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Britain records more coronavirus deaths in the preliminary toll

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britain records more coronavirus deaths in the preliminary toll

Britain today announced 12 more coronavirus deaths in the preliminary toll, taking the total number of victims to 44,840. 

Department of Health chiefs have yet to confirm the final daily figure, which is often much higher because it takes into account lab-confirmed fatalities in all settings. 

The early count — which only includes a fraction of the Covid-19 deaths in England — is calculated by adding up the individual updates declared by each of the home nations.

NHS England today posted 11 deaths in hospitals across the country. One Covid-19 fatalities was recorded in all settings in Northern Ireland but none were registered in Scotland or Wales.  

Government data shows 21 fatalities were recorded yesterday as well as 16 last Monday. However, counts released on Sundays and Mondays are always lower because of a recording lag at weekends. 

In other coronavirus developments Britain today:

  • Face masks could be made compulsory in shops ‘in the next few days’ as Boris Johnson promised clarity after ministers sparked confusion by contradicting each other over the policy;
  • More than 100 outbreaks of coronavirus in schools, businesses and pubs are ‘swiftly and silently’ being dealt with every week across the UK, Health Secretary Matt Hancock revealed;
  • The drive to bring workers back to the office from coronavirus lockdown hit a roadblock after some of country’s biggest firms said only 40 per cent will return from home;
  • Councils in England are preparing to make significant cuts in jobs and services after losing income on investments in airports, cinemas and offices amid the coronavirus pandemic;
  • British pharmaceutical giant AstraZeneca is preparing to launch human trials of an antibody treatment that could protect old and vulnerable people from coronavirus;
  • Beauty salons, nail bars and tattoo shops in England opened the first time in four months as part of the latest relaxation of lockdown restrictions;
  • Immunity to Covid-19 might be lost within months, according to research that suggests the virus could infect people on an annual basis, like the flu.
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30677950 0 image a 26 1594636741762

A further 21 people have died from coronavirus in 24 hours bringing the UK’s total death toll to 44,819 

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30696956 0 image a 28 1594636743534

BORIS PROMISES CLARITY ON FACE MASKS ‘IN THE NEXT FEW DAYS’ 

Boris Johnson wore his facemask again today as he visited the headquarters of the London Ambulance Service

Boris Johnson wore his facemask again today as he visited the headquarters of the London Ambulance Service

Boris Johnson wore his facemask again today as he visited the headquarters of the London Ambulance Service 

Boris Johnson vowed clarity on face masks ‘in the next few days’ today as the government’s approach descended into shambles.

The PM, who was wearing a covering out and about in London this morning, insisted they had a ‘great deal of value’ in confined spaces such as shops.

He said ministers and officials were ‘looking at’ the guidance on whether they should be compulsory in such settings, and suggested an announcement is imminent.

The comments came amid accusations that the government is ‘all over the place’ on face masks with the premier Mr Gove seemingly at odds over requiring them in shops. Currently they are only required by law on public transport in England.

Scientists have warned that the public will be ‘confused’ after the Cabinet minister insisted wearing coverings indoors should be a matter of ‘courtesy’.

Mr Johnson said on Friday that the government ‘needs to be stricter in insisting people wear face coverings in confined spaces’.

Meanwhile, Justice Secretary Robert Buckland added to the sense of confusion by saying ‘perhaps’ masks should become mandatory inside, arguing it was more than a ‘courtesy’ and about ‘safety’.

Nicola Sturgeon has already brought the rule in for Scotland, while London mayor Sadiq Khan has been demanding the change.

 

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Department of Health figures released yesterday showed 207,000 tests were carried out or posted the day before. The number includes antibody tests for frontline NHS and care workers.

But bosses again refused to say how many people were tested, meaning the exact number of Brits who have been swabbed for the SARS-CoV-2 virus has been a mystery for a month — since May 22.

Health chiefs also reported 650 more cases of Covid-19. Government statistics show the official size of the UK’s  outbreak now stands at 289,603 cases. 

But the actual size of the outbreak, which began to spiral out of control in March, is estimated to be in the millions, based on antibody testing data.

The daily death data does not represent how many Covid-19 patients died within the last 24 hours — it is only how many fatalities have been reported and registered with the authorities.

The data does not always match updates provided by the home nations. Department of Health officials work off a different time cut-off, meaning daily updates from Scotland as well as Northern Ireland are always out of sync.

