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China goes into ‘wartime mode’ to fight ‘flood catastrophe’ with 141 people dead or missing

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china goes into wartime mode to fight flood catastrophe with 141 people dead or missing

Multiple Chinese provinces have entered ‘wartime mode’ to fight what state media called a ‘flood catastrophe’ as torrential downpours batter the country.

By Sunday, an early rain season and ‘extraordinarily’ heavy rainfalls had already left 141 people dead or missing and 2.2million people evacuated, reported state-run newspaper The Global Times.

Wuhan, which has just fought the COVID-19 outbreak, raised its flood emergency response to ‘alert level two’ last week. Thousands of disaster-relief workers are on standby after parts of the city were inundated by rising rivers – with officials predicting the flood peak to arrive this week.

Inundated: This aerial view shows a bridge leading to the inundated Tianxingzhou island, which is set to be a flood flowing zone to relieve pressure from the high level of water in Yangtze River in Wuhan, China's central Hubei province, on July 13

Inundated: This aerial view shows a bridge leading to the inundated Tianxingzhou island, which is set to be a flood flowing zone to relieve pressure from the high level of water in Yangtze River in Wuhan, China's central Hubei province, on July 13

Inundated: This aerial view shows a bridge leading to the inundated Tianxingzhou island, which is set to be a flood flowing zone to relieve pressure from the high level of water in Yangtze River in Wuhan, China’s central Hubei province, on July 13

Wuhan in crisis: The COVID-19 epicentre raised its flood emergency response to 'alert level two' last week. This aerial photo taken on July 12 shows a closed park due to the high water level of the Yangtze River in Wuhan, China's central Hubei province

Wuhan in crisis: The COVID-19 epicentre raised its flood emergency response to 'alert level two' last week. This aerial photo taken on July 12 shows a closed park due to the high water level of the Yangtze River in Wuhan, China's central Hubei province

Wuhan in crisis: The COVID-19 epicentre raised its flood emergency response to ‘alert level two’ last week. This aerial photo taken on July 12 shows a closed park due to the high water level of the Yangtze River in Wuhan, China’s central Hubei province

Submerged: Thousands of disaster-relief workers are on standby in Wuhan after rising rivers inundated parts of the city. This photo taken on July 11 shows a man paddling near a flooded pavilion on the bank of the Yangtze River in Wuhan

Submerged: Thousands of disaster-relief workers are on standby in Wuhan after rising rivers inundated parts of the city. This photo taken on July 11 shows a man paddling near a flooded pavilion on the bank of the Yangtze River in Wuhan

Submerged: Thousands of disaster-relief workers are on standby in Wuhan after rising rivers inundated parts of the city. This photo taken on July 11 shows a man paddling near a flooded pavilion on the bank of the Yangtze River in Wuhan 

Flood peak to arrive: Wuhan officials warned the Yangtze could hit its third-highest levels in history in Wuhan on Thursday. This photo taken on July 12 shows residents looking at the swollen Yangtze River in Wuhan, a city of 11million

Flood peak to arrive: Wuhan officials warned the Yangtze could hit its third-highest levels in history in Wuhan on Thursday. This photo taken on July 12 shows residents looking at the swollen Yangtze River in Wuhan, a city of 11million

Flood peak to arrive: Wuhan officials warned the Yangtze could hit its third-highest levels in history in Wuhan on Thursday. This photo taken on July 12 shows residents looking at the swollen Yangtze River in Wuhan, a city of 11million

Authorities have activated emergency response to severe flooding in provinces including Jiangxi, Hubei, Hunan and Guizhou.

Floods across large swathes of central and eastern China are hitting record levels, with authorities warning the worst was yet to come.

The coronavirus ground zero of Wuhan, through which the mighty Yangtze River winds, is on an expanding list of areas warily watching the rising waters.

Local officials warned that the Yangtze could hit its third-highest levels in history in the city of 11million on Thursday.

At a flood-fighting meeting on Sunday, Wuhan leaders described the situation as ‘extremely severe‘.

