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Consultant anaesthetist was punched in face by ex-wife

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consultant anaesthetist was punched in face by ex wife

A doctor was punched in the face by his ex-wife outside the £450,000 countryside home he shared with a hospital nurse with whom he’d had an affair, a court heard.

Consultant anaesthetist Dr Anthony Doyle was ‘shocked’ when Vicki Doyle struck him with a clenched fist to the side of the face after he called her a ‘psychopath’ in an ugly row.

The couple had been married for 20 years and had two children together before Mr Doyle had an affair with hospital nurse Sarah Williams in 2018.

Tensions boiled over in January when Mrs Doyle, an NHS administrator, took their daughter to see her father  at his home in Bradford Peverell, Dorset, after the two had an argument over the phone.

When the teenager became upset on the doorstep the 53-year-old got out of her car to intervene.

During the ensuing argument, he repeatedly called Mrs Doyle a psychopath, magistrates heard.

She struck him across the face and Ms Williams, who was inside the house at the time, called the police. 

Mrs Doyle was arrested and later charged with assault by beating. She denied the charge, but was found guilty following a magistrates’ court trial. 

In January this year Mrs Doyle (pictured), an NHS administrator, took their daughter to see her father after the two had an argument over the phone.

In January this year Mrs Doyle (pictured), an NHS administrator, took their daughter to see her father after the two had an argument over the phone.

Dr Anthony Doyle (pictured) was ¿shocked¿ when Vicki Doyle struck him with a clenched fist to the side of the face after he called her a ¿psychopath¿ in an ugly row

Dr Anthony Doyle (pictured) was ¿shocked¿ when Vicki Doyle struck him with a clenched fist to the side of the face after he called her a ¿psychopath¿ in an ugly row

Dr Anthony Doyle (pictured right) was ‘shocked’ when Vicki Doyle (pictured left) struck him with a clenched fist to the side of the face after he called her a ‘psychopath’ in an ugly row

Tensions boiled over in January outside Dr Doyle's home in Bradford Peverell, Dorset (pictured)

Tensions boiled over in January outside Dr Doyle's home in Bradford Peverell, Dorset (pictured)

Tensions boiled over in January outside Dr Doyle’s home in Bradford Peverell, Dorset (pictured)

Harrison Willis, prosecuting, told Poole Magistrates’ Court: ‘Mr Doyle was at home with his partner Sarah Williams and had been on the phone to his daughter.

‘Following that she and the defendant arrived at the address. He invited his daughter in but things got heated.

‘He made comments along the lines of ‘you’re behaving like a psychopath’.

‘At this point the crown say the defendant hit her ex-partner once to the side of his face.’

Giving evidence, Mr Doyle, who works at the Dorset County Hospital in Dorchester, said the punch nearly knocked him to the ground.

He said: ‘My daughter was actually walking away and the next thing I knew I felt a punch on my right cheek.

Dr Doyle was living in the home in the Dorset village, pictured, with nurse Sarah Williams, whom he had had an affair with in 2018

Dr Doyle was living in the home in the Dorset village, pictured, with nurse Sarah Williams, whom he had had an affair with in 2018

Dr Doyle was living in the home in the Dorset village, pictured, with nurse Sarah Williams, whom he had had an affair with in 2018

‘It nearly knocked me over and was with a clenched fist. I fell back and felt shocked and surprised. I was not expecting it.

‘There was physical pain but no lasting injuries and no medical attention was needed.’

Mr Doyle initially made no mention of the affair but admitted it when pressed by defence solicitor Lee Christmas.

Mr Christmas said: ‘You’ve said that the relationship ended in December 2018 and your relationship with Sarah Williams began two years ago but that is not strictly true is it?

‘Is it not true that the marriage ended because you had an affair with your current partner?’

Mr Doyle responded: ‘Yes, that is true.’

Mrs Doyle admitted that she ‘lashed out’ but said she acted to protect herself and her daughter from verbal abuse.

She also called on the legal system to treat mental injuries as seriously as physical injuries.

