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Britain signs deals with Pfizer, BioNTech, Valneva for…

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britain signs deals with pfizer biontech valneva for

Britain has signed deals with two foreign pharmaceutical giants for 90million doses of new coronavirus vaccines with the option of buying 40million more, it was revealed today.

Agreement has been reached for 30million doses from BioNTech and German firm Pfizer and 60million doses from France’s Valneva. 

The figure of 90million is in addition to the 100million doses of vaccine that are being developed by Oxford University in partnership with AstraZeneca, as well as another at Imperial College London which started human trials in June.

Business Secretary Alok Sharma said the new agreements would ‘ensure the UK has the best chance possible of securing a vaccine that protects those most at risk’ as the UK secured close to 200million jabs.

Hopes for a working Covid-19 vaccine are growing as two projects in the UK and US have reported promising results in their early experiments with the details set to be published in The Lancet later on Monday.

Oxford scientists have already said they are ’80 per cent’ confident they can have their jab available by September. 

A vaccine against coronavirus being developed in Britain is showing positive signs it could work

A vaccine against coronavirus being developed in Britain is showing positive signs it could work

A vaccine against coronavirus being developed in Britain is showing positive signs it could work 

A quarter of Britons could REFUSE to take coronavirus vaccine despite risks being ‘overestimated by web myths’, new survey shows 

More than a quarter of people in the UK may refuse to be vaccinated against coronavirus, a worrying survey reveals.

Results will be released today for a global frontrunner vaccine, developed at Oxford University, showing whether it is safe and triggers a positive immune response.

But shocking figures show, even if this first step is successful, and the treatment is proven to work in the coming months, 14 per cent of people in the UK say they would be unwilling to be vaccinated.

Another 13 per cent say they don’t know if they would refuse a vaccine, according to a national survey.

There are concerns social media is being overwhelmed by ‘anti-vaxxer’ myths and scare stories, which the Daily Mail has campaigned against following a resurgence of measles and mumps.

Millennials are among the most wary, with a coronavirus vaccine most opposed by people aged 25 to 34. 

The key to beating the virus is to achieve ‘herd immunity’, which most experts say means at least 60 per cent of the population having been vaccinated or recovered from the virus.

Paul Hunter, professor of medicine at the University of East Anglia, said: ‘If we get an effective vaccine, and almost everyone takes it up, overnight all the restrictions can stop and life will return to normal like it was before March, with no social distancing or restrictions.

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Teams from Oxford University and the American pharmaceutical company Moderna have both revealed people in their studies are showing signs of immunity.

Each has been working on separate experimental jabs for months to try to protect millions of people from catching the coronavirus in future.    

People being given the Oxford vaccine have been developing antibodies and white blood cells called T cells which will help their bodies fight off the virus if they get infected, it is reported.

And experts at Moderna, based in Cambridge, Massachusetts, said participants in their trial – of a different type of vaccine – all successfully developed antibodies.

The vaccines work by tricking the body into thinking it’s infected with Covid-19 and causing it to produce immune substances that have the ability to destroy it.

While early research focused on antibodies, scientists are increasingly turning to a type of immunity called T cell immunity — which is controlled by white blood cells — which has shown signs of promise.

One source on the Oxford project told ITV News: ‘An important point to keep in mind is that there are two dimensions to the immune response: antibodies and T-cells. 

‘Everybody is focused on antibodies but there is a growing body of evidence suggesting that the T-cells response is important in the defence against coronavirus.’

Oxford’s phase 3 trial is involving around 8,000 people across the UK and also up to 6,000 people in Brazil and South Africa, where the jab may be easier to test because more people are infected with the coronavirus.

The vaccine is being manufactured by AstraZeneca, based in Cambridge, England, and millions of doses have already been ordered by Number 10 in the hope that it will work.

ITV’s political editor Robert Peston wrote in a blog that he has been told to expect good news on the trial later this week, with results expected in the British medical journal The Lancet on Thursday.

The piece said: ‘Apparently the vaccine is generating the kind of antibody and T-cell (killer cell) response that the researchers would hope to see.’

