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Can YOU find the renowned city souvenirs among this holiday scene?

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can you find the renowned city souvenirs among this holiday scene

A tricky new brainteaser is challenging players to spot seven renowned souvenirs in a jam-packed illustration. 

The seek-and-find puzzle, created by British travel company Love Holidays, has stumped many – including even the most eager of holiday-goers. 

Well hidden among the colourful holiday scene, how many souvenirs do you think you will be able to find?

A new brainteaser created by travel company Love Holidays, challenges the internet to spot seven renowned souvenirs from this colourful and busy graphic

A new brainteaser created by travel company Love Holidays, challenges the internet to spot seven renowned souvenirs from this colourful and busy graphic

A new brainteaser created by travel company Love Holidays, challenges the internet to spot seven renowned souvenirs from this colourful and busy graphic

To make the challenge that much harder, the creators have also kept the types of souvenirs a secret.

As well as finding all seven, are you able to name the items and where in the world they can be found? 

If you’re struggling, focus your attention on the smaller items in the busy graphic. 

Give up? Scroll down to find the well-hidden souvenirs highlighted. 

The seven hidden souvenir items, highlighted, were hidden among other vibrant pieces to distract peoples' eyes

The seven hidden souvenir items, highlighted, were hidden among other vibrant pieces to distract peoples' eyes

The seven hidden souvenir items, highlighted, were hidden among other vibrant pieces to distract peoples’ eyes 

What are the souvenirs and where can they be found?

Eiffel Tower – Paris, France

The Eiffel Tower remains the most popular image of Paris and is instantly reminiscent of the city’s romance and culture. Paris’ tourism authorities suggest picking up a small model from Les Parisettes to remember your trip.

Mannequin Pis – Brussels, Belgium 

A historic and cheeky fountain sculpture loved by the people of Brussels, was chosen as the best souvenir to take home from the city.

The seven renowned souvenirs items included the Eiffel Tower, a Matryoshka doll and a ceramic sardine

The seven renowned souvenirs items included the Eiffel Tower, a Matryoshka doll and a ceramic sardine

The seven renowned souvenirs items included the Eiffel Tower, a Matryoshka doll and a ceramic sardine

Matryoshka Doll – Moscow, Russia

 This authentic, hand-painted doll is said to be the most iconic image of Russia. The city’s tourism authorities picked out this memento as Moscow’s must have souvenir.

Buddy Bear – Berlin, Germany 

Buddy Bear statues have been a symbol of optimism in Berlin since 2001.

Luchadores Mask – Mexico City, Mexico 

Pick up a colourful wrestling mask as a souvenir of your time in Mexico City. Wrestling, or lucha libre, is incredibly popular and has been granted ‘Intangible Cultural Heritage’ status by the capital’s government.

Ceramic Sardine – Lisbon, Portugal

Lisbon’s tourism authorities recommend that you take home a ceramic sardine to remember your time in Portugal’s sunny capital.

Troll – Oslo, Norway

Trolls are an intrinsic part of Norwegian folklore and have often been the subject of art, music, and literature. Commemorate your time in Oslo by taking home a troll figurine.  

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Elsewhere on the internet UK-based sofa and carpet specialist ScS challenged people to find the TV remote hidden between plants, clocks and various chairs.

The creators of the fiendishly tricky seek-and-find puzzle claim that on average it takes 40 seconds for people to find the remote – so how long will it take you? 

A third of participants couldn’t find the control in under a minute, according to the creators. 

Only the most eagle-eyed participants can spot the TV remote lost among the various pieces of furniture in this fiendishly tricky seek-and-find puzzle (above)

Only the most eagle-eyed participants can spot the TV remote lost among the various pieces of furniture in this fiendishly tricky seek-and-find puzzle (above)

Only the most eagle-eyed participants can spot the TV remote lost among the various pieces of furniture in this fiendishly tricky seek-and-find puzzle (above)

Ensuring it’s more difficult for people, the colourful graphic makes it harder to spot where the electric device might be by packing the puzzle with objects.