Giving evidence, Mr Doyle, who works at the Dorset County Hospital in Dorchester, said the punch nearly knocked him to the ground

Giving evidence, Mr Doyle, who works at the Dorset County Hospital in Dorchester, said the punch nearly knocked him to the ground

Giving evidence, Mr Doyle, who works at the Dorset County Hospital in Dorchester, said the punch nearly knocked him to the ground

She told magistrates: ‘This is someone I spent 26 years with and I hung on his every word.

‘When he tells me I have a personality disorder, I believe him.

‘If I had gone to his house, knocked on his door and slapped him in the face then I would understand all this but that is not what happened.

‘I lashed out to protect my little girl and myself.

‘People can harm you with more than fists and that is something the legal system should take into account.’

After hearing all the evidence over the two hour trial, magistrates found Mrs Doyle guilty of assault by beating.

She was handed a 12 month suspended sentence and a year-long restraining order preventing any contact with Mr Doyle.

She was also ordered to pay £321 in costs to the court.

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Accountancy firm EY faces ‘Arthur Andersen moment’

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accountancy firm ey faces arthur andersen moment

Accountancy giant EY is under fire from multiple fronts after it emerged a whistleblower raised the alarm about possible fraud at Wirecard four years ago. 

Politicians and angry investors lined up to condemn the Big Four accountants, which were said to be facing their own ‘Arthur Anderson moment’.  

EY was dragged further into the Wirecard scandal this week when the Financial Times published claims that a whistleblower flagged signs of potential fraud in 2016.

The accountancy firm audited Wirecard’s books for more than a decade until the German payment company went bust this year after admitting that £1.7billion had vanished.

Accountancy giant EY is under fire from multiple fronts after it emerged a whistleblower raised the alarm about fraud at Wirecard four years ago

Accountancy giant EY is under fire from multiple fronts after it emerged a whistleblower raised the alarm about fraud at Wirecard four years ago

Accountancy giant EY is under fire from multiple fronts after it emerged a whistleblower raised the alarm about fraud at Wirecard four years ago

Green MP Danyal Bayaz said EY will be under the spotlight when Bundestag members drill down into the Wirecard affair next week. 

And Fabio De Masi MP, who represents the leftwing Die Linke party, said: ‘In a worst-case scenario, EY could face its Arthur Andersen moment,’ a nod to the auditors of Enron which famously collapsed after the energy giant emerged to be a fraud. 

Claims that the whistleblower highlighted fraud but this was supposedly not acted upon was branded ‘just unbelievable’ by a Wirecard investor, who told the FT if true it paves the way for them to sue EY for massive losses.

The allegations, which also included a bribery attempt of an EY employee in India, reportedly surfaced in a special audit into Wirecard by rival accountancy firm KPMG, which has been seen by the FT.

The accountancy firm audited Wirecard's books for more than a decade until the German payment company went bust this year after admitting that £1.7billion had vanished

The accountancy firm audited Wirecard's books for more than a decade until the German payment company went bust this year after admitting that £1.7billion had vanished

The accountancy firm audited Wirecard’s books for more than a decade until the German payment company went bust this year after admitting that £1.7billion had vanished 

Heribert Hirte, an MP for Angela Merkel’s CDU, said: ‘The new claims are likely to make it much harder for EY to prove that its annual audits were conducted properly and that the audit opinions were in line with the law.’ 

EY has acknowledged that issues relating to potential fraud and bribery concerns were flagged by an employee.

But it insists that the claims were thoroughly investigated by the accountancy firm as well as forensic teams.   

In January 2019, Wirecard was hit by allegations in the FT that its Singapore office made fake book-keeping entries to ‘pad’ its revenues.

EY investigated those claims and gave Wirecard management a clean bill of health. 

Further allegations – including that the finance team sought to inflate sales and profits at its units in Ireland and Dubai – led Wirecard to hire KPMG last autumn to conduct an outside audit.   

This post first appeared on dailymail.co.uk

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Anglia Ruskin university paid Instagram influencer graduates to promote its degrees

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anglia ruskin university paid instagram influencer graduates to promote its degrees

Instagram influences were paid to promote a university’s degree courses as part of a campaign to attract A-Level students – despite not being enrolled there.

Bosses at Anglia Ruskin University in Cambridge say a dozen life-style, fashion and travel influencers were paid to promote the institution on Instagram in the weeks leading to this year’s A Level results.