In the early stages researchers will want to see that the jab is safe for people to take and doesn’t cause serious side effects, and also that it seems to be stimulating the immune system in the right way.

WHAT ARE THE LEADING COVID-19 VACCINE CANDIDATES? 

University of Oxford

Clinical teams at the Oxford University’s Jenner Institute and Oxford Vaccine Group began developing the ChAdOx1 nCoV-19 vaccine in January, now named AZD1222 since a manufacturing partnership with pharmaceutical giant AstraZeneca was secured.

Human trials started on April 23 and they are now in the final phase. 

Lead of the project Professor Sarah Gilbert told The Times she is ’80 per cent’ confident of its success.

Imperial College London

Professor Robin Shattock is leading a team working to produce a vaccine at Imperial College. 

Fifteen volunteers have already been given the trial vaccines and testing is expected to ramp up to include as many as 200-300 new participants in the coming weeks.  

A second trial, involving 6,000 people, will come later. 

But Professor Shattock said the vaccine won’t be available until at least 2021 even if everything goes according to plan. 

If the jab works, the team want to make it as cheap as possible so the entire British population could be vaccinated for the ‘really good value’ of just under £200million.

Moderna 

Massachusetts-based Moderna was the first US company to start human trials of its potential Covid-19 vaccine, known as mRNA-1273, on March 16.

The jab has proven to trigger an immune response in all 45 injected volunteers, according to a study published in the prestigious New England Journal of Medicine on July 14.

Moderna’s shot showed early promise in its phase 2 human tests last month. The company reported that it triggered antibody production on par with that seen in recovered coronavirus patients. 

CanSino 

Chinese vaccine Ad5-nCoV, made by CanSino, was the very first shot to enter clinical trials earlier this year and is a leading candidate.

A trial of 108 healthy volunteers in China showed it safely triggered an immune response in participants.

Results published May 22 in The Lancet showed most of the people dosed with the vaccine had immune responses, although their levels of antibodies thought to neutralize the virus were relatively low. Researchers saw a stronger ramp-up of other immune compounds, called T-cells, that might also help fight the infection off.   

Pfizer

Pfizer and BioNTech have been working on a number of potential Covid-19 vaccines under the ‘BNT162 program’. 

It reported positive preliminary results from the ongoing Phase I/II clinical trial of one called BNT162b1 on July 1.

Data is available for the trial of BNT162b1 on 24 volunteers. The results showed that it was well tolerated and produced dose dependent immunity.

Dr Kathrin Jansen, Pfizer’s head of vaccine research and development, said the vaccine ‘is able to produce neutralizing antibody responses in humans at or above the levels observed’ in Covid-19 survivors.

Pfizer received fast track designation from the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for two of their four potential Covid-19 vaccines this month.   

Johnson & Johnson 

The drug giant started work on the vaccine in January, two months before Covid-19 was labelled a global pandemic. 

A vaccine trial spearheaded by Johnson and Johnson will start recruiting people in September, with clinical data available by the end of the year.

An ’emergency use’ batch of the vaccine is anticipated to be authorised as early as 2021, which would likely be prioritised for vulnerable people.

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If it passes these checkpoints researchers are expected to move on to even larger tests with thousands more members of the public.

In its own tests Moderna, the US pharmaceutical company, reports that its vaccine has passed these early milestones and now plans to move on to bigger trials.

Researchers at the company last night announced that all 45 volunteers in its early phase had developed immune responses after being given the vaccine.

They also found the jab — one of the front-runners in the global coronavirus vaccine race — was safe and no participants suffered any serious side effects. 

But more than half reported mild or moderate reactions such as fatigue, headache, chills, muscle aches or pain at the injection site. 

Scientists said side effects were a ‘small price to pay’ for protection against Covid-19. 

Dr Anthony Fauci, the US government’s top infectious disease expert, said: ‘No matter how you slice this, this is good news.’  

Moderna was the first US company to start human testing of a vaccine for the novel coronavirus on March 16, 66 days after the genetic sequence of the pathogen was released by China.

