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Charles Moore pulls out of BBC chairman race, sparking new hunt for the role 

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charles moore pulls out of bbc chairman race sparking new hunt for the role

The leading contender for the new BBC chairman role has pulled out, sparking a new hunt for the top spot. 

Lord Charles Moore of Etchingham is said to have suggested he will not apply for the position once current chairman Sir David Clementi stands down. 

Lord Moore, who previously worked as the editor of the Daily and Sunday Telegraph, has cited family reasons for his choice to back out of the race. 

Though the government is yet to publish a job advertisement for the position, Lord Moore has often been linked to the role, the Telegraph reports.  

Lord Charles Moore of Etchingham has said he will not apply for the BBC chairman position once current chairman Sir David Clementi stands down

Lord Charles Moore of Etchingham has said he will not apply for the BBC chairman position once current chairman Sir David Clementi stands down

Lord Charles Moore of Etchingham has said he will not apply for the BBC chairman position once current chairman Sir David Clementi stands down

Culture secretary Oliver Dowden insisted last month that ‘no offers have been made’ over who would be the new Ofcom and BBC chairmen – but warned the Governments wants a ‘strong, big person’ to hold Beeb to account 

Speaking in September Mr Dowden played down either appointment, pointing out there would be a process for appointing both roles, with interviews conducted by an independent panel. 

He told BBC One’s The Andrew Marr Show that no offers had been made, adding: ‘We have a formal process for them to go through so I will be launching shortly the competition for the chair of the BBC.’

But it hasn't stopped ongoing speculation that Paul Dacre has been approached by Boris Johnson to become Chairman of Ofcom, nor the belief that BBC critic Charles Moore could be the next chairman of the corporation

But it hasn't stopped ongoing speculation that Paul Dacre has been approached by Boris Johnson to become Chairman of Ofcom, nor the belief that BBC critic Charles Moore could be the next chairman of the corporation

But it hasn’t stopped ongoing speculation that Paul Dacre has been approached by Boris Johnson to become Chairman of Ofcom, nor the belief that BBC critic Charles Moore could be the next chairman of the corporation

But it hasn’t stopped ongoing speculation that Paul Dacre has been approached by Boris Johnson to become Chairman of Ofcom, nor the belief that BBC critic Charles Moore could be the next chairman of the corporation.

Speaking on Sky’s Sophy Ridge at the end of last month, Conservative MP Steve Moore said he would be ‘delighted’ to see both appointments. 

However the shadow culture secretary Jo Stevens asked why the Government was ‘interfering,’ in the process. 

This post first appeared on dailymail.co.uk

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Marcus Rashford helps out at charity that feeds vulnerable children

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marcus rashford helps out at charity that feeds vulnerable children

England football star Marcus Rashford and his mother yesterday visited a food charity which is naming a new warehouse in her honour after MPs voted down his plan to provide free school meals during the holidays.   

The pair’s visit to FareShare Greater Manchester came a day after a Labour motion for the meals scheme to be extended over school holidays until Easter 2021 was defeated in the House of Commons.

The campaign has been championed by Manchester United footballer Rashford, 22, who had called on people to ‘unite’ to protect the most vulnerable children after the vote.

Visiting FareShare with his mother Melanie, he said: ‘When we stumble, there will always be a community to wrap their arms around us and pick us back up.’ 

The football ace added that for many people this help will come from food banks staffed by ‘selfless’ volunteers who are dedicated to protecting the most vulnerable.

Hours after visiting the FareShare warehouse, Rashford heaped praise on local groups, businesses and schools which have done their bit for children in local communities. 

He forced a Government U-turn on free school meal vouchers over the summer holidays, and his petition urging the Government to go further in tackling child hunger hit 100,000 signatures just 10 hours after it was launched.  

England football star Marcus Rashford and his mother visited a food charity after MPs voted down his plan to provide free school meals during the holidays

England football star Marcus Rashford and his mother visited a food charity after MPs voted down his plan to provide free school meals during the holidays

England football star Marcus Rashford and his mother visited a food charity after MPs voted down his plan to provide free school meals during the holidays

The pair's visit to FareShare Greater Manchester came a day after a Labour motion for the meals scheme to be extended over school holidays was defeated in the House of Commons

The pair's visit to FareShare Greater Manchester came a day after a Labour motion for the meals scheme to be extended over school holidays was defeated in the House of Commons

The pair’s visit to FareShare Greater Manchester came a day after a Labour motion for the meals scheme to be extended over school holidays was defeated in the House of Commons

Rashford visiting FareShare Greater Manchester at New Smithfield Market with his mother

Rashford visiting FareShare Greater Manchester at New Smithfield Market with his mother

Rashford visiting FareShare Greater Manchester at New Smithfield Market with his mother

The campaign has been championed by Manchester United footballer Rashford, 22, who had called on people to 'unite' to protect the most vulnerable children after the vote

The campaign has been championed by Manchester United footballer Rashford, 22, who had called on people to 'unite' to protect the most vulnerable children after the vote

The campaign has been championed by Manchester United footballer Rashford, 22, who had called on people to ‘unite’ to protect the most vulnerable children after the vote 

This week the footballer blasted MPs for rejecting plans to extend free school meals during the Easter holidays, claiming that children 'will go to bed feeling hungry and worthless'

This week the footballer blasted MPs for rejecting plans to extend free school meals during the Easter holidays, claiming that children 'will go to bed feeling hungry and worthless'

This week the footballer blasted MPs for rejecting plans to extend free school meals during the Easter holidays, claiming that children ‘will go to bed feeling hungry and worthless’ 

The footballer has been an ambassador for national food redistribution charity FareShare since March 2020.

The charity said it has seen demand for food soar since the outbreak of Covid-19 and is now distributing double the amount of food in comparison to before the lockdown in March, enough food for two million meals each week.

To respond to the crisis, FareShare Greater Manchester has taken on additional warehouse space which could treble the amount of food distributed in the region, naming the space Melanie Maynard House.

The footballer has spoken about his own experience of using a food voucher scheme as a child.

In a recent letter to MPs, Rashford reflected on his own experience, writing: ‘I remember the sound of my mum crying herself to sleep to this day, having worked a 14-hour shift, unsure how she was going to make ends meet.’

The new warehouse is in need of major refurbishment and the charity has launched a £300,000 fundraising appeal to fund it.

Rashford visiting FareShare Greater Manchester at New Smithfield Market with his mother

Rashford visiting FareShare Greater Manchester at New Smithfield Market with his mother

Rashford visiting FareShare Greater Manchester at New Smithfield Market with his mother

England football star Marcus Rashford and his mother visited a food charity after MPs voted down his plan to provide free school meals during the holidays

England football star Marcus Rashford and his mother visited a food charity after MPs voted down his plan to provide free school meals during the holidays

England football star Marcus Rashford and his mother visited a food charity after MPs voted down his plan to provide free school meals during the holidays

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Hours after visiting the FareShare warehouse, Rashford heaped praise on local groups, businesses and schools which have done their bit for children in local communities

Hours after visiting the FareShare warehouse, Rashford heaped praise on local groups, businesses and schools which have done their bit for children in local communities

Hours after visiting the FareShare warehouse, Rashford heaped praise on local groups, businesses and schools which have done their bit for children in local communities

Rashford and his mother met staff and volunteers to see how the charity will be responding to soaring demand this Christmas.  

Tory MP Caroline Ansell quits her Government job after rebelling to back Labour and Marcus Rashford’s bid to offer free school meals to children during holidays until Easter 2021 as she says she could not ‘ignore’ her conscience 

Caroline Ansell

Caroline Ansell

Caroline Ansell

A Tory MP has quit her Government job after rebelling to back Labour and Marcus Rashford’s bid to offer free school meals to children during holidays until Easter 2021. 

Caroline Ansell was one of five Conservative backbenchers to go against the Government and vote for the plan last night. 

She said in a statement that while she believed extending the scheme was not a ‘long term solution’ she believed it could help people in the ‘immediate time ahead’ during the coronavirus crisis. 

She said she ‘could not in all conscience ignore that belief’ as she announced she had resigned as a Parliamentary Private Secretary at the Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs.       

Labour’s motion calling for the Government to offer more help to struggling families was defeated by 322 votes to 261, a majority of 61.

England and Manchester United football ace Rashford, who has been campaigning on the issue, slammed the outcome of the vote on Twitter as he said children would go to bed feeling hungry and worthless.     

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He said: ‘The real superstars in this country can be found in the heart of most cities, towns and villages, working tirelessly to support our most vulnerable across the UK.