Many of the posts carried captions that gushed about how important their time at university was. 

However many of those promoting ARU did not actually study at Anglia Ruskin, university chiefs have admitted.

They have also defended the marketing tactic, saying the Instagram posts were marked up as an ‘Ad’ and focus on the ‘wider benefits of considering a university education’.

Bosses at Anglia Ruskin University in Cambridge (pictured) say a dozen life-style, fashion and travel influencers were paid to promote the institution on Instagram in the weeks leading to this year's A Level results

Bosses at Anglia Ruskin University in Cambridge (pictured) say a dozen life-style, fashion and travel influencers were paid to promote the institution on Instagram in the weeks leading to this year's A Level results

Bosses at Anglia Ruskin University in Cambridge (pictured) say a dozen life-style, fashion and travel influencers were paid to promote the institution on Instagram in the weeks leading to this year’s A Level results

Many of the posts carried captions that gushed about how important their time at university was.  Travel blogger Lauren (pictured), who runs the Instagram account 'Spain With Lauren', also promoted Anglia Ruskin to her 10,400 followers - but with no mention of having studied there

Many of the posts carried captions that gushed about how important their time at university was.  Travel blogger Lauren (pictured), who runs the Instagram account 'Spain With Lauren', also promoted Anglia Ruskin to her 10,400 followers - but with no mention of having studied there

Many of the posts carried captions that gushed about how important their time at university was.  Travel blogger Lauren (pictured), who runs the Instagram account ‘Spain With Lauren’, also promoted Anglia Ruskin to her 10,400 followers – but with no mention of having studied there

The promotions were shared on A-Level results day and were aimed at students who did not get the grades for their first choice of university, and had to go through clearing.

Influencers who promoted Anglia Ruskin included travel and lifestyle blogger Mariana Alonso, who has a following of 82,800.

She graduated seven years ago as an engineer from Faculdades Integradas de Cataguases, in Brazil.

Travel blogger Lauren, who runs the Instagram account ‘Spain With Lauren’, also promoted Anglia Ruskin to her 10,400 followers – but with no mention of having studied there.  

In her post, which included a picture of her and her partner in Spain, she said: ‘And to think, really, a degree is what made this all possible.

‘Alex studied sports at university which has opened up so many doors for us, in terms of heading into teaching.

She added: ‘It’s given us the flexibility to live and work wherever his job takes him.’ 

Meanwhile, travel, fashion and lifestyle influencer Grace Bee, who has 5,764 followers, admitted that she did not study at Anglia Ruskin – but promoting them was a ‘business transaction’.

In her post, which included a picture of her holding a camera, she said university had help her leave her comfort zone and that it is ‘never too late to learn something new’.

She told Vice: ‘For me personally, it was a business transaction.

Influencers who promoted Anglia Ruskin included travel and lifestyle blogger Mariana Alonso (pictured), who has a following of 82,800

Influencers who promoted Anglia Ruskin included travel and lifestyle blogger Mariana Alonso (pictured), who has a following of 82,800

Influencers who promoted Anglia Ruskin included travel and lifestyle blogger Mariana Alonso (pictured), who has a following of 82,800

Meanwhile, travel, fashion and lifestyle influencer Grace Bee (pictured), who has 5,764 followers, admitted that she did not study at Anglia Ruskin - but promoting them was a 'business transaction'

Meanwhile, travel, fashion and lifestyle influencer Grace Bee (pictured), who has 5,764 followers, admitted that she did not study at Anglia Ruskin - but promoting them was a 'business transaction'

Meanwhile, travel, fashion and lifestyle influencer Grace Bee (pictured), who has 5,764 followers, admitted that she did not study at Anglia Ruskin – but promoting them was a ‘business transaction’

‘However, I’m quite picky with the brands I work with and I would never promote a brand I didn’t believe in.

‘Although I didn’t study at Anglia Ruskin, I think my time in further education was really formative so I was more than happy to promote it to my followers.’

Anglia Ruskin is one of the universities which spends the most money on marketing – in one year alone, they spent £1.19million on social media, search engines and print. 

A spokesperson for Anglia Ruskin University said: ‘We strongly believe in widening participation and a high proportion of our students are the first in their family to attend university.

