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Boy, 12, taken to hospital with Covid-19 symptoms is diagnosed with leukemia

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boy 12 taken to hospital with covid 19 symptoms is diagnosed with leukemia

The family of a 12-year-old boy have been left devastated after he was tested for coronavirus but turned out to be suffering from cancer. 

Cody Lockey from Darlington, County Durham, was taken to hospital on Monday, July 27, when his mother Lisa Marie Harry suspected he had contracted Covid-19 after he developed a high temperature and cold-like symptoms.

The schoolboy was also complaining of pain in his groin and hips for three days and so his concerned mum took him to be tested for the virus.

Although he tested negative for Covid-19, the family were stunned to discover Cody actually had acute lymphoblastic leukaemia – an aggressive cancer which targets white blood cells. 

The family of Cody Lockey from Darlington, County Durham, have been left devastated after he was tested for coronavirus but turned out to be suffering from cancer

The family of Cody Lockey from Darlington, County Durham, have been left devastated after he was tested for coronavirus but turned out to be suffering from cancer

Cody in hospital after being admitted on Monday, July 27

Cody in hospital after being admitted on Monday, July 27

The family of Cody Lockey from Darlington, County Durham, have been left devastated after he was tested for coronavirus but turned out to be suffering from cancer. Pictured right: Cody in hospital after being admitted on Monday, July 27

It has symptoms similar to coronavirus including tiredness, bone pain and fever. 

The diagnosis was officially confirmed last Tuesday, a day after Cody went to Newcastle’s Royal Victoria Infirmary.

Lisa, who has two other children, said: ‘Cody had been in pain for three days and when he came out in a fever I thought it could be Covid-19.

‘We took him to the hospital and the doctors said they didn’t like the look of his skin colour, because he was pale.

‘It is just horrible. We got a coronavirus test because I thought it was that at first as he had a temperature and was coughing, but doctors said it was cancer.

Cody was taken to hospital when his mother Lisa Marie Harry suspected he had contracted Covid-19 after he developed a high temperature and cold-like symptoms. Pictured: Cody (second from right) with his mother Lisa Harry, 31, brother Ceejay, 10, sister Mia, 13 and stepfather Errol Harry, 37

Cody was taken to hospital when his mother Lisa Marie Harry suspected he had contracted Covid-19 after he developed a high temperature and cold-like symptoms. Pictured: Cody (second from right) with his mother Lisa Harry, 31, brother Ceejay, 10, sister Mia, 13 and stepfather Errol Harry, 37

Cody was taken to hospital when his mother Lisa Marie Harry suspected he had contracted Covid-19 after he developed a high temperature and cold-like symptoms. Pictured: Cody (second from right) with his mother Lisa Harry, 31, brother Ceejay, 10, sister Mia, 13 and stepfather Errol Harry, 37 

‘They said there were too many white blood cells. Cody’s bone marrow is jam packed with cancer cells which are stopping good cells getting through.’

Cody’s family were then told that he needed chemotherapy urgently, otherwise he could die within weeks. 

Fortunately, cancer cells were not found in Cody’s spinal fluid but he still needed a blood transfusion and had to start chemotherapy on Friday. 

Leukemia is a cancer of the body’s bone marrow, which is where the blood cells are made. 

There are around 790 new cases of acute lymphoblastic leukaemia in the UK each year, and 5,930 in the US. 

Cody's family were told he needed urgent chemotherapy, which started on Friday

Cody's family were told he needed urgent chemotherapy, which started on Friday

Cody has been diagnosed withacute lymphoblastic leukaemia – an aggressive cancer which targets white blood cells. Cody’s family were told he needed urgent chemotherapy, which started on Friday 

Lisa, who says she hasn’t had time to process the diagnosis, said: ‘I haven’t had time to think about it. In a way that is a good thing, I think we have caught it quite quickly.

‘I keep thinking back to that day and the nurses keep saying that I should pat myself on the back for responding so quickly – I had a gut feeling.

Lisa added: ‘I would just say to anyone, go and get checked out. Follow your instinct. Do not hesitate.’

Cody’s aunt, Nicola Ann Cook, said the little boy was scared he was going to die because her daughter, his cousin, died from cancer at the age of 32 two years ago. 