It’s now preparing to start a 30,000-person trial later this month to prove the vaccine really is strong enough to protect against the coronavirus. 

The share price of the company surged on the news as it stoked hopes of progress in the global battle against Covid-19.

The US federal government is supporting Moderna’s vaccine with nearly half a billion dollars in funding. 

Its vaccine, known as mRNA-1273, works using ribonucleic acid (RNA), which is a chemical messenger in human bodies that contains instructions for making proteins. 

The jab introduces RNA which programmes the body to make proteins that look like those found on the surface of the coronavirus, which triggers the immune system to react because it recognises those proteins as a danger – even though they aren’t actually attached to a virus and can’t cause any harm. 

This then trains the body to recognise these as a foreign invader, and mount an immune response against it.

The results, published in the prestigious New England Journal of Medicine, involved three groups of 15 volunteers aged 18-55.

The groups tested 25, 100 or 250 micrograms of the vaccine. Everyone got two doses, 28 days apart. 

The team reported a dose-dependent effect, whereby the participants grew a larger antibody response the higher their vaccination dose was. 

In comparison, the University of Oxford team’s jab works by injecting a damaged part of the real coronavirus that has been attached to another, harmless, virus.

It’s a type of immunisation known as a recombinant viral vector vaccine. 

Researchers place genetic material from the coronavirus into another virus that’s been modified. They will then inject the virus into a human, hoping to produce an immune response against SARS-CoV-2. 

The carrier virus, weakened by genetic engineering so it doesn’t make people ill, is a type of virus called an adenovirus, the same as those which cause common colds, that has been taken from chimpanzees. 

If the vaccines can successfully mimic the spikes that are found on the outside of Covid-19 inside a person’s bloodstream, and stimulate the immune system to create special antibodies to attack it, this could train the body to destroy the real coronavirus if they get infected with it in future.

It could be developed so rapidly by Professor Sarah Gilbert, a vaccinology expert, and her team because they already had a base vaccine for similar coronaviruses. 

Professor Gilbert said earlier this month that protection from a jab against coronavirus should last for several years at least.

She told MPs she was optimistic that a vaccine would provide ‘a good duration of immunity’.

She is the world-renowned expert leading an Oxford University team devising a vaccine, so her claim could help to dispel the fears over how long protection against Covid-19 might last.

Concerns had been raised after those with other types of coronavirus – which are less dangerous and cause the common cold – were able, in tests, to be reinfected within a year.

But Professor Gilbert told the Commons science and technology committee there may be a better result from a vaccine than the natural immunity acquired when individuals simply recover from a virus. 

She said: ‘Vaccines have a different way of engaging with the immune system, and we follow people in our studies using the same type of technology to make the vaccines for several years, and we still see strong immune responses.

‘It’s something we have to test and follow over time – we can’t know until we actually have the data.

‘But we’re optimistic based on earlier studies that we will see a good duration of immunity, for several years at least, and probably better than naturally-acquired immunity.’ 

The key question is whether the vaccine will protect them from becoming infected, or simply make them less ill. It may also work less well in older people because their immune systems are weaker.

Sir John Bell, regius professor of medicine at Oxford University, also gave evidence to the committee, warning that the UK must ‘prepare for the worst’ this winter, rather than rely on the development of a vaccine.

Scientists at Moderna in Cambridge, Massachusetts, are developing a vaccine which uses RNA to force the body to produce proteins that look like the coronavirus and spur the immune system into action

Scientists at Moderna in Cambridge, Massachusetts, are developing a vaccine which uses RNA to force the body to produce proteins that look like the coronavirus and spur the immune system into action

Scientists at Moderna in Cambridge, Massachusetts, are developing a vaccine which uses RNA to force the body to produce proteins that look like the coronavirus and spur the immune system into action 

Experts in an Oxford Vaccine Group lab in England have developed a vaccine which injects a damaged and harmless section of the coronavirus in order to provoke the immune system

Experts in an Oxford Vaccine Group lab in England have developed a vaccine which injects a damaged and harmless section of the coronavirus in order to provoke the immune system

Experts in an Oxford Vaccine Group lab in England have developed a vaccine which injects a damaged and harmless section of the coronavirus in order to provoke the immune system

But he said he has now seen tests for coronavirus of a good standard which can produce a result in a ‘few minutes’.

