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DR MICHAEL MOSLEY: Yes, you CAN lose your Covid curves quickly and safely 

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dr michael mosley yes you can lose your covid curves quickly and safely
Dr Michael Mosley

Dr Michael Mosley

Dr Michael Mosley

My kitchen cupboards have long been cleared of junk food, yet the challenge of lockdown could so easily have posed a threat to my willpower.

With two of our children — Dan and Kate, both in their 20s — now living at home and regularly smuggling in chocolate and crisps, and with literally no escape from the temptation, you would surely have forgiven me if I broke under the pressure and indulged my terrible sweet tooth.

Thankfully, my children know my love for sweet treats is such that they don’t dare leave such things lying around, never mind eat them in front of me.

That said, I can absolutely understand how so many of us have piled on the pounds over the past four months. It has been a difficult and stressful time, and it’s all too easy to see why so many have turned to drink and comfort eating.

Sales of alcohol and ice cream have soared, and according to a recent survey two-thirds of British adults say they have gained weight during lockdown.

It is an understandable human response to stress, but a really unfortunate one. Because if you are significantly overweight, this not only leads to long-term health problems, but also puts you at greater risk should you get Covid-19. In fact, Dr Jenny Harries, England’s deputy chief medical officer, recently said one of the best ways to protect yourself against the virus is to lose weight.

So there’s no better time than now — 125 days since we all retreated to our homes — to shake our lockdown lethargy and try to lose some of those corona-pounds. It’s time to get ourselves back into shape safely and swiftly, before a second wave of Covid strikes.

I know how hard it is to lose weight, and keep it off, but it can be done — I shed 9kg (nearly 20lb) and reversed my diabetes diagnosis by putting myself on a low-calorie diet.

Now I’m working with Channel 4 on a new three-part series, during which we test out an even faster approach to weight loss. The idea is that we take a group of people who have piled on the pounds during lockdown and help them shed that excess weight by putting them on a rapid weight-loss diet. Calorie consumption is limited to around 800 to 1,000 calories a day, and it’s based on a healthy, low-carb, Mediterranean-style way of eating.

I know how hard it is to lose weight, and keep it off, but it can be done — I shed 9kg (nearly 20lb) and reversed my diabetes diagnosis by putting myself on a low-calorie diet

I know how hard it is to lose weight, and keep it off, but it can be done — I shed 9kg (nearly 20lb) and reversed my diabetes diagnosis by putting myself on a low-calorie diet

I know how hard it is to lose weight, and keep it off, but it can be done — I shed 9kg (nearly 20lb) and reversed my diabetes diagnosis by putting myself on a low-calorie diet

Time really is of the essence here. We’re currently enjoying lots of warm sunshine, which is helping to suppress the spread of the virus.

But many scientists fear we will get a second wave of Covid-19 in the autumn, on top of the usual winter outbreak of flu. So it’s important to start getting in shape, right now.

You might think a vaccination against Covid-19, not a diet, is the answer to our problems. And yes, our best hope of returning to some form of normality is a vaccine. But the bad news is that if you’re obese (in other words, if you have a Body Mass Index of 30 or higher) then the chance that a vaccine will work is likely to be lower.

We know this from studies of other infectious diseases, including one where more than 1,000 U.S. adults were vaccinated against the flu and then followed for a couple of years.

The researchers from the University of North Carolina wanted to see how many people they were tracking would get flu, despite having been vaccinated. What they found was disturbing.

You might think a vaccination against Covid-19, not a diet, is the answer to our problems. And yes, our best hope of returning to some form of normality is a vaccine

You might think a vaccination against Covid-19, not a diet, is the answer to our problems. And yes, our best hope of returning to some form of normality is a vaccine

You might think a vaccination against Covid-19, not a diet, is the answer to our problems. And yes, our best hope of returning to some form of normality is a vaccine

While 5 per cent of the patients who were a healthy weight went on to develop flu, the vaccine failed to protect 10 per cent of obese patients. That’s because fat around your tummy — known as visceral fat — produces chemical signals which make your immune system less effective. This also helps explain why people who are obese are at twice the risk of becoming seriously ill should they be exposed to coronavirus.