‘Our Instagram partners talk about how their university experiences and qualifications have helped to transform their own lives – sometimes in quite radical ways.

‘These posts, all written by the individuals themselves and clearly marked with an ‘ad’ tag, focus on the wider benefits of considering a university education.’

Last year, the Competition and Markets Authority (CMA) made an order for major stars in the UK to be more transparent over their endorsement deals when posting to social media

Last year, the Competition and Markets Authority (CMA) made an order for major stars in the UK to be more transparent over their endorsement deals when posting to social media

Last year, the Competition and Markets Authority (CMA) made an order for major stars in the UK to be more transparent over their endorsement deals when posting to social media

Last year, the Competition and Markets Authority (CMA) made an order for major stars in the UK to be more transparent over their endorsement deals when posting to social media. 

Influencers who do not clearly declare if they have been paid or received products as gifts they endorse, they could be in breach of consumer protection law.

Posts containing advertising must, by law, be flagged with the hashtag #ad, #sponsored or #freebie in a ‘prominent’ position on each individual post – as was done with the posts relating to Anglia Ruskin University.

All content that includes adverts or discount codes and provides a form of payment, whether monetary or in the shape of free gifts, must also be declared. 

In 2019, a number of top stars including singer Rita Ora, model Alexa Chung and Made in Chelsea star Louise Thompson pledged to declare their Instagram advertisements.

In August last year it was revealed that the platform itself was beginning to conduct tests in which some users will see advertisements in the story section of the app, back-to-back.

Speaking at the time, a spokesperson for Facebook — Instagram’s parent company — said that the test was meant to give users a more seamless experience.

However, it was reported that Facebook was believed to have instructed the photo and video-sharing platform to serve users ‘roughly double’ the amount of ads to bolster revenue.

This post first appeared on dailymail.co.uk

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Trained solicitor, 41, fails in ‘unusual’ court bid to force his parents to continue to support him

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trained solicitor 41 fails in unusual court bid to force his parents to continue to support him

A qualified lawyer has failed in an ‘unprecedented’ bid to force his wealthy parents to keep supporting him.

The man, a trained solicitor who has mental health disabilities and is currently unemployed, said his parents had ‘nurtured his dependency’ on them and that he was vulnerable.

The 41-year-old from London said his parents had recently ‘significantly reduced’ the financial support they had given down the years after his relationship with them deteriorated.

The man, who has not been identified, wanted a judge to rule they should continue to support him.

Lawyers representing the man argued that a judge had powers to order parents to provide support and cited laws relating to marriage and children.

His parents said the claim should be dismissed.

A trained solicitor has failed in a bid to force his wealthy parents to keep supporting him, in a case described as 'most unusual' by a judge. Library image of a wallet with money in it

A trained solicitor has failed in a bid to force his wealthy parents to keep supporting him, in a case described as 'most unusual' by a judge. Library image of a wallet with money in it

A trained solicitor has failed in a bid to force his wealthy parents to keep supporting him, in a case described as ‘most unusual’ by a judge. Library image of a wallet with money in it

Sir James Munby ruled against the man after considering arguments at a remote family court hearing.

He ruled that the man had ‘no case’.

The judge, who outlined detail of the case in a ruling published online on Wednesday, described the claim as ‘most unusual’ and, as far as he knew, ‘unprecedented’.

Sir James has not named the people involved, but said the man lived in London and his parents in Dubai.

‘His parents have supported him financially down the years and continue, to some extent, to do so,’ said Sir James in his ruling.

‘They have permitted him to live in a flat in central London, of which they are the registered proprietors, and in relation to which they have until recently been paying the utility bills.

‘Of late… the relationship between the applicant and his parents – in particular, it would appear, his father – has deteriorated and the financial support they are prepared to offer has significantly reduced.

‘He characterises their stance as seemingly being that, having in fact – whether wittingly or unwittingly – nurtured his dependency on them for the last 20 years or so – with the consequence that he is, so it is said, now completely dependent on them – they now seek to cast that dependency on to the state.’

The judge said he was satisfied the man had ‘no case’ and added: ‘His applications should be summarily dismissed.’

This post first appeared on dailymail.co.uk

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