‘As FareShare and other food-related charities approach one of the toughest Winters on record, with demand higher than ever before, it is important that I stay connected and lend my support wherever it is needed.

‘When we stumble, there will always be a community to wrap their arms around us and pick us back up. For many of us, that is FareShare or the local food bank.

‘Food banks who are staffed with selfless volunteers, dedicating their lives to protecting those most vulnerable, those who, in many cases, have fallen into unforeseen circumstances due to illness, personal loss and unemployment.

‘It should be noted that a lot of these volunteers have themselves suffered unemployment as a result of the pandemic, yet they still strive to help others less fortunate.

‘That to me is the greatest example of what we can do, and the difference we can make, when we just work together.’

In Greater Manchester alone, FareShare is now distributing more than 80 tonnes of food each week, equivalent to more than 200,000 meals.

Lindsay Boswell, chief executive of FareShare UK, added: ‘We are disappointed with the outcome of the vote, which would have been the first step on the road to providing some peace of mind to the millions of struggling UK families.

‘FareShare continues to provide over two million meals each week to vulnerable communities across the UK and we stand ready to provide all the food we can obtain, so we can continue supporting those families and children that seek help to access good, healthy food.’

Rashford’s campaigning has also led to the the Child Food Poverty Taskforce, a group of leading organisations, including FareShare, which aims to tackle the issue.

This week the footballer blasted MPs for rejecting plans to extend free school meals during the Easter holidays, claiming that children ‘will go to bed feeling hungry and worthless’. 

The forward, who has been a strong campaigner on the issue, lashed out on Twitter as a Labour motion to extend the scheme was rejected by 322 votes to 261, a majority of 61.  

It was the latest setback in his plea for the Government to fund hot meals for the most needy children during coronavirus lockdowns.

Five Conservative MPs rebelled to support the motion, according to the division list. They were: Caroline Ansell (Eastbourne), Robert Halfon (Harlow), Jason McCartney (Colne Valley), Anne Marie Morris (Newton Abbot) and Holly Mumby-Croft (Scunthorpe).

Taking to social media, Rashford wrote: ‘Put aside all the noise, the digs, the party politics and let’s focus on the reality.

‘A significant number of children are going to bed tonight not only hungry but feeling like they do not matter because of comments that have been made today.

‘We must stop stigmatising, judging and pointing fingers. Our views are being clouded by political affiliation. This is not politics, this is humanity.’ 

Rashford added that child food poverty ‘has the potential to become the greatest pandemic the country has ever faced’.

‘We must start working together and unite to protect our most vulnerable children. No more sticking plasters. Let’s face this head on,’ he said.

He said the requirements of the Child Food Poverty Taskforce remain the same, adding: ‘Following private and public approaches, I once again invite Number 10 to sit around the table with the taskforce so that, together, we can collaborate on how best to combat child poverty in the UK.’

Marcus Rashford’s statement in full 

Put aside all the noise, the digs, the party politics and let’s focus on the reality.

A significant number of children are going to bed tonight not only hungry but feeling like they do not matter because of comments that have been made today.

We must stop stigmatising, judging and pointing fingers. Our views are being clouded by political affiliation. This is not politics, this is humanity. 

We talk about the devastating impact of Covid-19 but, if projections are anything to go by child food poverty has the potential to become the greatest pandemic the country has ever faced.

We must start working together and unite to protect our most vulnerable children.

No more sticking plasters. Let’s face this head on. Let’s level up once and for all.

The asks of the Child Food Poverty Taskforce remain the same. We are endorsing Government-commissioned policy recommendations that were built from extensive research and data analysis. These policies are vital to stabilising millions of households across the UK and need to be implemented without delay.

Child hunger should never be faced with looming deadlines.

We need a long-term sustainable framework, and thanks to the 300,00+ signatures, we will now be offered the opportunity to discuss this. 

Following private and public approaches, I once again invited Number 10 to sit around the table with the Taskforce, so that, together, we can collaborate on how best to combat child food poverty in the UK.

We are here to help, but we require guidance and insight from those in Number 10.

I don’t have the education of a politician, many on Twitter have made that clear today, but I have a social education having lived through his and having spent time with the families and children most affected.

These children matter. These children are the future of this country. They are not just another statistic.

And for as long as they don’t have a voice, they will have mine. You have my word on that. 

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Labour had tried to use the Commons vote to call for free school meals to be extended over each school holiday from October half-term to Easter 2021 and appeared to have won the support of some rebel Tories, including Mr Halfon, chairman of the Commons Education Committee, who said the scheme should run until the spring at least.

However, the vote failed in a heated debate where one Tory MP suggested that reducing the length of the school summer holidays could help tackle food insecurity. 

Jonathan Gullis (Stoke-on-Trent North), a former secondary school teacher, made the call this evening, telling the Commons: ‘If we were to have a serious discussion about how to tackle this issue, one way in which we can do that is by reducing the summer holiday from six weeks to four weeks.

‘Because it costs £133 per week on average, the costs of childcare, and if we take those two weeks and redistribute them, one in October half-term and one in the May half-term.

‘Therefore, we can help to bring down the cost of the summer holiday on the parents and enable those parents to better… access the food that they of course need.

‘Free school meals are indeed important, but it is the role of the school to educate, not the role of the school to be the welfare state.’

It follows calls by former Tory education secretary Damian Hinds, who said earlier this month that the school holidays should be staggered in 2021 to extend the tourism season.

Earlier in the debate, Mr Gullis outlined his experience of teaching in schools in deprived areas.

He added: ‘I refuse to be lectured by members opposite who have not walked in my shoes.

‘I spent eight years of my life working as a secondary school teacher in which the overwhelming majority was as a head of year working in some of the most disadvantaged parts of London and of Birmingham, seeing the impact of child poverty and child hunger and the impact of not having a stable family and good role models as well crime and drugs in a local community.’

Deputy leader Angela Rayner tweeted after the vote: ‘Tonight I voted to feed our country’s vulnerable and needy children.

‘The Tories voted to let them go hungry.

‘I voted for workers facing hardship in areas under lockdown to get 80% of their incomes. The Tories voted against it.

‘That’s all you need to know.’  

Responding to Rashford’s statement, Greater Manchester’s mayor Andy Burnham tweeted: ‘Fantastic words Marcus.

‘You shouldn’t have had to listen to some of those ignorant speeches in Westminster today. But, then again, they show why your campaign is so vitally needed. Keep going, we’re all behind you #NoChildGoesHungry’. 

Several Conservative MPs argued against Labour’s proposal, with Brendan Clarke-Smith (Bassetlaw) saying he did not believe in ‘nationalising children’.

He told the Commons: ‘Where is the slick PR campaign encouraging absent parents to take some responsibility for their children?

‘I do not believe in nationalising children. Instead, we need to get back to the idea of taking responsibility, and this means less celebrity virtue-signalling on Twitter by proxy and more action to tackle the real causes of child poverty.’

Tory David Simmonds (Ruislip, Northwood and Pinner) also said: ‘What does it say about the Opposition’s priorities that all of their interests are simply swept aside in favour of currying favour with wealth and power and celebrity status, spending taxpayers’ money to curry favour with celebrity status, wealth and power.

Tory MP suggests reducing length of school summer holidays could help tackle food insecurity 

Reducing the length of the school summer holidays could help tackle food insecurity, a Tory MP has said.

Jonathan Gullis (Stoke-on-Trent North), a former secondary school teacher, made the call during a Commons debate on free school meals.

Mr Gullis told the Commons: ‘If we were to have a serious discussion about how to tackle this issue, one way in which we can do that is by reducing the summer holiday from six weeks to four weeks.

‘Because it costs £133 per week on average, the costs of childcare, and if we take those two weeks and redistribute them, one in October half-term and one in the May half-term.

‘Therefore, we can help to bring down the cost of the summer holiday on the parents and enable those parents to better… access the food that they of course need.

‘Free school meals are indeed important, but it is the role of the school to educate, not the role of the school to be the welfare state.’

It follows calls by former Tory education secretary Damian Hinds, who said earlier this month that the school holidays should be staggered in 2021 to extend the tourism season.

Earlier in the debate, Mr Gullis outlined his experience of teaching in schools in deprived areas.

He added: ‘I refuse to be lectured by members opposite who have not walked in my shoes.

‘I spent eight years of my life working as a secondary school teacher in which the overwhelming majority was as a head of year working in some of the most disadvantaged parts of London and of Birmingham, seeing the impact of child poverty and child hunger and the impact of not having a stable family and good role models as well crime and drugs in a local community.’