And if you’re thinking, ‘That’s tough, but I’m not obese’, then you might want to step on the scales to check. A recent survey found that only 10 per cent of Brits who are clinically obese realise they are, preferring to describe themselves as ‘average’ or ‘a bit overweight’. In this particular survey it was revealed that women had greater insight than men, with 12 per cent recognising they were obese, compared to 7 per cent of men.

SETTING A LOCKDOWN DIET CHALLENGE

Because of the threat posed by the link between obesity and Covid-19, I got together with BAFTA-award-winning production company Wall To Wall and Channel 4. We found five people who had put on lots of weight during lockdown. Could I help them shed that weight and improve their health, in just three weeks? I agreed to try — on the condition that I ran the experiment with Dr Clare Bailey. Clare has been a GP for more than 30 years and has lots of experience in helping people lose weight safely. She also happens to be my wife (we met at medical school nearly 40 years ago).

Among my five participants was Curtis, who until recently had been teaching English in China, but was stuck in London with his parents during lockdown. After his beloved grandmother died from Covid-19, he put on lots of weight through comfort eating. With a BMI of almost 33, he was now obese.

There was also Tracy, a 50-year-old wife and mother from Stroud, who had previously lost more than half her body weight some 20 years ago. But lockdown saw her begin to pile on the pounds, leaving her terrified she would regain all that hard-fought weight.

Because of the threat posed by the link between obesity and Covid-19, I got together with BAFTA-award-winning production company Wall To Wall and Channel 4. We found five people who had put on lots of weight during lockdown

Because of the threat posed by the link between obesity and Covid-19, I got together with BAFTA-award-winning production company Wall To Wall and Channel 4. We found five people who had put on lots of weight during lockdown

Because of the threat posed by the link between obesity and Covid-19, I got together with BAFTA-award-winning production company Wall To Wall and Channel 4. We found five people who had put on lots of weight during lockdown

TURBO-CHARGE YOUR WEIGHT LOSS

To shed the lockdown pounds, we asked our volunteers to stick to eating just 800 to 1,000 calories a day of delicious high-protein, low-carb food, with all the recipes provided by Clare.

This may sound like a crash diet, but it’s actually based on a lot of good-quality scientific studies. Low-calorie diets like this have been piloted by the NHS in a bid to tackle obesity. Our volunteers wanted to see results, fast. We wanted to make sure the weight loss was safe and sustainable.

Our goal was not only to help them lose weight, but also to improve their overall health, including their metabolic health. Around a third of British adults over 40 have metabolic syndrome, which means you have at least three of the following: a large stomach, high blood pressure, high blood sugars or abnormal levels of blood fats. If you have metabolic syndrome you are at greater risk of heart disease, cancer and type 2 diabetes. You are also much more likely to die from Covid-19.

Although our volunteers were quite young, with an average age of less than 40, our tests revealed they were already beginning to show signs of metabolic syndrome. Their blood tests also revealed four were deficient in nutrients, such as folate or vitamin D, which are crucial for a properly functioning immune system.

To shed the lockdown pounds, we asked our volunteers to stick to eating just 800 to 1,000 calories a day of delicious high-protein, low-carb food, with all the recipes provided by Clare

To shed the lockdown pounds, we asked our volunteers to stick to eating just 800 to 1,000 calories a day of delicious high-protein, low-carb food, with all the recipes provided by Clare

To shed the lockdown pounds, we asked our volunteers to stick to eating just 800 to 1,000 calories a day of delicious high-protein, low-carb food, with all the recipes provided by Clare

Little wonder, perhaps, thanks to a sustained period when people were outside less, thus getting less sunlight packed with vitamin D. They were also eating less fresh fruit and vegetables and more processed foods (all that stockpiled pasta comes to mind…).

While we’ve been repeatedly told rapid weight-loss diets are dangerous and ineffective, because you just put all the weight back on again, this is not borne out by the latest research. Recent studies show that, if done properly, not only are people who lose weight fast more likely to hit their targets, but they are also more likely to keep it off in the long term.

