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BREAKING NEWS: Donald Trump’s brother Robert hospitalized

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breaking news donald trumps brother robert hospitalized

President Donald Trump will fly to New York City on Friday to visit his ailing younger brother Robert after he was hospitalized earlier in serious condition. 

The 72-year-old was admitted to New York Presbyterian Hospital in Manhattan and was described as ‘very ill’, however further details of his illness or condition were not released.   

During a White House press briefing on Friday, the president said his brother is ‘having a hard time’ but did not elaborate on why he had been hospitalized.

‘I have a wonderful brother, we’ve had a great relationship for a long time. He’s in the hospital right now, hopefully he’ll be alright. He’s having a hard time,’ Trump told reporters before departing for New York.  

During a White House press briefing on Friday, President Trump said his younger brother is 'having a hard time' in the hospital

During a White House press briefing on Friday, President Trump said his younger brother is 'having a hard time' in the hospital

During a White House press briefing on Friday, President Trump said his younger brother is ‘having a hard time’ in the hospital 

Robert Trump, pictured with older brother Donald in 1999, was admitted to New York Presbyterian Hospital in Manhattan in serious condition

Robert Trump, pictured with older brother Donald in 1999, was admitted to New York Presbyterian Hospital in Manhattan in serious condition

Robert Trump, pictured with older brother Donald in 1999, was admitted to New York Presbyterian Hospital in Manhattan in serious condition 

The 72-year-old was previously hospitalized for a week at Mount Sinai Hospital New York in June. He is pictured right with sister Maryanne and brother Donald in 1990

The 72-year-old was previously hospitalized for a week at Mount Sinai Hospital New York in June. He is pictured right with sister Maryanne and brother Donald in 1990

The 72-year-old was previously hospitalized for a week at Mount Sinai Hospital New York in June. He is pictured right with sister Maryanne and brother Donald in 1990 

Robert was admitted to New York Presbyterian Hospital (pictured) but details on his condition or illness are unknown

Robert was admitted to New York Presbyterian Hospital (pictured) but details on his condition or illness are unknown

Robert was admitted to New York Presbyterian Hospital (pictured) but details on his condition or illness are unknown

A guard was seen blocking access to a street outside the Manhattan hospital ahead of the president's visit on Friday

A guard was seen blocking access to a street outside the Manhattan hospital ahead of the president's visit on Friday

A guard was seen blocking access to a street outside the Manhattan hospital ahead of the president’s visit on Friday 

Trump had already been scheduled to travel to his country club in nearby Bedminster, New Jersey, for the weekend. 

Hospital security guards were seen blocking off access to a street outside the medical center ahead of the president’s visit earlier this afternoon.  

Robert, the youngest of the five Trump siblings, had been previously hospitalized for ten days at Mount Sinai Hospital in New York in June.

He was admitted to the hospital’s neurosciences intensive care unit where he was treated for a ‘serious condition’, the Daily Beast reported. 

Around the same time, Robert had filed a lawsuit against his niece Mary Trump, seeking to block her from publishing a tell-all book on the president. 

Mary is the daughter of the brothers’ eldest sibling, Fred Trump Jr, who struggled with alcoholism and died in 1981 at the age of 43. 

Robert filed for an injunction claiming the explosive book, ‘Too Much and Never Enough: How My Family Created the World’s Most Dangerous Man’, violated the terms of a confidentiality agreement she signed nearly two decades ago.  

In a statement to The New York Times in June, he accused his niece of attempting to ‘sensationalize and mischaracterize’ their family relationship for her own financial gain.

Robert has openly voiced his support for his brother over years. He is pictured hugging Donald after his presidential acceptance speech on Election Day 2016

Robert has openly voiced his support for his brother over years. He is pictured hugging Donald after his presidential acceptance speech on Election Day 2016

Robert has openly voiced his support for his brother over years. He is pictured hugging Donald after his presidential acceptance speech on Election Day 2016

Robert was recently involved in a legal battle against niece Mary Trump (left) to block her from publishing a tell-all book on the president

Robert was recently involved in a legal battle against niece Mary Trump (left) to block her from publishing a tell-all book on the president

Too Much and Never Enough: How My Family Created the World's Most Dangerous Man, by Mary Trump was released last month

Too Much and Never Enough: How My Family Created the World's Most Dangerous Man, by Mary Trump was released last month

Robert was recently involved in a legal battle against niece Mary Trump (left) to block her from publishing a tell-all book on the president, Too Much and Never Enough: How My Family Created the World’s Most Dangerous Man (right)

‘I and the rest of my entire family are so proud of my wonderful brother, the president, and feel that Mary’s actions are truly a disgrace,’ Robert said. 

The explosive memoir was eventually released last month after a judge agreed to lift a temporary restraining order preventing Mary from publicizing or distributing her work.

The judge said the confidentiality clauses in the 2001 agreement, ‘viewed in the context of the current Trump family circumstances in 2020, would offend public policy as a prior restraint on protected speech.’  

The younger Trump has openly voiced his support for his brother over the years. 