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‘Now I have no doubt that Mr Rashford is an expert in his own experience, but we should not forget that the experiences he so movingly described took place under a Labour government then supposedly at the peak of its powers in tackling child poverty in this country.’

Tory minister Paul Scully also told the BBC that ‘children have been going hungry under a Labour government for years’ and insisted the Government had been tackling the issue.

But Conservative Mr Halfon urged the Government to continue providing meals over the holidays while the coronavirus crisis was ongoing and called on ministers to work with Rashford. 

The footballer continued: ‘I don’t have the education of a politician, many on Twitter have made that clear today, but I have a social education having lived through this and having spent time with the families and children most affected.

‘These children matter. These children are the future of this country. They are not just another statistic. And for as long as they don’t have a voice, they will have mine. You have my word on that.’

For Labour, shadow education secretary Kate Green said: ‘Boris Johnson and the Conservatives have badly let down more than one million children and their families.

‘No child should go hungry over the holidays, but the Government is blocking the action needed to prevent this.

‘We pay tribute to Marcus Rashford and others for shining a spotlight on this incredibly important issue.

‘This campaign is not over and the Government must reconsider.’

Kevin Courtney, joint general secretary of the National Education Union, branded the result of the vote as ‘callous’, adding: ‘No MP who voted against this will be going hungry tonight, not one of them will be wondering where their next meal is coming from and not one of them will struggle through every single day with insufficient food.

‘This isn’t right. No child should return to school after the half term break too hungry to learn.’

It came after a minister insisted people would rather pay than accept the ‘label’ attached with handouts.

Just hours after scoring the late winner that saw Man Utd beat Paris Saint-Germain 2-1 last night, Rashford turned the blowtorch on the Government in advance of the vote by urging his 3.4 million Twitter followers to lobby their MPs.

‘Paying close attention to the Commons today and to those who are willing to turn a blind eye to the needs of our most vulnerable children, 2.2M of them who currently qualify for Free School Meals,’ he said.

But former Brexit minister Steve Baker responded angrily, saying: ‘No one will be turning a blind eye and it is wrong to suggest anyone would.’ 

Rashford replied: ‘At least turn on your comments and let me respond Steve. I very much welcome conversation on this.’ 

Mansfield Tory MP Ben Bradley later waded in, saying: ‘We’re doing A LOT to help the most vulnerable children, but ever-extending freebies are a sticking plaster not a solution.’  

In the Commons, Boris Johnson continued to resist calls for a change of tack.

‘We support kids on low incomes in school and we will continue to do so,’ he told MPs at Prime Minister’s Questions.

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But he became embroiled in a spat with former Brexit minister Steve Baker, who said: 'No one will be turning a blind eye and it is wrong to suggest anyone would'

But he became embroiled in a spat with former Brexit minister Steve Baker, who said: 'No one will be turning a blind eye and it is wrong to suggest anyone would'

But he became embroiled in a spat with former Brexit minister Steve Baker, who said: ‘No one will be turning a blind eye and it is wrong to suggest anyone would’

‘But the most important thing is to keep them in school and not tear off into another national lockdown taking them out of school.

‘We will continue to use the benefits system and all the systems of income to support children throughout the holidays as well.’   

Deputy Labour leader Angela Rayner said the Government was spending money on consultants rather than school children living in districts designated Tier 2 and Tier 3 Covid-19 alert areas during the coronavirus pandemic.

‘This vote is about our values as a country and whether the Government, in the middle of this crisis, is happy to let our children go hungry,’ she added. 

Mr Halfon said earlier he could support a Labour motion calling for their extension to next Easter in the Commons on Wednesday.

‘I will either vote for the motion or abstain depending on what the Government says,’ he told the BBC Radio 4 Today programme.

Robert Halfon, chairman of the Commons Education Committee, said the meal scheme should run until the spring at least and threatened to back Labour in a vote

Robert Halfon, chairman of the Commons Education Committee, said the meal scheme should run until the spring at least and threatened to back Labour in a vote

Robert Halfon, chairman of the Commons Education Committee, said the meal scheme should run until the spring at least and threatened to back Labour in a vote

He added: ‘What the Government needs to do is to have a long-term plan, sit down with the taskforce set up by Marcus Rashford and actually come up with a serious plan and a budget to deal with this problem.

‘All the statistics show that families are struggling. We know that 10% of families are affected by food insecurity.

‘I am not arguing this should happen for ever but the free school meals should at least go on until we are out of the coronavirus, god willing, by next spring.’ 

Devon MP Anne Marie Morris said she would also support the Labour plan.

‘The ongoing pandemic has had a heavy impact on many across Teignbridge, bringing with it significant economic difficulties for many,’ she said.

‘This is why I am supporting the motion calling for the continuation of direct funding for FSM over school holidays until Easter 2021. 

Devon MP Anne Marie Morris said she would also support the Labour plan.

Devon MP Anne Marie Morris said she would also support the Labour plan.

Devon MP Anne Marie Morris said she would also support the Labour plan.

‘This time-limited measure is a perfectly sensible response as we deal with the economic consequences of Covid-19. Longer-term I believe it is right that those eligible should be supported through the Holidays & Activities Food Programme and the Universal Credit system.’

However, Downing Street has shown reluctance to extend the scheme, with a spokesman indicating last Thursday that ministers would not provide free school meals to children in England during the Christmas break.   

Business Minister Nadhim Zahari insisted struggling parents would rather pay than accept the ‘label’ attached to handouts. 

He said Universal Credit benefits were available to support hard-pressed families and suggested that research from holiday clubs shows that parents prefer to pay a small sum for food. 

He told BBC Radio 4’s Today programme: ‘The research when we did the pilot demonstrates that families didn’t just want the meals.

‘Although they valued the meals, they didn’t like the labelling of them being free. They actually prefer to pay a modest amount, £1 or £2.’

How MPs voted on motion to extend free school meals 

MPs have voted against Labour’s motion to extend free school meals over school holidays until Easter 2021, by 322 votes to 261 – a majority of 61.

The division list numbers differ to those announced in the chamber, showing 319 no votes and 259 ayes.

Here is the breakdown of the division list published after the vote.

Ayes

Five Conservative MPs: Caroline Ansell (Eastbourne), Robert Halfon (Harlow), Jason McCartney (Colne Valley), Anne Marie Morris (Newton Abbot), Holly Mumby-Croft (Scunthorpe).