That said, it is important that you talk to your doctor before starting a rapid weight-loss diet if you’re on medication — and there are also people for whom this is not suitable (more information is available at thefast800.com).

It’s also vital that you get enough protein (at least 60g a day), otherwise you will lose muscle. You need to be sure you are getting enough of all the other essential nutrients, too — you should avoid going on one of those crazy cabbage soup or green juice diets, for example.

It’s also vital that you get enough protein (at least 60g a day), otherwise you will lose muscle

It’s also vital that you get enough protein (at least 60g a day), otherwise you will lose muscle

It’s also vital that you get enough protein (at least 60g a day), otherwise you will lose muscle

So how did our Lockdown Diet participants get on? Well, at the start they were really enthused by the idea of rapid weight loss. The blood tests we did also brought home to them the damage they were doing to their bodies. One of the more depressing facts I came across in doing research for the series was that by my age (I’m 63) most people are already on multiple medications, at great cost to the NHS.

Our participants needed to act to avoid the same potential fate.

I can’t yet reveal the end results because we’re still filming and I’ve asked them not to weigh themselves until the final day. By then we’ll also have all the blood results, enabling us to assess how well their immune system may now be functioning. I am optimistic, but a little nervous, as you never quite know what will happen.

Although we’re only filming the results of their first three weeks on the diet, I plan to support them long term. I don’t want this to be just a quick fix. I want to instil in them habits which will become permanent. It can be done, and there is no better time than the present — for all of us.

Delicious ways to ditch the pounds and all low calorie

Pork steak with creamy wholegrain mustard and mushrooms

Serves 2 (470 cals)

  • 1 tbsp olive oil
  • 2 lean pork steaks (150g each)
  • 120g chestnut mushrooms, sliced
  • 2 tsp wholegrain mustard
  • 2 tbsp full-fat creme fraiche
  • ½ tbsp cider vinegar 
  • Generous handful of parsley, chopped
  • Salt and freshly ground black pepper
  • Steamed green or non-starchy vegetables, to serve

Heat a medium-sized pan to a moderate heat. Add oil and steaks. Cook for 4-5 minutes, until browning. Turn over and add mushrooms. Fry on the other side for 4-5 minutes until cooked through. Mix the mustard, creme fraiche, cider vinegar, half the parsley, a pinch of salt and a generous amount of pepper. When the pork is cooked and the juice runs clear, turn the heat down and pour over the sauce. Serve with parsley and half a plateful of veg.

Pork steak with creamy wholegrain mustard and mushrooms

Pork steak with creamy wholegrain mustard and mushrooms

Pork steak with creamy wholegrain mustard and mushrooms

Chickpea and leftover chicken Tagine

Serves 2 (490 cals)

  • 1 medium onion, diced
  • 2 tbsp olive oil
  • 1 small jar harissa paste
  • 1 tin chopped tomatoes
  • 1 tin chickpeas, partly drained
  • 200g leftover chicken, diced
  • Handful of fresh coriander (optional)
  • Steamed greens, to serve
  • 1 tbsp full fat Greek yoghurt (optional)

In a medium pan, sweat the onion in the oil for 5 minutes on a medium heat. Stir in the harissa paste and cook for a few seconds, then add the tomatoes and the chickpeas. Simmer for 15-20 minutes, adding extra water if needed. Add the chicken halfway through cooking. Serve with half a plateful of steamed greens and drizzle with the Greek yoghurt (30 extra cals).

Chickpea and leftover chicken Tagine

Chickpea and leftover chicken Tagine

Chickpea and leftover chicken Tagine

Tuna and anchovies roasted in peppers

Serves 2 (200 cals)

  • 2 red or yellow peppers, halved and deseeded
  • 160g tuna chunks in water, drained
  • 6 anchovy fillets, diced
  • 2 garlic cloves, sliced
  • 2 tsp capers
  • 6 cherry tomatoes, halved
  • 1 tbsp extra-virgin olive oil
  • Freshly ground black pepper
  • ½ tsp dried oregano, or fresh basil or oregano leaves

Preheat oven to 180C/160C fan/gas 4. Place peppers cut side up on a greased tray. Fill with tuna, anchovies, garlic and capers. Top with tomatoes. Add oil and pepper, then cook. Check in 15 minutes, add dried herbs and cook for 5-10 minutes. Remove when the pepper is softening and brown in places. Add herb leaves if using.