She said: ‘Cody’s chemotherapy started on Friday as without it they have said he would only have weeks left to live. He is very scared but he’s being strong.

Cody has been diagnosed withacute lymphoblastic leukaemia - an aggressive cancer which targets white blood cells

Cody has been diagnosed withacute lymphoblastic leukaemia - an aggressive cancer which targets white blood cells

Cody’s aunt, Nicola Ann Cook, said the little boy was scared he was going to die because her daughter, his cousin, died from cancer at the age of 32 two years ago 

‘His cousin, my daughter, died of bowel cancer two years ago aged just 32 so he was frightened he was going to die.

‘Cody is only 12 years old. He’ll be in the hospital until the chemotherapy starts working. Then no one is allowed in or out of the house for five weeks as he’s susceptible to infections.

‘Family members are all supporting the family as best we can via messages as we cannot visit because Cody and other children on the ward are extremely ill. Only parents can be there.’

His family, including Cody’s dad Richard Lockey, who rushed to his bedside from Norfolk, have been left devastated by the shock diagnosis. 

The ‘cheeky but loving’ boy’s siblings are Ceejay, aged 10, who is not old enough to fully understand Cody’s diagnosis, and 13-year-old Mia, who is ‘very upset’.  

The family have all offered to donate bone marrow if they are a match and if it is needed.

A GoFundMe page has been set up by Nicola to raise money for a trip for Cody who will be receiving chemotherapy for three years. You can donate to the page by clicking here.  

WHAT IS ACUTE LYMPHOBLASTIC LEUKAEMIA? 

Acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL) is a type of blood cancer that starts from young white blood cells in the bone marrow.

There are around 810 new cases in the UK every year. In the US, ALL affects approximately 1.7 adults per 100,000.

Anyone can develop ALL, however, it mainly affects younger people.

Many ALL symptoms are vague and flu-like, such as:

  • General weakness
  • Frequent infections
  • Bruising or bleeding easily, including nosebleeds, heavy periods and blood in the urine or faeces
  • Unexplained weight loss
  • Bone or joint pain
  • Breathlessness
  • Swollen lymph nodes
  • Feeling full
  • Paler skin than normal

Risks for developing ALL include exposure to radiation, smoking, being overweight and having a weak immune system.

Research suggests being breastfed and exposed to childhood infections may reduce a person’s risk.

The main ALL treatment is chemotherapy. Patients may also have radiotherapy, steroids or bone marrow transplants.

Source: Cancer Research UK

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Meghan Markle guided Prince Harry on his public ‘journey to wokeness’

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meghan markle guided prince harry on his public journey to wokeness

Meghan Markle helped guide Prince Harry on his very public ‘woke’ journey, the authors of the couple’s upcoming biography Finding Freedom have claimed.

The Duchess of Sussex, who is currently residing with her husband in Beverly Hills, Los Angeles, played a pivotal role in helping her husband become more attuned to racism, according to authors Omid Scobie and Carolyn Durand.

Speaking to the National Public Radio in the United States, Mr Scobie said: ‘Harry’s journey to wokeness has been very public. 

‘We’ve seen him learning and educating himself along the way, but this experience of witnessing Meghan face racist remarks and commentary would have been the first time he’d seen someone in his life or someone he was particularly close to affected by it in a certain way.

The Duchess of Sussex helped guide Prince Harry on his 'journey to wokeness', the authors of the couple's upcoming biography have claimed

The Duchess of Sussex helped guide Prince Harry on his 'journey to wokeness', the authors of the couple's upcoming biography have claimed

The Duchess of Sussex helped guide Prince Harry on his ‘journey to wokeness’, the authors of the couple’s upcoming biography have claimed

‘We talk about some of the more obvious examples in some of the media coverage but I think that the things that have flown under the radar are some of the othering of Meghan we’ve seen. 

‘We’ve sort of seen it repeatedly that she’s not one of us. And now, what do they mean by not one of us? 

‘And I think there are things like that which Harry’s really had to become more attuned to and learn to see when it happens in front of him. And Meghan would have been the person that guided him on that journey. ‘

During the interview, the authors also discussed the events that eventually led to the  duke and duchess to decide taking a step back from the royal family.