191 Labour MPs: Diane Abbott (Hackney North and Stoke Newington), Debbie Abrahams (Oldham East and Saddleworth), Rushanara Ali (Bethnal Green and Bow), Tahir Ali (Birmingham, Hall Green), Rosena Allin-Khan (Tooting), Mike Amesbury (Weaver Vale), Fleur Anderson (Putney), Jonathan Ashworth (Leicester South), Paula Barker (Liverpool, Wavertree), Margaret Beckett (Derby South), Apsana Begum (Poplar and Limehouse), Hilary Benn (Leeds Central), Clive Betts (Sheffield South East), Olivia Blake (Sheffield, Hallam), Paul Blomfield (Sheffield Central), Tracy Brabin (Batley and Spen), Ben Bradshaw (Exeter), Kevin Brennan (Cardiff West), Nicholas Brown (Newcastle upon Tyne East), Lyn Brown (West Ham), Chris Bryant (Rhondda), Karen Buck (Westminster North), Richard Burgon (Leeds East), Dawn Butler (Brent Central), Ian Byrne (Liverpool, West Derby), Liam Byrne (Birmingham, Hodge Hill), Ruth Cadbury (Brentford and Isleworth), Alan Campbell (Tynemouth), Dan Carden (Liverpool, Walton), Sarah Champion (Rotherham), Feryal Clark (Enfield North), Rosie Cooper (West Lancashire), Yvette Cooper (Normanton, Pontefract and Castleford), Jeremy Corbyn (Islington North), Neil Coyle (Bermondsey and Old Southwark), Stella Creasy (Walthamstow), Jon Cruddas (Dagenham and Rainham), Judith Cummins (Bradford South), Alex Cunningham (Stockton North), Janet Daby (Lewisham East), Wayne David (Caerphilly), Geraint Davies (Swansea West), Alex Davies-Jones (Pontypridd), Marsha De Cordova (Battersea), Thangam Debbonaire (Bristol West), Tanmanjeet Singh Dhesi (Slough), Anneliese Dodds (Oxford East), Stephen Doughty (Cardiff South and Penarth), Peter Dowd (Bootle), Jack Dromey (Birmingham, Erdington), Rosie Duffield (Canterbury), Maria Eagle (Garston and Halewood), Angela Eagle (Wallasey), Clive Efford (Eltham), Julie Elliott (Sunderland Central), Chris Elmore (Ogmore), Florence Eshalomi (Vauxhall), Bill Esterson (Sefton Central), Chris Evans (Islwyn), Colleen Fletcher (Coventry North East), Yvonne Fovargue (Makerfield), Vicky Foxcroft (Lewisham, Deptford), Mary Kelly Foy (City of Durham), Gill Furniss (Sheffield, Brightside and Hillsborough), Barry Gardiner (Brent North), Preet Kaur Gill (Birmingham, Edgbaston), Mary Glindon (North Tyneside), Kate Green (Stretford and Urmston), Lilian Greenwood (Nottingham South), Margaret Greenwood (Wirral West), Nia Griffith (Llanelli), Andrew Gwynne (Denton and Reddish), Louise Haigh (Sheffield, Heeley), Fabian Hamilton (Leeds North East), Emma Hardy (Kingston upon Hull West and Hessle), Harriet Harman (Camberwell and Peckham), Carolyn Harris (Swansea East), Helen Hayes (Dulwich and West Norwood), John Healey (Wentworth and Dearne), Mark Hendrick (Preston), Mike Hill (Hartlepool), Meg Hillier (Hackney South and Shoreditch), Margaret Hodge (Barking), Sharon Hodgson (Washington and Sunderland West), Kate Hollern (Blackburn), Rachel Hopkins (Luton South), George Howarth (Knowsley), Rupa Huq (Ealing Central and Acton), Imran Hussain (Bradford East), Dan Jarvis (Barnsley Central), Diana Johnson (Kingston upon Hull North), Kim Johnson (Liverpool, Riverside), Darren Jones (Bristol North West), Gerald Jones (Merthyr Tydfil and Rhymney), Kevan Jones (North Durham), Ruth Jones (Newport West), Sarah Jones (Croydon Central), Mike Kane (Wythenshawe and Sale East), Barbara Keeley (Worsley and Eccles South), Liz Kendall (Leicester West), Afzal Khan (Manchester, Gorton), Stephen Kinnock (Aberavon), Peter Kyle (Hove), David Lammy (Tottenham), Ian Lavery (Wansbeck), Emma Lewell-Buck (South Shields), Tony Lloyd (Rochdale), Rebecca Long Bailey (Salford and Eccles), Holly Lynch (Halifax), Justin Madders (Ellesmere Port and Neston), Khalid Mahmood (Birmingham, Perry Barr), Shabana Mahmood (Birmingham, Ladywood), Seema Malhotra (Feltham and Heston), Rachael Maskell (York Central), Christian Matheson (City of Chester), Steve McCabe (Birmingham, Selly Oak), Kerry McCarthy (Bristol East), Siobhain McDonagh (Mitcham and Morden), John McDonnell (Hayes and Harlington), Pat McFadden (Wolverhampton South East), Conor McGinn (St Helens North), Catherine McKinnell (Newcastle upon Tyne North), Jim McMahon (Oldham West and Royton), Anna McMorrin (Cardiff North), Ian Mearns (Gateshead), Edward Miliband (Doncaster North), Navendu Mishra (Stockport), Jessica Morden (Newport East), Stephen Morgan (Portsmouth South), Grahame Morris (Easington), Ian Murray (Edinburgh South), James Murray (Ealing North), Lisa Nandy (Wigan), Charlotte Nichols (Warrington North), Alex Norris (Nottingham North), Chi Onwurah (Newcastle upon Tyne Central), Abena Oppong-Asare (Erith and Thamesmead), Kate Osamor (Edmonton), Kate Osborne (Jarrow), Taiwo Owatemi (Coventry North West), Sarah Owen (Luton North), Stephanie Peacock (Barnsley East), Matthew Pennycook (Greenwich and Woolwich), Toby Perkins (Chesterfield), Jess Phillips (Birmingham, Yardley), Luke Pollard (Plymouth, Sutton and Devonport), Lucy Powell (Manchester Central), Yasmin Qureshi (Bolton South East), Angela Rayner (Ashton-under-Lyne), Steve Reed (Croydon North), Christina Rees (Neath), Ellie Reeves (Lewisham West and Penge), Rachel Reeves (Leeds West), Jonathan Reynolds (Stalybridge and Hyde), Bell Ribeiro-Addy (Streatham), Marie Rimmer (St Helens South and Whiston), Matt Rodda (Reading East), Lloyd Russell-Moyle (Brighton, Kemptown), Naz Shah (Bradford West), Virendra Sharma (Ealing, Southall), Barry Sheerman (Huddersfield), Tulip Siddiq (Hampstead and Kilburn), Andy Slaughter (Hammersmith), Cat Smith (Lancaster and Fleetwood), Nick Smith (Blaenau Gwent), Karin Smyth (Bristol South), Alex Sobel (Leeds North West), John Spellar (Warley), Keir Starmer (Holborn and St Pancras), Jo Stevens (Cardiff Central), Wes Streeting (Ilford North), Graham Stringer (Blackley and Broughton), Zarah Sultana (Coventry South), Mark Tami (Alyn and Deeside), Sam Tarry (Ilford South), Gareth Thomas (Harrow West), Nick Thomas-Symonds (Torfaen), Stephen Timms (East Ham), Jon Trickett (Hemsworth), Karl Turner (Kingston upon Hull East), Derek Twigg (Halton), Liz Twist (Blaydon), Valerie Vaz (Walsall South), Catherine West (Hornsey and Wood Green), Matt Western (Warwick and Leamington), Alan Whitehead (Southampton, Test), Mick Whitley (Birkenhead), Nadia Whittome (Nottingham East), Beth Winter (Cynon Valley), Mohammad Yasin (Bedford), Daniel Zeichner (Cambridge).

46 Scottish National Party MPs: Hannah Bardell (Livingston), Mhairi Black (Paisley and Renfrewshire South), Ian Blackford (Ross, Skye and Lochaber), Kirsty Blackman (Aberdeen North), Steven Bonnar (Coatbridge, Chryston and Bellshill), Deidre Brock (Edinburgh North and Leith), Alan Brown (Kilmarnock and Loudoun), Amy Callaghan (East Dunbartonshire), Lisa Cameron (East Kilbride, Strathaven and Lesmahagow), Douglas Chapman (Dunfermline and West Fife), Joanna Cherry (Edinburgh South West), Ronnie Cowan (Inverclyde), Angela Crawley (Lanark and Hamilton East), Martyn Day (Linlithgow and East Falkirk), Martin Docherty-Hughes (West Dunbartonshire), Dave Doogan (Angus), Allan Dorans (Ayr, Carrick and Cumnock), Marion Fellows (Motherwell and Wishaw), Stephen Flynn (Aberdeen South), Patricia Gibson (North Ayrshire and Arran), Patrick Grady (Glasgow North), Peter Grant (Glenrothes), Neil Gray (Airdrie and Shotts), Neale Hanvey (Kirkcaldy and Cowdenbeath), Drew Hendry (Inverness, Nairn, Badenoch and Strathspey), Stewart Hosie (Dundee East), Chris Law (Dundee West), David Linden (Glasgow East), Kenny MacAskill (East Lothian), Angus Brendan MacNeil (Na h-Eileanan an Iar), Stewart Malcolm McDonald (Glasgow South), Stuart C McDonald (Cumbernauld, Kilsyth and Kirkintilloch East), Anne McLaughlin (Glasgow North East), John McNally (Falkirk), Carol Monaghan (Glasgow North West), Gavin Newlands (Paisley and Renfrewshire North), John Nicolson (Ochil and South Perthshire), Brendan O’Hara (Argyll and Bute), Kirsten Oswald (East Renfrewshire), Tommy Sheppard (Edinburgh East), Alyn Smith (Stirling), Chris Stephens (Glasgow South West), Alison Thewliss (Glasgow Central), Richard Thomson (Gordon), Philippa Whitford (Central Ayrshire), Pete Wishart (Perth and North Perthshire).

Nine Liberal Democrat MPs: Alistair Carmichael (Orkney and Shetland), Wendy Chamberlain (North East Fife), Daisy Cooper (St Albans), Tim Farron (Westmorland and Lonsdale), Wera Hobhouse (Bath), Christine Jardine (Edinburgh West), Layla Moran (Oxford West and Abingdon), Jamie Stone (Caithness, Sutherland and Easter Ross), Munira Wilson (Twickenham).

One DUP MP: Jim Shannon (Strangford).

