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Coronavirus UK: Test that delivers results in 15 MINUTES is being developed by British manufacturers

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coronavirus uk test that delivers results in 15 minutes is being developed by british manufacturers

Britain could be carrying out a million coronavirus tests per day by Christmas with results in just 15 minutes, a scientist working on the testing scheme has said. 

The source, who was not named, revealed the government is buying new machines capable of processing 150,000 tests per day with the aim of trebling the current capacity of 300,000.

Separately, trials of pregnancy-style tests which could provide results in just 15 minutes will begin in northern hotspots from next week.

‘It’s going pretty well,’ the scientist told The Times. ‘They have really scaled up their capabilities. By Christmas we’ll be at a million a day, I think.  

Prime Minister Boris Johnson during a media briefing in Downing Street, London, on Friday. He said the new tests were 'faster, simpler and cheaper' and that work was being done to ensure they could be manufactured and distributed in the UK

Prime Minister Boris Johnson during a media briefing in Downing Street, London, on Friday. He said the new tests were 'faster, simpler and cheaper' and that work was being done to ensure they could be manufactured and distributed in the UK

Prime Minister Boris Johnson during a media briefing in Downing Street, London, on Friday. He said the new tests were ‘faster, simpler and cheaper’ and that work was being done to ensure they could be manufactured and distributed in the UK

‘That seems perfectly possible.’  

Mr Johnson told a No 10 press conference on Friday that the new tests were ‘faster, simpler and cheaper’ and that work was being done to ensure they could be manufactured and distributed in the UK.  

The Government has already set a target of 500,000 tests a day by the end of October and ministers spent more than £500 million in the last two weeks on laboratory-based machines that could more than triple the Government’s capacity of 300,000 tests a day. 

‘We are now testing more people than any other country in Europe but we always want to go further,’ Mr Johnson said on Friday.

‘Scientists and companies in Britain and around the world have been developing new tests which are faster, simpler and cheaper.

‘We’ve already bought millions of these tests, some of which are very simple, meaning you simply need to wipe the swab inside your mouth and can give a result as quickly as in 15 minutes.’

The Government has already set a target of 500,000 tests a day by the end of October and ministers spent more than £500 million in the last two weeks on laboratory-based machines that could more than triple the Government's capacity. Pictured, a self-test kit

The Government has already set a target of 500,000 tests a day by the end of October and ministers spent more than £500 million in the last two weeks on laboratory-based machines that could more than triple the Government's capacity. Pictured, a self-test kit

The Government has already set a target of 500,000 tests a day by the end of October and ministers spent more than £500 million in the last two weeks on laboratory-based machines that could more than triple the Government’s capacity. Pictured, a self-test kit

‘We’ve started building the infrastructure for domestic manufacture of these tests, ensuring that Britain has the ability to produce millions of fast tests here.

‘Over the next few weeks we will start distributing and trialling these tests across the country.’

The Government said that hospitals in Manchester, Liverpool, Birmingham, Leeds, Newcastle, Basingstoke and Southampton will test asymptomatic NHS staff, and use the data to assist with Track and Trace.

These pilots will see individuals tested weekly as a minimum.

In addition, trials of new ‘lateral flow tests’ – swab tests that do not require lab processing and can be returned within an hour – would be sent to adult social care settings, schools and universities in the hardest hit areas.

Mr Johnson said that Liverpool, Lancashire, and any other areas which enter the ‘very high’ alert level would be ‘immediately prioritised’ for fast turnaround tests.

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The Government said that hospitals in Manchester, Liverpool, Birmingham, Leeds, Newcastle, Basingstoke and Southampton will test asymptomatic NHS staff, and use the data to assist with Track and Trace. Pictured, a walk through test centre in Stirling that opened last week

The Government said that hospitals in Manchester, Liverpool, Birmingham, Leeds, Newcastle, Basingstoke and Southampton will test asymptomatic NHS staff, and use the data to assist with Track and Trace. Pictured, a walk through test centre in Stirling that opened last week

The Government said that hospitals in Manchester, Liverpool, Birmingham, Leeds, Newcastle, Basingstoke and Southampton will test asymptomatic NHS staff, and use the data to assist with Track and Trace. Pictured, a walk through test centre in Stirling that opened last week

The Government will also make tests available to local public health directors to help control localised outbreaks.