Sir John said: ‘That would be transformative because we could all test ourselves regularly and test our kids after they’ve been off to a rave and all that stuff.’

He also urged Britons to have the flu jab to ‘avoid pandemonium in A&E departments’.

Trials of a potential antibody treatment that could protect older people from coronavirus have also started.

Instead of a traditional vaccine the proposed treatment would see patients given a three-minute infusion of antibodies to the virus that could provide protection for up to six months.

For people whose immune systems do not respond to a vaccine, including those taking immunosuppressant drugs or undergoing chemotherapy, it could provide alternative way of developing resistance to the virus.

Older people also have less of a response to vaccines so the antibody infusion could help give extra protection for older people who are more at risk from coronavirus, reported The Times.

Pharmaceutical firm AstraZeneca are trialling the treatment and the drug maker is also working with Oxford University on a potential vaccine.

As well as preventing people catching the disease antibody therapy can help people who have caught it recover more quickly.

Sir Mene Pangalos, who heads the company’s research into treating respiratory diseases told The Times: ‘There’s a population who are elderly that [may not] get a particularly good immune response to the vaccine,

‘In those instances you might want to prophylactically treat those patients with an antibody to give them additional protection.’

It is not yet clear if the treatment will work and the first human trial will only have around 30 participants.

If no safety issues arise larger scale testing could begin in the autumn.

Sir Mene added: ‘We’re going to do this as fast as we can. Obviously we’ve got to show that you’re safe but antibodies are well known entities – it should be safe.

The trial comes following initial research at Vanderbilt University in the United States which looked into monoclonal antibodies, which can imitate the antibodies created by the body after being infected by coronavirus.

However the antibody therapy is not expected to be an alternative to a vaccine as it will cost a much while not providing protection for as long a period of time.

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Socialite, 53, who was bridesmaid at Princess Diana’s wedding admits stealing £680 Max Mara coat

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socialite 53 who was bridesmaid at princess dianas wedding admits stealing 680 max mara coat

Prince Charles‘ goddaughter has admitted stealing a £680 designer coat from Harrods.

Socialite India Hicks, who was a bridesmaid at Princess Diana‘s wedding in 1981 and is 678th in line to the throne, stole the expensive Max Mara ladies’ coat from one of its luxury branches at Heathrow Airport in January.

The mother-of-five, who was born in London but moved to the Bahamas with long term partner David Flint Wood in 1996, was taken to court after being charged with theft.

Hicks, 53, pleaded guilty at Uxbridge Magistrates’ Court on Monday and was conditionally discharged for three months. She was also ordered to pay £85 costs and a £22 victim surcharge.

Her address was given in court as Schenectady, a US city in New York state.

A spokesman for Hicks said she had been ‘absent-minded’ and had later returned the coat.

India Hicks, who was a bridesmaid at Princess Diana's wedding in 1981, stole the expensive Max Mara ladies' coat from one of Harrods' luxury branches at Heathrow Airport in January

India Hicks, who was a bridesmaid at Princess Diana's wedding in 1981, stole the expensive Max Mara ladies' coat from one of Harrods' luxury branches at Heathrow Airport in January

India Hicks, who was a bridesmaid at Princess Diana’s wedding in 1981, stole the expensive Max Mara ladies’ coat from one of Harrods’ luxury branches at Heathrow Airport in January

The mother-of-five, who was born in London but moved to the Bahamas with long term partner David Flint Wood in 1996, was taken to court after being charged with theft (back left, Hicks as a bridesmaid for Prince Charles and Princess Diana at their wedding in 1981)

The mother-of-five, who was born in London but moved to the Bahamas with long term partner David Flint Wood in 1996, was taken to court after being charged with theft (back left, Hicks as a bridesmaid for Prince Charles and Princess Diana at their wedding in 1981)

The mother-of-five, who was born in London but moved to the Bahamas with long term partner David Flint Wood in 1996, was taken to court after being charged with theft (back left, Hicks as a bridesmaid for Prince Charles and Princess Diana at their wedding in 1981)

They told The Sun: ‘The court accepted that at the time of taking the coat, India had simply been absent-minded and had not intended to leave without paying for it.