In an interview with Page Six ahead of the 2016 presidential election, Robert said he supported his brother’s campaign ‘1,000 per cent’.’ 

Robert is the youngest of the five Trump siblings born to Fred and Mary Anne MacLeod Trump. Pictured left to right: Donald, Fred Jr, Robert, Maryanne, and Elizabeth

Robert is the youngest of the five Trump siblings born to Fred and Mary Anne MacLeod Trump. Pictured left to right: Donald, Fred Jr, Robert, Maryanne, and Elizabeth

Robert is the youngest of the five Trump siblings born to Fred and Mary Anne MacLeod Trump. Pictured left to right: Donald, Fred Jr, Robert, Maryanne, and Elizabeth

In a rare but brief interview in December, Robert said his brother had been doing 'fantastic', when asked how the president was holding up during his impeachment trial

In a rare but brief interview in December, Robert said his brother had been doing 'fantastic', when asked how the president was holding up during his impeachment trial

In a rare but brief interview in December, Robert said his brother had been doing ‘fantastic’, when asked how the president was holding up during his impeachment trial 

Robert was married to socialite Blaine Trump (pictured) until their 2007 divorce. He now lives in Long Island with wife Anne Marie Pallan

Robert was married to socialite Blaine Trump (pictured) until their 2007 divorce. He now lives in Long Island with wife Anne Marie Pallan

Robert was married to socialite Blaine Trump (pictured) until their 2007 divorce. He now lives in Long Island with wife Anne Marie Pallan

He was later seen celebrating Donald’s victory at the New York Hilton where the then president-elect delivered his acceptance speech.

Robert also spoke out in support of his brother during a brief, but rare interview at LAX airport last December, when Trump was at the center of an impeachment trial. 

When asked how his older sibling was doing, he told the cameraman: ‘I think he’s doing fantastic’, before getting into the back seat of his car.  

Robert had also held a senior position in the family business, but unlike his brother, he has generally maintained a low public profile.

He previously served as an executive for Trump Organization where he managed the real estate portfolio outside of Manhattan.

He was married to socialite Blaine Trump until their 2007 divorce, and currently serves on the board of directors of ZeniMax Media.

Robert also has two older sisters, Elizabeth Trump Grau, who is a retired executive from Chase Manhattan Bank, and Maryanne Trump Barry, a retired federal judge.

He is currently based in Long Island where he lives with wife Anne Marie Pallan, his former secretary.  

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Prosecutor investigating Madeleine McCann’s disappearance says ‘nothing’ suggests she is still alive

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German authorities say there are 'many pieces' of the Madeleine McCann 'puzzle' pointing towards suspect Christian Brueckner (pictured)

German authorities say there are 'many pieces' of the Madeleine McCann 'puzzle' pointing towards suspect Christian Brueckner (pictured)

German authorities say there are ‘many pieces’ of the Madeleine McCann ‘puzzle’ pointing towards suspect Christian Brueckner (pictured)

German authorities say there are ‘many pieces’ of the Madeleine McCann ‘puzzle’ pointing towards suspect Christian Brueckner.

Prosecutor Hans Christian Wolters admitted there still was no ‘smoking gun’ evidence enabling charges to be brought against the 43-year-old paedophile over the British youngster’s disappearance.

But he insisted in an interview on Portuguese state broadcaster RTP, referring to Brueckner only by his first name and initial of his surname: ‘All I can say is this is like a puzzle and there are many pieces that lead us to believe Christian B is responsible.

‘One of the pieces is the signal from the mobile phone he was using at the time Madeleine McCann disappeared and has been shown to have been in the area of the Ocean Club resort where she was staying.’

Making his strongest assertion yet to justify the German decision to treat her disappearance as a murder case and not a missing persons’ inquiry, Mr Wolters added: ‘The result of our investigation does not point in any way to the possibility the suspect might have kept Madeleine alive.

‘We have nothing to indicate she could be alive.

‘Everything we have points to her being dead. We have no margin of manoeuvre.’

He also rubbished reports earlier this week that German police believed the chief Madeleine McCann suspect had an accomplice, and addressed earlier accusations made on Portuguese TV Brueckner’s ‘ex’ girlfriend Nicole Fehlinger was involved in an Algarve burglary he was linked to.

The Braunschweig-based prosecutor said: ‘Naturally we investigate everyone known to us to see if they had something to do with Madeleine’s disappearance.

‘This woman was the suspect’s ex-girlfriend and she is classed as a witness but we don’t have any reason to believe she is linked to this crime.

Prosecutor investigating the disappearance of Madeleine McCann (pictured) say there is 'nothing' suggesting she is still alive

Prosecutor investigating the disappearance of Madeleine McCann (pictured) say there is 'nothing' suggesting she is still alive

Prosecutor investigating the disappearance of Madeleine McCann (pictured) say there is ‘nothing’ suggesting she is still alive

‘She is not a suspect for us. We are only investigating Christian B, nobody else.

‘At this stage we believe he acted alone in this case.’

