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‘Courageous’ D-Day veteran John Hutton dies aged 96 one year after parachuting into France

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courageous d day veteran john hutton dies aged 96 one year after parachuting into france

A D-Day veteran has died at the age of 96, the Ministry of Defence said.

John Hutton, known by his friends as Jock, was 19 when he served in the 13th Lancashire Parachute Battalion during the Second World War.

The MoD said the ‘courage and spirit’ of Mr Hutton, from Stirling, Scotland, ‘must never be forgotten’ after he died on Wednesday.

In 1944, he parachuted into Normandy and descended to the famous Pegasus Bridge on D-Day.

John Hutton, known by his friends as Jock, was 19 when he served in the 13th Lancashire Parachute Battalion during the Second World War

John Hutton, known by his friends as Jock, was 19 when he served in the 13th Lancashire Parachute Battalion during the Second World War

John Hutton, known by his friends as Jock, was 19 when he served in the 13th Lancashire Parachute Battalion during the Second World War

The Ministry of Defence shared the sad news of Mr Hutton's death on Twitter

The Ministry of Defence shared the sad news of Mr Hutton's death on Twitter

The Ministry of Defence shared the sad news of Mr Hutton’s death on Twitter

Mr Hutton replicated his descent in June last year when he parachuted into France alongside fellow ex-serviceman Harry Read.

They took off from Duxford in Cambridgeshire, landing in fields overlooked by poppies – which was also the original drop zone for the 8th (Midlands) Parachute Battalion.

He, and other paratroopers aged in their 90s, jumped from Dakota war planes over Normandy in June last year.      

Mr Hutton, and other paratroopers aged in their 90s, jumped from Dakota war planes over Normandy in June last year

Mr Hutton, and other paratroopers aged in their 90s, jumped from Dakota war planes over Normandy in June last year

Mr Hutton, and other paratroopers aged in their 90s, jumped from Dakota war planes over Normandy in June last year

The British Army shared a photo of Mr Hutton talking to Prince Charles following his jump over Normandy in 2014

The British Army shared a photo of Mr Hutton talking to Prince Charles following his jump over Normandy in 2014

The British Army shared a photo of Mr Hutton talking to Prince Charles following his jump over Normandy in 2014

Jack ‘Jock’ Hutton’s role in World War II

Jack Hutton was transferred to airborne forces in late 1943 after serving with the Black Watch. 

He was posted to Mortar Platoon, 13th (Lancashire) Parachute Battalion after taking a parachute course which ran at RAF Ringway in January 1944. 

He jumped into Normandy on D Day on 6 June 1944. 

He was wounded on June 22 in the stomach from mortar fire during a patrol. 

However, he recovered in time to re-join his unit before the Battle of the Bulge at Ardennes, Operation Vasity at the Rhine Crossing and advancing across Germany to the Baltic. 

He went on to serve as a Regimental Sergeant Major in Rhodesia Squadron SAS.  

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They were re-enacting the bravery of soldiers who were central to the decisive D-Day landings 75 years ago.   

Around 280 took part in the jump over the French coast, including veterans of landings in World War II.  

Their display brought to life the daring efforts of Allied troops, who secured the first step on the road to defeating the Nazis with the offensive.

Tearful veterans gathered in Portsmouth, Duxford and Normandy as Queen Elizabeth II and US President Donald Trump hailed the bravery of those on the front line.    

The MoD posted on Twitter: ‘We are saddened by the passing of D-Day veteran John ‘Jock’ Hutton who served in the 13th (Lancashire) Parachute Battalion. 

‘Last year, Jock touched the hearts of many, parachuting over Normandy at the #DDay75 commemorations.

‘His courage and spirit must never be forgotten.’

Mr Hutton was transferred to airborne forces in late 1943 after serving with the Black Watch. 

He was posted to Mortar Platoon, 13th (Lancashire) Parachute Battalion after taking a parachute course which ran at RAF Ringway in January 1944. He jumped into Normandy on D Day on 6 June 1944. 

In 2014, Mr Hutton was photographed shaking Prince Charles’s hand following his jump over Normandy.  

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Postman sacked for drink driving after being called into work at short notice while drunk on cider

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postman sacked for drink driving after being called into work at short notice while drunk on cider

A Royal Mail delivery driver has been sacked for drink driving after he was called in to work on his week off because the office was ‘really busy’. 