Tuna and anchovies roasted in peppers

Tuna and anchovies roasted in peppers

Tuna and anchovies roasted in peppers

Top tips to banish your lockdown lethargy 

Months of being trapped indoors means many are feeling rundown and lacking in energy. You know you should be trying to be healthy, but the motivation to do anything has drained away.

But don’t beat yourself up. After all, we’re grieving for a life which, though it wasn’t perfect, was at least more stable and predictable than the one we face now. But to deal with our feelings, we need to acknowledge them. Indeed, there are four stages to grief.

First, denial: in the words of Donald Trump, this will ‘just disappear’. Then, anger: why hasn’t the Government sorted this? How will I ever go back to my old life?

Third, depression: will I still have a job in a few months? What about my children’s prospects? With these dark thoughts, we turn to comfort eating and box sets, which only make things worse.

Finally, acceptance: adapting to ‘the new normal’. In my view, we are all emerging into this final stage now, and we must cling to hope. I firmly believe a safe and effective vaccine will become available before the end of this year. Meanwhile, if you’re feeling drained and anxious, here are a few practical tips to help…

  • Make time to practise calming breathing techniques or even mindful meditation. I use a breathing exercise called 4:2:4. I breathe in through my nose to a count of four, hold it for a count of two, then breathe out to a count of four. Do this for a couple of minutes. Your heart rate will drop and you should feel much calmer.
  • Exercise is a great stress-buster, boosting the production of feel-good neurotransmitters. If you don’t fancy running or cycling, aim to do a few brisk walks a day for Just 10-20 minutes each is fine, and you will get a real boost from being outside. I recommend downloading the NHS Active 10 app.
  • Build up your muscles. I’ve never been a fan of the gym, but there are plenty of strength-building exercises you can do at home. The two most basic are the squat and the press-up. I do them first thing, as I know if I don’t do them then, I never will. Start slowly, doing as many as you can, and build up over time.
  • Limit social-media use. There is clear evidence that the more time you spend on it, the more stressed and depressed you get.
  • Cut back on booze. Heavy alcohol consumption will wreck your sleep, weaken your immune system and make you prone to weight gain.
  • Be grateful. Keep a gratitude diary where every evening, before you go to bed, you write down three good things that happened that day. The simple act of remembering and writing things down makes you feel better.
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Lose a stone in 21 days with Dr Michael Mosley, on Wednesday, August 5 at 9pm on Channel 4. 

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Second body is found in the sea off Brighton

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second body is found in the sea off brighton

A second body has been recovered from the sea off the coast of Sussex after police recovered a small rubber dinghy yesterday lunchtime. 

The first victim was found off Lancing beach in west Sussex at 1.40pm yesterday. 

The RNLI recovered a second body this morning. Neither of the victims are believed to have been migrants attempting to cross the channel. 

The distinctive green dinghy, which did not have an engine, was loaded with a wheeled shopping trolley and a mobile phone.

Two bodies have been recovered from the Sussex coast over the past 24 hours. It is believed the victims had been using this small inflatable boat. The victims are not believed to migrants

Two bodies have been recovered from the Sussex coast over the past 24 hours. It is believed the victims had been using this small inflatable boat. The victims are not believed to migrants

Two bodies have been recovered from the Sussex coast over the past 24 hours. It is believed the victims had been using this small inflatable boat. The victims are not believed to migrants 

The body of a man was recovered off the coast of West Sussex yesterday

The body of a man was recovered off the coast of West Sussex yesterday

The body of a man was recovered off the coast of West Sussex yesterday 

A major search operation was launched yesterday after the body was reported into the water

A major search operation was launched yesterday after the body was reported into the water

A major search operation was launched yesterday after the body was reported into the water

On Monday, 116 people were rescued from the sea by the Coastguard and the RNLI

On Monday, 116 people were rescued from the sea by the Coastguard and the RNLI

On Monday, 116 people were rescued from the sea by the Coastguard and the RNLI

Police in Sussex are trying to identify the body of a man who was found in the sea off the coast of Brighton yesterday afternoon. 