'Extremely severe' situation: At a flood-fighting meeting on Sunday, Wuhan leaders warned of the city's rising river levels. Officials predicted that the Yangtze River's level could reach 95.8 feet, its third-highest levels in history, on Thursday

'Extremely severe' situation: At a flood-fighting meeting on Sunday, Wuhan leaders warned of the city's rising river levels. Officials predicted that the Yangtze River's level could reach 95.8 feet, its third-highest levels in history, on Thursday

‘Extremely severe’ situation: At a flood-fighting meeting on Sunday, Wuhan leaders warned of the city’s rising river levels. Officials predicted that the Yangtze River’s level could reach 95.8 feet, its third-highest levels in history, on Thursday 

New way of crossing: Summer flooding has been an annual scourge in China since ancient times, often focused along the vast Yangtze basin. This photo  shows a man paddling near a flooded sculpture on the bank of the Yangtze River in Wuhan

New way of crossing: Summer flooding has been an annual scourge in China since ancient times, often focused along the vast Yangtze basin. This photo  shows a man paddling near a flooded sculpture on the bank of the Yangtze River in Wuhan

New way of crossing: Summer flooding has been an annual scourge in China since ancient times, often focused along the vast Yangtze basin. This photo taken on July 11 shows a man paddling near a flooded sculpture on the bank of the Yangtze River

'Alert level two' for Wuhan: Since last week, worsening downpours have caused water levels to spike higher and the government to ramp up alert levels. Wuhan raised its flooding alert level to two in a three-tier disaster warning system

'Alert level two' for Wuhan: Since last week, worsening downpours have caused water levels to spike higher and the government to ramp up alert levels. Wuhan raised its flooding alert level to two in a three-tier disaster warning system

 ‘Alert level two’ for Wuhan: Since last week, worsening downpours have caused water levels to spike higher and the government to ramp up alert levels. Wuhan raised its flooding alert level to two in a three-tier disaster warning system

Thirty-three rivers in China have reached record highs, while alerts have been issued on a total of 433 rivers, officials from the Ministry of Water Resources said during a briefing on Monday. Pictured, Wuhan locals look at an inundated pavilion on July 12

Thirty-three rivers in China have reached record highs, while alerts have been issued on a total of 433 rivers, officials from the Ministry of Water Resources said during a briefing on Monday. Pictured, Wuhan locals look at an inundated pavilion on July 12

Thirty-three rivers in China have reached record highs, while alerts have been issued on a total of 433 rivers, officials from the Ministry of Water Resources said during a briefing on Monday. Pictured, Wuhan locals look at an inundated pavilion on July 12

Summer flooding has been an annual scourge in China since ancient times, often focused along the vast Yangtze basin that drains much of the central part of the country.

Steady rains since late June have flooded huge areas, leaving 141 people dead or missing so far, affecting 37.89million others and destroying 28,000 homes, according to the latest central government tallies.

The adverse weather has also caused 82.2billion yuan in economic losses, reported the Global Times

But worsening downpours since last week have caused water levels to spike higher and the government to ramp up alert levels.

An aerial photo taken on July 11 shows people reinforcing temporary waterproof dyke to stop the flood at Jiangjialing Village in Poyang County, east China's Jiangxi Province. Jiangxi has been one of the provinces worst-hit by floods in China this month

An aerial photo taken on July 11 shows people reinforcing temporary waterproof dyke to stop the flood at Jiangjialing Village in Poyang County, east China's Jiangxi Province. Jiangxi has been one of the provinces worst-hit by floods in China this month

An aerial photo taken on July 11 shows people reinforcing temporary waterproof dyke to stop the flood at Jiangjialing Village in Poyang County, east China’s Jiangxi Province. Jiangxi has been one of the provinces worst-hit by floods in China this month

The worst-hit provinces were Jiangxi, Hubei and Hunan in central China, Anhui, Zhejiang and Jiangsu in the country's east, and the southwestern mega-city of Chongqing, authorities said. The above picture shows a submerged village in Jiangxi

The worst-hit provinces were Jiangxi, Hubei and Hunan in central China, Anhui, Zhejiang and Jiangsu in the country's east, and the southwestern mega-city of Chongqing, authorities said. The above picture shows a submerged village in Jiangxi

The worst-hit provinces were Jiangxi, Hubei and Hunan in central China, Anhui, Zhejiang and Jiangsu in the country’s east, and the southwestern mega-city of Chongqing, authorities said. The above picture shows a submerged village in Jiangxi

Part of an 800-year-old bridge, Caihong Bridge, is destroyed by flood caused by continuous rainfall in Shangrao city, Jiangxi

Part of an 800-year-old bridge, Caihong Bridge, is destroyed by flood caused by continuous rainfall in Shangrao city, Jiangxi

Part of an 800-year-old bridge, Caihong Bridge, is destroyed by flood caused by continuous rainfall in Shangrao city, Jiangxi

Thirty-three rivers have reached record highs, while alerts have been issued on a total of 433 rivers, officials from the Ministry of Water Resources said during a briefing in Beijing on Monday.

