Bodnant Garden, North Wales. The vibrant yellow flowers usually attract 50,000 visitors when they bloom for just three weeks each spring

The Laburnum Arch in Bodnant Garden, North Wales. The vibrant yellow flowers usually attract 50,000 visitors when they bloom for just three weeks each spring

The Laburnum Arch in Bodnant Garden, North Wales. The vibrant yellow flowers usually attract 50,000 visitors when they bloom for just three weeks each spring

A glorious arch of golden laburnum

Bodnant Garden, North Wales

Julie Walters and Colin Firth walk under a stunning arch of flowering laburnum in this scene filmed at Bodnant Garden.

Described by the National Trust as ‘the height of spring’, the Laburnum Arch is 180ft long and was created in 1880.

Julie Walters and Colin Firth walk under a stunning arch of flowering laburnum in this scene for The Secret Garden (2020) filmed at Bodnant Garden

Julie Walters and Colin Firth walk under a stunning arch of flowering laburnum in this scene for The Secret Garden (2020) filmed at Bodnant Garden

Julie Walters and Colin Firth walk under a stunning arch of flowering laburnum in this scene for The Secret Garden (2020) filmed at Bodnant Garden

The vibrant yellow flowers usually attract 50,000 visitors when they bloom for just three weeks each spring. 

So while you will have to wait to see the arch in its full glory, the rest of the garden — featuring manicured lawns, flower-filled terraces, meadows and water gardens — is currently open, with adult tickets for £8 (half-price for children).

  • 01492 650460; nationaltrust.org.uk/bodnant-garden
Built in 1758, Helmsley Walled Garden in North Yorkshire has a starring role in the new film

Built in 1758, Helmsley Walled Garden in North Yorkshire has a starring role in the new film

Built in 1758, Helmsley Walled Garden in North Yorkshire has a starring role in the new film

The big star of the show

Helmsley Walled Garden, North Yorkshire

Nestled at the foot of the North York Moors and built in 1758, the walled garden has a starring role in the new film. 

It was originally designed to provide vegetables, fruit and flowers to the Feversham family, who lived at nearby Duncombe Park (which appears as Misselthwaite Manor in the film). 

It was originally designed to provide vegetables, fruit and flowers to the Feversham family, who lived at nearby Duncombe Park (which appears as Misselthwaite Manor in the film). Pictured: Filming at Helmsley Walled garden for The Secret Garden

It was originally designed to provide vegetables, fruit and flowers to the Feversham family, who lived at nearby Duncombe Park (which appears as Misselthwaite Manor in the film). Pictured: Filming at Helmsley Walled garden for The Secret Garden

It was originally designed to provide vegetables, fruit and flowers to the Feversham family, who lived at nearby Duncombe Park (which appears as Misselthwaite Manor in the film). Pictured: Filming at Helmsley Walled garden for The Secret Garden

Tickets for the garden cost from £7, children go free. It’s open from Thursday to Sunday.

  • 01439 772314; helmsley walledgarden.org.uk
Triffid-like Elephant’s Rhubarb plants tower over two children at Trebah Gardens, Cornwall

Triffid-like Elephant’s Rhubarb plants tower over two children at Trebah Gardens, Cornwall

Triffid-like Elephant’s Rhubarb plants tower over two children at Trebah Gardens, Cornwall

Fun among giant triffids 

Trebah Gardens, Cornwall 

Actress Dixie Egerickx (who plays Mary Lennox) peers through the twilight world of Gunnera Passage at Trebah Gardens.

Actress Dixie Egerickx (who plays Mary Lennox) peers through the twilight world of Gunnera Passage at Trebah Gardens

Actress Dixie Egerickx (who plays Mary Lennox) peers through the twilight world of Gunnera Passage at Trebah Gardens

Actress Dixie Egerickx (who plays Mary Lennox) peers through the twilight world of Gunnera Passage at Trebah Gardens

Its huge, Triffid-like Elephant’s Rhubarb plants are native to the mountains of south-east Brazil, with leaves up to 2.5m wide and stems as thick as a man’s wrist. 

Open Saturdays to Wednesdays, tickets from £11.

  • 01326 252200; trebahgarden.co.uk
Fountains Abbey in North Yorkshire was established by monks almost 900 years ago

Fountains Abbey in North Yorkshire was established by monks almost 900 years ago

Fountains Abbey in North Yorkshire was established by monks almost 900 years ago

Today, the atmospheric ruins provide the backdrop to elegant water gardens with mirror-like lakes and ponds. Pictured: A still from the latest film version of The Secret Garden

Today, the atmospheric ruins provide the backdrop to elegant water gardens with mirror-like lakes and ponds. Pictured: A still from the latest film version of The Secret Garden

Today, the atmospheric ruins provide the backdrop to elegant water gardens with mirror-like lakes and ponds. Pictured: A still from the latest film version of The Secret Garden

The wonder of a ruined abbey  

Fountains Abbey, North Yorkshire

The magnificent abbey was established by monks almost 900 years ago. 

Today, the atmospheric ruins provide the backdrop to elegant water gardens with mirror-like lakes and ponds. 

Tickets cost £13 (children go half-price).