‘She was full of remorse for this mistake, and was discharged by the District Judge.’

Former fashion model Hicks is the daughter of Lady Pamela Mountbatten, a great-great-grandchild to Queen Victoria, and famed interior designer David Nightingale Hicks.

She is the granddaughter of Earl Mountbatten, the uncle to Prince Philip and second cousin once removed of the Queen, whose father George VI took over the throne when Edward abdicated.

Over recent months Hicks has shared a look at her glamorous life in lockdown in the Bahamas, boasting al fresco meals cooked by her children, painting and homeschooling in their airy library room, beach walks and family games by the beach. 

She and her long term partner share a sprawling white-washed villa – which boasts a pool and sea views – with their sons Felix, Amory, Conrad, and daughter Domino, and Wesley, who she adopted when he was 15, after his mother died.

In a 2016 interview with Business Insider, Hicks cited her grandmother – the last Vicereine of India Edwina Mountbatten- as her professional inspiration. 

Hicks stole a £680 Max Mara coat, but it is unclear if this is the exact style that was shoplifted

Hicks stole a £680 Max Mara coat, but it is unclear if this is the exact style that was shoplifted

Hicks stole a £680 Max Mara coat, but it is unclear if this is the exact style that was shoplifted 

India Hicks, who was a bridesmaid at Princess Diana's wedding in 1981, stole the expensive Max Mara ladies' coat from one of Harrods' luxury branches at Heathrow Airport in January

India Hicks, who was a bridesmaid at Princess Diana's wedding in 1981, stole the expensive Max Mara ladies' coat from one of Harrods' luxury branches at Heathrow Airport in January

India Hicks, who was a bridesmaid at Princess Diana’s wedding in 1981, stole the expensive Max Mara ladies’ coat from one of Harrods’ luxury branches at Heathrow Airport in January

Despite being extremely wealthy, Hicks has been labelled ‘unusual’ as one of the few British heiresses to earn their own income.

In 2015 she launched India Hicks Style, an e-commerce business which sells jewellery, accessories, make-up and homeware, with products ranging between £15 to £400 — but announced over the summer that it would be closing down.

Hicks has described Prince Charles as being a ‘caring, considerate and involved’ godfather. She was 13 and on holiday in the Bahamas when he asked her to be a bridesmaid.

Describing her preparation, she said: ‘But first, I had to practise. It was during these rehearsals that I got to know Diana, whom I first met at a dress fitting.

‘She always seemed more like a head girl than a ­princess-in-waiting, with never a shy moment in private.’

In a recent interview she also said she had kept the flower wreath from the wedding.

Hicks was educated at £40,000-a-year all-girls Gordonstoun School in Scotland.

She previously worked for Ralph Lauren and J Crew and is often featured in society magazine Tatler. 

This post first appeared on dailymail.co.uk

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There are now just NINE countries where Britons can travel freely

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there are now just nine countries where britons can travel freely

Britain’s ‘safe to travel’ list has been reduced to just nine countries – including Gibraltar, San Marino and Liechtenstein – after more destinations were red-flagged. 

Restrictions were imposed on arrivals from Denmark, Iceland, Slovakia and the Caribbean island of Curacao this weekend.  

It means travellers returning from those destinations to England will face 14 days in quarantine when they get back. 

Transport Secretary Grant Shapps announced this evening that Denmark is one of four countries being added to the Government’s travel quarantine ‘red list’.  

The new rules will come into force at 4am on Saturday morning and mean Brits can travel to just seven countries without restrictions on either border.

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NINE NATIONS WHERE BRITONS CAN TRAVEL FREELY 

Sweden

Poland

Germany

Italy

Greece

Turkey

San Marino

Liechtenstein

Gibraltar 

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Germany, Poland, Italy, Sweden, Turkey, Greece, Gibraltar, Liechtenstein and San Marino are the only countries Brits can travel to without facing quarantine or tests both ways. 