Daniel Austin had already drunk a large amount of strong cider when he received the call from bosses asking him to work at short notice during the height of the coronavirus pandemic. 

Mr Austin walked to the delivery office and when he got there colleagues raised concerns about his condition with two managers.

Daniel Austin, from Staffordshire, has lost his job and been convicted of drink driving after he was found to be drunk while behind the wheel of his Royal Mail delivery van. Austin says he was called into work at short notice on his week off during the height of the Covid-19 pandemic

Daniel Austin, from Staffordshire, has lost his job and been convicted of drink driving after he was found to be drunk while behind the wheel of his Royal Mail delivery van. Austin says he was called into work at short notice on his week off during the height of the Covid-19 pandemic

Daniel Austin, from Staffordshire, has lost his job and been convicted of drink driving after he was found to be drunk while behind the wheel of his Royal Mail delivery van. Austin says he was called into work at short notice on his week off during the height of the Covid-19 pandemic

But the 40-year-old was instructed to drive one of the delivery vans – and was caught drink-driving soon after.

North Staffordshire Justice Centre has heard how Mr Austin believes a manager reported him to police. 

The court heard Mr Austin had left it a couple of hours before going to work. Police discovered him on Saturn Road, Smallthorne, on April 9.

Prosecutor Jacqueline Coley-Fisher said: ‘At the time of the incident Austin was working for Royal Mail and was driving a Peugeot Partner delivery van.

‘He was seen to be unsteady on his feet and the police were contacted. Police officers arrived and spoke to Austin.

‘A roadside breath test was carried out. He was arrested and conveyed to the police station.’

Mr Austin, of Tunstall, gave an alcohol reading of 108 micrograms in 100 millilitres of breath.

The legal limit is 35. He pleaded guilty to drink-driving. He has no previous convictions or cautions and had a clean driving record.

James Hulse, mitigating, said the defendant had found out his father had been diagnosed with a terminal brain tumour and had gone to drink himself ‘to oblivion’ when he received the call from his employer.

He said: ‘He was off work the week the offence was committed. He finds out his father has a terminal brain tumour.

‘He’s off work so he thinks I’m going to drink myself to oblivion as I don’t want to think about this. He consumed a large amount of strong cider.

‘Then work ring and say they are really busy, in the middle of the pandemic, and ask ‘can you come in?’. He thinks he’ll leave it a couple of hours and it should be alright.

‘He walks to work, sees two colleagues, and they say to him that they don’t think he’s in a fit state to be in work. They can see he is under the influence of alcohol.

‘They go to speak to two managers who make the decision not to do anything and tell him to go out in the delivery van and do what he is accustomed to.

‘Mr Austin believes it is one of those managers who, after he left, rang the police. The police were located at his first drop-off and he had delivered one parcel.

The court heart Austin was 'drinking himself into oblivion' after discovering his father had been diagnosed with a terminal brain tumour and waited two hours before going into work

The court heart Austin was 'drinking himself into oblivion' after discovering his father had been diagnosed with a terminal brain tumour and waited two hours before going into work

The court heart Austin was ‘drinking himself into oblivion’ after discovering his father had been diagnosed with a terminal brain tumour and waited two hours before going into work

‘He’s then arrested, he was fully compliant with the police. There have been disciplinary proceedings with Royal Mail.

‘Instead of saying he could be signposted to mental health or social services they dismiss him after 22 years despite his alcohol use being a result of the devastating news about his father’s brain tumour.

‘It is frustrating that a large organisation just turned a blind eye to that. He attended unfit for work on a day he was not supposed to be in work.

‘He holds a real grudge against Royal Mail for how he feels he was treated by them.

‘He is someone of good character and the driving disqualification will impact him in the short term and long term even when the disqualification has expired.’

Royal Mail has come under fire from Mr Austin’s family who has accused the company of being ‘negligent’ and called for the introduction of random drug and alcohol tests.

Following the drink-drive case, mum Angela Marsden said: ‘I am disappointed, and extremely concerned, that Royal Mail allowed my son to drive a vehicle.

‘Managers had been made aware by work colleagues that Daniel appeared to be under the influence of drink and had been drinking the night before.

‘Daniel was not on duty that day and was called in as they were short-staffed.

‘In my opinion, Royal Mail should have had a duty of care to my son and sent him home.

‘I feel that Royal Mail is in some way negligent and should be held to account for this

‘Royal Mail never does random drug or alcohol tests and I feel this would be a way forward to prevent the same happening again.