But Mr Johnson warned that a ‘cautious’ approach should be taken to the new technology.

‘No country in the world is regularly testing millions of people so we need to take the time to establish how to do this effectively and safely and to build the logistics and distribution operation,’ he said.

‘We won’t be able to get testing to get business back to normal quickly.

‘In time we want to use tests to keep open more parts of the economy that have sadly been closed but it is crucial that we make sure such systems work safely,

‘I must level with you that it will take time to get this right before many organisations can buy and operate these tests themselves.’

Meanwhile, London’s transport network could grind to a halt this weekend after mayor Sadiq Khan demanded a cash injection to keep it running. Khan was accused of ‘playing games’ today after claiming ministers are demanding he extends the congestion zone to get a £1billion bailout.

Staff member Ewen Smart (left) gets his QR code scanned during a demonstration on how to do the self-test kit at a walk-through Covid test centre at The Engine Shed, Stirling

Staff member Ewen Smart (left) gets his QR code scanned during a demonstration on how to do the self-test kit at a walk-through Covid test centre at The Engine Shed, Stirling

Staff member Ewen Smart (left) gets his QR code scanned during a demonstration on how to do the self-test kit at a walk-through Covid test centre at The Engine Shed, Stirling

He faced fury over suggestions the government made the move a condition of the latest extraordinary cash injection to keep Transport for London from grinding to a halt, amid fears that could happen as early as this weekend.

Further anger has stemmed from data revealing Devon, Oxford and Coventry all have higher coronavirus infection rates than London but will face no lockdown rules when the capital moves into Tier Two tomorrow. 

Mayor Khan was accused of egging the Government on to toughen its stance in the capital. 

Health Secretary Matt Hancock and Khan yesterday confirmed a ban on people meeting in indoor spaces will begin at midnight tonight in the city. 

The tough social distancing rule mirrors what is in place in Covid hotspots in the North of England, where the country’s second wave is running rampant. 

Staff collect samples at a drive through test centre in Leicester. Some 136 deaths and 15,635 confirmed cases in the UK were announced on Friday

Staff collect samples at a drive through test centre in Leicester. Some 136 deaths and 15,635 confirmed cases in the UK were announced on Friday

Staff collect samples at a drive through test centre in Leicester. Some 136 deaths and 15,635 confirmed cases in the UK were announced on Friday

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But London’s infection rate is significantly lower than in those areas, and is below the average for the country as a whole, which is approximately 160 cases per 100,000. 

It is lower even than other areas that don’t have any extra rules at all, abiding only by social distancing and the rule of six, according to Department of Health statistics. 

Some 136 deaths and 15,635 confirmed cases in the UK were announced on Friday. 

While the 32 boroughs of London recorded an average of 99 Covid-19 cases per 100,000 people in the week up to October 10, the figure was 159 in Coventry and 154 in Oxford during the same period.

Not a single borough of London currently has an infection rate that high, with the 147 in Ealing the city’s highest. 

It stood at 146 per 100,000 in Bristol, in Bournemouth there were 139 cases per 100,000, in Bath 115 and in Devon – driven by an outbreak in the university city of Exeter, where the rate is nearly 400 – the average was 106. 

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All those areas are in the South of England which is not facing any regional restrictions like the Midlands, North West and North East are, where some areas with lower infection rates are locked down to protect them from nearby outbreaks. 

The entire of London may be heading into lockdown earlier than other areas – most of which have had significantly higher infection rates before facing new rules – because outbreaks can spread faster between boroughs because the population moves around so much.

A third of English councils saw a FALL in coronavirus cases last week 

Almost a third of England’s councils saw a drop in coronavirus infections last week amid calls for a second circuit-breaker lockdown and tightening restrictions across the country.

As many as 41 out of 149 councils recorded a fall in their Covid-19 infection rates in the week ending October 11, according to Public Health England’s weekly surveillance report. For comparison, only two saw a dip last week.