Mr Shapps also said that no countries will be removed from the ‘red list’ this week. 

Other countries on the UK’s ‘green list’ – including Singapore, Thailand, Vietnam, Finland and the Seychelles – are either closed to travellers, require up to 14 days quarantine or only allow travellers with a negative Covid test in the last 72 hours.

The devolved administrations often update their own lists following the UK Government’s announcement of its weekly changes for England.

In the past two months the Government has hacked its list of ‘green’ countries down dramatically – axing Spain, France, Croatia, Slovenia, Hungary, Belgium, Austria, Switzerland, Malta, the Netherlands, Czech Republic and mainland Portugal.  

Mr Shapps reminded travellers that they are legally required to fill out a ‘Passenger Locator Form’ when they return to England. 

Announcing the changes, Mr Shapps tweeted: ‘Data shows we need to remove DENMARK, SLOVAKIA, ICELAND, and CURACAO from the Travel Corridor list. 

Transport Secretary Grant Shapps today announced Denmark, Slovakia, Iceland and Curacao are being added to the Government's travel quarantine 'red list'

Transport Secretary Grant Shapps today announced Denmark, Slovakia, Iceland and Curacao are being added to the Government's travel quarantine 'red list'

Transport Secretary Grant Shapps today announced Denmark, Slovakia, Iceland and Curacao are being added to the Government’s travel quarantine ‘red list’

‘If you arrive in the UK from these destinations after 4am this Saturday, you will need to self-isolate for 14 days.

‘We will not be adding any destinations to the Travel Corridor list this week. 

‘Remember: You MUST complete a Passenger Locator Form by law if you enter the UK. 

‘This protects public health and ensures those who need to are complying with self-isolation rules.’ 

The UK Government currently uses a threshold of 20 cases per 100,000 when it makes decisions on whether to add or remove countries from its quarantine list.  

Downing Street remains under intense pressure to change the UK’s travel quarantine rules amid growing fears for the future of the aviation and travel industries. 

Ministers have faced calls for months to replace the current 14 day self-isolation restrictions for people returning to the UK from high risk countries with a more nuanced system of airport testing. 

Advocates believe testing on arrival could open the door to significantly reducing the two week quarantine period to potentially less than seven days. 

A double testing approach would see travellers tested on arrival and then told to self-isolate for something like five days when they would then be tested for a second time. 

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Two negative tests would be enough to allow people to end their period in quarantine and return to normal life. 

However, ministers have been reluctant to approve airport testing because of concerns that the approach could fail to identify some people who have the virus. 

This is because of the amount of time it can take for the virus to be detectable after the moment of infection. 

But many MPs believe the current blanket approach to travel quarantine cannot continue for much longer because of the damage it is doing to the aviation sector. 

This post first appeared on dailymail.co.uk

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Smitten Kylie Minogue gushes over ‘supportive’ boyfriend Paul Solomons  

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smitten kylie minogue gushes over supportive boyfriend paul solomons

Kylie Minogue has praised her ‘supportive’ boyfriend Paul Solomon for staying by her side when she was sick. 

The Australian pop star, 52, was forced to cancel gigs on her Golden Tour in October 2018 after coming down with an infection, but revealed Paul helped nurse her back to health. 

Joking that the creative was ‘thrown into the deep end’ by dating her, Kylie told The Sun: ‘He had to come to the rescue a few times on tour when I was really unwell. He’d swoop in and hold me in a way that no one else can.’

Loved-up: Kylie Minogue has praised her 'supportive' boyfriend Paul Solomon for staying by her side when she was sick (pictured together in 2019)

Loved-up: Kylie Minogue has praised her 'supportive' boyfriend Paul Solomon for staying by her side when she was sick (pictured together in 2019)

Loved-up: Kylie Minogue has praised her ‘supportive’ boyfriend Paul Solomon for staying by her side when she was sick (pictured together in 2019)

Kylie continued: ‘He cares about my fans, he cares about my world, but mostly he cares about me. It’s so nice to have that one person who’s not involved in your tour, not in that way, and just wants to know that I’m OK.’