And the count announced by NHS England every afternoon — which only takes into account deaths in hospitals — does not match up with the DH figures because they work off a different recording system.

For instance, some deaths announced by NHS England bosses will have already been counted by the Department of Health, which records fatalities ‘as soon as they are available’.  

More than 1,000 infected Brits died each day during the darkest days of the crisis in mid-April but the number of victims had been dropping by around 20 to 30 per cent week-on-week since the start of May.

It comes after the Health Secretary today claimed more than 100 outbreaks of coronavirus are ‘swiftly and silently’ being dealt with every week across the UK.

Matt Hancock revealed how flare-ups in schools, businesses and pubs across the country are consistently being handled with ‘local actions’, just nine days after many businesses reopened.

Writing in the Daily Telegraph today, he added that many of the outbreaks are nipped in the bud before they can ‘make the news’. 

He stated that increased testing, some of which is being done door-to-door in infected areas, means officials can take a more targeted approach rather than imposing national measures.

Mr Hancock’s comments came after 73 cases of the virus were confirmed at A S Green And Co, a farm in Mathon, Herefordshire, leading to around 200 workers being quarantined as a precautionary measure. 

In other developments today, Boris Johnson vowed clarity on face masks in the next few days as the government’s approach on coverings descended into shambles.

The Prime Minister, who was pictured wearing a covering out and about in London this morning, insisted they had a ‘great deal of value’ in confined spaces such as shops.

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30701816 8517341 image a 43 1594638296256

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30701820 8517341 image a 45 1594638299330

COVID-19 IMMUNITY MAY BE LOST WITHIN MONTHS, STUDY FINDS 

Immunity to Covid-19 might be lost within months, according to research. The graph shows how antibody levels peaked five weeks after symptoms began (POS) but then faded away. The colour of the dots indicate severity, with purple being the most severe symptoms

Immunity to Covid-19 might be lost within months, according to research. The graph shows how antibody levels peaked five weeks after symptoms began (POS) but then faded away. The colour of the dots indicate severity, with purple being the most severe symptoms

Immunity to Covid-19 might be lost within months, according to research. The graph shows how antibody levels peaked five weeks after symptoms began (POS) but then faded away. The colour of the dots indicate severity, with purple being the most severe symptoms

Immunity to Covid-19 might be lost within months, according to research.

The findings suggest that, like the common cold and flu, the virus could infect people on an annual basis.

This undermines ideas that herd immunity could be a way of defeating the virus.

King’s College London scientists looked at the immune response of more than 90 patients and healthcare workers at Guy’s and St Thomas’ NHS foundation trust.

They found antibody levels peaked three weeks after symptoms and then declined.  

Lead author Dr Katie Doores told the Guardian: ‘People are producing a reasonable antibody response to the virus, but it’s waning over a short period of time and depending on how high your peak is, that determines how long the antibodies are staying.’ 

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He claimed ministers and officials were ‘looking at’ the guidance on whether they should be compulsory in such settings, and suggested an announcement is imminent.

The comments came amid accusations that the government is ‘all over the place’ on face masks with the premier seemingly at odds with Michael Gove over requiring them in shops. 

Scientists have warned that the public will be ‘confused’ after the Cabinet minister insisted wearing coverings indoors should be a matter of ‘courtesy’.

Mr Johnson said on Friday that the government ‘needs to be stricter in insisting people wear face coverings in confined spaces’.

Meanwhile, Justice Secretary Robert Buckland added to the sense of confusion by saying ‘perhaps’ masks should become mandatory inside, arguing it was more than a ‘courtesy’ and about ‘safety’. 

More questions today arose over the coronavirus immunity puzzle, with research suggesting that antibody levels peak three weeks after symptoms and then fade away. 

The findings — uncovered by a team at King’s College London — suggest that the coronavirus could infect people on an annual basis, like the flu.

This undermines ideas herd immunity could be a way of defeating the virus and that any protection from a vaccine may not be very long lasting and the vaccine may need to be reformulated every year.

Researchers looked at the immune response of more than 90 patients and healthcare workers at Guy’s and St Thomas’ NHS foundation trust.  

But there remains a chance that even if antibody levels do drop, the body could fight off the virus a second time using T-cells.

It comes as another study found more than half of hospitalised coronavirus patients given heart scans worldwide were found to have abnormalities.

Separate figures released yesterday showed more than 230,000 Covid-19 cases were recorded on Sunday in the darkest 24 hours of the pandemic so far, according to the World Health Organization (WHO).