And only eight registered a surge in cases of more than 50 per cent – more than 13 times less than the week before when 109 local authorities saw major spikes, suggesting the second wave may be slowing down.

The biggest dip was recorded in the city of Manchester – which the Government is threatening with a tier three lockdown – with a 22 per cent fall in infections from 557.8 to 433.8 cases per 100,000 people.

Southend-on-sea saw the second largest fall, with a 20.5 per cent dip from 42.6 to 33.9 cases per 100,000 people. Slough, outside London, came third with a 19 per cent drop in infections from 86.9 to 70.2 per 100,000.

But many areas still recorded rises in infections – although none saw rates double compared to the 52 areas that recorded this surge last week.

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The decision to place London into a Tier Two lockdown today sparked fears around 200,000 people in the city’s centre could lose their jobs in hospitality this weekend. An industry spokesman warned the drastic restrictions would see a ‘maximum squeeze on revenue and no support’. 

It comes as Lancashire heads into Tier 3 – meaning pubs and bars will be required to close with restaurants only allowed to serve customers who also order ‘substanial’ meals. The county has its last night of freedom before the rules are put in place at midnight.

Lancashire joins Liverpool as the only areas in the top bracket, which means a ban on household mixing indoors and in gardens. Thousands of venues are expected to be closed from midnight tonight, with casinos, betting shops and car boot sales given another 48 hours’ grace. 

The Department of Health said there would be a £12million support package in Lancashire as well as more money for an economic recovery ‘task force’ over the next six months. Local sources claimed in total it could be worth £30million. 

Meanwhile, sources close to Mr Khan said he was bravely resisting spreading the congestion zone to the North and South circulars, which would force up to three million citizens to pay £15 to use their cars. 

But senior Tories raged that actually the mayor went to the Treasury with a ‘begging bowl’. 

They said he was told he needed to find some savings to help balance the books after years of mismanagement. They insisted it was up to him how the money was found. 

In other coronavirus news, motorists were seen driving freely into Wales from England as the 6pm coronavirus travel ban came into force this evening.

The ban – which was described as ‘unenforceable’ by the Police Federation earlier this week – makes it an offence to travel to Wales from coronavirus hotspots in the UK.

But there was no sign of any high visibility patrols to deter travel from Merseyside.

Only a handful of mobile homes were seen on the main A55 dual carriageway coming into North Wales as the movement restriction went into force.

Meanwhile Welsh First Minister Mark Drakeford said he was ‘looking very carefully’ at whether to bring in a ‘circuit-breaker’ lockdown in an effort to stop the spread of the virus.

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If he goes ahead with the proposals to shut bars and restaurants temporarily, it would leave England as the only UK nation not to have such blanket measures in place.

Despite the latest travel rules, it has been confirmed that people from areas with high levels of coronavirus will still be allowed to enter Wales for work, education and medical care, according to legislation published by the Welsh Government.

Wales’s ban will also grant exemptions for people seeking food or medical supplies, items for essential home maintenance, moving home, and attending weddings or funerals.

Obtaining or depositing money with a business, accessing care for children or vulnerable adults, carrying out voluntary or charity work, and training as an elite athlete will also allow a person to cross into the country.

The full list of 18 exemptions, published on Friday, can be found on the Welsh Government’s website. 

This post first appeared on dailymail.co.uk

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Coronavirus UK: Fears of London gridlock before second lockdown

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coronavirus uk fears of london gridlock before second lockdown

Britons are plotting to head away from cities to rural areas during a second UK lockdown days after Paris saw huge traffic jams as people left city.

The Mail revealed last night that Boris Johnson is expected to announce a second nationwide lockdown next week.

Social media users reacted quickly to say they would flee London and other cities for the countryside before the new restrictions are put in place.

Piers Corbyn and a small number of anti-lockdown protesters were also on the streets of London last night.  

It comes as the roads out of Paris were jammed on Thursday after France‘s second lockdown was ordered yesterday.

