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Churches risk being ‘engulfed by a crimewave’, campaigners warn

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churches risk being engulfed by a crimewave campaigners warn

Britain risks being ‘engulfed by a church crimewave’ according to campaigners after new figures showed that more than 5,000 crimes were committed on religious premises last year.

Despite the four month coronavirus lockdown, an average of 13 crimes a day were committed between July 2019 and July 2020 including rape, arson and drug trafficking.

Figures from 37 of the country’s 45 territorial police forces showed there were 5,367 incidents of theft, vandalism, assault or burglary across the UK in just 12 months.

The Metropolitan Police recorded some 1,106 crimes in religious locations which include 250 cases of violence against the person, 273 burglaries, 188 offences of arson and criminal damage and 371 thefts – an average of more than one day.

Items stolen included a 300 year old brass bell from England’s smallest church in Wiltshire and a money box from a Gloucester church taken on Boxing Day after thieves broke in to search through the nativity scene.

Britain risks being 'engulfed by a church crimewave' according to campaigners after new figures showed that more than 5,000 crimes were committed on religious premises last year

Britain risks being 'engulfed by a church crimewave' according to campaigners after new figures showed that more than 5,000 crimes were committed on religious premises last year

Britain risks being ‘engulfed by a church crimewave’ according to campaigners after new figures showed that more than 5,000 crimes were committed on religious premises last year

The figures were provided by the Countryside Alliance as part of a call to focus attention on rural churches and increase funding for security at places of worship.

This year 90 places of worship are being added to Historic England’s Heritage at Risk Register with almost half included because of the impact of crime such as lead theft.

The Countryside Alliance figures show that some 278 lead thefts were recorded in just 12 months including the roof of the 15th century St John the Baptist church in Somerset that has left the parish with a bill for £41,600 in repairs.

Mo Metcalf-Fisher of the Countryside Alliance said: ‘The latest set of figures, out only a year after the incredibly distressing numbers in 2019, make for horrific reading.

‘We cannot risk being engulfed by a church crime wave and clearly more needs to be done to tackle this problem.

‘Taking into account that during some of this year, the country was in lockdown, it is chilling to learn that criminals either acting alone or in gangs have taken advantage of this awful pandemic and continued to target rural churches.’

In the West Midlands there was 146 violent assaults on church property ranging from racially or religiously aggravated harassment, malicious wounding and an assault on a male child by penetration.

Items stolen in Nottinghamshire include everything from apples to work tools, with records showing handbags, plant pots, a CCTV camera and even food for collection among items stolen.

Sussex Police recorded ‘exposure and voyeurism’ in one local cemetery while sexual offences in the area’s churchyards included six sexual assaults on a female aged 13 or over.

Crimes in South Yorkshire churches and cemeteries included incidents of drug trafficking, possession of weapons charges and three rapes of a female child under 13.

Churches in Suffolk meanwhile recorded cases of assault by beating of a constable and the theft of a motor vehicle while shoplifting and stolen bikes were documented in West Mercia.

This post first appeared on dailymail.co.uk

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Gary Lineker leads tributes to former Grandstand host Frank Bough after he dies aged 87 

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gary lineker leads tributes to former grandstand host frank bough after he dies aged 87

Tributes have been paid to former BBC broadcaster Frank Bough, the Grandstand host who became the first voice heard on British Breakfast TV, with Gary Linkeker declaring he ‘made it all look so easy’.

 Bough, who for much of his career was one of the most famous and highly paid personalities on UK television screens, died in a care home last Wednesday, a family friend revealed.

Fellow broadcaster Michael Parkinson once said of Bough: ‘If my life depended on the smooth handling of a TV show, Bough would be my first choice to be in charge.’

Match of the Day presenter Lineker tweeted: ‘Sorry to hear that Frank Bough has passed away. Grew up watching him present Grandstand on Saturdays. He was a brilliant presenter who made it all look so easy. RIP Frank.’  

