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Duchess of Cambridge’s brother James Middleton has his hands full with lively litter of six spaniels

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duchess of cambridges brother james middleton has his hands full with lively litter of six spaniels

Cuddling six adorable puppies with his French fiancee, James Middleton looks every inch the happy dogfather.

Sadly for the Duchess of Cambridge‘s brother, however, he will soon be saying goodbye to his canine crew.

The six black and brown spaniels are going to new homes.

James Middleton, 33, and his fiancee Alizee Thevenet (both pictured), have been happy dogparents to six black and brown spaniels

James Middleton, 33, and his fiancee Alizee Thevenet (both pictured), have been happy dogparents to six black and brown spaniels

James Middleton, 33, and his fiancee Alizee Thevenet (both pictured), have been happy dogparents to six black and brown spaniels

The Duchess of Cambridge's brother has six other dogs including Luna, whose puppies are pictured above

The Duchess of Cambridge's brother has six other dogs including Luna, whose puppies are pictured above

The Duchess of Cambridge’s brother has six other dogs including Luna, whose puppies are pictured above

But he will not be left alone. He has six other dogs – including Luna, whose puppies are the ones pictured here with Mr Middleton, 33, and his fiancee Alizee Thevenet.

Mr Middleton wrote on Instagram: ’56 days ago you were born, 56 days of early starts, lots of poo and half eaten socks but 56 days of pure joy watching you grow. But now it’s time for you to go. 

‘I am sad to see you go, and yes I might cry, but it will be with happiness as each of your new homes are bursting with love.

‘You might be scared at first, that’s OK. Just be yourself and you will never understand how much happiness you will bring to your new families and all the people you meet. 

Mr Middleton is rehoming the dogs and will give the money from the sale to Pets As Therapy, who he volunteers for. The charity provide therapeutic dog visits to hospitals and care homes

Mr Middleton is rehoming the dogs and will give the money from the sale to Pets As Therapy, who he volunteers for. The charity provide therapeutic dog visits to hospitals and care homes

Mr Middleton is rehoming the dogs and will give the money from the sale to Pets As Therapy, who he volunteers for. The charity provide therapeutic dog visits to hospitals and care homes

Mr Middleton has credited dogs with playing a 'vital role' in helping him to find love, as he met Miss Thevenet for the first time when his spaniel Ella bounded over to her during a walk

Mr Middleton has credited dogs with playing a 'vital role' in helping him to find love, as he met Miss Thevenet for the first time when his spaniel Ella bounded over to her during a walk

Mr Middleton has credited dogs with playing a ‘vital role’ in helping him to find love, as he met Miss Thevenet for the first time when his spaniel Ella bounded over to her during a walk

‘Make me proud and remember to write. Lots of love.’

The money from the sale of the pups will go to Pets As Therapy, a charity for which he volunteers that provides therapeutic visits of dogs to hospitals and care homes.

Mr Middleton has credited dogs with playing a ‘vital role’ in helping him to get out of depression – and find love.

He met Miss Thevenet for the first time when his spaniel Ella bounded over to her during a walk.

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Lebanon’s president and PM were warned about chemical explosion in Beirut

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lebanons president and pm were warned about chemical explosion in beirut

Lebanon’s president and prime minister were warned last month that a stash of ammonium nitrate at the port of Beirut could destroy the city if it exploded, it has emerged. 

Security officials wrote a letter on July 20 saying the industrial chemicals which had been idling in a warehouse since 2013 needed to be secured immediately.  

Just over two weeks later, the stockpile went up in a massive blast that obliterated most of the port and swathes of the capital, killed at least 163 people, injured 6,000 and has sparked mass protests against Lebanon’s elite.   

Prime minister Hassan Diab announced his resignation yesterday and blamed the blast on the incompetence of the elite, declaring that an ‘apparatus of corruption bigger than the state’ was blocking the path to reform. 

However, the documents seen by Reuters show that both Diab and President Michel Aoun had been warned in a private letter that ‘this could destroy Beirut if it exploded’.  

Diab’s camp claimed he had forwarded the letter to the Supreme Defence Council within 48 hours, pointing the finger at ‘previous administrations [who] had over six years and did nothing’.    

Prime minister Hassan Diab (pictured) announced his resignation yesterday and blamed the blast on the incompetence of the elite, declaring that an 'apparatus of corruption bigger than the state' was blocking the path to reform

Prime minister Hassan Diab (pictured) announced his resignation yesterday and blamed the blast on the incompetence of the elite, declaring that an 'apparatus of corruption bigger than the state' was blocking the path to reform

Prime minister Hassan Diab (pictured) announced his resignation yesterday and blamed the blast on the incompetence of the elite, declaring that an ‘apparatus of corruption bigger than the state’ was blocking the path to reform

Lebanese security forces clash with protesters in the vicinity of the parliament in central Beirut last night after the government announced its resignation

Lebanese security forces clash with protesters in the vicinity of the parliament in central Beirut last night after the government announced its resignation

Lebanese security forces clash with protesters in the vicinity of the parliament in central Beirut last night after the government announced its resignation 