The man was recovered from the sea in Lancing at 1.40pm yesterday. A dinghy containing a shopping trolley and mobile phone was discovered nearby. 

Sussex Police told The Argus: ‘A second body has been recovered from the sea by RNLI lifeboat crews and HM Coastguard who were searching after a dinghy was found floating empty in the sea off Shoreham on Monday (August 10).

‘The body of a man was recovered by the RNLI Shoreham lifeboat from the sea off Brighton just after 5pm on Monday afternoon.

‘He has not been formally identified at this time, but it is believed to be that of a man linked to the small, unoccupied dinghy that had been found at 1.40pm.

‘During enquiries to confirm the identity of the man it became apparent that his friend was also missing and a search continued at sea on Monday evening and resumed on Tuesday morning.

‘Around 8.45am, a body was spotted by the crew of a Coastguard helicopter and was picked up by the Shoreham lifeboat crew.

‘It has not formally identified, but is believed to be that of the missing man.

The Maritime and Coastguard Agency told MailOnline: ‘The search and rescue helicopter from Lee-on-the-Solent, RNLI lifeboats from Shoreham, Brighton and Newhaven and the Coastguard Rescue Teams from Shoreham and Littlehampton assisted Sussex Police with a search off Shoreham today (August 11) following further information received about an inflatable dinghy found drifting off Shoreham yesterday (August 10).’ 

On Monday, 169 incidents were reported to the Coastguard, including 87, 999 emergency calls. 

The RNLI spent nine hours searching for the second victim yesterday before resuming the operation this morning at first light. 

The RNLI launched both its inshore and all-weather live boats at 6am.

As a result of the current heatwave and the difficulty of going on holiday abroad, hundreds of thousands of Britons have been flocking to the beach. 

On Friday alone, the coastguard responded to 70 call-outs by mid-day, which is ‘above average for this time of year. 

The Coastguard reported its busiest day for more than four years as it dealt with 329 incidents on July 31, when the UK recorded the hottest day of the year and the third warmest on record, with the mercury rising to 37.8C (100.04F) at Heathrow Airport.

Matt Leat, head of infrastructure and technology lead at HM Coastguard, said this weekend could see a similar number of call-outs as families take advantage of the heatwave. 

Mr Leat urged the public not to use inflatables at the beach as they get blown out to sea, and to check the tide to keep safe and to look out for each other.

On Saturday, HM Coastguard dealt with 340 individual incidents across the UK – the highest level of call outs for four years. 

On Friday, they had 329 emergency calls. 

According to HM Coastguard: ‘Packed coastlines and beaches kept us very busy throughout another hot heatwave day, which saw Coastguard Rescue Teams attend 221 incidents.

‘Both the RNLI and independent lifeboats were called out on 155 occasions combined and aircraft (30 taskings) were also used to assist at the coast and sea.

‘HM Coastguard responded to 186 999 calls yesterday and coordinated search and rescue responses to a wide-range of incidents, which included people being cut off by the tide and children swept out to sea on inflatables.

I’n total, the service rescued 146 people and assisted a further 371 people.’ 

In figures released by the Coastguard, compared with August 2019, they are dealing with 145 per cent increase in emergency calls. .

HM Coastguard Head of Coastguard Operations Richard Hackwell said: ‘We have seen a big rise in incident numbers this weekend as more people visit coastal areas and head to the beach. We understand that people want to have fun at the coast and enjoy the heatwave but we urge everyone to respect the sea and take responsibility in helping to ensure the safety of themselves, friends and family.

‘We’re heading into a period of more good weather so we want to remind you to check and double check tide times as even the most experienced swimmer or keen watersports enthusiast can get caught out by currents and tides. Plan your day out, always exercise caution and make sure you have a way of contacting us if you get into trouble.’