The TV personality died on Wednesday in a care home, a family friend told the BBC. Pictured in 2001

The TV personality died on Wednesday in a care home, a family friend told the BBC. Pictured in 2001

The TV personality died on Wednesday in a care home, a family friend told the BBC. Pictured in 2001

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Gary Lineker and Piers Morgan led tributes to the broadcaster after his death aged 87

Gary Lineker and Piers Morgan led tributes to the broadcaster after his death aged 87

Gary Lineker and Piers Morgan led tributes to the broadcaster after his death aged 87

Bough fronted the team who launched the BBC’s Breakfast Time, revolutionising the UK television landscape in January 1983.

After the news of his death last night, current breakfast presenter Piers Morgan called him ‘one of the great live TV presenters’, but added that his career had been ‘ruined by scandal’.

That was a reference to a 1988 News Of The World expose in which Bough confessed to taking cocaine with prostitutes.

 He was sacked from his £200,000-a-year contract by the BBC but would later return to presenting on outlets including Sky and London’s LBC.

Before the revelations about his private life, he had been known for his squeaky-clean image and passion for sport.

His wife Nesta – who survives him – stuck with him and stayed with him up until his death.  

Frank is credited with pioneering breakfast television, launching BBC’s Breakfast Time in 1983, alongside Selina Scott (pictured together) and Nick Ross

Frank is credited with pioneering breakfast television, launching BBC’s Breakfast Time in 1983, alongside Selina Scott (pictured together) and Nick Ross

Frank is credited with pioneering breakfast television, launching BBC’s Breakfast Time in 1983, alongside Selina Scott (pictured together) and Nick Ross

After the sting he said: ‘I have been exceedingly stupid and I accept that 

‘I caused a lot of pain to my wife and my family and I bitterly regret all these things – but I have to say that I believe that everybody, when they have difficulties with their marriage or sexuality, surely has the right to sort these things out in the privacy of their own home.’

Nesta had admitted she was furious at her husband and also the press over the sting and had considered leaving him.

She said in a Sky News programme: ‘Obviously I have thought, ‘Do I stay or do I go?’. 

‘We have been together a long time. We have brought up a family.

‘We have still got a lot going for us. I do feel betrayed by it, but I do not feel that it is anything personal to do with me.’

The scandal turned the couple into recluses after previously being well-known in their old Thames-side mansion, where they held glamorous parties at the height of his fame.

But in 2014 it was reported he was planning a comeback to try and finally banish the ghosts of his past and reclaim his broadcasting legacy.

It never happened and he continued to turn down offers to return to any anniversary celebrations of his former shows. 

The presenter, adored by viewers, became known for his smooth, unflappable and in control broadcast style. In one of the last photographs of him, Bough his seen here in Maidenhead, Berks, in 2018

The presenter, adored by viewers, became known for his smooth, unflappable and in control broadcast style. In one of the last photographs of him, Bough his seen here in Maidenhead, Berks, in 2018

The presenter, adored by viewers, became known for his smooth, unflappable and in control broadcast style. In one of the last photographs of him, Bough his seen here in Maidenhead, Berks, in 2018

Born into a family in a two-up, two-down terraced house in Stoke-on-Trent in 1933, Bough would later tell Desert Island Discs that he enjoyed ‘very happy days’ growing up with his sister.

At 18 he became the first member of his family to attend university when he won an all-rounder scholarship to Merton College, Oxford.

He won a football Blue and grew to be a talented sportsman, but opted for broadcasting for a career working at first in BBC regional news then national sports programmes Sportsview and Grandstand.

He anchored six football World Cups, six Olympics and at least 12 of rugby’s Five Nations Championships for the corporation.

But it was in Breakfast TV that his fame was its greatest. As he welcomed viewers to Breakfast Time, he and fellow presenters Selina Scott and Nick Ross spoke of how they hoped the informal format would be as popular in the UK as it was abroad.

It was – and made stars of many of the people who appeared on it. 