Three Plaid Cymru MPs: Ben Lake (Ceredigion), Liz Saville Roberts (Dwyfor Meirionnydd), Hywel Williams (Arfon).

Two SDLP MPs: Colum Eastwood (Foyle), Claire Hanna (Belfast South).

One Alliance MP: Stephen Farry (North Down).

One Independent MP: Claudia Webbe (Leicester East).

Tellers for the ayes were Labour MPs Bambos Charalambous (Enfield Southgate) and Jeff Smith (Manchester Withington).

Noes

318 Conservative MPs: Nigel Adams (Selby and Ainsty), Bim Afolami (Hitchin and Harpenden), Adam Afriyie (Windsor), Imran Ahmad Khan (Wakefield), Nickie Aiken (Cities of London and Westminster), Peter Aldous (Waveney), Lucy Allan (Telford), David Amess (Southend West), Lee Anderson (Ashfield), Stuart Anderson (Wolverhampton South West), Stuart Andrew (Pudsey), Edward Argar (Charnwood), Sarah Atherton (Wrexham), Victoria Atkins (Louth and Horncastle), Gareth Bacon (Orpington), Richard Bacon (South Norfolk), Kemi Badenoch (Saffron Walden), Shaun Bailey (West Bromwich West), Duncan Baker (North Norfolk), Steve Baker (Wycombe), Harriett Baldwin (West Worcestershire), Steve Barclay (North East Cambridgeshire), Simon Baynes (Clwyd South), Aaron Bell (Newcastle-under-Lyme), Scott Benton (Blackpool South), Paul Beresford (Mole Valley), Jake Berry (Rossendale and Darwen), Saqib Bhatti (Meriden), Bob Blackman (Harrow East), Crispin Blunt (Reigate), Peter Bone (Wellingborough), Peter Bottomley (Worthing West), Andrew Bowie (West Aberdeenshire and Kincardine), Ben Bradley (Mansfield), Karen Bradley (Staffordshire Moorlands), Graham Brady (Altrincham and Sale West), Suella Braverman (Fareham), Jack Brereton (Stoke-on-Trent South), Andrew Bridgen (North West Leicestershire), Steve Brine (Winchester), Paul Bristow (Peterborough), Sara Britcliffe (Hyndburn), James Brokenshire (Old Bexley and Sidcup), Anthony Browne (South Cambridgeshire), Fiona Bruce (Congleton), Felicity Buchan (Kensington), Robert Buckland (South Swindon), Alex Burghart (Brentwood and Ongar), Conor Burns (Bournemouth West), Rob Butler (Aylesbury), Alun Cairns (Vale of Glamorgan), Andy Carter (Warrington South), James Cartlidge (South Suffolk), William Cash (Stone), Miriam Cates (Penistone and Stocksbridge), Maria Caulfield (Lewes), Alex Chalk (Cheltenham), Rehman Chishti (Gillingham and Rainham), Jo Churchill (Bury St Edmunds), Greg Clark (Tunbridge Wells), Simon Clarke (Middlesbrough South and East Cleveland), Theo Clarke (Stafford), Brendan Clarke-Smith (Bassetlaw), Chris Clarkson (Heywood and Middleton), James Cleverly (Braintree), Therese Coffey (Suffolk Coastal), Damian Collins (Folkestone and Hythe), Alberto Costa (South Leicestershire), Robert Courts (Witney), Claire Coutinho (East Surrey), Geoffrey Cox (Torridge and West Devon), Virginia Crosbie (Ynys Mon), James Daly (Bury North), David T C Davies (Monmouth), James Davies (Vale of Clwyd), Gareth Davies (Grantham and Stamford), Mims Davies (Mid Sussex), Philip Davies (Shipley), David Davis (Haltemprice and Howden), Dehenna Davison (Bishop Auckland), Caroline Dinenage (Gosport), Sarah Dines (Derbyshire Dales), Jonathan Djanogly (Huntingdon), Michelle Donelan (Chippenham), Nadine Dorries (Mid Bedfordshire), Steve Double (St Austell and Newquay), Oliver Dowden (Hertsmere), Jackie Doyle-Price (Thurrock), Richard Drax (South Dorset), Flick Drummond (Meon Valley), David Duguid (Banff and Buchan), Iain Duncan Smith (Chingford and Woodford Green), Philip Dunne (Ludlow), Mark Eastwood (Dewsbury), Ruth Edwards (Rushcliffe), Michael Ellis (Northampton North), Tobias Ellwood (Bournemouth East), Natalie Elphicke (Dover), George Eustice (Camborne and Redruth), Luke Evans (Bosworth), David Evennett (Bexleyheath and Crayford), Ben Everitt (Milton Keynes North), Michael Fabricant (Lichfield), Laura Farris (Newbury), Simon Fell (Barrow and Furness), Katherine Fletcher (South Ribble), Mark Fletcher (Bolsover), Nick Fletcher (Don Valley), Vicky Ford (Chelmsford), Kevin Foster (Torbay), Mark Francois (Rayleigh and Wickford), Lucy Frazer (South East Cambridgeshire), George Freeman (Mid Norfolk), Mike Freer (Finchley and Golders Green), Richard Fuller (North East Bedfordshire), Marcus Fysh (Yeovil), Mark Garnier (Wyre Forest), Nusrat Ghani (Wealden), Nick Gibb (Bognor Regis and Littlehampton), Peter Gibson (Darlington), Jo Gideon (Stoke-on-Trent Central), Cheryl Gillan (Chesham and Amersham), John Glen (Salisbury), Robert Goodwill (Scarborough and Whitby), Michael Gove (Surrey Heath), Richard Graham (Gloucester), Helen Grant (Maidstone and The Weald), James Gray (North Wiltshire), Chris Grayling (Epsom and Ewell), Chris Green (Bolton West), Damian Green (Ashford), Andrew Griffith (Arundel and South Downs), Kate Griffiths (Burton), James Grundy (Leigh), Jonathan Gullis (Stoke-on-Trent North), Luke Hall (Thornbury and Yate), Stephen Hammond (Wimbledon), Matt Hancock (West Suffolk), Greg Hands (Chelsea and Fulham), Mark Harper (Forest of Dean), Rebecca Harris (Castle Point), Trudy Harrison (Copeland), Sally-Ann Hart (Hastings and Rye), Simon Hart (Carmarthen West and South Pembrokeshire), John Hayes (South Holland and The Deepings), Oliver Heald (North East Hertfordshire), Chris Heaton-Harris (Daventry), Gordon Henderson (Sittingbourne and Sheppey), Darren Henry (Broxtowe), Antony Higginbotham (Burnley), Damian Hinds (East Hampshire), Kevin Hollinrake (Thirsk and Malton), Philip Hollobone (Kettering), Adam Holloway (Gravesham), Paul Holmes (Eastleigh), John Howell (Henley), Paul Howell (Sedgefield), Nigel Huddleston (Mid Worcestershire), Eddie Hughes (Walsall North), Jane Hunt (Loughborough), Jeremy Hunt (South West Surrey), Tom Hunt (Ipswich), Alister Jack (Dumfries and Galloway), Sajid Javid (Bromsgrove), Ranil Jayawardena (North East Hampshire), Mark Jenkinson (Workington), Andrea Jenkyns (Morley and Outwood), Robert Jenrick (Newark), Boris Johnson (Uxbridge and South Ruislip), Caroline Johnson (Sleaford and North Hykeham), Gareth Johnson (Dartford), David Johnston (Wantage), Andrew Jones (Harrogate and Knaresborough), Fay Jones (Brecon and Radnorshire), David Jones (Clwyd West), Marcus Jones (Nuneaton), Simon Jupp (East Devon), Daniel Kawczynski (Shrewsbury and Atcham), Alicia Kearns (Rutland and Melton), Gillian Keegan (Chichester), Julian Knight (Solihull), Greg Knight (East Yorkshire), Danny Kruger (Devizes), Kwasi Kwarteng (Spelthorne), John Lamont (Berwickshire, Roxburgh and Selkirk), Robert Largan (High Peak), Andrea Leadsom (South Northamptonshire), Edward Leigh (Gainsborough), Ian Levy (Blyth Valley), Andrew Lewer (Northampton South), Brandon Lewis (Great Yarmouth), Ian Liddell-Grainger (Bridgwater and West Somerset), Chris Loder (West Dorset), Mark Logan (Bolton North East), Marco Longhi (Dudley North), Julia Lopez (Hornchurch and Upminster), Jack Lopresti (Filton and Bradley Stoke), Jonathan Lord (Woking), Craig Mackinlay (South Thanet), Cherilyn Mackrory (Truro and Falmouth), Rachel Maclean (Redditch), Alan Mak (Havant), Kit Malthouse (North West Hampshire), Anthony Mangnall (Totnes), Scott Mann (North Cornwall), Julie Marson (Hertford and Stortford), Theresa May (Maidenhead), Jerome Mayhew (Broadland), Karl McCartney (Lincoln), Mark Menzies (Fylde), Johnny Mercer (Plymouth, Moor View), Huw Merriman (Bexhill and Battle), Stephen Metcalfe (South Basildon and East Thurrock), Robin Millar (Aberconwy), Maria Miller (Basingstoke), Amanda Milling (Cannock Chase), Nigel Mills (Amber Valley), Andrew Mitchell (Sutton Coldfield), Gagan Mohindra (South West Hertfordshire), Robbie Moore (Keighley), Penny Mordaunt (Portsmouth North), David Morris (Morecambe and Lunesdale), James Morris (Halesowen and Rowley Regis), Wendy Morton (Aldridge-Brownhills), Kieran Mullan (Crewe and Nantwich), David Mundell (Dumfriesshire, Clydesdale and Tweeddale), Sheryll Murray (South East Cornwall), Andrew Murrison (South West Wiltshire), Robert Neill (Bromley and Chislehurst), Caroline Nokes (Romsey and Southampton North), Jesse Norman (Hereford and South Herefordshire), Neil O’Brien (Harborough), Guy Opperman (Hexham), Owen Paterson (North Shropshire), Mark Pawsey (Rugby), Mike Penning (Hemel Hempstead), John Penrose (Weston-super-Mare), Chris Philp (Croydon South), Christopher Pincher (Tamworth), Rebecca Pow (Taunton Deane), Victoria Prentis (Banbury), Mark Pritchard (The Wrekin), Jeremy Quin (Horsham), Will Quince (Colchester), Tom Randall (Gedling), John Redwood (Wokingham), Jacob Rees-Mogg (North East Somerset), Nicola Richards (West Bromwich East), Angela Richardson (Guildford), Rob Roberts (Delyn), Laurence Robertson (Tewkesbury), Mary Robinson (Cheadle), Andrew Rosindell (Romford), Lee Rowley (North East Derbyshire), Dean Russell (Watford), David Rutley (Macclesfield), Gary Sambrook (Birmingham, Northfield), Selaine Saxby (North Devon), Paul Scully (Sutton and Cheam), Bob Seely (Isle of Wight), Andrew Selous (South West Bedfordshire), Grant Shapps (Welwyn Hatfield), Alok Sharma (Reading West), Alec Shelbrooke (Elmet and Rothwell), David Simmonds (Ruislip, Northwood and Pinner), Chris Skidmore (Kingswood), Chloe Smith (Norwich North), Greg Smith (Buckingham), Henry Smith (Crawley), Julian Smith (Skipton and Ripon), Amanda Solloway (Derby North), Ben Spencer (Runnymede and Weybridge), Mark Spencer (Sherwood), Alexander Stafford (Rother Valley), Andrew Stephenson (Pendle), Jane Stevenson (Wolverhampton North East), John Stevenson (Carlisle), Bob Stewart (Beckenham), Iain Stewart (Milton Keynes South), Gary Streeter (South West Devon), Mel Stride (Central Devon), Rishi Sunak (Richmond (Yorks)), James Sunderland (Bracknell), Desmond Swayne (New Forest West), Robert Syms (Poole), Derek Thomas (St Ives), Maggie Throup (Erewash), Edward Timpson (Eddisbury), Kelly Tolhurst (Rochester and Strood), Justin Tomlinson (North Swindon), Michael Tomlinson (Mid Dorset and North Poole), Craig Tracey (North Warwickshire), Anne-Marie Trevelyan (Berwick-upon-Tweed), Laura Trott (Sevenoaks), Tom Tugendhat (Tonbridge and Malling), Martin Vickers (Cleethorpes), Matt Vickers (Stockton South), Theresa Villiers (Chipping Barnet), Robin Walker (Worcester), Charles Walker (Broxbourne), Jamie Wallis (Bridgend), David Warburton (Somerton and Frome), Matt Warman (Boston and Skegness), Giles Watling (Clacton), Suzanne Webb (Stourbridge), Helen Whately (Faversham and Mid Kent), Heather Wheeler (South Derbyshire), Craig Whittaker (Calder Valley), John Whittingdale (Maldon), Bill Wiggin (North Herefordshire), James Wild (North West Norfolk), Craig Williams (Montgomeryshire), Gavin Williamson (South Staffordshire), Mike Wood (Dudley South), William Wragg (Hazel Grove), Jeremy Wright (Kenilworth and Southam), Jacob Young (Redcar), Nadhim Zahawi (Stratford-on-Avon).