He also rebutted claims made by disgraced former police officer Goncalo Amaral, who met with Brueckner’s defence lawyer Friedrich Fulscher last week in Portugal, that the German was being ‘scapegoated.’

The controversial ex-cop, who was removed from the initial Madeleine McCann investigation for criticising British police, is involved in an ongoing legal battle with her parents Kate and Gerry over his insistence she died by accident in their apartment and they covered it up.

He told the RTP channel’s Sexta as 9 show: ‘I know this former inspector speaks a lot and comments on our work.

‘We’re not going to get into a war of words. All I will say is that we have carried out a very serious investigation and there is no indication whatsoever Madeleine McCann’s parents are linked to her disappearance.

‘On the other hand we have a lot of evidence pointing to Christian B killing her.

‘Goncalo Amaral knows how he reaches his conclusions and that’s not up to us to judge.’

His comments came as Brueckner’s lawyer dramatically declined an opportunity to rule out his client’s involvement in Madeleine McCann’s disappearance, and appeared to accept he had funded his nomadic Algarve lifestyle through house break-ins.

Mr Fulscher has always insisted Brueckner was not involved in Madeleine McCann’s disappearance and claimed prosecutors are basing their case on information from dubious witnesses.

But asked on Friday night by investigative reporter and Sexta as 9 presenter Sandra Felgueiras if Brueckner had told him he had ‘nothing’ to do with the May 3 2007 disappearance, he paused for several seconds before responding: ‘Everything that’s said between a client and his lawyer is protected by confidentiality and therefore I cannot say what he tells me.

‘But you can be sure that doesn’t mean he has something to hide.’

Quizzed about reports Breuckner used to live off the proceeds of burglaries he committed on the Algarve, he admitted: ‘It’s not something that surprises me.

‘As his lawyer it wouldn’t surprise me if he was convicted for these burglaries.’

Mr Wolters revealed earlier this month German authorities had asked Portuguese police to investigate ‘more sexual abuse and rapes’ they believe Brueckner could have carried out on the Algarve.

He has already been linked to a sex offence on a beach near Praia da Luz a month before Madeleine vanished and has been confirmed as an ‘official suspect’ in the 2004 rape of Irish tour rep Hazel Behan.

Ms Behan waived her right to anonymity in June to say she believed the masked man who targeted her in her Algarve apartment could have been Brueckner. 

His lawyer has insisted he has nothing to do with the horrific sex attack.

Brueckner is currently in Germany’s Kiel Prison for drugs offences and is due to start a seven-year sentence for the 2005 rape in Praia da Luz of an American OAP.

He was convicted of the horrific sex crime late last year in Germany.

A former girlfriend spoke out last month to reveal he had sexually assaulted her five-year-old daughter and would also launch violent attacks against her during their nine-month relationship in the northern Germany city of Braunschweig.

The crimes, which sparked a European Arrest Warrant and his 2017 extradition to Portugal, ended up with him receiving a 15-month prison sentence.

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Hideous truth of Nazi massacre emerged thanks to Scotland Yard investigator

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hideous truth of nazi massacre emerged thanks to scotland yard investigator

Clutching her two-week-old son in her bare arms, a young mother stared down into a ravine where a mass of naked corpses lay tangled together.

She stood among countless other Jewish women and children stretched along the edge of the gorge as far as the eye could see.

All had been forced to strip before being marched to this godforsaken place and they knew that in a few moments they would form part of the grotesque human collage below.

Recalling the scene years later, at his trial, one SS commander spoke of the ‘indescribable wailing’ echoing across the valley.

Between September 29 and 30, 1941, an estimated 33,771 Jews — almost all women, children, or elderly people — were herded to the canyon, 150 metres long, in the Ukrainian city of Kiev, where they were summarily slaughtered, then covered with soil and rubble

Between September 29 and 30, 1941, an estimated 33,771 Jews — almost all women, children, or elderly people — were herded to the canyon, 150 metres long, in the Ukrainian city of Kiev, where they were summarily slaughtered, then covered with soil and rubble

Between September 29 and 30, 1941, an estimated 33,771 Jews — almost all women, children, or elderly people — were herded to the canyon, 150 metres long, in the Ukrainian city of Kiev, where they were summarily slaughtered, then covered with soil and rubble

As a team of Nazi assassins moved along the line with their fast-action pistols, the mother was despatched with a single bullet to the back of her head.

We will never know whether her baby was murdered in the same way because, to save ammunition, the soldiers sometimes beat small children to death or left them to be crushed under the weight of fallen bodies.

What we do know, thanks to a meticulous investigation involving a former Scotland Yard war-crimes expert, is that this newborn innocent was the youngest victim of the Babyn Yar Massacre.

This month marks the 79th anniversary of that act of evil, one of World War II’s worst, yet shamefully forgotten, atrocities.

Between September 29 and 30, 1941, an estimated 33,771 Jews — almost all women, children, or elderly people — were herded to the canyon, 150 metres long, in the Ukrainian city of Kiev, where they were summarily slaughtered, then covered with soil and rubble. The wounded were buried alive.