Austin was handed 12-month community order, told to complete 80 hours unpaid work

Austin was handed 12-month community order, told to complete 80 hours unpaid work

Austin was handed 12-month community order, told to complete 80 hours unpaid work

‘Daniel worked for Royal Mail for 22-years and had an unblemished record. He now has no job or driving licence and a criminal record.

‘I am no way trying to absolve my son of his responsibility. But Daniel was under the influence of drink and was still given the keys to a Royal Mail vehicle.’

Magistrates handed Mr Austin a 12-month community order. He must also complete 80 hours unpaid work and was banned from driving for 26 months. He must pay £400 costs and a £90 victim surcharge.

Royal Mail is standing by its decision to sack Mr Austin.

Following the case, a Royal Mail spokesman said: ‘Although we cannot comment on the details of individual cases, we can confirm that the correct procedures were followed in this matter.’

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Donald Trump offered Julian Assange a ‘win-win’ deal to avoid extradition, court hears

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donald trump offered julian assange a win win deal to avoid extradition court hears

Donald Trump offered Julian Assange a ‘win-win’ deal to avoid extradition if he disclosed the source behind leaked Democratic party emails, a court heard today.

Jennifer Robinson, one the lawyer’s representing the WikiLeaks founder, said Republican Congressman Dana Rohrabacher and Trump associate Charles Johnson acted as conduits for the President to tout an arrangement.

They said Assange, 49, would be left alone to ‘get on with his life’ if he revealed the DNC hacking source, which was of ‘value’ to Mr Trump, Ms Robinson claimed.

Assange is fighting extradition to the US following the leaks of hundreds of thousands of classified documents in 2010 and 2011.

At his extradition hearing at the Old Bailey today, Ms Robinson made a statement in which she recalled a meeting with the pair on August 15, 2017 at the Ecuadorian embassy in London, where Assange was holed up until being turfed out last year.

Julian Assange (pictured in April 2019) is fighting extradition to the US following the leaks of hundreds of thousands of classified documents in 2010 and 2011

Julian Assange (pictured in April 2019) is fighting extradition to the US following the leaks of hundreds of thousands of classified documents in 2010 and 2011

Julian Assange (pictured in April 2019) is fighting extradition to the US following the leaks of hundreds of thousands of classified documents in 2010 and 2011 

Donald Trump (pictured speaking during a rally in Wisconsin yesterday) offered Julian Assange a 'win-win' deal to avoid extradition if he disclosed the source behind leaked Democratic party emails, a court heard today

Donald Trump (pictured speaking during a rally in Wisconsin yesterday) offered Julian Assange a 'win-win' deal to avoid extradition if he disclosed the source behind leaked Democratic party emails, a court heard today

Donald Trump (pictured speaking during a rally in Wisconsin yesterday) offered Julian Assange a ‘win-win’ deal to avoid extradition if he disclosed the source behind leaked Democratic party emails, a court heard today

Jennifer Robinson, one of the lawyer's representing Assange, made a statement to the Old Bailey today (pictured last week)

Jennifer Robinson, one of the lawyer's representing Assange, made a statement to the Old Bailey today (pictured last week)

Jennifer Robinson, one of the lawyer’s representing Assange, made a statement to the Old Bailey today (pictured last week)

She said: ‘They stated that President Trump was aware of and had approved of them coming to meet with Mr Assange to discuss a proposal – and that they would have an audience with the president to discuss the matter on their return to Washington DC.

‘Congressman Rohrabacher explained he wanted to resolve the ongoing speculation about Russian involvement in the Democratic National Committee leaks to WikiLeaks, which were published by WikiLeaks and other media organisations in 2016.

‘He stated that he regarded the ongoing speculation as damaging to US-Russian relations, that it was reviving Cold War politics, and that it would be in the best interests of the US if the matter could be resolved.

‘He and Mr Johnson also explained that any information from Mr Assange about the source of the DNC leaks would be of interest, value and assistance to Mr Trump.’

Ms Robinson said Republican Congressman Dana Rohrabacher (pictured) and Trump associate Charles Johnson acted as conduits for the President to tout an arrangement

Ms Robinson said Republican Congressman Dana Rohrabacher (pictured) and Trump associate Charles Johnson acted as conduits for the President to tout an arrangement

Ms Robinson said Republican Congressman Dana Rohrabacher (pictured) and Trump associate Charles Johnson acted as conduits for the President to tout an arrangement

Ms Robinson said Mr Rohrabacher said he had come to London to talk to Assange about ‘what might be necessary to get him out’ and presented him with a ‘win-win situation’ which would allow him to leave the embassy and ‘get on with his life’ without fear of extradition to the US.