One Independent MP: Julian Lewis (New Forest East).

Tellers for the noes were Conservative MPs Tom Pursglove (Corby) and Leo Docherty (Aldershot).

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Ulrika Jonsson hits out at those criticising her decision to share THAT naked selfie

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ulrika jonsson hits out at those criticising her decision to share that naked selfie

Ulrika Jonsson has hit out at those who criticised her for sharing a naked selfie, including her own kids, as she claimed ‘my body, my rules.’

On Tuesday, the TV presenter, 53, shared a bold naked selfie hours after TV host John Leslie was found not guilty of sexually assaulting a woman at a Christmas party in 2008. 

Detailing her decision to post the snap in her column for The Sun on Thursday, she said: ‘It was neither pre-planned nor especially well thought out. And it seems to have touched a nerve because the response was considerable.’

'My body, my rules': Ulrika Jonsson hit out at those criticising her decision to share THAT naked selfie (including her own children!) as she detailed her desire to 'own' her body on Thursday

'My body, my rules': Ulrika Jonsson hit out at those criticising her decision to share THAT naked selfie (including her own children!) as she detailed her desire to 'own' her body on Thursday

‘My body, my rules’: Ulrika Jonsson hit out at those criticising her decision to share THAT naked selfie (including her own children!) as she detailed her desire to ‘own’ her body on Thursday

Ulrika explained that she didn’t post a more ‘explicit’ or ‘outrageous’ naked snap for the sake her children, though she was quick to point out that she didn’t care if they were concerned about the photo.

Addressing her four children, Cameron, 26, Bo, 20, Martha, 16, and Malcom, 12, she went on: ‘For the record, children, I honestly don’t care much for your embarrassment. My body, my rules. 

‘The intention behind the post was not to offend, outrage, challenge or disturb. It was a note to myself – a reminder that for all that my body has endured, I now need to reclaim it and do something I’ve never really done before: Own it.’

Reasons: Of the post, Ulrika said 'It was neither pre-planned nor especially well thought out. And it seems to have touched a nerve because the response was considerable'

Reasons: Of the post, Ulrika said 'It was neither pre-planned nor especially well thought out. And it seems to have touched a nerve because the response was considerable'

Reasons: Of the post, Ulrika said ‘It was neither pre-planned nor especially well thought out. And it seems to have touched a nerve because the response was considerable’

Ulrika went on to say she felt ‘dispossessed’ when it came to her figure in the past as both puberty and the menopause hit her badly, and she also struggled with what to ‘expect or demand’ when she was intimate with a man. 

She admitted to feeling ’embarrassed’ about showing her feelings with a member of the opposite sex and said she often felt she had to allow the man to take the control in a relationship, but now realises she ‘deserved ownership’ of her body.

Going on to discuss being sexually assaulted at the age of 19, Ulrika lamented how at the time it was socially acceptable for a man to force themselves on their wife, meaning she believed she couldn’t stop the assault from happening to her.  

Candid: Addressing her four children, Cameron, Bo, Martha, and Malcom, she went on: 'For the record, children, I honestly don't care much for your embarrassment. My body, my rules'

Candid: Addressing her four children, Cameron, Bo, Martha, and Malcom, she went on: 'For the record, children, I honestly don't care much for your embarrassment. My body, my rules'

Candid: Addressing her four children, Cameron, Bo, Martha, and Malcom, she went on: ‘For the record, children, I honestly don’t care much for your embarrassment. My body, my rules’

In her naked selfie post, Ulrika wrote that she was ‘reclaiming her body’ but added: ‘reclaiming my mind is taking a bit more time.’

The post came hours after Leslie was cleared and Ulrika did not reference him at all.  He was falsely accused of raping Ulrika in 2002 – although not by the TV star.