He added: ‘As our latest statistics show, we’ll always respond when someone calls 999 and asks for the Coastguard but help us to help you by not making choices which could put yourself and others at risk.

‘Every time our frontline teams respond – as they always do and always will – please don’t forget that they’re also put at risk too. Take extra care at the coast today and over the coming days. We don’t want you to remember your day-out for all the wrong reasons.’

Meanwhile, the RNLI has called on beachgoers to follow water safety advice and adhere to social distancing.

Last week, the charity carried out 30 rescues in one day on just one beach in Cornwall.

Anyone who sees a person in trouble should alert lifeguards or call 999 and ask for the Coastguard.

A coastguard helicopter was also involved in yesterday's search and rescue operation

A coastguard helicopter was also involved in yesterday's search and rescue operation

A coastguard helicopter was also involved in yesterday’s search and rescue operation 

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Married couple form a THROUPLE with a woman and say they’re happier than ever

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married couple form a throuple with a woman and say theyre happier than ever

A couple who were married for 17 years formed a throuple with a woman they met on a camping trip to help get through a ‘rough patch’.

Technician Eli Titus, 36, and health services coordinator Mikey Titus, 37, from Beaverton, Oregon, met Alida Gibson, 31, in July 2018, forming a triad in the hope of rekindling their rocky marriage.

The insurance rep, who they met through a mutual friend,  had also been going through a hard time and was recently divorced.  

Eli and Mikey had three children – Linkoln, 12, Maddox, seven, and Lennox, five, – before they met Alida, but they now consider her another parent to their brood. 

Eli, 36, (center) and Mikey Titus, 37, (right) met Alida Gibson, 31, (left) at a private camping festival. They had been married for 17 years when they decided to form a triad

Eli, 36, (center) and Mikey Titus, 37, (right) met Alida Gibson, 31, (left) at a private camping festival. They had been married for 17 years when they decided to form a triad

Eli, 36, (center) and Mikey Titus, 37, (right) met Alida Gibson, 31, (left) at a private camping festival. They had been married for 17 years when they decided to form a triad

Between them they have three children, Linkoln, 12, Maddox, 7, and Lennox, 5, all born during Mikey and Eli's original marriage.  Eli, (center) and Mikey  (left) and Alida (right) are pictured with their children and dog

Between them they have three children, Linkoln, 12, Maddox, 7, and Lennox, 5, all born during Mikey and Eli's original marriage.  Eli, (center) and Mikey  (left) and Alida (right) are pictured with their children and dog

Between them they have three children, Linkoln, 12, Maddox, 7, and Lennox, 5, all born during Mikey and Eli’s original marriage.  Eli, (center) and Mikey  (left) and Alida (right) are pictured with their children and dog 

The group met a camping festival two years ago and began chatting and instantly bonded with each other, sharing their love of the outdoors, crafting and music. 

 Eli and Mikey soon realized that Alida would be the perfect fit to join their relationship.

But while the triad have openly spoken to the children about what makes polyamory different, other people aren’t so understanding. 

People have said to them that they cannot believe Eli has two partners and even suggested they must be with him for money.

‘Sometimes, it feels that looks could kill,’ Mikey said.

‘We hear people say, “he must have money,”‘ or “Eli is the man,” all the time. It makes it seem as if our relationship is dependent on him which of course, it’s not. 

The throuple are pictured enjoying a meal out together. When they met they instantly bonded with each other, sharing their love of the outdoors, crafting and music. PIctured left to right: Mikey, Eli and Alida

The throuple are pictured enjoying a meal out together. When they met they instantly bonded with each other, sharing their love of the outdoors, crafting and music. PIctured left to right: Mikey, Eli and Alida

 The throuple are pictured enjoying a meal out together. When they met they instantly bonded with each other, sharing their love of the outdoors, crafting and music. PIctured left to right: Mikey, Eli and Alida

‘We live in the pacific northwest so “weird” is a regular occurrence here but even still, people say, “I couldn’t do that,” or “it’s just a phase.”