But if you’re struggling, concentrate your attention towards the bottom of the vibrant graphic.  

Give up? Scroll down to find the well-hidden TV remote highlighted. 

Answer: The TV remote is circled. The key to the puzzle was to focus your attention towards the bottom of the graphic

Answer: The TV remote is circled. The key to the puzzle was to focus your attention towards the bottom of the graphic

Answer: The TV remote is circled. The key to the puzzle was to focus your attention towards the bottom of the graphic

Meanwhile, a tricky new brainteaser is challenging players to find a single queen bee hiding within her busy colony.

Hungarian children’s illustrator and viral puzzle sensation Gergely Dudás, better known as Dudolf, recently shared the seek-and-find puzzle on his website and Facebook page for fans to enjoy.

Players are asked to spot the single queen bee in the hectic scene and, to throw people off and make things as difficult as possible, all the insects look frustratingly similar.

Hungarian children's illustrator and viral puzzle sensation Gergely Dudás, better known as Dudolf, recently shared this seek-and-find puzzle on his website and Facebook page for fans to enjoy

Hungarian children's illustrator and viral puzzle sensation Gergely Dudás, better known as Dudolf, recently shared this seek-and-find puzzle on his website and Facebook page for fans to enjoy

Hungarian children’s illustrator and viral puzzle sensation Gergely Dudás, better known as Dudolf, recently shared this seek-and-find puzzle on his website and Facebook page for fans to enjoy

The cartoonist also filled the vibrant image with plenty of playful characters, brightly coloured accessories and extra details to try to confuse the eye.

If you’re struggling to find the answer, then here’s a clue – feast your eyes towards the bottom right-hand side of the busy image. 

Give up? Scroll down to find the well-hidden queen bee highlighted. 

But don’t fret if you didn’t manage to complete the tricky challenge this time round – because it’s just the latest in a long line of brainteasers sweeping the web.

Don't fret if you didn't manage to complete the tricky challenge this time round - because it's just the latest in a long line of brainteasers sweeping the web

Don't fret if you didn't manage to complete the tricky challenge this time round - because it's just the latest in a long line of brainteasers sweeping the web

Don’t fret if you didn’t manage to complete the tricky challenge this time round – because it’s just the latest in a long line of brainteasers sweeping the web

Earlier this year, Dudolf shared a tricky spot the difference puzzle which left even the most eagle-eyed players scratching their heads. 

He challenged puzzlers to find the seven things separating these two almost identical beach scenes.  

To have any hope of getting all seven, you will have to pay close attention to even the smallest of objects. 

Scroll down for the solution 

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30493802 8498843 image m 92 1594138611588

Hungarian children's illustrator Gergely Dudás, better known as Dudolf, challenged players to find the seven things separating these two almost identical beach scenes

Hungarian children's illustrator Gergely Dudás, better known as Dudolf, challenged players to find the seven things separating these two almost identical beach scenes

Hungarian children’s illustrator Gergely Dudás, better known as Dudolf, challenged players to find the seven things separating these two almost identical beach scenes

The puzzle, shared on Dudolf’s Facebook and website, proved popular with his fans, who agreed it was ‘seriously difficult’ but ‘fun’. 

One posted: ‘Found five! Then I needed the solution’. Another wrote: ‘Couldn’t find the last one, but finally did.’ A third asked: ‘Did everyone have as much difficulty as I did?’ 

If you’re struggling to find them then here’s a clue: the differences may be as small as a change in logo or a detail on an item of clothing.

Still having a hard time? You’ll find the solutions below. 