Video broadcast by Chinese state-run media at the weekend showed vast stretches of cities and towns inundated by water that rose in some places to the roofs of single-story homes, as rescue personnel evacuated men, women and children aboard inflatable boats.

Elsewhere, homes were shown flattened by landslides that had tumbled from water-logged hillsides.

Steady rains since late June have flooded huge areas, leaving 141 people dead or missing so far. Pictured, rescuers evacuate villagers from a village which is submerged by Changjiang River flood due to a dike burst in Poyang, Jiangxi, on July 11

Steady rains since late June have flooded huge areas, leaving 141 people dead or missing so far. Pictured, rescuers evacuate villagers from a village which is submerged by Changjiang River flood due to a dike burst in Poyang, Jiangxi, on July 11

Steady rains since late June have flooded huge areas, leaving 141 people dead or missing so far. Pictured, rescuers evacuate villagers from a village which is submerged by Changjiang River flood due to a dike burst in Poyang, Jiangxi, on July 11

The adverse weather has also caused 82.2billion yuan in economic losses, reported state-run newspaper Global Times

The adverse weather has also caused 82.2billion yuan in economic losses, reported state-run newspaper Global Times

The adverse weather has also caused 82.2billion yuan in economic losses, reported state-run newspaper Global Times

Chinese paramilitary policemen form a line to move sandbags to reinforce a dyke along the banks of Poyang Lake on July 12

Chinese paramilitary policemen form a line to move sandbags to reinforce a dyke along the banks of Poyang Lake on July 12

Chinese paramilitary policemen form a line to move sandbags to reinforce a dyke along the banks of Poyang Lake on July 12

The worst-hit provinces were Jiangxi, Hubei and Hunan in central China, Anhui, Zhejiang and Jiangsu in the country’s east, and the southwestern mega-city of Chongqing, authorities said.

Illustrating the growing alarm, President Xi Jinping on Sunday called on authorities in affected areas to mobilise to help stricken residents, urging them to be ‘courageous’.

China’s worst floods in recent decades came in 1998 during an El Nino weather effect, killing more than 4,000 people, mostly around the Yangtze.

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Video of woman washing her boyfriend’s pillows for the first time in 10 YEARS horrifies social media

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video of woman washing her boyfriends pillows for the first time in 10 years horrifies social media

A woman has filmed herself washing her boyfriend’s stained pillows for the first time in 10 years — and social media users are horrified by the state of them. 

In the viral video, the TikToker claimed her boyfriend refuses to replace his decade-old pillows, noting that he never washed them once in all of the time he has had them.

She documented the entire cleaning process, washing three of the dingy pillows — which were yellowed and filthy — and the result is astounding.

Filthy: A TikTok user filmed a video of herself cleaning her boyfriend's pillows for the first time in 10 years, explaining that he refuses to replace them

Filthy: A TikTok user filmed a video of herself cleaning her boyfriend's pillows for the first time in 10 years, explaining that he refuses to replace them

Filthy: A TikTok user filmed a video of herself cleaning her boyfriend's pillows for the first time in 10 years, explaining that he refuses to replace them

Filthy: A TikTok user filmed a video of herself cleaning her boyfriend's pillows for the first time in 10 years, explaining that he refuses to replace them

Filthy: A TikTok user filmed a video of herself cleaning her boyfriend’s pillows for the first time in 10 years, explaining that he refuses to replace them 

While her boyfriend was at work, she placed them in the bathtub and threw in a couple of dishwasher tablets.

She then poured some Borax powder into the tub before adding bleach into the mixture.

The TikToker proceeded to use a mop to wring out the dirt from the pillows, and then tossed them into the washing machine.

Surprisingly, the pillows came out completely white — a stark contrast to their dark yellow and brown shade before the wash. 

Getting started: She placed them in the bathtub and threw in a couple of dishwasher tablets

Getting started: She placed them in the bathtub and threw in a couple of dishwasher tablets

Getting started: She placed them in the bathtub and threw in a couple of dishwasher tablets

Getting started: She placed them in the bathtub and threw in a couple of dishwasher tablets

Getting started: She placed them in the bathtub and threw in a couple of dishwasher tablets

Next up: The TikToker also added Borax power and bleach to the water

Next up: The TikToker also added Borax power and bleach to the water

Next up: The TikToker also added Borax power and bleach to the water

Next up: The TikToker also added Borax power and bleach to the water

Next up: The TikToker also added Borax power and bleach to the water 

The video has since gone viral on TikTok, gaining over 1.7 million views and leaving users in shock at the state of the pillows before they were washed. 