Caroline Durand said: ‘Harry really was looking out for his family. 

‘His wife felt aggrieved, and they thought that the best decision that they could make was to step back, have a little bit more privacy but still be in a situation where they could carry on their mission, devote themselves to the causes that were so important to them.’

Speaking on the reported tensions between Prince Harry and his brother, Mr Scobie added: ‘I think it’s one of the early stories you saw come out of this book was this conversation that took place between Harry and William where William seemingly gives sort of brotherly advice to Harry about sort of perhaps watching the speed at which his relationship with Meghan was progressing. 

‘And I think there’ve been some people have commented that that might have been a moment where Harry was too sensitive. 

‘But I think we need to really look at the overall picture here and what led up to that moment. Harry was already aware of some of the murmurings that were taking place behind his back within the royal household about Meghan.  

The couple's upcoming biography Finding Freedom was written by Omid Scobie and Carolyn Durand

The couple's upcoming biography Finding Freedom was written by Omid Scobie and Carolyn Durand

The couple’s upcoming biography Finding Freedom was written by Omid Scobie and Carolyn Durand

‘He’d also experienced some of his own friends speaking about Meghan or making negative remarks behind her back that word had traveled back to him about. So when William sat down and had that conversation with him, that was the starting point.’ 

This week it was revealed that Prince Charles has remained in regular contact with his son despite being being hurt by revelations in the upcoming biography.

The biography offers an insights into Harry and Meghan’s relationships with his brother and sister-in-law, his father and the Royal Family as a whole. 

However, the Prince of Wales, who was said to have been hurt by some of the claims in the book, has been in regular contact with Prince Harry in the hope that the door can be kept open for a return, the Sun reports.

A royal insider told the paper: ‘Since his move to Los Angeles they have been in regular contact. Charles is not an avid user of texts but there are video and phone calls.

‘The book has never been a massive talking point between them and Charles is determined that it is not an obstacle. ‘

The Sussexes, who stepped down as working royals earlier this year, recently moved to a 14-acre estate in the famed 90210 postcode of Beverly Hills after flying from the Vancouver Island they were living on in March.     

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CHRISTOPHER STEVENS reviews last night’s TV: Moaning about a soaking on the flume? Don’t be so wet!

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christopher stevens reviews last nights tv moaning about a soaking on the flume dont be so wet

Inside Legoland: A World Of Wonder

Rating: rating showbiz 4

Rolling In It

Rating: rating showbiz 2

Royal watchers desperate for a glimpse of the Duke and Duchess of Sussex in Windsor won’t get much joy if they hang around outside the couple’s erstwhile home, Frogmore Cottage.

But they might have better luck if they check into one of the hotels at nearby Legoland. Among the 2,000 models of pirates, dinosaurs, pop stars and exotic flowers, guests might find life-size replicas in one corridor of Kate, William, Charles and Harry — built from Lego.

At least, Harry’s model was there last year when Inside Legoland: A World Of Wonder (C5) was filmed. Perhaps, like the real-life Duke himself, it has since disappeared.

Among the 2,000 models of pirates, pop stars and exotic flowers at Legoland (above), guests might find life-size replicas of Kate, William, Charles and Harry

Among the 2,000 models of pirates, pop stars and exotic flowers at Legoland (above), guests might find life-size replicas of Kate, William, Charles and Harry

Among the 2,000 models of pirates, pop stars and exotic flowers at Legoland (above), guests might find life-size replicas of Kate, William, Charles and Harry

The alternative would be that a Lego Meghan has been added to the display, and I wouldn’t envy the model-maker who has to get that job right. Imagine the ducal indignation if Her Grace was depicted wearing the wrong tiara.

Working at the theme park is already stressful enough, to judge from this lighthearted series. Visitors rush the turnstiles at opening time, determined to squeeze every minute of fun from the price of their ticket, but once inside many of them seem to spend the day queuing at the customer services desk to have a rant.

One choice gripe was that there weren’t enough staff to handle all the complaints. Now, how would anyone know that, if they hadn’t joined the queue to have a moan in the first place? The most popular complaint was that people were getting too wet on the water ride, Pirate Falls. If you’ve ever been on a water ride, you’ll appreciate that half the fun is getting soaked.