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30493804 8498843 image m 90 1594138367435

Answers: The logo on the suncream, the fruit on the ground, the direction of the seashell swirl, the watermelon seeds, the band on a sunhat, the colours on an ice lolly, the sandcastle flag

Answers: The logo on the suncream, the fruit on the ground, the direction of the seashell swirl, the watermelon seeds, the band on a sunhat, the colours on an ice lolly, the sandcastle flag

Answers: The logo on the suncream, the fruit on the ground, the direction of the seashell swirl, the watermelon seeds, the band on a sunhat, the colours on an ice lolly, the sandcastle flag

It came just weeks after Dudolf challenged players to find the snake hiding in a jungle-themed seek-and-find puzzle.

The brainteaser shows a jungle scene in shades of green, with birds flitting between branches and thick foliage in the background. 

But the single slithering snake is almost impossible to find. 

The brainteaser, created by children's illustrator Gergely Dudás, from Budapest, Hungary, shows a mass of green and yellow leaves with misleading parrots

The brainteaser, created by children's illustrator Gergely Dudás, from Budapest, Hungary, shows a mass of green and yellow leaves with misleading parrots

The brainteaser, created by children’s illustrator Gergely Dudás, from Budapest, Hungary, shows a mass of green and yellow leaves with misleading parrots 

The challenging graphic, produced by the illustrator of Fox & Rabbit, prompted fans of Dudolf’s work to say it is ‘very difficult’. 

If you’re looking for a place to start, begin by working from left to right and look closely between the leaves to see if anything is hiding.

Try not to be put off by the vine leaves and parrots as you weave you way through the jungle to find the snake. 

And if you are still struggling, try looking closely at the patterns on the leaves to spot the creature. 

Give up? Then scroll down to find the answer highlighted among the faded jungle scene. 

The snake can be seen on the left-hand side of the jungle graphic hiding between the leaves

The snake can be seen on the left-hand side of the jungle graphic hiding between the leaves

The snake can be seen on the left-hand side of the jungle graphic hiding between the leaves

This post first appeared on dailymail.co.uk

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PM under new pressure for second lockdown: SAGE scientists predict second wave ‘deadlier than first’

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pm under new pressure for second lockdown sage scientists predict second wave deadlier than first

The Prime Minister has been told to prepare for the second wave of coronavirus to be more deadly than the first, with the death toll likely to remain high throughout the winter, SAGE advisors have reportedly warned.

According to internal analysis provided by the Scientific Advisory Group for Emergencies (SAGE), deaths will peak at a lower level than in the spring but could remain high for weeks or even months with a Christmas rest-bite unlikely.

A source told the Telegraph: ‘It’s going to be worse this time, more deaths. That is the projection that has been put in front of the Prime Minister, and he is now being put under a lot of pressure to lock down again.’

According to the SAGE prediction, all of England could be in Tier 3 restrictions by Christmas.

Covid rates all over the country are forecast to soar past the levels seen in areas already put into the ‘very high’ category over the next two months, while 25,000 people could be in hospital with the virus by the end of November — higher than the spring peak.

According to internal analysis provided by the Scientific Advisory Group for Emergencies (SAGE), deaths will peak at a lower level than in the spring but could remain high for weeks or even months with a Christmas rest-bite unlikely

According to internal analysis provided by the Scientific Advisory Group for Emergencies (SAGE), deaths will peak at a lower level than in the spring but could remain high for weeks or even months with a Christmas rest-bite unlikely

According to internal analysis provided by the Scientific Advisory Group for Emergencies (SAGE), deaths will peak at a lower level than in the spring but could remain high for weeks or even months with a Christmas rest-bite unlikely

Chief scientific adviser Sir Patrick Vallance has reportedly urged Boris Johnson to take action by imposing a second lockdown to avoid the excess deaths, which are projected to reach 500 a day within the coming weeks.  

Projections made by Sir Patrick appear to rule out the possibility of that the current nationwide restrictions – which dictate that people can only mix indoors and outdoors in groups of no more than six – will be eased up before Christmas. 

A government source told The Sun: ‘The latest Sage numbers are utterly bleak.’ 

Dr Yvonne Doyle, the medical director of Public Health England, said: ‘We continue to see the trend in deaths rising, and it is likely this will continue for some time. Each day we see more people testing positive and hospital admissions increasing.