Firecrackers thrown by protesters explode in front of riot police amid clashes in the vicinity of the parliament in central Beirut on August 10, 2020

Firecrackers thrown by protesters explode in front of riot police amid clashes in the vicinity of the parliament in central Beirut on August 10, 2020

Firecrackers thrown by protesters explode in front of riot police amid clashes in the vicinity of the parliament in central Beirut on August 10, 2020

A demonstrator fires firecrackers during a protest in Beirut, Lebanon, August 10, 2020

A demonstrator fires firecrackers during a protest in Beirut, Lebanon, August 10, 2020

A demonstrator fires firecrackers during a protest in Beirut, Lebanon, August 10, 2020

A Lebanese protester uses a slingshot to hurl stones at security forces amid clashes in the vicinity of the parliament in central Beirut on August 10, 2020, following the deadly Beirut port explosion

A Lebanese protester uses a slingshot to hurl stones at security forces amid clashes in the vicinity of the parliament in central Beirut on August 10, 2020, following the deadly Beirut port explosion

A Lebanese protester uses a slingshot to hurl stones at security forces amid clashes in the vicinity of the parliament in central Beirut on August 10, 2020, following the deadly Beirut port explosion

A handout picture provided by the Lebanese photo agency Dalati and Nohra on August 10, 2020 shows Prime Minister Hassan Diab (R) submitting his resignation to President Michel Aoun at the presidential palace in Baabda, east of the capital Beirut

A handout picture provided by the Lebanese photo agency Dalati and Nohra on August 10, 2020 shows Prime Minister Hassan Diab (R) submitting his resignation to President Michel Aoun at the presidential palace in Baabda, east of the capital Beirut

A handout picture provided by the Lebanese photo agency Dalati and Nohra on August 10, 2020 shows Prime Minister Hassan Diab (R) submitting his resignation to President Michel Aoun at the presidential palace in Baabda, east of the capital Beirut

Lebanese protesters run from tear gas fired by security forces today in Beirut today. Many see the blast as a symbol of corruption and incompetence among the country's elite, and protests have broken out after months of political and economic meltdown.

Lebanese protesters run from tear gas fired by security forces today in Beirut today. Many see the blast as a symbol of corruption and incompetence among the country's elite, and protests have broken out after months of political and economic meltdown.

Lebanese protesters run from tear gas fired by security forces today in Beirut today. Many see the blast as a symbol of corruption and incompetence among the country’s elite, and protests have broken out after months of political and economic meltdown.

The devastated port of Beirut is seen in an aerial view yesterday after the explosion at a warehouse which has killed more than 160 people and left hundreds of thousands homeless

The devastated port of Beirut is seen in an aerial view yesterday after the explosion at a warehouse which has killed more than 160 people and left hundreds of thousands homeless

The devastated port of Beirut is seen in an aerial view yesterday after the explosion at a warehouse which has killed more than 160 people and left hundreds of thousands homeless

Details of the private letter emerged in a report by the General Directorate of State Security on events leading up to the explosion.

While the content of the letter was not in the report, a senior security official said it summed up the findings of a judicial investigation launched in January which concluded the chemicals needed to be secured immediately. 

‘There was a danger that this material, if stolen, could be used in a terrorist attack,’ the official said.

‘At the end of the investigation, Prosecutor General (Ghassan) Oweidat prepared a final report which was sent to the authorities,’ he said. ‘I warned them that this could destroy Beirut if it exploded.’ 

A representative for Diab said the PM received the letter on July 20 and it was sent to the Supreme Defence Council for advice within 48 hours. 

‘The current cabinet received the file 14 days prior to the explosion and acted on it in a matter of days. Previous administrations had over six years and did nothing,’ they said. The president’s office has not commented. 

Hezbollah-backed Diab announced the government’s resignation last night while President Aoun – who has rejected calls for an international probe into the disaster – is also facing pressure to quit.  

Many in Lebanon see the blast as a symbol of the failed political system, and protests have broken out with tear gas fired on crowds after months of political and economic meltdown. 

Even as Diab spoke, security forces in central Beirut clashed for a third night with protesters demanding sweeping change to the political system. 

At least nine lawmakers have also announced they would quit in protest, as have two senior members of the Beirut local government. 

Lebanon’s system is modelled on that of former colonial power France, where the president appoints the prime minister and is not required to resign along with the cabinet. 

However, Aoun is also under pressure to quit and his portrait was burned by demonstrators who burst into the foreign ministry building during angry protests at the weekend.  

The country’s sectarian power-sharing system requires the president to be a Maronite Christian, the prime minister to be a Sunni and the parliament speaker to be a Shi’ite.  

France, whose president Emmanuel Macron visited Beirut in the days after the blast, called for the ‘rapid formation’ of a new government. 

Lebanon is already seeking $20billion in funding from the IMF and now faces billions more in disaster costs, with losses from the explosion estimated to be between $10billion and $15billion.  

A week after the enormous chemical blast which was felt as far away as the island of Cyprus, residents and volunteers were still clearing the debris off the streets.