Ex Blue Peter presenter John was found not guilty by a jury over claims he grabbed a woman’s breasts at a Christmas party in central London on December 5, 2008. 

Not guilty: Ulirka shared her post after Blue Peter presenter John was found not guilty by a jury over claims he grabbed a woman's breasts at a Christmas party in central London in 2008

Not guilty: Ulirka shared her post after Blue Peter presenter John was found not guilty by a jury over claims he grabbed a woman's breasts at a Christmas party in central London in 2008

Not guilty: Ulirka shared her post after Blue Peter presenter John was found not guilty by a jury over claims he grabbed a woman’s breasts at a Christmas party in central London in 2008

The woman said she came forward after being ‘inspired’ by the MeToo movement, but Leslie was cleared of sexual assault by a jury of nine men and three women after just 23 minutes deliberation. 

Before the trial, Leslie had already been investigated an astonishing number of times over separate sexual assault allegations made to police since 2002, when he was falsely accused of raping Ulrika, who he dated for a few months.

Ulrika has never made any complaint to police. In her 2002 autobiography, Honest, Ulrika revealed she had been date raped by an unnamed TV presenter aged 19, she said she had only met the man one time.

Pals: Ex Blue Peter presenter Anthea Turner celebrated John's not guilty verdict with an Instagram post in which she and Diane Louise Jordan praised the 'amazing gentle giant'

Pals: Ex Blue Peter presenter Anthea Turner celebrated John's not guilty verdict with an Instagram post in which she and Diane Louise Jordan praised the 'amazing gentle giant'

Pals: Ex Blue Peter presenter Anthea Turner celebrated John’s not guilty verdict with an Instagram post in which she and Diane Louise Jordan praised the ‘amazing gentle giant’

John claimed he asked Ulrika to publicly say he was not her attacker, but she allegedly said she wouldn’t.

Leslie was falsely accused of raping Ulrika by the TV presenter Matthew Wright on air – he later apologised, saying he had given his name in error.   

Other women have publicly accused John of similar seedy behaviour, while he has been the subject of salacious revelations about his sex life (including his starring role in a threesome sex tape with Abi Titmuss) and his use of cocaine.

A string of former Blue Peter presenters rallied around Leslie at his trial, with Anthea Turner, Diane Louise Jordan and Yvette Fielding taking to the stand to call him a ‘gentleman’ and deny he was ever inappropriate towards women.

Leslie has never been found guilty of any offence, but his own barrister claimed he had become a ‘notorious’ and a ‘nobody’ because of the repeated claims against him.

The former star, who once earned £350,000 a year, was last known to be living in an Edinburgh bungalow and doing DJ jobs to earn extra money.   

Ulrika discussed her rape ordeal with Piers Morgan in 2009 and said her attacker suggested they go to the cinema after he had assaulted her.

Throwback: Televison presenter John pictured with Yvette Fielding and Holly Johnson

Throwback: Televison presenter John pictured with Yvette Fielding and Holly Johnson

Throwback: Televison presenter John pictured with Yvette Fielding and Holly Johnson

She said:‘I felt pain, physical pain. I just lay there. And he said “We should go to the cinema”.

‘I said “I can’t go”. I don’t remember what I said but I stayed and he left. I actually don’t think he realised what he’d done.’   

She said of the incident: ‘I felt a bit foolish. I think that was the overwhelming feeling. I felt I’d allowed myself into a situation which I shouldn’t have. I blamed myself.’

Ulrika said the man, who was known to her, came to her hotel room to pick her up for a date.

She said: ‘He was charming and very nice and then things started to happen very quickly. He got very amorous and I panicked because to me that was not what I was expecting.

Past: John has been the subject of salacious revelations about his sex life (including his role in a threesome sex tape with Abi Titmuss - pictured) and his use of cocaine

Past: John has been the subject of salacious revelations about his sex life (including his role in a threesome sex tape with Abi Titmuss - pictured) and his use of cocaine

Past: John has been the subject of salacious revelations about his sex life (including his role in a threesome sex tape with Abi Titmuss – pictured) and his use of cocaine

‘I panicked to the extent my voice wasn’t working – I couldn’t get anything out. I felt like I was screaming and saying “No, no, no!” I probably was at the beginning.’

The former weathergirl said she was not sexually experienced at the time.

Fighting back tears, she said: ‘One of the great weaknesses I’ve had is this inability to assert myself properly.

‘I’d only been sexually active for about a year and a half so this was quite an overwhelming experience.’

‘I don’t think at that stage there was this definition of a ‘date rape’ – of knowing somebody, of trusting somebody and somebody not understanding when you say no.’

However, Ulrika said the full horror of the violation struck her only when she was forced to seek medical treatment.

‘The fact that I ended up in hospital because it was not consensual meant that this was clearly an aggressive act,’ she said.

She admitted she held back from calling the police because she blamed herself. 

In August 2003 Leslie said: ‘I was not damned by anything Ulrika said – I was damned by her silence.

‘With one simple statement she could have resolved this one way or another. If she had said “John Leslie did not rape me,” that would have put an end to it. If she had said “John Leslie did rape me,” I I could have defended myself.

‘As human beings, what separates us from animals is a core sense of decency for other people and for her not to say anything at that stage was inhuman and something I can never forgive her for.

‘Through lawyers, I asked her to please make some sort of clarification – not to get me off the hook but just to let me know exactly what I was dealing with.

‘Instead, she took the third way – she said nothing. Why, why, why?’

In the interview, Ulrika admitted it was a “bad mistake” to reveal the attacker was a TV presenter.

She said: ‘The point was the act of violence against me and not who it was that did it. If I had wanted that person’s name to come out, I’d have done something about it when it happened.’ 

She admitted to some sympathy for Leslie, whose career was ruined. Ulrika said: ‘I’ve never commented about him but what I would say is trial by media is awful.’ 

Speaking out: Ulrika first discussed her rape ordeal with Piers Morgan in 2009 and said her attacker suggested they go to the cinema after he had assaulted her

Speaking out: Ulrika first discussed her rape ordeal with Piers Morgan in 2009 and said her attacker suggested they go to the cinema after he had assaulted her

Speaking out: Ulrika first discussed her rape ordeal with Piers Morgan in 2009 and said her attacker suggested they go to the cinema after he had assaulted her 

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Anna Wintour cuts a glum figure as she steps out after ‘splitting from partner Shelby Bryan’

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anna wintour cuts a glum figure as she steps out after splitting from partner shelby bryan

Anna Wintour cut a glum figure Thursday as she was pictured for the first time since news broke that she had split from her long term partner Shelby Bryan after 20 years together. 

The longtime Vogue editor, 70, was spotted clutching a stack of papers while walking through the streets of New York City. 

She hid her face behind her signature sunglasses but they didn’t conceal her downcast, unsmiling expression.  

Her outing came hours after it was first reported that Wintour and Bryan, 74, had parted ways.

The news marks the latest in a string of woes for the woman dubbed ‘Nuclear Wintour’ in recent months after her former friend released a scathing memoir and she was forced to admit to race-related ‘mistakes’ at Vogue.

Anna Wintour cut a glum figure Thursday as she was pictured for the first time since news broke that she had split with her partner Shelby Bryan after 20 years together

Anna Wintour cut a glum figure Thursday as she was pictured for the first time since news broke that she had split with her partner Shelby Bryan after 20 years together

Anna Wintour cut a glum figure Thursday as she was pictured for the first time since news broke that she had split with her partner Shelby Bryan after 20 years together

The longtime Vogue editor, 70, was spotted clutching a stack of papers out walking through the streets of New York City

The longtime Vogue editor, 70, was spotted clutching a stack of papers out walking through the streets of New York City

The longtime Vogue editor, 70, was spotted clutching a stack of papers out walking through the streets of New York City

Wintour was dressed in a long brown patterned dress, red boots and had a floral jacket slung over her arm. 

She was holding her phone, wallet, a tablet and some documents in her right hand.  

Page Six reported Wednesday that the relationship between the Vogue editor and Texas-born investor Bryan, 74, has been cooling since 2013 and the couple have only rarely been seen in public together since.

The powerful pair began dating back in 1999, with their romance causing a stir among New York’s elite because Bryan reportedly walked out on his wife to be with Wintour. 

At the time, the media maven had herself just divorced her psychiatrist husband David Shaffer, with whom she shares two children. 

But Wintour and Bryan have rarely been seen in public in recent years.  