‘With that alone, I would replace the boyfriend. Hygiene is everything,’ one person wrote, while another added: ’10 years of sweat, dead skin, dirt, oil and bacteria’ 

Someone else commented: ‘They are meant to be replaced every two years… they come with expiry dates on them…’

Social media users certainly had reason to be appalled, considering pillows are supposed to be replaced every one or two years and washed at least four times a year.   

Getting them clean: She proceeded to use a mop to wring out the dirt from the pillows

Getting them clean: She proceeded to use a mop to wring out the dirt from the pillows

Getting them clean: She proceeded to use a mop to wring out the dirt from the pillows

Getting them clean: She proceeded to use a mop to wring out the dirt from the pillows

Getting them clean: She proceeded to use a mop to wring out the dirt from the pillows

Amazing: After throwing the soaked pillows in the wash, they came out perfectly white

Amazing: After throwing the soaked pillows in the wash, they came out perfectly white

Amazing: After throwing the soaked pillows in the wash, they came out perfectly white

Amazing: After throwing the soaked pillows in the wash, they came out perfectly white

Amazing: After throwing the soaked pillows in the wash, they came out perfectly white

An expert from Christy England, which supplies to Wimbledon and the royal family, told FEMAIL in April that ‘pillows should be washed every three months because, similar to bedding, they contain a build-up of sweat and dead skin.’ 

And while most people think that a whirl in the washing machine will thoroughly clean their clothes and linens — but it turns out that some fabrics may be retaining a horrifying buildup of dirt.

‘Stripping’ laundry is the special trick that gets everything super clean, removing the grime that washing machines won’t.

The technique involves soaking laundry in a tub of hot water, baking soda, Borax, and detergent, similar to what the TikToker did to her boyfriend’s pillows. 

Like new: The Tiktoker joked that she 'can sleep better knowing those nasty pillows are clean'

Like new: The Tiktoker joked that she 'can sleep better knowing those nasty pillows are clean'

Like new: The Tiktoker joked that she 'can sleep better knowing those nasty pillows are clean'

Like new: The Tiktoker joked that she 'can sleep better knowing those nasty pillows are clean'

Like new: The Tiktoker joked that she ‘can sleep better knowing those nasty pillows are clean’

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33536796 8765053 image a 90 1600879674088

33536784 8765053 image a 91 1600879677225

33536784 8765053 image a 91 1600879677225

Say what? Social media users were horrified by the filthy brown pillows

Say what? Social media users were horrified by the filthy brown pillows

Say what? Social media users were horrified by the filthy brown pillows 

People have been stripping their laundry for ages, but the process is reaching a new generation after going viral on TikTok in recent months. 

Nurse Lauren Elms shared several walk-throughs on the app, first stripping her workout clothes on April 22 and then doing her towels on April 24.

The video of her stripping her towels was viewed more than six million times.

In the clip, she filled a tub with hot water and added a quarter cup of baking soda, a quarter cup of Borax, and a generous scoop of powder detergent and places her laundry in the tub.  

Lauren advised stirring the clothes every couple of hours, but she showed that just ten minutes in, the water was already dirty. After seven hours, the water was a filthy, dark brown color.

She pointed out that her clothes and towels were actually ‘clean’ when they went in the tub, so this was all buildup. She told viewers to finish up by re-washing their laundry as they normally would in a machine. 

Get stripping! Most people think that the washing machine will thoroughly clean their clothes and linens — but it turns out that some fabrics may be retaining a horrifying buildup of dirt

Get stripping! Most people think that the washing machine will thoroughly clean their clothes and linens — but it turns out that some fabrics may be retaining a horrifying buildup of dirt

Get stripping! Most people think that the washing machine will thoroughly clean their clothes and linens — but it turns out that some fabrics may be retaining a horrifying buildup of dirt

Mix it up: 'Stripping' laundry involves soaking laundry in a tub of hot water, baking soda, Borax, and detergent

Mix it up: 'Stripping' laundry involves soaking laundry in a tub of hot water, baking soda, Borax, and detergent

Mix it up: 'Stripping' laundry involves soaking laundry in a tub of hot water, baking soda, Borax, and detergent

Mix it up: 'Stripping' laundry involves soaking laundry in a tub of hot water, baking soda, Borax, and detergent

Mix it up: ‘Stripping’ laundry involves soaking laundry in a tub of hot water, baking soda, Borax, and detergent

Yuck! After soaking the laundry in the solution, it may leave behind water that looks like this

Yuck! After soaking the laundry in the solution, it may leave behind water that looks like this

Yuck! After soaking the laundry in the solution, it may leave behind water that looks like this

She also showed that the bottom of her drained tub was dirtied with a surprising residue from the soak.