‘Being in a polyamorous relationship is pretty literal to us. Polyamory means “many loves” so we believe that the more love, the better,’ she added.

‘Within your family, you don’t just love your mum or your dad, so why should we restrict ourselves to one love in our romantic relationships if there’s a connection there with someone?

All of them say they have never felt as complete in a previous relationships as they do now. Pictured: Left to right: Mikey, Alida and Eli

All of them say they have never felt as complete in a previous relationships as they do now. Pictured: Left to right: Mikey, Alida and Eli

All of them say they have never felt as complete in a previous relationships as they do now. Pictured: Left to right: Mikey, Alida and Eli 

Mikey and Eli were aware of polyamory but never thought it would be something they would explore themselves, until they met Alida. 

All of them say they have never felt as complete in a previous relationships as they do now. 

The group say they feel that being together has made each of them a better person – particularly when it comes to being in a relationship.

‘The children are aware that our family is special. As the eldest, Linkoln was aware of “normal” relationships but we talked with him openly and honestly. We encourage our kids to be themselves no matter what others think.

Mikey (left) and Eli (right) say when they met Alida (center) they knew she would be the perfect fit to join their relationship and say they've all made each other better people

Mikey (left) and Eli (right) say when they met Alida (center) they knew she would be the perfect fit to join their relationship and say they've all made each other better people

Mikey (left) and Eli (right) say when they met Alida (center) they knew she would be the perfect fit to join their relationship and say they’ve all made each other better people

‘Linkoln has had a friend ask if it was a good or bad thing to have three parents. He said it’s only bad if he’s in trouble.

‘We recognise that there are four relationships within our triad – those with each and also as a whole. We do everything we can to avoid couples’ privilege,’ Mikey added.

‘We check in with each other on a regular basis. It’s a constant learning experience. 

‘Sometimes, certain people have less time together due to work schedules and the kids.

‘If someone can’t make it to something though, we always take pictures and fill them in as we really do prefer being together as one. 

The throuple hope to one day get married in their home state of Oregon and decided to share their experiences to raise awareness of poly rights. They are pictured at a pride march

The throuple hope to one day get married in their home state of Oregon and decided to share their experiences to raise awareness of poly rights. They are pictured at a pride march

The throuple hope to one day get married in their home state of Oregon and decided to share their experiences to raise awareness of poly rights. They are pictured at a pride march

‘We’re constantly improving our communication – learning how to be engaged and present with each partner in the hard times as well as the good.”

The throuple feel that being together has made each of them a better person – particularly when it comes to being in a relationship.

‘Me and Eli had been married for fifteen years before we met Alida. 

‘Being in a relationship since we were basically kids meant that we’d done things we weren’t proud of,’ Mikey said.

‘We’d do dumb things young kids do when they’re trying to figure out how to be adults – argue, break up, and spending money we didn’t have.

The throuple speak openly about the differences in a polyamorous relationship with their children but sadly not everyone is receptive to the idea. Pictured back to front: Alida, Mikey and Eli

The throuple speak openly about the differences in a polyamorous relationship with their children but sadly not everyone is receptive to the idea. Pictured back to front: Alida, Mikey and Eli

The throuple speak openly about the differences in a polyamorous relationship with their children but sadly not everyone is receptive to the idea. Pictured back to front: Alida, Mikey and Eli

‘When we met Alida, something felt different. We felt this need to be better. We’ve been able to work through some things and create a stronger connection between us all.

‘Alida has brought a different perspective and understanding.

‘We weren’t actually looking for a poly relationship but we just knew that as a group, we wanted to be together.”

Mikey, Eli, and Alida’s own families find the arrangement confusing, but the throuple aren’t put off by the constraints of what is considered to be ‘normal’ in society.

Eli (right) and Mikey (center) soon realised that Alida (left)  would be the perfect fit to join their relationship and may be the 'something' they needed to change to be happy

Eli (right) and Mikey (center) soon realised that Alida (left)  would be the perfect fit to join their relationship and may be the 'something' they needed to change to be happy

Eli (right) and Mikey (center) soon realised that Alida (left)  would be the perfect fit to join their relationship and may be the ‘something’ they needed to change to be happy

‘Our families are amazingly supportive. We don’t think our mums truly understand but as long as we’re happy, they are,’ Alida said.