Frank married Nesta Howells (pictured together) in 1959 after he left the army, the couple had three sons together - David, Stephen and Andrew. Pictured: Nesta and Frank in 1993

Frank married Nesta Howells (pictured together) in 1959 after he left the army, the couple had three sons together - David, Stephen and Andrew. Pictured: Nesta and Frank in 1993

Frank married Nesta Howells (pictured together) in 1959 after he left the army, the couple had three sons together – David, Stephen and Andrew. Pictured: Nesta and Frank in 1993

Frank Bough and Chris Bonnington in a group picture from the 2nd Royal Tank Regiment

Frank Bough and Chris Bonnington in a group picture from the 2nd Royal Tank Regiment

Frank Bough and Chris Bonnington in a group picture from the 2nd Royal Tank Regiment

Frank Bough and his wife Nesta at a dinner in London

Frank Bough and his wife Nesta at a dinner in London

Frank Bough and his wife Nesta at a dinner in London

‘COKE AND VICE GIRLS SCANDAL’ BOUGH NEVER LIVED DOWN

For the best part of 20 years, Frank chose to live in reclusive obscurity with his wife at home in Berkshire after the shame of two very public sex and drug scandals that brought his career to a premature end.

In 1988 he was sacked by the Corporation after the News of the World revealed he had taken cocaine with prostitutes at a Mayfair brothel.

Amid a torrent of more damaging revelations, he attempted to stem the tide by giving an ill-advised interview to the now defunct paper in a bid to protect his marriage and spare his three sons humiliation.

It ran the story with the front page headline: ‘Frank Bough: I Took Drugs with Vice Girls’.

In a grovelling mea culpa, he confessed to snorting cocaine with escort girls and drug-pushers and to watching couples have sex at wild parties, though he insisted the drug made him unable to have sex himself.

He said he’d been lured into the world of high-class prostitutes after being introduced to a French-born vice queen.

In 1992 he was seen leaving another prostitute’s flat which reportedly contained a cage and school canes. 

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Last night the show’s astrologer, Russell Grant, was among those paying tribute.

‘I am deeply saddened at the loss of an old television friend,’ he Tweeted. ‘Frank Bough was a great man to work with. We launched #BBCBreakfastTime in January 1983. 

‘Always there for advice and support. ‘They’ said we wouldn’t get on but we absolutely did – chalk n cheese! See you, Frank.’

Soccer Saturday host Jeff Stelling said Bough was ‘one of the very best in the business’ and had always been ‘helpful and generous with his time’.

Andrea Jenkyns MP, said her father Clifford ‘spoke highly’ of him when reminiscing about time served together in the Tank Regiment during conscription.

Former F1 world champion Damon Hill said simply ‘RIP Frank indeed.’

Former Labour MP George Galloway called Bough ‘peerless’ as a presenter, adding: ‘The BBC have no one like him now.’

A BBC spokesperson said: ‘Frank excelled as a live presenter with the BBC for many years and we are very sorry to hear of his passing.

‘We send our condolences to his family and friends.’

Bough retired from broadcasting in 1998, a decade after the News of the World scandal that tarnished his reputation.

Speaking about it years later, Bough said: ‘I’m not a wicked man, nor do I mean any harm or evil to people. I’ve made mistakes, but everyone’s entitled to do that. No one suffered but my wife, my family and myself.

‘It was a brief but appalling period in my life. Don’t condemn my entire career for a brief episode I regret.’

He claimed a therapist had cured him of his cocaine habit and his ‘other life’ – ‘for good’.

Early start: The first episode of Breakfast Time, pictured in 1983, included a champagne celebration. Bough is pictured centre, surrounded by his team

Early start: The first episode of Breakfast Time, pictured in 1983, included a champagne celebration. Bough is pictured centre, surrounded by his team

Early start: The first episode of Breakfast Time, pictured in 1983, included a champagne celebration. Bough is pictured centre, surrounded by his team

Co-hosts: Bough pictured with co-hosts Debbie Rix, left, and Selina Scott, right, in 1983

Co-hosts: Bough pictured with co-hosts Debbie Rix, left, and Selina Scott, right, in 1983

Co-hosts: Bough pictured with co-hosts Debbie Rix, left, and Selina Scott, right, in 1983

Frank Bough and Selina Scott, the hosts of Breakfast Time

Frank Bough and Selina Scott, the hosts of Breakfast Time

Frank Bough and Selina Scott, the hosts of Breakfast Time

After retirement, Bough lived in relative obscurity with wife Nesta Howells. The couple married in 1959 after he left the army – where he did his national service in the Royal Tank Regiment – and they had three sons together; David, Stephen and Andrew.

In 2001, he had to undergo a liver transplant after doctors found a cancer – though he has been involved in no other public health battles since. 