Over the years, fragments of the story of this abomination have emerged. But until now they have never been fully pieced together.

A day later, Russian PoWs cover the bodies. Some historians believe it signalled the true start of the Final Solution, the plan devised by Heinrich Himmler and authorised by Hitler to exterminate the entire Jewish race

A day later, Russian PoWs cover the bodies. Some historians believe it signalled the true start of the Final Solution, the plan devised by Heinrich Himmler and authorised by Hitler to exterminate the entire Jewish race

A day later, Russian PoWs cover the bodies. Some historians believe it signalled the true start of the Final Solution, the plan devised by Heinrich Himmler and authorised by Hitler to exterminate the entire Jewish race

This major new investigation, details of which were revealed to me this week, has recreated events in graphic detail.

The mass execution was choreographed with chilling insouciance by SS commander Paul Blobel, who carried out his orders — to exterminate every Jew in the Nazi-occupied parts of the Soviet Union — with ill-disguised pleasure.

Driving past the scene with a superior officer a few weeks afterwards, he gestured towards the clumps of earth covering the bodies and nonchalantly remarked: ‘Here lie my 30,000 Jews.’

Although this monstrous man (who was eventually convicted at Nuremberg and hanged for crimes against humanity) had overseen massacres of lesser magnitude before, the scale of Babyn Yar was of a different order.

Some historians believe it signalled the true start of the Final Solution, the plan devised by Heinrich Himmler and authorised by Hitler to exterminate the entire Jewish race.

Before that, the Nazis had executed able-bodied Jewish men but largely spared their womenfolk and children. What happened at Babyn Yar sent out the message that no one was to be spared.

When Hitler heard how easy it had been to murder so many Jews without the outside world hearing of it, he was encouraged to accelerate the extermination plan.

As of September 1941, Babyn Yar was the largest Nazi mass-killing on the Eastern Front — but the very next month it was surpassed by the shooting and burning of 50,000 more Jews in the Black Sea port of Odessa.

Even today, many people remain unaware that the Holocaust began not in death camps such as Auschwitz but in a Ukrainian ravine, and that the Nazis first used machine-guns, not gas chambers, to exterminate Jews.

For in 1943, when the Germans were in retreat from Russia and their high command saw defeat was inevitable, they ordered Blobel to destroy evidence of the massacre by exhuming all the bodies and burning them on giant pyres.

As tens of thousands more had by then been murdered in the same place — not only Jews but Roma gipsies, Soviet prisoners of war and Ukrainian nationals — this task took a month to complete.

It was carried out by prisoners from forced labour camps — many of them Jews — who were themselves executed afterwards to preserve the secrecy of the operation.

To dispose of the bodies quickly, Blobel devised a method of piling them on iron frames in layers, interspersed with firewood.

After the war, Stalin and his Communist successors were reluctant to remember the annihilation of Jews during the war, preferring to glorify the heroic struggle of the Russian people. So they perpetuated the cover-up.

Pure evil: A mother, cradling her child, is shot.  Even today, many people remain unaware that the Holocaust began not in death camps such as Auschwitz but in a Ukrainian ravine, and that the Nazis first used machine-guns, not gas chambers, to exterminate Jews

Pure evil: A mother, cradling her child, is shot.  Even today, many people remain unaware that the Holocaust began not in death camps such as Auschwitz but in a Ukrainian ravine, and that the Nazis first used machine-guns, not gas chambers, to exterminate Jews

Pure evil: A mother, cradling her child, is shot.  Even today, many people remain unaware that the Holocaust began not in death camps such as Auschwitz but in a Ukrainian ravine, and that the Nazis first used machine-guns, not gas chambers, to exterminate Jews

The ravine was filled in and landscaped to create a park where Kiev residents now play sports and have picnics, the younger ones quite unaware that beneath them lies one of the world’s biggest makeshift graveyards.

While some commemorative monuments have belatedly been sited at Babyn Yar since Ukraine gained its independence, none conveys the enormity of the massacre or its historical significance — and none is substantial enough to honour the victims’ memory.

This new project, funded by wealthy benefactors under the auspices of the Babyn Yar Memorial Center, will give the genocidal atrocity due prominence.

It draws heavily on the expertise of Cambridge-educated war-crimes sleuth Dr Martin Dean, a former consultant to the Metropolitan Police, who is helping to piece together the full story.

He has discovered details such as the route the victims took to Babyn Yar and the precise location of many shootings.

After almost 80 years, the investigation will also provide thousands of families with the missing details of how their relatives died.

Already the identities of some 18,000 Jews murdered over those two September days have been confirmed. Of these, the fate of 907 had previously been unknown.

But the team have uncovered more than just names. Much new biographical material has been found: the victims’ ancestry; where they lived and worked; how they struggled to survive after the Nazis stormed into Kiev.

This wealth of new material will be showcased in a museum to be built at Babyn Yar.

Gathering the information is a monumental task. Only a handful of people lived to tell of the massacre (one woman feigned death by jumping into the ravine a split second before the trigger was pulled and lay for hours amid bodies) and no survivors are alive today.