The record-high number of new infections means 12.5million people worldwide have now been struck down since the pandemic began back in December.

Outbreaks are growing in the US, Brazil, India and South Africa, statistics show. While European nations appear to have emerged from the worst of the crisis.

The coronavirus — which first emerged in China — has killed more than half a million but the number of infected patients dying each day has barely changed.

WHO chiefs have warned the peak of the Covid-19 pandemic is yet to come because the spread of the virus is accelerating in some parts of the world.

The total number of cases worldwide has doubled in the last six weeks, according to Dr Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus, director general of the UN agency.

Dr Tedros last week warned the coronavirus pandemic has still not reached its peak and admitted the situation is ‘getting worse’.

HOW MANY PEOPLE HAVE REALLY DIED OF THE CORONAVIRUS IN THE UK?

Department of Health: 44,819

Department of Health’s latest death count for all settings (as of 9am, July 8) stands at 44,819.

The daily data does not represent how many Covid-19 patients died within the last 24 hours — it is only how many fatalities have been reported and registered with the authorities. 

It also only takes into account patients who tested positive for the virus, as opposed to deaths suspected to be down to the coronavirus.  

National statistical bodies: 55,216

Data compiled by the statistical bodies of each of the home nations show 55,216 people died of either confirmed or suspected Covid-19 across the UK by the end of May.

The Office for National Statistics yesterday confirmed that 50,219 people in England and Wales died with confirmed or suspected Covid-19 by June 19.

The number of coronavirus deaths was 824 by the same day in Northern Ireland, according to the Northern Ireland Statistics and Research Agency (NISRA).

National Records Scotland — which collects statistics north of the border — said 4,173 people had died across the country by June 22.

Their tallies are always 10 days behind the Department of Health (DH) because they wait until as many fatalities as possible for each date have been counted, to avoid having to revise their statistics.

Excess deaths: 65,249

The total number of excess deaths has now passed 65,000. 

Excess deaths are considered to be an accurate measure of the number of people killed by the pandemic because they include a broader spectrum of victims.

As well as including people who may have died with Covid-19 without ever being tested, the data also shows how many more people died because their medical treatment was postponed, for example, or who didn’t or couldn’t get to hospital when they were seriously ill.

Data from England and Wales shows there has been an extra 59,324 deaths between March 15 and June 12, as well as 4,924 in Scotland between March 10 and June 22 and 1,001 in Northern Ireland between March 28 and June 26. 

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ITV drama Des hit with Ofcom complaints from viewers disturbed by details of Dennis Nilsen’s murders

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itv drama des hit with ofcom complaints from viewers disturbed by details of dennis nilsens murders

ITV drama Des depicts the true story of British serial killer Dennis Nilsen and his murderous atrocities committed against men and boys between 1978 and 1983.

The broadcast regulators, Ofcom, have reportedly received seven complaints from viewers who were  left horrified by the disturbing details of his crimes in the three-part series, reports the Sun.

The TV drama documents Dennis – played by David Tenant – during his arrest and subsequent trial for the brutal murders of 15 young men, and launched to critical acclaim on Monday.

New show: ITV drama Des depicts the true story of British serial killer Dennis Nilsen and his murderous atrocities committed against men and boys between 1978 and 1983

New show: ITV drama Des depicts the true story of British serial killer Dennis Nilsen and his murderous atrocities committed against men and boys between 1978 and 1983

New show: ITV drama Des depicts the true story of British serial killer Dennis Nilsen and his murderous atrocities committed against men and boys between 1978 and 1983

Des has given ITV it’s biggest drama launch of the year after an average of 5.4 million viewers tuned in to watch. 

The first episode peaked at 5.9 million, however some fans were deterred by the chilling revelations of his crimes which included necrophilia and dismemberment, and they felt it warranted a complaint to Ofcom.

Other viewers took to Twitter to share their reaction as they became engrossed in the dark yet gripping storytelling of Dennis which unfolded on the small screen. 

Horrified: The broadcast regulators, Ofcom, have reportedly received seven complaints from viewers left horrified by the disturbing nature of the three part series

Horrified: The broadcast regulators, Ofcom, have reportedly received seven complaints from viewers left horrified by the disturbing nature of the three part series

Horrified: The broadcast regulators, Ofcom, have reportedly received seven complaints from viewers left horrified by the disturbing nature of the three part series

One viewer penned: ‘Oh it’s time to scare myself silly again Face screaming in fearwatching @itv #Des I’m hoping @TwiningsUK Sleeping symbol is going to help this evening #scared #itv #itvdes #tea #twinings #sleep.’