Gushing that things were going ‘really good’ between the pair, she concluded:  We’re really low-key, we’re very real, very supportive. We’re just taking things as they come for now, for always. Who knows what’s to come?’  

The couple have been going from strength to strength since they first laid eyes on each other when they were introduced through mutual friends in February 2018.

Kylie met Paul – who works as GQ magazine’s creative director – following the breakdown of her relationship with Joshua Sasse.

Supportive: The pop sensation revealed that Paul helped look after her when she was sick from an infection during her 2018 Golden Tour and had to cancel some gigs

Supportive: The pop sensation revealed that Paul helped look after her when she was sick from an infection during her 2018 Golden Tour and had to cancel some gigs

Supportive: The pop sensation revealed that Paul helped look after her when she was sick from an infection during her 2018 Golden Tour and had to cancel some gigs

The singer and her actor ex-fiancé Joshua, now 32, announced their split in February 2017 after three years together. 

At the time, unconfirmed reports claimed the singer booted the British actor out of her West London home after he grew too close to Spanish actress Marta Milans, 35.

After their split the songstress, who said she felt ‘broken at the time, took herself to Thailand to ‘heal’ herself.

In a candid interview with The Sunday Times, Kylie revealed that she came to the conclusion it ‘wasn’t the right union’.

Full of praise: Kylie said that Paul 'cares about my fans, he cares about my world, but mostly he cares about me' in a gushing interview about her love (pictured together in March)

Full of praise: Kylie said that Paul 'cares about my fans, he cares about my world, but mostly he cares about me' in a gushing interview about her love (pictured together in March)

Full of praise: Kylie said that Paul ‘cares about my fans, he cares about my world, but mostly he cares about me’ in a gushing interview about her love (pictured together in March)

Kylie later confirmed the sad news of her split on Instagram, thanking her loyal fans for their messages of concern and support. 

Alongside a picture of a sunrise, Kylie wrote: ‘Thank you now for your love and understanding with the news that Josh and I have decided to go our separate ways.

‘We wish only the best for each other as we venture towards new horizons. #thesunalwaysrises’. 

Going strong: The Austrian and GQ magazine's creative director Paul were introduced through mutual friends in February 2018 (pictured together in September 2019)

Going strong: The Austrian and GQ magazine's creative director Paul were introduced through mutual friends in February 2018 (pictured together in September 2019)

Going strong: The Austrian and GQ magazine’s creative director Paul were introduced through mutual friends in February 2018 (pictured together in September 2019)

Kylie and her new beau Paul confirmed their romance in April and the singer has been very open about the relationship, once saying she had ‘found her man.’

Kylie recently told The Mirror: ‘Who says you can’t be soppy and romantic later in life? Particularly when you find a good and true love.

‘I feel even more thankful and lucky that I have this in my life now… I’m really being taken care of.’

She also told Stella magazine: ‘When something’s precious, you want to handle it with care.’

She added: ‘We’re learning about each other’s worlds, of course there’s a part of his profession that crosses over to mine. I really just don’t want to say too much. He’s a great, great guy. We’re just doing our thing’.  

Speaking out: Kylie confirmed the sad news of her split from former fiancé Joshua Sasse on Instagram in 2017, thanking her loyal fans for their messages of concern and support

Speaking out: Kylie confirmed the sad news of her split from former fiancé Joshua Sasse on Instagram in 2017, thanking her loyal fans for their messages of concern and support

Speaking out: Kylie confirmed the sad news of her split from former fiancé Joshua Sasse on Instagram in 2017, thanking her loyal fans for their messages of concern and support

Throwback: Joshua famously ended his engagement to Kylie in 2017 after two years together.( (Pictured on June 29, 2016 in London)

Throwback: Joshua famously ended his engagement to Kylie in 2017 after two years together.( (Pictured on June 29, 2016 in London)

Throwback: Joshua famously ended his engagement to Kylie in 2017 after two years together.( (Pictured on June 29, 2016 in London)

This post first appeared on dailymail.co.uk

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