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Britons have claimed they will head away to rural areas for the second UK lockdown days after Paris saw huge traffic jams as people left city

Britons have claimed they will head away to rural areas for the second UK lockdown days after Paris saw huge traffic jams as people left city

Britons have claimed they will head away to rural areas for the second UK lockdown days after Paris saw huge traffic jams as people left city

Social media users in the UK indicated they would act in the same way to the country’s impending lockdown.

One wrote: ‘So we got until Wednesday for Lockdown 2 rumour has it. 

‘Right the plan is: get a 24 hour covid test tomorrow, if you’re negative we takeover a great big mansion in the countryside for a month and put on shows and make movies and hangout in a giant bubble. Who’s in?’

Another said: ‘I can see a lockdown coming to London soon ….leave London now…it’s going to get horrible!!!’

One said: ‘We staying at grandmas house cus no way I’m gonna be in London in lockdown again.’

Piers Corbyn was on the streetsof London last night with a small number of anti-lockdown protesters

Piers Corbyn was on the streetsof London last night with a small number of anti-lockdown protesters

Piers Corbyn was on the streetsof London last night with a small number of anti-lockdown protesters

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Scientists from the Sage committee yesterday presented No 10 with bleak figures showing that Covid is spreading ‘significantly’ faster than even their original ‘worst-case scenario’ prediction.

Last night a Cabinet source told the Mail that the dramatic move will be announced next week. 

It was not clear exactly what form the new lockdown would take, or what would be ordered to close or how long it would last.

The Government now faces a critical weekend to determine the shape of the measures before an announcement.

The Prime Minister and Chancellor Rishi Sunak are said to have agonised over the decision because of fears it would leave the economy in tatters. 

But the scientists – backed by Health Secretary Matt Hancock and senior minister Michael Gove – told them the virus was on track to kill 85,000 this winter, and that it was too late for a so-called ‘circuit break’.

Tens of thousands of Parisians last night caused massive traffic jams in a desperate attempt to flee the French capital ahead of the start of Emmanuel Macron's new national shutdown

Tens of thousands of Parisians last night caused massive traffic jams in a desperate attempt to flee the French capital ahead of the start of Emmanuel Macron's new national shutdown

Tens of thousands of Parisians last night caused massive traffic jams in a desperate attempt to flee the French capital ahead of the start of Emmanuel Macron's new national shutdown

Tens of thousands of Parisians last night caused massive traffic jams in a desperate attempt to flee the French capital ahead of the start of Emmanuel Macron's new national shutdown

Tens of thousands of Parisians last night caused massive traffic jams in a desperate attempt to flee the French capital ahead of the start of Emmanuel Macron’s new national shutdown 

View of traffic jams in Paris as traffic records have been broken in Paris ahead of the new shutdown coming into force

View of traffic jams in Paris as traffic records have been broken in Paris ahead of the new shutdown coming into force

View of traffic jams in Paris as traffic records have been broken in Paris ahead of the new shutdown coming into force

Parisians flocked to the Gare de Lyon to avoid confining themselves to the French capital during the shutdown

Parisians flocked to the Gare de Lyon to avoid confining themselves to the French capital during the shutdown

Parisians flocked to the Gare de Lyon to avoid confining themselves to the French capital during the shutdown

It comes as Parisians fleeing for the countryside jammed the roads on Thursday ahead of France’s lockdown to slow the spread of the resurgent coronavirus.

There was only a sprinkling of people hurrying along city sidewalks Friday as the nationwide restrictions went into effect.

Dystopian images of logjams that stretched for 435 miles (700km) at one point Thursday evening – exacerbated by the upcoming long holiday weekend – were a grim sign of a return to the dark days of the spring. 

With infections hitting record levels in some countries, many are now resorting to severe restrictions again .

In France, concerns were growing that rising infections would swamp the country’s health system, so authorities ordered another four-week lockdown beginning Friday. 