DCI Jay is in charge of the investigation into Dennis and is played by Ashes to Ashes actor, Daniel Mays. A viewer tweeted to the 42-year old actor and said: ‘@DanielMays9 Just watched Des, scared to go to sleep now!’

Another viewer added: ‘I can attest that reading Dennis Nilsen’s Wikipedia page before turning in doesn’t make for a great night’s sleep. #Des.’

MailOnline have reached out to Ofcom for further comment.     

Too much: An average 5.4 million viewers tuned in to watch Des however some fans were deterred by the chilling details of his crimes which included necrophilia and dismemberment

Too much: An average 5.4 million viewers tuned in to watch Des however some fans were deterred by the chilling details of his crimes which included necrophilia and dismemberment

Too much: An average 5.4 million viewers tuned in to watch Des however some fans were deterred by the chilling details of his crimes which included necrophilia and dismemberment

Dennis, who died at the age of 74 in 2018 at HMP Full Sutton, 34 years into his life sentence, is believed to have killed as many as 15 gay men, most of them homeless, at his homes in north London suburbs Cricklewood and Muswell Hill.

During his killing spree, Dennis would befriend his subjects in pubs and bars in London before luring them into his flat, where he would murder them and sit with their corpses before dismembering them.

His crimes were discovered when a drain outside his home on Cranley Gardens, Muswell Hill, became blocked by human remains that he had tried to flush away.  

Dennis was jailed for life with a recommendation he serve a minimum of 25 years in 1983, on six counts of murder and two of attempted murder. The sentence was later upgraded to a whole-life tariff.   

Shocking: Dennis (pictured) who died at the age of 74 in 2018 at HMP Full Sutton, 34 years into his life sentence, is believed to have killed as many as 15 gay men at his homes in north London

Shocking: Dennis (pictured) who died at the age of 74 in 2018 at HMP Full Sutton, 34 years into his life sentence, is believed to have killed as many as 15 gay men at his homes in north London

Shocking: Dennis (pictured) who died at the age of 74 in 2018 at HMP Full Sutton, 34 years into his life sentence, is believed to have killed as many as 15 gay men at his homes in north London

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Covid gridlock ‘puts 999 patients in peril’

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covid gridlock puts 999 patients in peril

Road closures brought in during the pandemic are causing gridlock and leading to life-threatening delays for the emergency services, campaigners claim.

Councils are using emergency coronavirus cash to rush through the ‘green’ measures, an audit of local road schemes suggests.

Under the projects brought in to aid social distancing and encourage walking and cycling, portions of road are being turned over to pedestrians and bikes – and in some cases, closed off altogether.

Blocked by bollards: Ambulance in Ealing, west London. Road closures brought in during the pandemic are causing gridlock and leading to life-threatening delays for the emergency services, campaigners claim

Blocked by bollards: Ambulance in Ealing, west London. Road closures brought in during the pandemic are causing gridlock and leading to life-threatening delays for the emergency services, campaigners claim

Blocked by bollards: Ambulance in Ealing, west London. Road closures brought in during the pandemic are causing gridlock and leading to life-threatening delays for the emergency services, campaigners claim

The Mail carried out a snapshot survey of 30 local authorities and found all have introduced schemes that have an impact on traffic in the past four months.

Analysis of data from satnav makers TomTom also reveals rush-hour congestion was worse than normal in 19 of 25 towns and cities on Thursday morning. 

The rash of new restrictions has also led to life-threatening delays in reaching heart attack and stroke patients, according to the College of Paramedics.

In May, councils were handed £250million for ‘green’ schemes to promote social distancing and to encourage walking and cycling in the wake of lockdown.

Supporters say the measures have cut air pollution, led to a rise in physical activity and attracted strong local support.

But campaigners claim draconian measures are being rushed through, bringing chaos to the roads at a time when many are shunning public transport in favour of their cars over Covid fears.

Department for Transport figures show traffic volumes were at 97 per cent of normal levels on Monday, September 13, compared with 36 per cent for trains.

Chaos: Traffic chokes a road in King’s Cross, London, as bollards mark a new cycle lane

Chaos: Traffic chokes a road in King’s Cross, London, as bollards mark a new cycle lane

Chaos: Traffic chokes a road in King’s Cross, London, as bollards mark a new cycle lane

In a letter seen by the Mail, the AA has warned Transport Secretary Grant Shapps the combination of high traffic levels and anti-car schemes has made congestion and pollution worse in some areas.