Prince Harry certainly knows this. He and his big brother famously rode the log flume with their mother at Thorpe Park on a family day out in 1993, and got drenched.

What was considered safe for royals in the Nineties might be grounds for a health and safety case today, so the maintenance team hurried out to make sure the bigger hoses were pointing away from riders on Pirate Falls.

That left the tricky problem of what to do with the smaller squirters that spurted from Lego frogs. Should these be regarded as a hazard to public safety too?

Eventually, an engineer made an executive decision. ‘Right,’ he said, ‘I’m turning the frogs back on.’

Doleful ballad of the weekend:

The Bollywood star Tabu, who gets top billing in A Suitable Boy (BBC1), launched into another of her dirge-like laments — then stopped, and started again. Each week, she sings twice. Is this ritual written into her contract?

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This was as dramatic as the programme got. Elsewhere, a small boy fell and scraped his knee, and a little girl was supremely unbothered after getting separated from her parents: she sat and watched a video in the Lost Children booth until they collected her.

A charmingly British holiday atmosphere hung over it all. Like Lego itself, the park seemed imbued with nostalgia.

Presenter Stephen Mulhern was hoping to draw on the same magic with his game show Rolling In It (ITV) — a quiz based on the penny-rollers in seaside amusement arcades.

Three contestants, helped out by three actors from Coronation Street, aimed giant coins down a ramp and onto a conveyor belt. Their prizes were determined by where the coins landed, with thousands of pounds depending on a lucky roll.

It was all a bit laborious, slowed down further by 15 multiple-choice quiz questions. These were mostly about pop, telly and celebs, though that didn’t help the player who had to guess which TV comedy featured ‘Mrs Slocombe’s pussy’.

She’d never heard of Are You Being Served? — ‘I’m young,’ she wailed — so she plumped for Keeping Up Appearances.

I shudder to think what Hyacinth Bucket, the glorious snob from that sitcom, would have made of such a vulgar question. But then, ‘Mrs Bouquet’ would never have admitted to watching ITV.

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Jamie Oliver’s everyday heroes: From perfect peppers to roasted broccoli

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jamie olivers everyday heroes from perfect peppers to roasted broccoli

We know that everyone cooks the same small repertoire of recipes, so I want to help you expand on that and arm you with some new favourites.

For the first time, I’ve looked at the data that shows what we’re putting into our shopping baskets, week in, week out, and have built meals around the 18 hero ingredients that kept appearing.

These recipes will give you new ideas for the ingredients you already know and love.

Let’s face it, life is busy, and these days we seem to have more and more demands on our time and headspace. 

We know that everyone cooks the same small repertoire of recipes, so I want to help you expand on that and arm you with some new favourites, writes Jamie Oliver

We know that everyone cooks the same small repertoire of recipes, so I want to help you expand on that and arm you with some new favourites, writes Jamie Oliver

We know that everyone cooks the same small repertoire of recipes, so I want to help you expand on that and arm you with some new favourites, writes Jamie Oliver

So this is about giving you inspiration on the food front for every day of the week.

We’re keeping things simple, pushing maximum flavour with minimum effort. We want fun, and we want solid, super-tasty recipes that consistently deliver.

The majority of ingredients will be easy to find in any food shop in any town in the country. As is often the case in cooking, the success of the recipes comes down to the quality of the ingredients you use.

Hero ingredient

Peppers are super-versatile. Try roasting them with other ‘nightshade’ veggies, such as chillies and tomatoes, or adding to curries, lasagne, pasta dishes and stir-fries. 

They also add crunch to salads.

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There’s not loads of stuff to buy for each recipe, so I’m hoping that will give you the excuse to trade up where you can, buying the best meat, fish or veggies you can find.

For your store cupboard, there are just five ingredients that I consider to be everyday staples: olive oil for cooking, extra-virgin olive oil for dressing and finishing dishes, red wine vinegar as a good all-rounder when it comes to acidity and balancing marinades, sauces or dressing and, of course, sea salt and black pepper for seasoning.

Cooking is simply impossible without these items at your fingertips and I believe every household should have them in stock.