Inspecting the site is of little use, either, as it has been so completely concealed that it is impossible to tell the 45ft-deep ravine, once the site of a sand quarry, ever existed.

But by sifting through archive documents and maps, and studying unpublished pictures taken by Nazi propaganda photographers, the investigative team have found out what happened.

The photographs, some taken just a day after the massacre as Soviet prisoners of war were shovelling earth over the corpses, others captured from a plane flying over the site at around the time of the exhumation in 1943, have proved particularly useful.

Matching them against a 1924 geographical survey of the ravine, experts have used 3D imaging to create an eerie timelapse video.

It shows how the Valley of Death’s entire contour changed after the thousands of bodies were buried.

The haunting film also reveals precisely where most executions were carried out, at the western spur of the ravine, and depicts the victims’ discarded clothing and belongings strewn in the sand quarry where they were stripped.

By analysing shadows on the grainy black-and-white pictures, the team have even established the times of day they were taken.

Dr Dean’s reputation as one of Britain’s most formidable war-crimes investigators was enhanced in 1999, when he acted as chief historian in the prosecution of Anthony Sawoniuk, the only person convicted under the UK’s War Crimes Act.

Having settled in London after the war, posing as a Polish refugee, Sawoniuk was unmasked in his 70s as a Nazi collaborator who shot at least 18 Jews. Convicted of two specimen murder charges, he was sent to prison for life.

Dr Dean has taken on the task of investigating Babyn Yar ‘because it is the right thing to do’. 

He says: ‘For many years it was a scandal that there was no memorial at all. Then, when the Soviet Union put one up, they put it in the wrong place and it didn’t even mention Jews. They just said it was a crime against the Soviet Union. They didn’t want the Jews to have special status as victims.’

The horrors of Babyn Yar began with a cynical ploy.

On September 26, 1941, the Nazis posted an edict on Kiev’s streets ordering all Jews living in and around the city to assemble at a meeting point, bringing their documents, valuables and warm clothing. Anyone failing to obey would be shot.

Although Blobel expected only five or six thousand to fall into his trap, more than 30,000 turned up. The Jews of Eastern Europe were long accustomed to such edicts, which usually presaged their forced resettlement.

‘I think they were expecting to be sent somewhere by train. There is a freight railway station not far from the route they took to the site of the shooting,’ says Dr Dean.

Once rounded up, the throng were formed into columns and began the three-mile trudge to the ravine, passing a checkpoint where they were ordered to leave their heavy baggage, horses and carts.

Even then they remained oblivious to their fate. One witness described how Blobel reprimanded a German policeman for beating some of the Jews, as he wanted them to believe they would be given safe passage.

It was only as they neared the sand quarry that cold realisation dawned and word of the slaughter unfolding ahead was passed back.

Some tried to turn back but they had been channelled into a narrow funnel of soldiers and policemen, who flayed them with sticks to keep them moving along.

Once they had been stripped, they were jabbed towards the cliff-top where the killers of Sonderkommando 4A were waiting.

By the second day, the bodies were piled seven deep.

It took about 1,000 men to carry out so many murders. Some must have felt remorse — yet many members of the death squad took lunch and dinner breaks. Then, after their mission was completed, SS high command in Kiev held a raucous celebratory banquet.

Yet even amid such mind-numbing, calculated cruelty and sheer evil, the project’s researchers have found a few uplifting stories.

One is that of Olga Kobets, who was only seven when the massacre happened but managed to save the life of her best friend Ilya Mitelman, then aged eight.

This week, via Zoom-link to the Ukraine, Mrs Kobets, now 86, told me what happened. Although she is an Orthodox Christian and Ilya was Jewish, they were neighbours and their families were close.

Ilya’s father Noah and his brother Borya were not among the thousands duped into turning up at the assembly point on September 29.

Sensing danger, they decided to defy the order and go into hiding, leaving Ilya in the care of his mother Sara, who, as only one of her parents was Jewish, had obtained documents stating that she was a Ukrainian gentile.

Yet even amid such mind-numbing, calculated cruelty and sheer evil, the project’s researchers have found a few uplifting stories. One is that of Olga Kobets, who was only seven when the massacre happened but managed to save the life of her best friend Ilya Mitelman, then aged eight. Olga (centre) saved the life of her Jewish friend Ilya, left

Yet even amid such mind-numbing, calculated cruelty and sheer evil, the project’s researchers have found a few uplifting stories. One is that of Olga Kobets, who was only seven when the massacre happened but managed to save the life of her best friend Ilya Mitelman, then aged eight. Olga (centre) saved the life of her Jewish friend Ilya, left

Yet even amid such mind-numbing, calculated cruelty and sheer evil, the project’s researchers have found a few uplifting stories. One is that of Olga Kobets, who was only seven when the massacre happened but managed to save the life of her best friend Ilya Mitelman, then aged eight. Olga (centre) saved the life of her Jewish friend Ilya, left

But before they could make their escape, the two men went to buy food at the market. They were never heard of again. ‘We were told later that they were taken to Babyn Yar,’ said Mrs Kobets.