‘Being seriously ill enough from the infection to need hospital admission can sadly lead to more Covid-related deaths. We can help to control this virus.’ 

Prime Minister Boris Johnson during a visit to Royal Berkshire Hospital, Reading, to mark the publication of a new review into hospital food, October 26

Prime Minister Boris Johnson during a visit to Royal Berkshire Hospital, Reading, to mark the publication of a new review into hospital food, October 26

Prime Minister Boris Johnson during a visit to Royal Berkshire Hospital, Reading, to mark the publication of a new review into hospital food, October 26

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Britain today recorded 367 more Covid-19 victims in the highest daily death toll since the end of May as a senior health official warned the number of fatalities will continue to rise ‘for some time’.

Despite the grisly death figures, Government statistics also offer hope the outbreak could finally be tailing off, with another 22,885 infections today — up just 7 per cent in a week. Coronavirus cases were doubling every week in September, which sparked fears the UK had sleep-walked into a second wave following a lull in transmission.

Chief scientific adviser Sir Patrick Vallance has reportedly urged Boris Johnson to impose a second lockdown

Chief scientific adviser Sir Patrick Vallance has reportedly urged Boris Johnson to impose a second lockdown

Chief scientific adviser Sir Patrick Vallance has reportedly urged Boris Johnson to impose a second lockdown

Infections are still a way off levels seen during the worst stage of the pandemic in March and April, when at least 100,000 Britons were catching the life-threatening illness every day. And top experts warn cases are still growing, even though data shows they are slowing down.

An internal memo from Leeds Teaching Hospitals NHS Trust showed that non-covid treatments had once again been suspended to cope with the growing number of covid patients, reports The Telegraph.

The memo – seen by the publication –  from the trust’s deputy chief medical officer, David Berridge, warned that they had seen a 78 per cent rise in admissions in one week and suggested it was very likely ‘Leeds will move into Tier 3. 

The UK would not be alone in imposing a second national lockdown as many European countries appear to be on the cusp of the same decision as infections increase to record levels. 

In Germany Angela Merkel is said to be drawing up plans for a so-called ‘lockdown light’ in which bars and restaurants would shut but most schools would stay open.

Merkel is due to hold talks with regional leaders on Wednesday amid rapidly rising coronavirus infections in Germany, with her economy minister warning that cases could soon reach 20,000 per day.  

While in France French President Macron is due to make a televised address at 8pm tomorrow which is expected to see a national lockdown imposed or a host of local measures and curfews extended.

The French government is envisaging a month-long national lockdown to combat the coronavirus resurgence which could take effect from midnight on Thursday, France’s BFM TV reported today.  

In Italy bars and restaurants were ordered to close by 6pm and with public gyms, cinemas and swimming pools closed to try to slow a second wave of coronavirus infections that is battering much of the country.   

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West Yorkshire may be next to move into Tier Three affecting 1.8million people. If it were to be plunged into Tier Three, it would follow neighbours South Yorkshire, Lancashire and Greater Manchester

Office for National Statistics figures showed 761 Brits fell victim to the disease in the week ending October 16, the most recent recording period. Not since June 19, when there were 849 deaths, have more people lost their lives to the disease in a single week. At that point, the country was still in a national lockdown

Office for National Statistics figures showed 761 Brits fell victim to the disease in the week ending October 16, the most recent recording period. Not since June 19, when there were 849 deaths, have more people lost their lives to the disease in a single week. At that point, the country was still in a national lockdown

Office for National Statistics figures showed 761 Brits fell victim to the disease in the week ending October 16, the most recent recording period. Not since June 19, when there were 849 deaths, have more people lost their lives to the disease in a single week. At that point, the country was still in a national lockdown

IS WEST YORKSHIRE NEXT TO BE HIT WITH TIER 3 RESTRICTIONS?