She said: ‘The proposal put forward by Congressman Rohrabacher was that Mr Assange identify the source for the 2016 election publications in return for some kind of pardon, assurance or agreement which would both benefit President Trump politically and prevent US indictment and extradition.

‘The meeting was concluded on the basis that Congressman Rohrabacher would return to have a direct conversation with President Trump about exactly what would be done to prevent Mr Assange’s indictment and extradition.’

The barrister added that Assange did not provide any source of information.

James Lewis QC, for the US government, said: ‘The position of the government is we don’t contest these things were said. We obviously do not accept the truth of what was said by others.’ 

He is facing 18 charges – including plotting to hack computers and conspiring to obtain and disclose national defence information.

The hearing continues.  

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Officers make 230 arrests in crackdown on illegal drugs sold in and around London in county lines op

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officers make 230 arrests in crackdown on illegal drugs sold in and around london in county lines op

An elaborate police operation has bought down a network of county lines drug operations in and around London, with more than 200 people arrested. 

Officers from nine police forces were drafted into the three-day campaign, code named Operation Pandilla.  

A number of ‘extremely dangerous’ criminals were among the 230 people arrested.

County lines is the term given to the phenomenon when drug gangs from big cities expand their sales to smaller towns, using violence to drive out local dealers.

The networks are known to exploite children and vulnerable people along the way. 

The multi-force police operation used automatic number plate recognition (ANPR) to target vehicles used by vehicles to smuggle drugs on arterial routes and motorways. 

Chief Inspector Jack May Robinson from the Met’s Violent Crime Taskforce said: ‘Some of the individuals arrested are extremely dangerous, lead criminal lifestyles and exploit vulnerable people to run drugs and commit crime.’ 

Of the 230 arrests made, offences include attempted murder, possession with intent to supply class A and B drugs, possession of offensive weapons, possession of firearms, assault and possession of criminal property. 

A stash of weapons, including 22 knives, was also seized, while 54 vehicles and 62 illegal items including drugs were conviscated. 

Officers from nine police forces were drafted into the three-day campaign, code named Operation Pandilla

Officers from nine police forces were drafted into the three-day campaign, code named Operation Pandilla

Officers from nine police forces were drafted into the three-day campaign, code named Operation Pandilla

A total of 230 arrests were made and a stash of weapons, including 22 knives, was also seized

A total of 230 arrests were made and a stash of weapons, including 22 knives, was also seized

A total of 230 arrests were made and a stash of weapons, including 22 knives, was also seized. Police also conviscated 54 vehicles and 62 illegal items including drugs

Officers from the Metropolitan, Surrey, Kent, Essex, Hertfordshire, Thames Valley, Hampshire, City of London and British Transport Police were all involved in the complex operation. 

Chief Inspector Robinson added: ‘Due to the need to safeguard those who have been exploited, we resourced a dedicated phone line of trained officers to give specialist advice to officers to ensure the best care and response possible.

‘Operation Pandilla is part of our effort to target the drivers of violent crime. 

‘Drugs are inextricably linked to a high proportion of the violence; therefore we will continue to target those who exploit children to peddle drugs and target the most vulnerable within our communities. 

‘We simply can’t do this alone and must work with our partners.

‘Our message to criminals using the road network to transport drugs and illegal assets is clear. We are tirelessly working 24/7 to disrupt you. 

Chief Inspector Jack May Robinson from the Met's Violent Crime Taskforce said some of the individuals arrested were 'extremely dangerous'

Chief Inspector Jack May Robinson from the Met's Violent Crime Taskforce said some of the individuals arrested were 'extremely dangerous'

Chief Inspector Jack May Robinson from the Met’s Violent Crime Taskforce said some of the individuals arrested were ‘extremely dangerous’

‘If you are stopped with anything illegal we will arrest you and put you before the courts. 

‘We are working stronger together and sharing intelligence across borders to make it as hard as possible for you to run county lines.’

County lines networks are growing alarmingly fast. In 2015, only seven police forces reported knowledge of county lines in their area.

By November 2017 there were 720 ‘lines’ or networks known to police; by the end of last year that number had risen to more than 2,000. 

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