‘We host family get-togethers and continue working on the bonds between our families.

‘We’re just like everyone else. We all want to grow old together – raise our kids, buy a home, travel, retire, and drive Eli crazy until the end.

‘We would love to get married but at this time, that’s not legal in Oregon. We’re hoping that by raising awareness, we might be able to change the rights and be legally married by the state one day.

‘Our relationship requires a lot of communication, dedication, self-reflection, and compromise. It isn’t always easy, but it is always worth it.

‘We are a team and we believe that each of us are equally important.. One day, we’d like being in a polyamorous triad to be more widely accepted.’

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Donald Trump mocked for saying ‘1917’ Spanish Flu pandemic ended World War Two

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donald trump mocked for saying 1917 spanish flu pandemic ended world war two

The U.S. President has been criticized for claiming the ‘1917’ Spanish Flu pandemic ended World War Two, which did not begin until 1939. 

Donald Trump once again referenced the 1918 Spanish Flu pandemic in comparison to the coronavirus crisis during a White House press briefing on Monday. 

He accidentally connected it to World War II which began more than two decades later.

 The bizarre gaffe was on the day his campaign tried to hijack a Joe Biden campaign hashtag, #JoesAd, with videos suggesting the Democratic presumptive nominee is mentally impaired.

President Trump said the 'great pandemic' of 1917 'probably ended the second World War, all the soldiers were sick'

President Trump said the 'great pandemic' of 1917 'probably ended the second World War, all the soldiers were sick'

President Trump said the ‘great pandemic’ of 1917 ‘probably ended the second World War, all the soldiers were sick’

 

‘The closest thing is in 1917 they say, right? The great pandemic, certainly as a terrible thing,’ Trump said. 

Then he said it ‘probably ended the Second World War, all the soldiers were sick.’ 

The Spanish flu, also known as the 1918 flu pandemic, lasted from February 1918 to April 1920.

It infected an estimated 500 million people – about a third of the world’s population at the time – in four successive waves. 

The death toll is typically estimated to have been somewhere between 17 million and 50 million. 

New York City celebrating VJ Day at the end of World War Two in Japan 1945. Trump connected the flu pandemic of 1918 to the end of the war

New York City celebrating VJ Day at the end of World War Two in Japan 1945. Trump connected the flu pandemic of 1918 to the end of the war

New York City celebrating VJ Day at the end of World War Two in Japan 1945. Trump connected the flu pandemic of 1918 to the end of the war

A White House official clarified to USA Today that Trump was referring to World War I. 

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), the deployment of troops during WWI could have helped contribute to the spread of the Spanish Flu.

Trump’s own grandfather, Frederick Trump, died after contracting Spanish Flu. Trump took ill on May 29, 1918, and passed away the next day in what was one of the early cases of the Spanish Flu.  

World War I ended after Germany surrendered on November 11, 1918. On June 28, 1919, Germany and the Allied Nations, including Britain, France, Italy and Russia, signed the Treaty of Versailles, formally ending the war.

Some took to Twitter to point out the President’s blunder. Actress and activist Sophia Bush tweeted:  ‘The Second World War ended in … 1945.

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‘So to recap things we’ve learned since 2016 … 45 hasn’t read the Constitution, hasn’t read the Bible (but likes to hold one upside down), and clearly never took a US History class. Or … math? Cool cool, very cool.’ 

Rep. Eric Swalwell wrote: ‘The Second World War ended in 1945. It’s cruel for @DonaldJTrumpJr and family to let @realDonaldTrump stand out there like this.’ 

Star Trek actor George Takei warned against ‘distorting history’. He wrote: ‘The president thinks the Spanish Flu probably ended World War Two (!) because “all the soldiers were sick.” 

‘The atomic bomb dropped on Nagasaki fell 75 years ago yesterday, bringing a long and devastating war to a shattering, violent end. Remember history. Don’t distort it.’ 

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