Huddersfield MP Barry Sheerman said a Tier Three lockdown would be announced 'quite soon' in his borough of Kirklees

Huddersfield MP Barry Sheerman said a Tier Three lockdown would be announced 'quite soon' in his borough of Kirklees

Huddersfield MP Barry Sheerman said a Tier Three lockdown would be announced ‘quite soon’ in his borough of Kirklees

West Yorkshire looks set to become the next part of England to move into a Tier Three lockdown, after a local MP admitted the toughest restrictions were ‘inevitable’ because of spiralling cases and hospital admissions.

Speaking ahead of crunch talks with the Government this evening, Huddersfield MP Barry Sheerman said the new rules – which would plunge another 1.8million people into the harshest bracket of lockdown – would be announced ‘quite soon’.

On his borough of Kirklees, the Labour MP told Yorkshire Live: ‘Covid is rampant. Rates are going up. Hospitals are under pressure locally and nationally. I think they are going to put us in the next tier quite soon. It’s inevitable.’

Local officials across the region held crunch talks with senior ministers yesterday to discuss the ‘next steps’ in tackling Covid-19 in West Yorkshire, with further behind-closed-doors meetings scheduled tonight and in the coming days.

Kirklees is among five local authority areas within West Yorkshire, along with Leeds, Calderdale, Bradford and Wakefield. All five boroughs are already under Tier Two, which means people are banned from meeting up with friends and family indoors.

But a Tier Three status would see all pubs and bars have to close unless they serve meals. Residents would also be banned from mixing with anyone they don’t live with indoors or in private gardens and beer gardens.   

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This post first appeared on dailymail.co.uk

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Businesswoman sues ex-boyfriend for half of his £400,000 house

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businesswoman sues ex boyfriend for half of his 400000 house

A businesswoman who claims she was ‘evicted’ by her boyfriend after she spent nearly £100,000 of her own money doing up and paying for his house is now suing him for half the property.

Vijaya Jules, 49, was still living with her estranged husband when she got together with former police worker Jason Spencer, 51, after the pair met at an Essex gym in 2012, Central London County Court heard.

Ms Jules says she spent thousands of her savings on mortgage payments and renovations for Mr Spencer’s £400,000 semi-detached home while he was ‘not working’ and ‘had no money.’

She says she believed she was putting money into their future, but that later he booted her out of the house that was supposed to be their home together, and claimed it was all his.

They split up in 2018 and Ms Jules has now dragged her ex to court, demanding he sell the house – which is his childhood home – and give her half.

Vijaya Jules, 49, says she spent thousands of her savings on mortgage payments and renovations for her ex Jason Spencer's £400,000 semi-detached Essex home while he was 'not working' and 'had no money'. She is suing him for half the property

Vijaya Jules, 49, says she spent thousands of her savings on mortgage payments and renovations for her ex Jason Spencer's £400,000 semi-detached Essex home while he was 'not working' and 'had no money'. She is suing him for half the property

Vijaya Jules, 49, says she spent thousands of her savings on mortgage payments and renovations for her ex Jason Spencer’s £400,000 semi-detached Essex home while he was ‘not working’ and ‘had no money’. She is suing him for half the property

But Mr Spencer, now a commercial director, denies being out of a job when the work was done and says that the pair – who he claims had an ‘extremely volatile’ relationship – never actually lived together permanently.

Although she stayed for a month or so, she spent most of her time living elsewhere with her two kids and, when she did stay at his house towards the end of their relationship, she slept in the guest room, he says.

Judge Nicholas Parfitt heard that Ms Jules and Mr Spencer got together in 2012 after meeting at the gym and split in 2018 after – Ms Jules told the court – she had been ‘evicted’ by Mr Spencer from his house in Oakwood Hill, Loughton, Essex.

By then, she claims to have spent more than £50,000 on renovations and put in £32,000 to pay off his mortgage in 2017 – at a time he was not working – in the belief she was investing in a property that would be half hers.

In the witness box, she told the judge: ‘We knew each other from the health club we both attended. Our first date was in October 2012. At that point I was separated from my ex-husband but still co-habiting.’