We’ve included oil and vinegar in each individual recipe’s ingredients list where needed, although I’m presuming you’ll stock up on them before you start cooking.

One-pan wonders like the Stuffed red peppers involve minimum prep so you can let the oven do all the hard work. The clean-up after will be simple too.

Experiment with herbs and condiments

Herbs are a gift to any cook. Instead of buying them, why not grow the plants in the garden or in a pot on the windowsill? 

Herbs allow you to add single-minded flavour to a dish, without the need to over-season, which is good for everyone.

They’re also packed with incredible nutrition — we like that.

I use a lot of condiments in my new book 7 Ways, like mango chutney, curry pastes, black bean and teriyaki sauces, miso and pesto.

These are items you can find in all supermarkets, and of an extraordinary quality. They guarantee flavour and save hours of time in preparation. Most are long-lasting, which means you’re not under pressure to use them too quickly.

I have been criticised for using these so-called ‘cheat’ ingredients, but I think cheat ingredients help keep food exciting.

I’ve kept the equipment used pretty simple — a set of saucepans and non-stick ovenproof frying pans, a griddle and a shallow casserole pan, chopping boards, sturdy roasting trays and a decent set of knives will see you through.

If you want to save time, there are a few kitchen gadgets that will make your life a lot easier — like a speed-peeler, a box grater, and a pestle and mortar are fantastic for creating great texture and boosting flavour, and a blender and food processor are always a bonus, especially if you’re short on time!

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Stuffed red peppers

Serves 4  

Avocado, lime & feta cheese, qick black bean & smoked ham stew

Cook/prep time: 40 minutes 

  • 4 small red peppers
  • 200g sliced smoked higher-welfare ham
  • 1 onion
  • 2 x 400g tins of black beans
  • 1 x 250g packet cooked, mixed grains
  • 60g feta cheese
  • 1 ripe avocado
  • 2 limes
  • Olive oill
  • Red wine vinegar

Preheat the oven to 200c/gas 6. Cut the tops off the peppers, pull out the seeds, then sit the lids and bases on the bars of the oven to start softening. 

Finely chop the ham and put in a large, non-stick ovenproof frying pan on a medium heat with one tablespoon of olive oil, stirring as you peel and finely chop the onion. 

Once the ham is crispy, stir in the onion to cook and soften for five minutes. Add a tablespoon of red wine vinegar, then the beans, juice and all. Remove the peppers from the oven and nestle the bases in the stew. 

Divide the grains and a little feta between them and sit the pepper lids ajar. Transfer to the oven for 20 minutes, or until the peppers are cooked through, then season the stew to perfection. 

Dice the avocado flesh, then toss with the juice of one lime and season. 

Spoon over the peppers, crumble over the remaining feta, and serve with lime wedges, for squeezing over. 

Stuffed red peppers

Stuffed red peppers

Stuffed red peppers

Stuffed red peppers
Energy 454kcal 
Fat  19g 
Sat Fat  5.2g 
Protein  27.4g 
Carbs  36.9g 
Sugars  11.6g 
Salt  1.7g 
Fibre  18.9g 

Roasted broccoli on romesco 

Creamy butter beans, smoked almonds, sardines & toast

Cook/prep time: 55 minutes 

Serves 4 

  • 2 heads of broccoli (375g each)
  • 4 cloves of garlic
  • 1 x 460g jar roasted red peppers
  • 320g ripe mixed-colour cherry tomatoes
  • 50g smoked almonds
  • 2 x 400g tins butter beans
  • 5 slices sourdough bread
  • 2 x 120g tins sardines from sustainable sources
  • Red wine vinegar
  • Olive oil

Preheat the oven to 180c/gas 4. Trim the broccoli stalks, then halve each head and place in a roasting tray. 

Peel and finely slice the garlic then add to the tray, tear in the drained peppers, then halve and add the cherry tomatoes. 

Toss with one tablespoon each of red wine vinegar and olive oil, and a pinch of sea salt and black pepper, then pull the broccoli halves to the top and roast for 40 minutes. 