The motoring organisation’s president Edmund King has asked the minister to rethink the schemes so local people and emergency services are properly consulted.

In his letter, he wrote: ‘Some schemes are regrettably adding to congestion and poorer air quality rather than improving them.

‘As you know, governments at all levels succeed best when they engage residents and include them in both the thought and decision-making process.

‘Unfortunately, the lack of consultation is leading to growing levels of dissatisfaction and frustration across many road users, including some emergency services.’

Richard Webber, of the College of Paramedics, said certain schemes had caused ambulance delays.

He told the Mail: ‘Some streets are now almost impossible to get through. This really matters with heart attack and stroke patients. For every minute you delay treatment for a cardiac arrest, there is a 10 per cent drop in survivability. Crews have been given keys to bollards. But the process of unlocking them is time-consuming.

Covid blitz on drivers

Bristol: Council has pedestrianised parts of city and suspended parking. Bristol Bridge has been closed to private vehicles.

Bath: Motorists are banned from using key city roads from 10am to 6pm.

West London: Several roads have been closed in Ealing to give people more room to socially distance.

Bolton: Seven roads shut in the city centre to aid social distancing.

Colchester: High street closed to cars. 

Ludlow, Shropshire: High street closed to traffic between 10am and 3pm.

Wigan: Pedestrian zone times extended so they run from 9am to 5pm. 

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‘As for cycle lanes, some have been extended and separated from the road by hard bollards. This means that ambulances are forced to sit in traffic.’

The London Ambulance Service said the changes all had the potential to delay their response – although they admitted that, even though the schemes had caused problems, they have still managed to hit all response time targets.

Howard Cox, of pressure group FairFuelUK, said: ‘Clueless local authorities, conspiring with and funded by central government, are aimlessly clogging up the heart of our cities, and screwing the world’s already highest taxed drivers with yet more “pay to pollute” congestion and ultra-low emission taxes.’

A Department for Transport spokesman said: ‘We expect local authorities to engage constructively with residents to make sure any changes they make are the right ones for everyone and must accommodate emergency services.

‘Evidence shows these schemes are significantly cutting rat-running traffic, improving air quality and reducing noise pollution, and increasing walking and cycling. Where they do this, they have attracted strong public support.’

The Mail’s survey of local authorities uncovered the introduction of schemes from the widening of pavements and cycle lanes to full closures of town centres to cars.

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Theresa May photo portrait finally goes on No.10 staircase

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theresa may photo portrait finally goes on no 10 staircase

For years, Margaret Thatcher’s portrait has been the only one of a woman to adorn the famous yellow staircase at 10 Downing Street.

But yesterday, it was finally joined by a photo of Theresa May, the country’s second woman prime minister.

Portraits of former prime ministers line the staircase chronologically, so Mrs May is positioned next to her predecessor David Cameron.

For years, Margaret Thatcher’s portrait has been the only one of a woman to adorn the famous yellow staircase at 10 Downing Street. But yesterday, it was finally joined by a photo of Theresa May, the country’s second woman prime minister

For years, Margaret Thatcher’s portrait has been the only one of a woman to adorn the famous yellow staircase at 10 Downing Street. But yesterday, it was finally joined by a photo of Theresa May, the country’s second woman prime minister

For years, Margaret Thatcher’s portrait has been the only one of a woman to adorn the famous yellow staircase at 10 Downing Street. But yesterday, it was finally joined by a photo of Theresa May, the country’s second woman prime minister

Portraits of former prime ministers line the staircase chronologically, so Mrs May is positioned next to her predecessor David Cameron. Once a PM is out of office, his or her photo is added to the No.10 wall

Portraits of former prime ministers line the staircase chronologically, so Mrs May is positioned next to her predecessor David Cameron. Once a PM is out of office, his or her photo is added to the No.10 wall

Portraits of former prime ministers line the staircase chronologically, so Mrs May is positioned next to her predecessor David Cameron. Once a PM is out of office, his or her photo is added to the No.10 wall

Once a prime minister is out of office, his or her photo is added to the wall, then all the other pictures are shuffled down the staircase. 

Art historian Simon Schama once said in a documentary on Downing Street: ‘Where you might have in other great houses of state, even in the White House, huge portraits, larger than life size, here [in the UK] we have modest engravings and photographs of the ghosts of Downing Street.’

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