She said the couple had begun talking about buying a house together in early 2013, but instead they decided that she would pay off his mortgage and refurbish his home in return for her owning half.

‘I paid for all of the works from my personal savings,’ she told the judge. ‘A lot of the times I paid for with cash and a lot of money was taken from my parents.’

But Mr Spencer, now a commercial director, denies being out of a job when the work was done and says that the pair - who he claims had an 'extremely volatile' relationship - never actually lived together permanently

But Mr Spencer, now a commercial director, denies being out of a job when the work was done and says that the pair - who he claims had an 'extremely volatile' relationship - never actually lived together permanently

But Mr Spencer, now a commercial director, denies being out of a job when the work was done and says that the pair – who he claims had an ‘extremely volatile’ relationship – never actually lived together permanently

Ms Jules claims that, in 2017, she stumped up £32,000 of her own money to pay off the mortgage on the house, which Mr Spencer had bought with his late mum, Eileen.

‘He wasn’t working at the time. He hadn’t worked since December 2015,’ Ms Jules continued.

‘There was no money coming from him to me ever – I paid for everything.’

Her barrister, Nigel Woodhouse, said she claims half of the house on the basis of a ‘constructive trust’ arising from an ‘express agreement’ between the two of them, as well as her spending on the property.

Richard Bowles, for Mr Spencer, told the judge that Mr Spencer did not leave his job with the Met Police until 2017 and, while there had been discussions between the couple about the property being shared equally, there was no agreement.

‘These discussions did not result in the parties agreeing that they would each be co-owners of the property,’ he said.

‘Rather, they resulted in Mr Spencer expressly stating that he did not wish to own the property jointly with Ms Jules.

‘She only lived at the property for a very short time, and when she would stay over – towards the end of the parties’ relationship – she would do so as a guest and sleep in the guest bedroom.

‘The property was plainly not used by Ms Jules as her home. No inference can be drawn from her visits that the property was intended to be owned by her, in fact the position was quite the reverse.

‘This is not a case where the parties owned the property together. Simply, the parties had a relationship and it didn’t work out. They did not live together, save for a very short and unsuccessful period in 2016, and the property did not form any sort of “family home”.’

It is claimed Ms Jules only stayed at the home in Loughton, Essex for about a month in 2016, and contributed towards an update to the kitchen 'as a Christmas present in 2015'

It is claimed Ms Jules only stayed at the home in Loughton, Essex for about a month in 2016, and contributed towards an update to the kitchen 'as a Christmas present in 2015'

It is claimed Ms Jules only stayed at the home in Loughton, Essex for about a month in 2016, and contributed towards an update to the kitchen ‘as a Christmas present in 2015’

He said Ms Jules had provided little evidence to back up her case.

As she stood in the witness box, he told her: ‘You are bringing this claim, claiming you own half of my client’s property.

‘Mr Spencer has lived in the house all his life.

‘You are asking the court to believe that there was an express agreement. There’s no evidence of that. All the evidence we have points the other way.

‘The only evidence we have of you making any contribution is one reference in a letter.’

But Ms Jules replied: ‘I don’t have any receipts. When he evicted me, he wouldn’t give me copies of any receipts. He said he needed them for his contents insurance. “It’s my house and you don’t need them”, he told me. 

‘I don’t have the receipts, but I did the refurbishment. He told me he had no money, but I would be added as a joint owner. That’s why I continued to do the refurbishments and eventually would have paid off the mortgage.’

Mr Spencer insists he was not supported by his ex, that he had been on a £30,000-a-year police salary at the time and they had each provided the other with emotional and financial support during the relationship.

He says he paid off the mortgage himself after selling another property and that he and Ms Jules split after arguing over her demands that her name be put on the house deeds.

Since 2013, she had spent almost all of her time living with her two children from her previous marriage elsewhere in Ilford, only staying at his home for about a month in 2016, he claims.