Meanwhile, crush half the almonds in a pestle and mortar. Pour the butter beans, juice and all, into a small pan and simmer on a medium-high heat for ten to 15 minutes, or until the liquid has reduced. Remove the broccoli to a board, then put the tray’s contents in a blender. 

Add the remaining almonds, tear in one slice of bread and blitz until smooth, then season to perfection with red wine vinegar, salt and pepper. 

Toast the rest of the bread. Divide the romesco sauce and beans between warm plates. Sit the broccoli on top. 

Scatter over the crushed almonds and serve with sardines and hot toast on the side.

Roasted broccoli on romesco

Roasted broccoli on romesco

Roasted broccoli on romesco

Roasted broccoli on romesco
Energy 563kcal 
Fat  20.9g   
Sat Fat  3.6g   
Protein  39.1g   
Carbs  53.5g   
Sugars  11.8g   
Salt  1.7g   
Fibre  17.3g   

Broccoli & halloumi salad 

Sweet slow-roasted cherry tomatoes, golden peaches, mint & grains

Cook/prep time: 1 hour, 10 minutes

Serves 4  

  • 320g ripe mixed-colour cherry tomatoes
  • 1 head broccoli (375g)
  • 1 x 415g tin peach halves in juicel
  • 100g halloumi
  • 2 x 250g packets mixed, cooked grains
  • 8 mixed-colour olives (stone-in)
  • ½ bunch of mint (15g)
  • 4 tbsp natural yoghurt
  • Extra virgin olive oil
  • Red wine vinegar

Hero ingredient

Never overcook broccoli — it’s best with bite. Try the florets raw, steamed, stir-fried, sautéed or roasted. 

The stem, leaves and flowers are edible too. To prepare the stem, peel off the tough outer skin.

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Preheat the oven to 140c/gas 1. 

Halve the cherry tomatoes, toss with one tablespoon of olive oil and a pinch of sea salt and black pepper, and place cut-side up in a roasting tray. 

Roast for one hour, or until soft and sticky. Meanwhile, trim the tough end off the broccoli stalk. 

Cut off the florets and cook in boiling water for five minutes, then drain. 

Very finely slice the remaining broccoli stalk. Mix two tablespoons each of peach juice, extra virgin olive oil and red wine vinegar, then toss half with the broccoli stalk. 

In a large non-stick frying pan on a medium-high heat cook the halloumi, drained peach halves and broccoli florets until golden, while you heat the grains according to packet instructions. Squash and destone the olives.

On a serving platter, toss the grains with the remaining dressing. 

Arrange everything else on top, tearing the halloumi and any large mint leaves, then spoon over the yoghurt.

Broccoli & halloumi salad

Broccoli & halloumi salad

Broccoli & halloumi salad

Broccoli & halloumi salad
Energy 456kcal 
Fat 20.9g 
Sat Fat 6.9g 
Protein  17.2g 
Carbs  48.7g 
Sugars 13g 
Salt  2g 
Fibre  9.2g 

Broccoli & cheese pierogi 

Super-quick sweet cherry tomato & garlic sauce with chives

Cook/prep time: 50 minutes

Serves 2  

  • 100g self-raising flour, plus extra for dusting
  • 1 free-range large egg
  • 1 head of broccoli (375g)
  • 25g Cheddar cheese
  • ½ bunch chives (10g)
  • 1 tbsp soured cream
  • Olive oil
  • 2 cloves of garlic
  • 1 x 400g tin quality cherry tomatoes

Mix the flour, egg and a pinch of sea salt until you have a smooth dough, adding a splash of water, if needed. 

Knead on a flour-dusted surface for two minutes, cover and pop into the fridge. Trim the tough end off the broccoli stalk. Remove the florets, halving any larger ones, and chop the remaining stalk into 2cm chunks. 

Put one third of the florets aside, then cook the rest with the chopped stalk in a pan of boiling water for 8 minutes. 

Drain and mash well, then finely grate in the cheese, finely chop the chives and add half, stir in the soured cream, season to perfection and leave to cool. Peel and finely slice the garlic. 

Divide the dough into eight, then roll out each piece into a 14cm circle, dusting with flour as you go. Divide up equal amounts of the filling on one side of each circle. 

Lightly brush the exposed pastry with water, then fold it over the filling, twisting along the edge to seal, like in the picture.