She was dressed in a long patterned dress, red boots and her signature sunglasses as she appeared downcast and didn't smile

She was dressed in a long patterned dress, red boots and her signature sunglasses as she appeared downcast and didn't smile

She was dressed in a long patterned dress, red boots and her signature sunglasses as she appeared downcast and didn’t smile

Her outing came hours after it was first reported that Wintour and Bryan, 74, had parted ways

Her outing came hours after it was first reported that Wintour and Bryan, 74, had parted ways

 Her outing came hours after it was first reported that Wintour and Bryan, 74, had parted ways

Wintour hid her face behind her signature sunglasses and appeared downcast

Wintour hid her face behind her signature sunglasses and appeared downcast

Wintour hid her face behind her signature sunglasses and appeared downcast

The fashionista is known to have a wide circle of males friends, including the British actor Bill Nighy, who she has been regularly spotted with him at fashion shows and restaurant trips.

When Nighy was asked about the nature of their relationship in 2015, he replied, ‘I obviously have nothing to say about that. There are a lot of rumors about me and probably about Anna Wintour’.

The separation sets up the prospect of a multi-million dollar break up, with Wintour boasting an estimated net worth of $35million alongside her husband’s sizeable fortune. 

The couple split their time between a $11.4m townhouse in Manhattan’s trendy Greenwich Village and a sprawling holiday home in the Hamptons, which features a tennis court and stunning landscaped grounds leading down to the waterfront. 

Anna Wintour and her partner Shelby Bryan have split after 20 years together, according to a Wednesday report running in Page Six. The couple are pictured together in 2016

Anna Wintour and her partner Shelby Bryan have split after 20 years together, according to a Wednesday report running in Page Six. The couple are pictured together in 2016

Anna Wintour and her partner Shelby Bryan have split after 20 years together, according to a Wednesday report running in Page Six. The couple are pictured together in 2016 

Wintour and Bryan are pictured together in 2001

Wintour and Bryan are pictured together in 2001

Wintour and Bryan are pictured together in 2001

A representative for Wintour declined to comment on Page Six’s report of her break up. 

The site claims that there has been ‘chatter around town that Bryan had gone back to his ex-wife Katherine, whom he left for Wintour more than two decades ago’. 

However, an anonymous source stated that those rumors are untrue. 

‘Katherine and Shelby have kids together[and] are friends. That’s all,’ the insider alleged. 

Wintour and Bryan’s relationship is said to have run into trouble in 2013, when it was revealed that he owed $1.2 million in back taxes to the IRS. 

The pair were often pictured at social events and tennis matches in the years prior,  but have less frequently been spotted out in the time since. 

According to Page Six, their relationship ran into trouble in 2013 and the pair began to be seen in public less frequently. They are pictured during a rare appearance together at the 2018 US Open

According to Page Six, their relationship ran into trouble in 2013 and the pair began to be seen in public less frequently. They are pictured during a rare appearance together at the 2018 US Open

According to Page Six, their relationship ran into trouble in 2013 and the pair began to be seen in public less frequently. They are pictured during a rare appearance together at the 2018 US Open 

Anna Wintour's 19th century townhouse, in an exclusive block in Greenwich Village, New York, is estimated to be worth $11.4m, according to Zillow

Anna Wintour's 19th century townhouse, in an exclusive block in Greenwich Village, New York, is estimated to be worth $11.4m, according to Zillow

Anna Wintour’s 19th century townhouse, in an exclusive block in Greenwich Village, New York, is estimated to be worth $11.4m, according to Zillow 

Wintour is known to have a wide circle of males friends, including the British actor Bill Nighy, who she has been regularly spotted with him at fashion shows and restaurant trips. They are pictured together in Paris in January

Wintour is known to have a wide circle of males friends, including the British actor Bill Nighy, who she has been regularly spotted with him at fashion shows and restaurant trips. They are pictured together in Paris in January

Wintour is known to have a wide circle of males friends, including the British actor Bill Nighy, who she has been regularly spotted with him at fashion shows and restaurant trips. They are pictured together in Paris in January

Wintour and Bryan have largely kept their relationship private, but a 2007 Observer article gave a glimpse. 

The US Vogue editor – who took the helm of the fashion bible back in 1988 – is famous for her icy persona. However, a source told the Observer that Bryan had ‘softened’ her. 

‘She smiles now and has been seen to laugh,’ a source told that publication.  

Wintour and Bryan do not have children together. 

Wintour is a mother to son, Charles, 35, and daughter, Bea, 33, from her marriage to David Shaffer. They were married from 1984 until 1999. 

Wintour was previously married to David Shaffer from 1984 until 1999. They are pictured together in 1989

Wintour was previously married to David Shaffer from 1984 until 1999. They are pictured together in 1989

Wintour was previously married to David Shaffer from 1984 until 1999. They are pictured together in 1989 

Wintour does not have children with Bryan. She shares two children from her former marriage to Shaffer, including daughter Bea. They are pictured together last year

Wintour does not have children with Bryan. She shares two children from her former marriage to Shaffer, including daughter Bea. They are pictured together last year

Wintour does not have children with Bryan. She shares two children from her former marriage to Shaffer, including daughter Bea. They are pictured together last year 

Wednesday’s news of their separation comes amid a torrid year for the magazine titan.  

In May, Wintour’s former confidante, André Leon Talley, painted a scathing portrait of her in his memoir, The Chiffon Trenches back in May. 

Talley, who worked at Vogue for more than two decades and eventually became the magazine’s editor-at-large, slammed Wintour in his memoir, The Chiffon Trenches. 

In one book passage, Talley described being frozen out by Wintour because he was ‘too old, too overweight, too uncool’ for her.  

He went on to claim that there were an ‘endless’ list of writers, stylists and models who she has cast onto a ‘frayed and tattered heap during her powerful rule’.

In another scorching paragraph he wrote:  ‘She is immune to anyone other than the powerful and famous people who populate the pages of Vogue.

‘She has mercilessly made her best friends people who are the highest in their chosen fields.

‘Serena Williams, Roger Federer, Mr. and Mrs. George Clooney are, to her, friends. I am no longer of value to her’. 

Wintour has already endured a difficult year, with her fractious relationship with her former colleague and confidante André Leon Talley hitting headlines in May. Pictured: The former friends at the Met gala in 1999

Wintour has already endured a difficult year, with her fractious relationship with her former colleague and confidante André Leon Talley hitting headlines in May. Pictured: The former friends at the Met gala in 1999

Wintour has already endured a difficult year, with her fractious relationship with her former colleague and confidante André Leon Talley hitting headlines in May. Pictured: The former friends at the Met gala in 1999

The following month, Vogue’s publisher Condé Nast was rocked by allegations of widespread racism.  

As well as being editor of Vogue, Wintour also serves as the publisher’s artistic director. 

The claims prompted Wintour to issue a rare mea culpa, in which she apologized for race-related ‘mistakes’. 

In an internal memo to staff at Condé, Wintour admitted to letting ‘hurtful and intolerant behavior’ go unchecked during her 32-year reign at the fashion magazine, as well as not doing enough to champion black staffers and designers.  

‘I want to say plainly that I know Vogue has not found enough ways to elevate and give space to Black editors, writers, photographers, designers and other creators ,’ Wintour wrote. 

 ‘We have made mistakes too, publishing images or stories that have been hurtful or intolerant. I take full responsibility for those mistakes.’ 

In June, the influential editor made a rare mea culpa amid accusations of racism at Vogue's publisher Condé Nast

In June, the influential editor made a rare mea culpa amid accusations of racism at Vogue's publisher Condé Nast

In June, the influential editor made a rare mea culpa amid accusations of racism at Vogue’s publisher Condé Nast 

The note was sent out to staffers three days before Adam Rapoport, the editor-in-chief of another Condé Nast publication, Bon Appetit, resigned from his post after a photo surfaced of him in brownface, exacerbating a race-based controversy regarding pay equity in the outlet’s video department. 

Many believed Wintour may finally step down from her role as editor-in-chief of Vogue, but the company strongly expressed its support for their most famous employee. 

However, her memo still appeared to indicate changing power dynamics and a possible loss of influence for an editor who was once deemed untouchable. 

Wintour and Bryan are pictured in 2007. Her horror year appears to indicate changing power dynamics and a possible loss of influence for an editor who was once deemed untouchable

Wintour and Bryan are pictured in 2007. Her horror year appears to indicate changing power dynamics and a possible loss of influence for an editor who was once deemed untouchable

Wintour and Bryan are pictured in 2007. Her horror year appears to indicate changing power dynamics and a possible loss of influence for an editor who was once deemed untouchable

This post first appeared on dailymail.co.uk

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