Her contribution towards an updated kitchen at the house had been a ‘gesture of goodwill and thanks’ for his support and as a Christmas present in 2015, he said.

The hearing continues.

This post first appeared on dailymail.co.uk

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No10’s publicly-available coronavirus statistics are ‘disparate’, top scientists warn

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no10s publicly available coronavirus statistics are disparate top scientists warn

Number 10‘s publicly-available coronavirus statistics are ‘disparate’ and mask the true scale of England’s second wave, top scientists have warned.

Researchers from University College London warned there are ‘significant gaps in data quality, consistency and availability’ which make tracking the virus’ trajectory near-impossible.

They slammed ministers for cherry-picking figures — which are ‘often from disparate sources and are not linked together’ — and parading them at press conferences to justify tightening or loosening lockdown restrictions.

The team at UCL have now created their own Covid-19 dashboard, which tracks the virus in real time, to rival the Government’s version, where the best available data is often two weeks old.

They hope the public dashboard will make data more transparent and boost adherence to lockdowns in hotspot areas. Currently, the Government’s out-of-date data has left residents confused about why they are being forced to live under economically-crippling and socially-restrictive measures.

Creators of the new dashboard said that, while developing the web tool, they found that NHS Test and Trace was performing even poorer than official statistics indicate. They also criticised Downing Street for not having routine data on how well requests for 14-day isolation are adhered to.

Asked whether she believed the Government was purposefully concealing certain data to mask its shortcomings, lead researcher Professor Christina Pagel said: ‘The fact you’re asking that question just shows the Government has a big job to do to get people’s trust back.’ 

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Experts from University College London have created their own Covid-19 dashboard, which tracks the virus in real time, to rival the Government's version, where the best available data is often two weeks old

Experts from University College London have created their own Covid-19 dashboard, which tracks the virus in real time, to rival the Government's version, where the best available data is often two weeks old

Experts from University College London have created their own Covid-19 dashboard, which tracks the virus in real time, to rival the Government’s version, where the best available data is often two weeks old

It breaks down estimated cases being picked up by the Government's coronavirus testing programme every week, as well as the true number of infections, including people who are asymptomatic and were not swabbed

It breaks down estimated cases being picked up by the Government's coronavirus testing programme every week, as well as the true number of infections, including people who are asymptomatic and were not swabbed

It breaks down estimated cases being picked up by the Government’s coronavirus testing programme every week, as well as the true number of infections, including people who are asymptomatic and were not swabbed

The dashboard updates in real-time to give the public a clearer picture of the current trajectory of the coronavirus

The dashboard updates in real-time to give the public a clearer picture of the current trajectory of the coronavirus

The dashboard updates in real-time to give the public a clearer picture of the current trajectory of the coronavirus

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UK RECORDS 367 COVID DEATHS IN HIGHEST DAILY TOLL SINCE MAY

Britain today recorded 367 more Covid-19 victims in the highest daily death toll since the end of May as a senior health official warned the number of fatalities will continue to rise ‘for some time’.

Despite the grisly death figures, Government statistics also offer hope the outbreak could finally be tailing off, with another 22,885 infections today — up just 7 per cent in a week. Coronavirus cases were doubling every week in September, which sparked fears the UK had sleep-walked into a second wave following a lull in transmission.

Infections are still a way off levels seen during the worst stage of the pandemic in March and April, when at least 100,000 Britons were catching the life-threatening illness every day. And top experts warn cases are still growing, even though data shows they are slowing down.

For comparison, 241 Covid-19 deaths and 21,331 infections were recorded last Tuesday, as well as 102 deaths and 20,890 cases yesterday. But fatality counts on Mondays are always lower than usual because of a recording lag at the weekend, meaning today’s toll is likely to be slightly inflated.

Dr Yvonne Doyle, medical director of Public Health England, today warned the rising death toll from Covid-19 was likely to ‘continue for some time’ because of the spike in cases. It can take infected patients several weeks to fall severely ill, meaning the consequences of Britain’s spiralling outbreak are only just starting to be seen.