There was only a sprinkling of people hurrying along city sidewalks in Paris on Friday as the nationwide restrictions went into effect

There was only a sprinkling of people hurrying along city sidewalks in Paris on Friday as the nationwide restrictions went into effect

There was only a sprinkling of people hurrying along city sidewalks in Paris on Friday as the nationwide restrictions went into effect

A man walks by the empty Tuileries gardens in the centre of Paris. French authorities ordered another four-week lockdown beginning Friday

A man walks by the empty Tuileries gardens in the centre of Paris. French authorities ordered another four-week lockdown beginning Friday

A man walks by the empty Tuileries gardens in the centre of Paris. French authorities ordered another four-week lockdown beginning Friday

Many areas of the French capital resembled a regular lazy weekend morning – on what would normally have been a bustling weekday. 

Those who were out frequently clutched permission forms proving they had an exemption that allowed them to to be on streets.

The only places that were busy were grocery stores and markets as people stockpiled food and other necessities.

All of France’s 67 million people have been ordered to stay at home at all times with no visitors, or risk steep fines or prosecution. 

There are a handful of exceptions, such as being allowed out for one hour of exercise a day within a half-mile (1km) of home, to go to medical appointments, to a place of work, or to shop for essential goods. 

Restaurants and cafes are shuttered, apart from those that offer takeout.

This post first appeared on dailymail.co.uk

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Coronavirus UK: 46% familes WILL stick to Christmas lockdown rules

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coronavirus uk 46 familes will stick to christmas lockdown rules

Almost half of families in the UK intend to stick to coronavirus rules at Christmas even if they prevent them from seeing their loved ones. 

An exclusive poll for MailOnline found 46 per cent of people said they will fully adhere to the rules and not celebrate with relatives or friends from other households indoors if that is what the restrictions in their local area demand. 

The survey of 3,000 people, conducted by Redfield & Wilton Strategies on October 28, found that just 19 per cent intend not to fully adhere to the rules and still celebrate indoors with people from outside their immediate household.  

Just over one in 10, some 14 per cent, said they would try to stick to restrictions and meet loved ones outdoors in a public space on the big day while five per cent intend to celebrate overseas and 17 per cent were unsure what they will do. 

Just 19 per cent of people said they intend not to adhere to coronavirus rules over Christmas if there is a ban on households gathering indoors

Just 19 per cent of people said they intend not to adhere to coronavirus rules over Christmas if there is a ban on households gathering indoors

Just 19 per cent of people said they intend not to adhere to coronavirus rules over Christmas if there is a ban on households gathering indoors 

The Government is facing a major headache over what to do about coronavirus rules over the Christmas period. 

Ministers believe it is inevitable that many people will travel to be with their families even if restrictions say they should not do so. 

However, there are fears that lifting the rules temporarily to allow families to meet would result in a ‘spreading event’ which would cause a significant spike in coronavirus infections. 

Today’s poll found that the nation is split on whether the Government understands the economic and social damage its lockdown restrictions are doing. 

Some 47 per cent of respondents said the Government does understand the impact on the public but 37 per cent think the Government does not. 

Meanwhile, four in ten Britons (39 per cent) said they would support restrictions like the Rule of Six being relaxed over Christmas and 31 per cent would oppose such a much.  

The debate over what to do during the Christmas period remains ongoing in Whitehall with ministers insisting that it is too early to make decisions on the matter. 

Police chiefs have said that if rules banning household mixing are in place over Christmas then officers could break up family gatherings. 

Housing Secretary Robert Jenrick said yesterday that ‘the police have a duty and a responsibility to enforce the rules’.

‘We obviously want to ensure that families can gather for Christmas,’ he told Sky News.

‘I want to be with my own family at Christmas. That is some way off.

‘What we have to do now is take action, decisive action now against the virus to give us the best possible chance of being able to achieve that and that is exactly what we are trying to do.’

Tory MPs have urged the Government to give families a ‘break’ and allow them to meet after a ‘dreadful year’.   

They also blasted the suggestion that police could crackdown on families meeting for Christmas dinner as they said ‘this is not some totalitarian state like China’.  

This post first appeared on dailymail.co.uk

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Philophobia: Low budget film hits cinemas as James Bond postponed

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philophobia low budget film hits cinemas as james bond postponed

The director of a low-budget coming of age film has said he cold-called the box office of local cinemas to get them to show his movie after the latest James Bond film was delayed.