Television Presenter and former Beauty Queen Debbie Greenwood with Frank Bough at BBC TV Breakfast Xmas Party

Television Presenter and former Beauty Queen Debbie Greenwood with Frank Bough at BBC TV Breakfast Xmas Party

Television Presenter and former Beauty Queen Debbie Greenwood with Frank Bough at BBC TV Breakfast Xmas Party

Frank fronting a special exhibition stand at Waterloo Station in London where commuters were given a glimpse of programmes on offer from Sky Television, the satellite broadcasting station

Frank fronting a special exhibition stand at Waterloo Station in London where commuters were given a glimpse of programmes on offer from Sky Television, the satellite broadcasting station

Frank fronting a special exhibition stand at Waterloo Station in London where commuters were given a glimpse of programmes on offer from Sky Television, the satellite broadcasting station

In 2006, he turned down a chance to appear on a special BBC show celebrating Breakfast’s 25th anniversary, the BBC said. 

But viewers long remembered Bough’s unflappable style and the calm, friendly manner that won him legions of fans in his career’s 1970s and 80s heyday. 

A MASTER OF LIVE TV: SIX OLYMPICS, SIX WORLD CUPS, 15 YEARS ON GRANDSTAND… AND ONE SAILOR SUIT 

For all his decades as the face of the BBC’s news and sports output, it was a dance routine in a sailor suit that won Frank Bough more viewers than any other show he appeared on.

He was one of the stars in Morecambe and Wise’s 1977 Christmas special, performing a routine from South Pacific to the delight of a then-record 21 million people tuning in. 

That he was asked shows how high Bough’s star had risen at the corporation by the end of the 1970s.

Bough (back row, centre) with Eric Morecambe and Ernie Wise (front from left) in the dance routine during the comic duo's record-breaking 1977 Christmas Special on the BBC

Bough (back row, centre) with Eric Morecambe and Ernie Wise (front from left) in the dance routine during the comic duo's record-breaking 1977 Christmas Special on the BBC

Bough (back row, centre) with Eric Morecambe and Ernie Wise (front from left) in the dance routine during the comic duo’s record-breaking 1977 Christmas Special on the BBC

Born to an upholsterer father in 1933, Bough joined the BBC after picking up a love for performing in productions at school and Oxford University.

He started out on the regional magazine show Home At Six, now known as Look North, which was broadcast from Newcastle.

It cemented his love for live television, and in 1964 he combined this with his love of live sport when he took over from pioneering host Peter Dimmock to present midweek programme Sportsview. 

Two years later he was part of the BBC team who covered England’s glorious World Cup campaign, commentating on one of the greatest upsets in the sport to date when North Korea defeated Italy 1-0 in Middlesbrough.

Sportsview became Sportsnight in 1968, and Bough moved on to Grandstand, the BBC’s long-running flagship Saturday afternoon sports programme.

It began a 15-year stint as the face of BBC sport, with the show covering sports from the Olympic Games to rugby league. 

He also fronted Sports Review Of The Year, the forerunner to the current Sports Personality Of The Year event, for 18 years.

In the 1970s, Bough took his experience of live TV and moved to news magazine programmes. Nationwide, one of the most-watched shows of the time, attracted Bough in 1972 – although some BBC managers objected to a sports broadcaster muscling in on news’s territory.

It didn’t matter to viewers though, and he was an instant success with his easy-going style.

It meant that by 1983, when the BBC won the race with ITV to bring breakfast television to UK screens by just two weeks, Bough was a shoo-in as one of the launch hosts.

BBC Breakfast Time would cement his reputation as one of the most reliable hosts on TV, moving from interviewing Prime Ministers to handling lighter segments with ease.

Grandstand presenters (left to right) Steve Ryder, David Coleman, Peter Dimmock, Des Lynam and Frank Bough during a celebration transmission to mark the 40th anniversary of the sports programme

Grandstand presenters (left to right) Steve Ryder, David Coleman, Peter Dimmock, Des Lynam and Frank Bough during a celebration transmission to mark the 40th anniversary of the sports programme

Grandstand presenters (left to right) Steve Ryder, David Coleman, Peter Dimmock, Des Lynam and Frank Bough during a celebration transmission to mark the 40th anniversary of the sports programme

However he lasted just four years, growing tired of the early mornings, and moved on to the Holiday programme. 