Put a large non-stick frying pan on a medium heat with half a tablespoon of olive oil, the pierogi and the reserved broccoli florets. Pour in boiling kettle water until it is 1cm deep, cover and boil for four minutes. 

Uncover and fry the pierogi and broccoli on one side for four minutes, or until the water has evaporated and the bases are golden. 

Meanwhile, place one teaspoon of olive oil and the garlic in the pan you used to boil your broccoli, stir until lightly golden, then pour in the tomatoes, simmer for two minutes and season to perfection. 

Serve it all together, sprinkled with the remaining chives.

Broccoli & cheese pierogi

Broccoli & cheese pierogi

Broccoli & cheese pierogi

Broccoli & cheese pierogi
Energy 402kcal 
Fat 14.7g 
Sat Fat  5.5g 
Protein  22.2g 
Carbs  48.4g 
Sugars  9.5g 
Salt  1.5g 
Fibre  8.1g 

Cauli chicken pot pie

Serves 4  

Smoked pancetta, sweet cherry tomatoes & puff pastry

Cook/prep time: 50 minutes  

  • 1 head of cauliflower (800g)
  • 1 red onion
  • 4 free-range skinless, boneless chicken thighs
  • 4 rashers of higher-welfare smoked pancetta
  • 160g ripe cherry tomatoes
  • 1 heaped tsp wholegrain mustard
  • 2 heaped tsp runny honey
  • 1 x 320g sheet all-butter puff pastry
  • Olive oil
  • Red wine vinegar

Preheat the oven to 220c/gas 7. Click off and discard only the tatty outer leaves of the cauliflower, then cut it into quarters. 

Hero ingredient

Cauliflower is great with spices and is delicious roasted with dried chilli, cumin and coriander seeds. 

The leaves and stalks are also edible and can be added, along with the florets, to dishes like cauliflower cheese.

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Blanch in a pan of boiling water for five minutes, then drain. Meanwhile, peel the onion and cut into sixths. Halve the chicken thighs. 

In a 28cm non-stick ovenproof frying pan on a medium-high heat, fry the chicken and onion with one tablespoon of olive oil, a pinch of sea salt and lots of black pepper until lightly golden, stirring occasionally.

Add the cauliflower to the pan. Cook and turn for five minutes, then push it all to one side of the pan and add the pancetta to crisp up. 

Now add the tomatoes, mustard, honey and one tablespoon of red wine vinegar, and mix well. 

When it’s looking really golden, roll the pastry out a little to fit the pan and place it over the top, using a wooden spoon to push it right into the edges. 

Bake for 25 minutes at the bottom of the oven, or until golden and puffed up. Using oven gloves, pop a large plate over the pan and confidently but very carefully turn out and serve. 

Cauli chicken pot pie

Cauli chicken pot pie

Cauli chicken pot pie

Cauli chicken pot pie
Energy  615kcal 
Fat  34.6g 
Sat Fat  16.9g 
Protein  30.3g 
Carbs  45.7g 
Sugars  14.7g 
Salt  1.4g 
Fibre  6.3g 
Extracted from 7 ways: Easy Ideas For Every Day Of The Week by Jamie Oliver, published by Michael Joseph on August 20, 2020, at £26. © Jamie Oliver 2020

Extracted from 7 ways: Easy Ideas For Every Day Of The Week by Jamie Oliver, published by Michael Joseph on August 20, 2020, at £26. © Jamie Oliver 2020

Extracted from 7 ways: Easy Ideas For Every Day Of The Week by Jamie Oliver, published by Michael Joseph on August 20, 2020, at £26. © Jamie Oliver 2020

Extracted from 7 ways: Easy Ideas For Every Day Of The Week by Jamie Oliver, published by Michael Joseph on August 20, 2020, at £26. 

© Jamie Oliver 2020.

We’ve partnered with WHSmith to offer readers the chance to buy 7 Ways for only £12. 

Pre-order online from today or buy in-store from August 20, 2020.  

See page 60 for details and conditions.

Photography © Levon Biss

Jamie: Keep Cooking Family Favourites will air on Channel 4 at 8pm from Monday, August 17.  

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