Britain’s official coronavirus death toll today topped 45,000, with the daily number of fatalities being the highest since May 27, when 422 victims were registered. It means 200 Britons are now succumbing to the life-threatening illness every day, on average.

It comes as separate data today revealed the number of Brits dying from Covid-19 rose by more than 50 per cent in seven days. Office for National Statistics figures showed 761 Britons fell victim to the disease in the week ending October 16, the most recent recording period, up from 474 the week before.

But the number of deaths is still a far-cry away from the peak of the pandemic during the spring, when more than 9,400 patients died in the worst week. And to bring the figures into perspective, Covid-19 was only responsible for one in 16 total deaths in the UK in the most recent week, and flu and pneumonia killed twice as many people.

And despite warnings that the death toll will continue to soar, a raft of statistics have suggested Britain’s outbreak has already started to slow down thanks to tighter restrictions on freedoms nationally and the three-tier lockdown system in hotspots. It suggests fatalities could start to tail off in the coming weeks.

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Professor Pagel added: ‘Increasing volumes of data are being shown in the media and in government press conferences as a basis for local tightening of restrictions. 

‘However, these data are often from disparate sources, and are not linked together to give a more complete picture of how we are doing. 

‘This was the motivation behind our dashboard development. We wish to contribute to the public understanding of Covid-19’s spread, and support policymakers.’

The new dashboard, which can be accessed by the public here, was developed by UCL research spin-off i-sense.

Its creators said they developed the system after struggling to find ‘quality, consistent and reliable data needed to manage the coronavirus pandemic and its impacts’.

The COVID Response Evaluation Dashboard, or COVID RED, collates and presents data from the Office of National Statistics, Public Health England, and the NHS.

It breaks down the data into five categories; Find, Test, Track, Isolate and Support for those asked to Isolate (FTTIS). 

It presents indicators of England’s performance under each of these headings, and identifies areas where more data are needed. 

In developing the dashboard, researchers found significant gaps in data quality and availability. 

Placed in the context of the total number of estimated infections, the proportion of cases whose contacts are asked to isolate is smaller than official data indicates.

The team estimate just 39 per cent of all positive cases were actually picked up in the most recent week, 31 per cent were reached by contact tracers and 16 per cent of their close contacts were advised to isolate. 

By comparison Number 10’s official Test and Trace report would have you believe 80 per cent of infected people had been reached by tracers and 60 per cent of contacts were reached. 

This is because it does not factor in all of the cases who were never tested – including asymptomatic people and those who couldn’t access a swab because of shortages.

The Government’s scientific experts have warned that the contact tracing system can only work effectively if at least 80 per cent of close contacts are actually tracked down and to quarantine for 14 days.

Furthermore, no routine data are collected on how well requests for 14-day isolation are adhered to, the UCL researchers warned.

This makes it impossible to currently assess how effective NHS Test and Trace is in reducing Covid-19 transmission. 

The researchers note that gaps in information regarding follow up of confirmed Covid-19 cases is an issue. At present, the number of people isolating with symptoms in England is unknown, and there is a lack of data on those who need or are receiving any kind of support.

Furthermore, the best available data for some areas of the dashboard is up to two weeks old.

The team emphasised the need for real-time information to be prioritised to inform and support the necessary responses, including regional or local lockdowns. 

COVID RED co-developer Professor Deenan Pillay, an infectious disease expert at UCL, added: ‘Coronavirus case numbers are doubling every two weeks at the moment, and access to real-time data will be essential during this time to monitor ‘hot-spots’ of infection as we head into winter so that local health authorities can better control community spread.

‘Indeed, an effective local public health approach is key to ensuring we avoid the need for regular lockdowns. 

‘Track, trace, isolate is a key part of monitoring the effectiveness of social distancing measures, and to ensure infections remain low once we come out of current and future restrictions.’ 

This post first appeared on dailymail.co.uk

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