It was that job he was sacked from after the News of the World expose.

His career never really recovered.  He presented ITV’s Rugby World Cup coverage in 2003 but it was to be his last major gig.

When he died he Bough had not been seen since a 2014 documentary on 30 years of breakfast TV. 

This post first appeared on dailymail.co.uk

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Experts reveal how a broad smile transforms face after Melania Trump photo reignites rumours

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experts reveal how a broad smile transforms face after melania trump photo reignites rumours

A photograph of Melania Trump beaming as she stepped out of Marine One sent Twitter users into a frenzy yesterday, with many suggesting it was a body double because her grin did not match her usual subtle smile. 

The conspiracy theory that Melania has a lookalike stand in for her at public events has circulated on social media for years, resurfacing whenever proponents spot a slight change in her appearance.

But now experts have revealed how a celebrity can become ‘unrecognisable’ by smiling due to ‘fat pads lifting’ and ‘skin folds moving’ in the face. 

Dr Hussain Cheema, co-founder and director of Fvce, told FEMAIL that a smile could dramatically change the appearance of a celebrity to the point where they are ‘unrecognisable’, particularly if they are normally photographed with a stonier expression.

Experts have revealed how an individual can become 'unrecognisable' by smiling due to 'fat pads lifting' and 'skin folds moving' in the face. It comes after Twitter users speculated a photograph of Melania Trump smiling proved she was using a body-double

Experts have revealed how an individual can become 'unrecognisable' by smiling due to 'fat pads lifting' and 'skin folds moving' in the face. It comes after Twitter users speculated a photograph of Melania Trump smiling proved she was using a body-double

Experts have revealed how an individual can become ‘unrecognisable’ by smiling due to ‘fat pads lifting’ and ‘skin folds moving’ in the face. It comes after Twitter users speculated a photograph of Melania Trump smiling proved she was using a body-double

The conspiracy theory that Melania has a lookalike stand in for her at public events has been circulated on social media for years, resurfacing whenever proponents spot a slight change in her appearance

The conspiracy theory that Melania has a lookalike stand in for her at public events has been circulated on social media for years, resurfacing whenever proponents spot a slight change in her appearance

The conspiracy theory that Melania has a lookalike stand in for her at public events has been circulated on social media for years, resurfacing whenever proponents spot a slight change in her appearance

Dr Hussain Cheema said the contracting facial muscles in the lower half of Melania's face, compared with her moving skin folds, can mean the First Lady's face dramatically changes when she smiles

Dr Hussain Cheema said the contracting facial muscles in the lower half of Melania's face, compared with her moving skin folds, can mean the First Lady's face dramatically changes when she smiles

Dr Hussain Cheema said the contracting facial muscles in the lower half of Melania's face, compared with her moving skin folds, can mean the First Lady's face dramatically changes when she smiles

Dr Hussain Cheema said the contracting facial muscles in the lower half of Melania's face, compared with her moving skin folds, can mean the First Lady's face dramatically changes when she smiles

Dr Hussain Cheema said the contracting facial muscles in the lower half of Melania’s face can mean the First Lady’s face dramatically changes when she smiles (left, and right)

He revealed: ‘Any facial expression requires use of our facial muscles. When we smile, muscles contract in the lower face to showcase our grin. 

‘In doing so, overlying fat pads over the cheeks get lifted and push against our eyes making them appear smaller.’

Meanwhile he added that skin folds within the face will become more apparent with the movement of a broad smile.

He explained: ‘Certain skin folds also appear on the face that would otherwise be hidden in a neutral facial position. 

The expert also revealed skin folds within the face will become more apparent with the movement of a broad smile

The expert also revealed skin folds within the face will become more apparent with the movement of a broad smile

The expert also revealed skin folds within the face will become more apparent with the movement of a broad smile

The expert also revealed skin folds within the face will become more apparent with the movement of a broad smile

The expert also revealed skin folds within the face will become more apparent with the movement of a broad smile (pictured left, Melania with a relaxed face, and right, smiling) 

‘Altogether, the combination of movement and skin folds can sometimes change ones appearance completely – with some people being referred to as unrecognisable when compared to a photo of them with no expression.’