In the ensuing months and years, she and her family protected Sara (who changed her name to Maria) and Ilya.

Concealing the little boy’s religion wasn’t easy, even though his mother had him baptised as a Christian and hung a cross around his neck. For he looked distinctly Jewish and, to curry favour with the Nazis, an informer betrayed his true identity.

Ilya had to hide in the cellar whenever the Germans did their rounds of the neighbourhood

‘He was afraid to be locked away there on his own. It was freezing cold and dark and there were rats, so I would go down there with him,’ she told me.

‘We were both afraid. We would hold hands and pray together. It didn’t matter to us that our religions were different. We had the same God; a children’s God.’

When heavy jackboots made the floorboards creak above them and they heard German voices, they feared Ilya would be caught. But they never did find him.

Ilya lived to become a successful engineer and, although he moved to Germany in later life, he and Mrs Kobets remained friends until he died, aged 82, in 2015.

Fate dealt a different hand to the two-week-old baby who died in his mother’s arms and the more than 33,000 others who walked into the Valley of Death. At least now they will be remembered.

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Sasha Swire dazzled men – but can MP’s wife behind scurrilous diary survive social Siberia?

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sasha swire dazzled men but can mps wife behind scurrilous diary survive social siberia

How frightfully unfair it is on gorgeous, glamorous Sasha Swire to judge her by her conversations with those famous politicians — royals, too — after she jotted down every lip-smacking detail night after night in her secret diary.

How much fairer to remember the willowy beauty who mesmerised men — such as David Cameron — with a sway of her slim hips and a whiff of her expensive perfume. Or flirting with a plutocrat at a Buckingham Palace banquet and noting approvingly to herself — after he offers to whisk her to Corsica on his superyacht — that it’s ‘nice my husband thinks I can still pull’.

Sex, discussing it and complaining about the lack of it is a constant feature of Sasha’s newly published Diary Of An MP’s Wife. ‘David talks a lot about sex,’ she says of our former prime minister in one Bridget Jones-style entry.

But he’s not the only one. At a Chequers dinner party Lady Swire, 57, whose father Sir John Nott was Defence Secretary at the time of the Falklands War, enlivens the company by announcing: ‘I enjoy sex much more in my 50s than in my 40s.’

Perhaps this, then, is how she should be recognised, as a towering show-off and attention-seeker. As well as someone with a fear of losing her allure and an obsession with money — although thanks to the staggering indiscretions in her diary, she will now be having it delivered by the sackful.

Financial reward may, however, be the one compensation for putting pen to paper. Friendships have been broken and bridges burned on such an epic scale that all those glossy invitations to the smartest house parties are likely to vanish.

As one Tory grandee who entertained Sasha and her husband, former MP Sir Hugo Swire, at his country home said: ‘When she came to stay we had no idea she was keeping copious notes so we could appear in her diaries. They are a lovely couple but Sasha has a ruthless streak in her.’

Sasha Swire was a willowy beauty who mesmerised men — such as David Cameron — with a sway of her slim hips and a whiff of her expensive perfume

Sasha Swire was a willowy beauty who mesmerised men — such as David Cameron — with a sway of her slim hips and a whiff of her expensive perfume

Sasha Swire was a willowy beauty who mesmerised men — such as David Cameron — with a sway of her slim hips and a whiff of her expensive perfume

Another ‘victim’, a former Cabinet minister with whom she used to exchange intimacies, recalled how in recent years, whenever she saw Sasha, she was bombarded with questions about her sex life. ‘I now think she was looking for nuggets for her bloody book,’ she says.

‘I feel very used. She goes out of her way to get you to open up emotionally. And I know others feel the same way.’

One figure says he and his wife came to dread going to dinner with the Swires. ‘The first thing she’ll say is, ‘Do you still sleep with your wife?’ It’s so disarming.

‘She seeks to be friendly but it’s actually humiliating and it comes across as sheer bloody rudeness.’

For ten years at the epicentre of a social salon at the top of the political tree, Sasha Swire had a ringside seat in the management of Britain thanks to her husband’s friendship and support of David Cameron.

And all that time she was scratching away in the room at her Devon manor house she calls her ‘writing tower’, overlooking the landscaped gardens she designed herself.

Her name is on the book and the words are certainly hers, but it has been a joint enterprise. Sir Hugo, a former debs’ delight who once dated Jerry Hall (when the Texan model was on the rebound from serially unfaithful Mick Jagger), was no mere passive observer.

It must, therefore, have been that much harder to include — amid all the lewd banter, cruel mockery, Negronis at dawn and withering put-downs — a reference to a suspected affair between her husband and an unnamed woman.

As the Mail reported yesterday, this was one social indiscretion Lady Swire was reluctant to enlarge upon.

Many wonder if this book will be the equivalent of the Alan Clark diaries of the Thatcher and Major years of the Eighties and Nineties? Clark, of course, found himself an object of contempt and derision over his sordid, and to many people, repulsive revelations about his sexual depravity.