  • 01765 608888; nationaltrust.org.uk/fountains-abbey-and-studley-royal-water-garden
Award-winning grounds of Iford Manor Estate, Wiltshire are Grade I-listed, have magnificent rural views and are interspersed with architectural gems hidden throughout

Award-winning grounds of Iford Manor Estate, Wiltshire are Grade I-listed, have magnificent rural views and are interspersed with architectural gems hidden throughout

Award-winning grounds of Iford Manor Estate, Wiltshire are Grade I-listed, have magnificent rural views and are interspersed with architectural gems hidden throughout

Silver-screen debut for a historic gem

Iford Manor Estate, Wiltshire

Sitting in the middle of a 900-acre estate, the award-winning grounds are Grade I-listed, have magnificent rural views and are interspersed with architectural gems hidden throughout. 

Big-screen debut: The Secret Garden, film 2020 filmed in Iford Manor

Big-screen debut: The Secret Garden, film 2020 filmed in Iford Manor

Big-screen debut: The Secret Garden, film 2020 filmed in Iford Manor

They’ve appeared on TV before — in Sanditon recently — but this is their big-screen debut. 

The estate will reopen in April 2021.

  • 01225 863146; ifordmanor.co.uk
Situated in the Forest of Dean, Puzzlewood is a breathtaking collection of twisted woodland which has provided scenery for everything from Star Wars to Doctor Who

Situated in the Forest of Dean, Puzzlewood is a breathtaking collection of twisted woodland which has provided scenery for everything from Star Wars to Doctor Who

Situated in the Forest of Dean, Puzzlewood is a breathtaking collection of twisted woodland which has provided scenery for everything from Star Wars to Doctor Who

From star wars to a forest of dreams

Puzzlewood, Forest of Dean

Situated in the Forest of Dean, Puzzlewood is a breathtaking collection of twisted woodland with more than a mile and a half of paths, bridges and view points. 

Pictured: Dixie Egerickx as Mary Lennox in a scene filmed in Puzzlewood

Pictured: Dixie Egerickx as Mary Lennox in a scene filmed in Puzzlewood

Pictured: Dixie Egerickx as Mary Lennox in a scene filmed in Puzzlewood

The ancient boughs have provided scenery for everything from Star Wars to Doctor Who, so if you enjoy walking through breathtaking scenery, you’ll love Puzzlewood. 

There are even cottages to stay in, too.

  • 01594 833187; puzzlewood.net

The Secret Garden is in cinemas and on Sky from October 23.

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Renters betrayed as new evictions approach after housing secretary ‘tears up his pledge’

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renters betrayed as new evictions approach after housing secretary tears up his pledge

Renters have been plunged into turmoil as evictions are set to resume after the housing secretary ‘tore up his pledge’ to protect them. 

Robert Jenrick introduced a ban at the start of the Covid pandemic which halted all hearings of possession cases as he championed that ‘no renter who lost income due to coronavirus will be forced out of their home’.

But, six months later, the government will allow evictions to resume in England and Wales from Monday.

Robert Jenrick (pictured) introduced a ban at the start of the Covid pandemic which halted all hearings of possession cases as he championed that 'no renter who lost income due to coronavirus will be forced out of their home'

Robert Jenrick (pictured) introduced a ban at the start of the Covid pandemic which halted all hearings of possession cases as he championed that 'no renter who lost income due to coronavirus will be forced out of their home'

Robert Jenrick (pictured) introduced a ban at the start of the Covid pandemic which halted all hearings of possession cases as he championed that ‘no renter who lost income due to coronavirus will be forced out of their home’

Alicia Kennedy, who has directed the campaign Generation Rent, told The Times: ‘Robert Jenrick has torn up his pledge to protect renters.

‘There is now nothing stopping tenants who have been given a Section 21 [eviction] notice from being forced out of their home. 

‘Even renters in severe financial distress can only buy themselves an extra six weeks’ grace.

‘These new rules provide no comfort and do nothing to prevent hardship and homelessness.’

UK courts can usually grant automatic eviction notices if a tenant falls eight weeks into rent arrears. 

The ban on evictions has already been extended twice since March as figures from YouGov and Shelter suggest that 322,000 renters have fallen behind on their monthly payments due to the impact of the pandemic.    

The ban on evictions has already been extended twice as figures from YouGov and Shelter suggest that 322,000 private renters have fallen behind on their monthly payments due to the impact of the pandemic (stock image)

The ban on evictions has already been extended twice as figures from YouGov and Shelter suggest that 322,000 private renters have fallen behind on their monthly payments due to the impact of the pandemic (stock image)

The ban on evictions has already been extended twice as figures from YouGov and Shelter suggest that 322,000 private renters have fallen behind on their monthly payments due to the impact of the pandemic (stock image)

The government has instructed that bailiffs are still forbidden from evicting those in areas of local lockdown or in the run up to Christmas – apart from in exceptional circumstances. 

Labour is also calling for a further extension of the ban similar to that seen in Scotland and Northern Ireland where renters will not face eviction until March 31. 

Defending the decision, Mr Jenrick said it was ‘right that we strike a balance between protecting renters and ensuring landlords whose tenants have behaved in illegal or anti-social ways have access to justice’.

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