Meanwhile Dr Hussain went on to comment on several celebrities who may be best known for their scowling expressions, but whose appearance is dramatically altered when they are snapped smiling.

He explained Victoria Beckham’s smile causes her cheeks to become more plump because the fat pads in her face get lifted. 

Dr Hussain Cheema revealed skin folds between the corners of Victoria Beckham's mouth and nose made the features appear 'more prominent' when she smiles

Dr Hussain Cheema revealed skin folds between the corners of Victoria Beckham's mouth and nose made the features appear 'more prominent' when she smiles

Dr Hussain Cheema revealed skin folds between the corners of Victoria Beckham's mouth and nose made the features appear 'more prominent' when she smiles

Dr Hussain Cheema revealed skin folds between the corners of Victoria Beckham's mouth and nose made the features appear 'more prominent' when she smiles

Dr Hussain Cheema, Co-founder and director of Fvce, said movements to skin folds in the face can have a dramatic impact on an individual’s facial features (pictured left , Victoria Beckham). He revealed skin folds between the corners of her mouth and nose made the features appear ‘more prominent’ when she smiles (right)

The expert said a person's facial features could be 'changed completely' by the 'combination of movement and skin folds' caused by a smile

The expert said a person's facial features could be 'changed completely' by the 'combination of movement and skin folds' caused by a smile

The expert said a person's facial features could be 'changed completely' by the 'combination of movement and skin folds' caused by a smile (

The expert said a person's facial features could be 'changed completely' by the 'combination of movement and skin folds' caused by a smile (

The expert said a person’s facial features could be ‘changed completely’ by the ‘combination of movement and skin folds’ caused by a smile (pictured left, Anna Wintour, and right, the Vogue editor-in-chief smiling) 

Meanwhile Dr Hussain also revealed designers and child stars Mary-Kate and Ashley Olsen appear dramatically different when smiling, which makes their eyes 'smaller' and also elongates the face

Meanwhile Dr Hussain also revealed designers and child stars Mary-Kate and Ashley Olsen appear dramatically different when smiling, which makes their eyes 'smaller' and also elongates the face

Meanwhile Dr Hussain also revealed designers and child stars Mary-Kate and Ashley Olsen appear dramatically different when smiling, which makes their eyes 'smaller' and also elongates the face

Meanwhile Dr Hussain also revealed designers and child stars Mary-Kate and Ashley Olsen appear dramatically different when smiling, which makes their eyes 'smaller' and also elongates the face

Meanwhile Dr Hussain also revealed designers and child stars Mary-Kate and Ashley Olsen appear dramatically different when smiling, which makes their eyes ‘smaller’ and also elongates the face 

He added: ‘Skin folds between the corners of the mouth and the nose appear, aka nasolabial folds, more prominent.’

What is the body double theory? 

The unfounded body double theory began in October 2017 when Twitter users zeroed in on footage of Melania standing behind her husband as he spoke to reporters about hurricane relief for Puerto Rico.

During the briefing, Trump pointed out the presence of his wife even though she was standing in clear view of the cameras.

‘My wife, Melania, who happens to be right here,’ he said.

Conspirators based their body double speculation on that comment, saying that he mentioned her presence to cover for the fact that she was actually somewhere else.

They also claimed that Melania didn’t look like herself in the footage, specifically questioning the shape of her nose.

The theory re-emerged in August 2018 when the president and his wife visited Ohio, and Twitter users claimed that Melania’s hair was parted the wrong way and thus it wasn’t her.

 

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Meanwhile Dr Hussain also revealed how Mary-Kate and Ashley Olsen have similar transformations when pictured smiling.

He explained: ‘What’s interesting to note is also how the lifting of cheeks when we smile make the eyes appear smaller. 

‘When Ashley is seen smiling, her jaw is slightly open which elongates the face giving it a more feminine appearance.’

Dr Hussain’s comments come after rumors were sparked over the weekend about Melania using a body double due to a new photograph of her smiling. 

The speculation was fueled by a photo of Melania and her husband Donald Trump boarding Marine One on Thursday on their way to the final presidential debate. 

Melania is seen wearing large sunglasses and a broad smile that some Twitter users believe did not match her usual subtle grin. 

The theory doesn’t hold up when compared to other photos of Melania taken minutes earlier, which clearly show its her and not an impostor. 