Lady Swire’s wicked disclosures are, so far, only registering shock and dismay but the final judgment could yet be merciless. All the same, the Clark parallel does resonate. There is nothing in her memoir to match the grubbiness of Clark’s ‘coven’ — a mother and her two daughters with whom he slept. But some will see in this undoubtedly gripping diary an example of the seediness of life at the top of Britain.

And there is also the possibility that her diaries might one day be televised as Clark’s were. ‘She’s imagining a little mini-series,’ says a Devon friend.

Such chutzpah suggests that she feels she has done nothing to be ashamed of. ‘Yes, of course there were a few tears when the criticism began rolling in, but not for long and not very many,’ says a confidante. ‘Sasha’s very pragmatic. She’s looked at what’s been said about the diaries and concluded that it’s mainly of a political nature.’

The journalist Petronella Wyatt, whose father Woodrow published a posthumous and outrageous account of private conversations with the great and the good, says Lady Swire — a friend of more than 20 years — had initially been upset at the reaction. ‘She doesn’t think the criticism is justified,’ adds Wyatt. ‘It’s a fun book. It’s not nasty. No one should take offence.’

Sex, discussing it and complaining about the lack of it is a constant feature of Sasha's newly published Diary Of An MP's Wife

Sex, discussing it and complaining about the lack of it is a constant feature of Sasha's newly published Diary Of An MP's Wife

Sex, discussing it and complaining about the lack of it is a constant feature of Sasha’s newly published Diary Of An MP’s Wife

Others may disagree. Mr Cameron, for example, was left squirming over Lady Swire’s tales detailing his personal feuds, drinking and sexual innuendos.

Of the incident in which he allegedly joked that her perfume made him want to push her ‘into the bushes and give you one’, he prudently said he had no memory.

However, the former prime minister and his wife, Samantha, who in one passage is described as having ‘gin-sodden breath’ following her husband’s resignation after the EU referendum, are said to have been ‘astonished’ by the betrayal of so many friends and confidences. They were aware that the diaries were coming. Others were not so fortunate.

At the same time it does seem extraordinary that the Camerons hosted the couple at their home in Cornwall for a weekend only a fortnight ago.

And that just last Saturday — 24 hours before the first instalment appeared in a Sunday newspaper and in which the ex-PM was said to have made smutty jokes about dogging and mocked for his fitness fads — he and Sir Hugo, 60, were shooting grouse together in Yorkshire with other senior Tories.

‘This actually tells you more about the Swires than the Camerons,’ says a figure. ‘Sasha is shameless and has this breathtaking confidence that Hugo is swept along by. It was the same when they met.’ Their meeting in 1996 had something of a coup de foudre about it says the friend. ‘Hugo had been a dashing army officer in the Grenadier Guards and was making his way at Sotheby’s and there were no shortage of girlfriends.’

At one stage he was a ‘walker’ for the separated Duchess of York. ‘Along came Sasha, this leggy blonde with a mind of her own and he was smitten.’

With Sasha pregnant with their first daughter — not a good look for a Tory seeking a parliamentary seat — they were married quickly.

Only five people were at the ceremony at the Royal Hospital chapel in Chelsea in 1996 where the best man was Lord Michael Cecil, youngest brother of the Marquess of Salisbury.

A church service in Kensington was followed by a reception in the Long Room at Lord’s cricket ground. Among the guests were the Tory donor Anthony Bamford, owner of the JCB digger company and now a member of the House of Lords.

The Swires’ daughter Saffron was born five months later and a second daughter, Siena, came along in 2001, shortly after Hugo’s election as MP for East Devon. (He had contested the hopeless Labour seat of Greenock in 1997, the year of Tony Blair’s landslide.)

Cameron was also part of that 2001 intake and, although Hugo is seven years his senior, he saw leadership qualities in his fellow old Etonian and the two became friends.

‘Despite that, Sasha was always gunning for Dave,’ says a former minister. ‘She feels to this day that Hugo should have been given a job in the Cabinet. She thinks the only reason he isn’t is because of the Eton connection and that it didn’t fit in with the Cameron modernising agenda.’

The source adds: ‘It actually had nothing to do with that; the truth is Hugo wasn’t good enough, which is why he was sent to Northern Ireland as minister of state.’

An old friend says: 'She was fantastically glamorous and one always felt she was looking for a suitable husband. Hugo was good looking and funny and, though they were not an obvious pairing, they hit it off'

An old friend says: 'She was fantastically glamorous and one always felt she was looking for a suitable husband. Hugo was good looking and funny and, though they were not an obvious pairing, they hit it off'

An old friend says: ‘She was fantastically glamorous and one always felt she was looking for a suitable husband. Hugo was good looking and funny and, though they were not an obvious pairing, they hit it off’

But then the outspoken Sasha not only knew her mind, she was also from a political family herself, and her school years had often been spent on the campaign trail supporting her father.

During elections she would turn up for lessons sporting a blue rosette, and out of school delivered leaflets.

She grew up in Cornwall and her father was friends with the former Poet Laureate Ted Hughes, who is said to have dedicated two poems to Sasha. She used to go fishing with Hughes and her father.