Lauren’s video set off a trend, and several others have mimicked her with their own clips. Some just shared shocked and horrified reactions, while others replicated the experiment with their own clothes.

According to The Spruce, ‘body soil and bacteria’ can get stuck in fabrics, especially terry cloth towels.

That’s why some older towels and gym clothes may smell clean immediately after coming out of the wash, but will start to smell as soon as they get damp.

When laundry is thrown in the wash, the soap is doing a lot of the work to clean it — but it’s still circulating in dirty water, which gets reabsorbed into the fabric.

Stripping can get rid of some of the dirt and bacteria, while smells can be killed by adding vinegar to a wash.

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PAUL THOMAS on… our military Covid marshals

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paul thomas on our military covid marshals
33546296 8766691 image a 34 1600910835132

33546296 8766691 image a 34 1600910835132

To order a print of this Paul Thomas cartoon or one by Pugh, visit Mailpictures.newsprints.co.uk or call 0191 6030 178. 

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Chief Scientific Officer Sir Patrick Vallance has £600,000 of shares in vaccine maker GSK

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chief scientific officer sir patrick vallance has 600000 of shares in vaccine maker gsk

Sir Patrick Vallance has a £600,000 shareholding in a pharmaceuticals giant which is racing to develop a Covid vaccine for the Government, a report has revealed.

The Chief Scientific Adviser holds the deferred bonus of 43,111 shares in GlaxoSmithKline (GSK) from his time as president of the multinational company.

Sir Patrick has already sold more than £5 million in shares he received during his tenure from 2012 to 2018, when he was appointed by the Government.

Accounts seen by the Telegraph show that Sir Patrick held 404,201 GSK shares when he resigned, worth £6.1 million at today’s price.

Sir Patrick Vallance speaking to the nation on Monday night. He and Chris Whitty outlined why the Government was announcing a raft of new lockdown measures

Sir Patrick Vallance speaking to the nation on Monday night. He and Chris Whitty outlined why the Government was announcing a raft of new lockdown measures

Sir Patrick Vallance speaking to the nation on Monday night. He and Chris Whitty outlined why the Government was announcing a raft of new lockdown measures

Sir Patrick, who also chairs the Government’s expert panel on vaccines, predicted at a news conference this week that the first effective doses of a jab might become available on a limited basis by the end of this year.

GSK is one of more than 20 drugs companies around the world in the race to provide the cure for coronavirus – an achievement which would be colossally lucrative.

Sir Patrick’s former employer has deals with the British and US governments to supply them with Covid-19 vaccines, subject to terms in a final contract.

A senior Conservative MP and ex-Cabinet minister told The Telegraph that Sir Patrick should have declared his stake in GSK.

‘The policy of this Government is to try to suppress Covid at every opportunity until we get a vaccine,’ the MP said. ‘That makes it more likely that a vaccine will be prioritised by the Government and he happens to be holding shares in one of the leading companies that are developing it. It is a potential conflict of interest.

‘If he is making decisions on vaccines and advising the Government on them, then he either needs to divest himself of the shares or make a declaration every time he touches on the subject. In the Commons, every time MPs raise an issue in which there is a registered interest, they have to declare it. Every time he is talking about vaccines or on TV, he should put it on the table.’

The GlaxoSmithKline pharmaceuticals headquarters in Brentford, west London

The GlaxoSmithKline pharmaceuticals headquarters in Brentford, west London

The GlaxoSmithKline pharmaceuticals headquarters in Brentford, west London

A government spokesman said that Sir Patrick holds a deferred share bonus which will mature in April but declined to comment on the size of the holding or its value.

‘Upon his appointment, appropriate steps were taken to manage the Government Chief Scientific Adviser’s (GCSA) interests in line with advice provided at the time,’ the spokesman said.

The Government’s spokesman added that while Sir Patrick chairs the Government’s expert panel on vaccines, he ‘has no input into contractual and commercial decisions on vaccine procurement,’ which are the province of ministers.

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