Guy Davies, 29, from Stroud, Gloucestershire, said while Cineworlds and Picturehouses have temporarily closed, the delay of No Time To Die until 2021 has left cinemas that remain open in need of new releases – and so he decided to try his luck with his feature debut Philophobia.

He said: ‘It happened that it just created more space for us when cinemas decided to stay open.

The UK cinema industry was deeply disappointed when film bosses delayed the release of the 25th James Bond film for a second time - prompting two major chains to close down again temporarily

The UK cinema industry was deeply disappointed when film bosses delayed the release of the 25th James Bond film for a second time - prompting two major chains to close down again temporarily

The UK cinema industry was deeply disappointed when film bosses delayed the release of the 25th James Bond film for a second time – prompting two major chains to close down again temporarily

The film's director Guy Davies, 29, from Stroud, Gloucestershire, rang up cinemas across the country seeing if they would like to show his movie as many big producers are holding back their big releases or putting them online

The film's director Guy Davies, 29, from Stroud, Gloucestershire, rang up cinemas across the country seeing if they would like to show his movie as many big producers are holding back their big releases or putting them online

The film’s director Guy Davies, 29, from Stroud, Gloucestershire, rang up cinemas across the country seeing if they would like to show his movie as many big producers are holding back their big releases or putting them online

The low-budget movie is going to be shown in 50 cinemas and is loosely based on the writer-director's own life

The low-budget movie is going to be shown in 50 cinemas and is loosely based on the writer-director's own life

The low-budget movie is going to be shown in 50 cinemas and is loosely based on the writer-director’s own life

‘It’s worked out really well, I got a little bit frustrated or tired of trying to work the distribution process, we had offers but they weren’t necessarily going to be doing all the things I wanted to do with the film, so I thought “Why not?”

‘There is a space in the cinemas right now because studios are pulling their films out and we’ve got a film that has done well on the festival circuit, so I just thought I would have a crack.

‘I started with local cinemas because I was only trying to get four or five to be honest, and then once I had a few I thought maybe I should try and expand this so I went a little bit further afield.

‘Then once I got a few more I started receiving phone calls from cinema programmers saying ‘We have seen the trailer, it looks good, can we check it out?’, and it spread really quickly in matter of a few days after I got the first few.’

The film will now open in almost 50 cinemas around the UK, including in London’s Leicester Square.

He said: ‘I made a list of cinemas, starting with independent cinemas, that I thought would be good for the film, and scoured the internet for the contact details of the people who book the films and if I couldn’t find them I just rang the box office at the cinema and asked who to talk to.’

Davies has taken a DIY approach to everything about the movie, including securing funding.

He said: ‘The Stroud News And Journal have been incredibly supportive the entire way through this process.

Cinema owners hoped No Time To Die could save 2020 for the industry, but the film's producers decided to postpone its release for a second time

Cinema owners hoped No Time To Die could save 2020 for the industry, but the film's producers decided to postpone its release for a second time

Cinema owners hoped No Time To Die could save 2020 for the industry, but the film’s producers decided to postpone its release for a second time

Guy Davies said he wanted his film to be released in the cinema instead of streaming it online

Guy Davies said he wanted his film to be released in the cinema instead of streaming it online

Guy Davies said he wanted his film to be released in the cinema instead of streaming it online

‘I got in touch with them and they wrote a little piece saying I was doing this film, someone read it and got in touch and we went to a cafe and that is how I got my first chunk of money, and then I just went from there.

‘I made a list of local people that had some kind of influence or might know people that might want to invest and politely got in touch, but 90 per cent of the money was funded locally, maybe even 95 per cent per cent.’

While many films have skipped the theatrical release and gone straight to streaming, Davies said he was always determined to show his debut in cinemas.

‘It was important because it was my first film and it was shot for cinema, that is just what I did.

‘I really had cinemas in mind from the beginning, it was always part of the goal and I feel the film plays a lot better in cinemas because I made it for there.’

Philophobia is out now in UK cinemas.

This post first appeared on dailymail.co.uk

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