With two brothers — Julian, a musician who later made millions composing the scores for Wallace And Gromit and Peppa Pig animated films, and William who is in the oil business — Sasha was determined to win the approval of her father, to whom she was devoted.

‘She was like the pupil who always has their hand up in class trying to catch the teacher’s eye,’ says a Nott family friend. ‘She always wanted to impress her father.’

Her book, of course, will do just that. Nott cared little for party political sensibilities, once walking out of a TV interview with Robin Day who had accused him of being a ‘here today, gone tomorrow politician’.

And he also walked out on Margaret Thatcher by quitting the Commons to her dismay — though she refused to accept his resignation after the Argentine invasion of the Falklands and he oversaw the huge success of the British task force to liberate the islands.

‘He’s chomping at the bit to read the book,’ says the friend. ‘His attitude is ‘that’s my girl’ and he won’t give a fig if it has upset some people in the Tory Party.’

Strikingly good looking, his adored daughter was sent to Cranborne Chase, the fee-paying girls’ school near Tisbury, Wilts, which has since closed and was never noted for its academic qualities.

Sasha is remembered as being ‘a cracker’ and the prettiest girl of her year.

If John Nott provided her political education, she inherited her sense of outrage from her Slovenian mother Miloska, whose own background is heroic.

In the war, her father was a partisan, running a hotel where the Gestapo liked to eat by day, and smuggling Jews and others wanted by the Nazis to safety by night. Five months before the end of the war, he was caught and sent to Dachau concentration camp where he died.

Miloska met her husband in Cambridge, where she had been sent to learn English — at her engagement party to someone else.

In Nott’s memoir, Memorable Encounters, she recounted his exact words to her. ‘He said ‘I love you and I am going to marry you’, and then he went. I went home and wrote in my diary: ‘What a cheek, what a conceit, what a presumptuous male.’ ‘

Nevertheless they were married in 1959, the year Nott was president of the Cambridge Union. ‘Miloska is unbelievably frank, strong-minded, impetuous and forthright,’ says an acquaintance. ‘It’s clear that’s where Sasha gets it all from.’

After leaving school, she launched herself with gusto on the London social scene. ‘She was always the life and soul of a party with a drink in one hand, cigarette in the other, having fun — and, with her looks, she had a queue of boys wanting to take her out,’ remembers a friend.

One event fondly recalled is a party at Admiralty Arch — which her father had the use of — at the time of the wedding of Charles and Diana, a venue which overlooked the route. She was also a regular at the then achingly hip Camden Palace party venue in North London.

But though portrayed as a dippy aristocrat — her title comes from Swire’s knighthood, his consolation prize for not making the Cabinet — she was determined to make her own way and trained as a journalist, first in Lincolnshire and then at the Nottingham Post, where an admirer was known as ‘Forest’ because of his love of the local football team.

By the early 1990s she was in Hong Kong where one article for the South China Morning Post had the headline: ‘Would you sleep with a stranger for $1 million?’ Notable citizens were asked for their opinions, including the late socialite David Tang.

Back in London she became interested in political reporting and was often to be spotted with some of the livelier lobby correspondents. Another admirer was the architect and interior design guru Willie Nickerson, but until meeting Swire there were no serious love matches.

An old friend says: ‘She was fantastically glamorous and one always felt she was looking for a suitable husband. Hugo was good looking and funny and, though they were not an obvious pairing, they hit it off.’

But money was always an issue. A businessman who sat next to her at a dinner recalls: ‘She was extremely cross about the fact that politicians did not get enough money, saying that they should be paid more.’

Despite sharing his name with the famous Swire business conglomerate, which owns Cathay Pacific, her husband is only distantly related and has no financial connection.

Two years ago she confided to friends she had been keeping a diary and that she had written more than a million words since 2010. When Swire stood down as an MP last year, she sought a publishing deal.

Not everyone is surprised by what she has done. One well-placed Tory source said: ‘She came to dinner once with a video camera wanting to record the evening. We had to tell her to switch it off. I thought then: ‘How odd. Is she doing a documentary about us?’ ‘

A former Tory backbench colleague of Swire told us: ‘Sasha used to have a favourite phrase at the end of a week in Westminster: ‘What contributions do you have for our pension fund?’ In other words, she wanted Swire to reveal joyous indiscretions about life in the Cameron camp. He duly obliged.’

Her diaries may be unfair for their searing portrayal of the Cameron era as a frivolous, privileged elite playing at government but being more interested in sex and drinking. And for those who feature in the book’s pages it will be chiefly remembered for her grotesque breach of the etiquette of politics.

Frances Osborne, ex-wife of former Chancellor George Osborne, is understood to be dismayed at her depiction as a dull, downtrodden spouse. Both women grew up in the South West. She considered Sasha a friend.

The diaries, however, with their mix of treachery and snobbery, will provide gleeful pleasure for readers. As for Sasha Swire, she is already planning her next publishing sensation — a novel she hopes to complete by Christmas.

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