But Twitter users seized on the theory anyway as #FakeMelania began trending.  

‘The only thing I’ll miss from this administration is them swapping in new Melanias and just pretending we won’t notice like a 4-year-old with a guppy,’ one man tweeted. 

‘I never believed the #FakeMelania conspiracies, but you can tell this 100% isn’t her, because she’s looking fondly at a Christmas tree in the distance.’

‘I was planning on getting a good night’s sleep but now I’m freaked out by fake Melania OMG,’ a woman added.  

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His comments come after Twitter users were sent into a frenzy by photographs of Melania Trump smiling

His comments come after Twitter users were sent into a frenzy by photographs of Melania Trump smiling

His comments come after Twitter users were sent into a frenzy by photographs of Melania Trump smiling 

This post first appeared on dailymail.co.uk

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Covid fraudsters caught selling masks offering no protection and UV lights that do not kill viruses

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covid fraudsters caught selling masks offering no protection and uv lights that do not kill viruses

Covid-19 fraudsters have been caught selling face masks that offer no protection, UV lights that do not kill viruses and gadgets that falsely claim to ‘sterilise the air’. 

An urgent warning has been issued to shoppers to avoid buying any of the products that were found on sale by trading standards watchdogs in West Sussex. 

Basic face coverings claiming to be made to a ‘KN95’ standard were purchased by officers in 23 high street shops across the county including Chichester, Burgess Hill, Crawley and Horsham.

The report says that ‘KN95’ is a standard used in China and is not recognised in the UK as providing any form of virus protection.

Disposable face coverings claiming to be made to a 'KN95' standard, pictured above, a standard used in China, were purchased by officers in 23 high street shops across West Sussex

Disposable face coverings claiming to be made to a 'KN95' standard, pictured above, a standard used in China, were purchased by officers in 23 high street shops across West Sussex

Disposable face coverings claiming to be made to a ‘KN95’ standard, pictured above, a standard used in China, were purchased by officers in 23 high street shops across West Sussex

In a safety alert, the Health and Safety Executive (HSE), a UK government agency, warns that masks can only be sold or supplied as PPE if they are CE marked.

It adds that KN95 ‘must not be used as PPE at work’ unless the supply ‘has been agreed by HSE as the Market Surveillance Authority’. 

Officers are tracing the supply chain back to the importers and advising the sellers about not stocking products making misleading claims.

Products which claim to kill 99 per cent of viruses using UV lights were also found online, coming in the form of wands that move over surfaces and a box which disinfects items such as mobile phones.

Officers sent a selection of these products for testing and these claims were shown to be false. 

In one example the levels of UV emitted were so low it would have taken at least 12 hours to kill 99 per cent of viruses – which the advertising claimed happened in 5 minutes.

A card which claims to ‘sterilise the air’ around the user by emitting chlorine dioxide was also found for sale on UK online platforms by officers. There is no scientific basis for this.

Trading Standards informed the Office of Product Safety and Standards who have ensured online market places do not list these products. 

The Health and Safety Executive (HSE) says that KN95, above, 'must not be used as PPE at work' unless supply 'has been agreed by HSE as the Market Surveillance Authority'

The Health and Safety Executive (HSE) says that KN95, above, 'must not be used as PPE at work' unless supply 'has been agreed by HSE as the Market Surveillance Authority'

The Health and Safety Executive (HSE) says that KN95, above, ‘must not be used as PPE at work’ unless supply ‘has been agreed by HSE as the Market Surveillance Authority’

Peter Aston, Trading Standards Team Manager, said: ‘We are working hard to ensure residents looking to protect themselves from coronavirus are not lured into purchases by false information.

‘All of these products were falsely labelled. Not only would purchasing one of these lead to unnecessary expenditure, it could also make the buyer feel protected from the virus and therefore less likely to take other precautions such as social distancing and frequent hand washing.’

Deborah Urquhart, a Member for Environment at West Sussex County Council, said: ‘I would like to thank Trading Standards officers for uncovering these products. 

‘The best way to protect ourselves and our communities from coronavirus is to continue to wash our hands regularly, keep socially distanced, wear a face mask where appropriate and get tested when we have symptoms.’

This post first appeared on dailymail.co.uk

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