International rescue teams with sniffer dogs and specialised equipment remained at work at ‘ground zero’ on Monday, where the search is now for bodies and not survivors.

The Lebanese army said yesterday that another five bodies were pulled from the rubble with the help of Russian and French rescue teams, raising the death toll to 163. 

Lebanese protesters clash with security forces in the vicinity of the parliament in central Beirut on Monday

Lebanese protesters clash with security forces in the vicinity of the parliament in central Beirut on Monday

Lebanese protesters clash with security forces in the vicinity of the parliament in central Beirut on Monday 

The devastating explosion last week. An Italian expert has claimed that the brick red cloud suggests that the blast was not caused by ammonium nitrate and suggested burning armaments had instead caused the blast

The devastating explosion last week. An Italian expert has claimed that the brick red cloud suggests that the blast was not caused by ammonium nitrate and suggested burning armaments had instead caused the blast

The devastating explosion last week. An Italian expert has claimed that the brick red cloud suggests that the blast was not caused by ammonium nitrate and suggested burning armaments had instead caused the blast

The personal guard of Nabih Berri, speaker of the Lebanese parliament - shoots live rounds over the heads of protesters

The personal guard of Nabih Berri, speaker of the Lebanese parliament - shoots live rounds over the heads of protesters

The personal guard of Nabih Berri, speaker of the Lebanese parliament – shoots live rounds over the heads of protesters

Lebanese anti-government protesters try to break through a barrier placed by Lebanese police to block a road leading to the parliament building during a protest in Beirut

Lebanese anti-government protesters try to break through a barrier placed by Lebanese police to block a road leading to the parliament building during a protest in Beirut

Lebanese anti-government protesters try to break through a barrier placed by Lebanese police to block a road leading to the parliament building during a protest in Beirut

Italian firefighters from the NBCR (Nuclear Biological Chemical Radiological) unit inspecting a ship wreck in the port of Beirut

Italian firefighters from the NBCR (Nuclear Biological Chemical Radiological) unit inspecting a ship wreck in the port of Beirut

Italian firefighters from the NBCR (Nuclear Biological Chemical Radiological) unit inspecting a ship wreck in the port of Beirut

The explosion, which drew comparisons with the Hiroshima atom bomb 75 years ago, has also injured more than 6,000 people and left 300,000 homeless. 

The disaster also sparked widespread panic over wheat shortages after 15,000 tonnes of grains were blasted out of the silos.  

The cabinet decided to refer the investigation of the blast to the judicial council, the highest legal authority whose rulings cannot be appealed. 

Lebanon’s president had previously said explosive material was stored unsafely for years at the port. 

He said an investigation would consider whether the cause was external interference as well as negligence or an accident. 

‘There are two possible scenarios for what happened: it was either negligence or foreign interference through a missile or bomb,’ he said last Friday. 

The shipment of ammonium nitrate was officially destined for Mozambique when it sailed on the cargo ship Rhosus in 2013, but the vessel made an unscheduled stop in Beirut where the chemicals were impounded.   

The captain of the Rhosus claims he was told to stop in Beirut to pick up extra cargo – while Mozambique has denied all knowledge of the shipment. 

Cypriot police said on Thursday that they had questioned Russian businessman Igor Grechushkin over his alleged links the ship and its cargo.  

Russian emergency personnel walk on the site of the explosion in the port of Beirut, where rescuers are continuing their recovery efforts nearly a week after the blast

Russian emergency personnel walk on the site of the explosion in the port of Beirut, where rescuers are continuing their recovery efforts nearly a week after the blast

Russian emergency personnel walk on the site of the explosion in the port of Beirut, where rescuers are continuing their recovery efforts nearly a week after the blast 

Beirut’s governor said many foreign workers and truck drivers remained missing and were assumed to be among the casualties. 

Anti-government protests in the past two days have been the biggest since October, when demonstrators took to the streets over the country’s economic crisis. 

The personal bodyguard of top official Nabih Berry was pictured firing live rounds at protesters over the weekend as fury over the Beirut explosion threatens to spark a revolution. 

Sporting jeans and a black top, the Hezbollah-linked bodyguard pointed a shotgun at swarms of demonstrators yesterday afternoon and fired in their direction as huge protests rocked the Lebanese capital. 

Protesters accused the political elite of siphoning off state resources after last week mobbing French president Emmanuel Macron with demands for reform. 

‘If reforms are not carried out, Lebanon will continue to sink,’ Macron said after being met at the airport by President Aoun last week. 

France has always maintained close ties with Lebanon, which was administered by France under a League of Nations mandate until 1943 when it gained independence.  

Officials have estimated losses of around $15billion from the explosion, a bill which Lebanon cannot afford after already defaulting on sovereign debt.  

Eli Abi Hanna’s house and his car repair shop were destroyed in the blast.

‘The economy was already a disaster and now I have no way of making money again,’ he said. ‘It was easier to make money during the civil war. The politicians and the economic disaster have ruined everything.’

Wreckage lies in front of destroyed grain silos in the port of Beirut,  three days after the devastating explosion in the Lebanese capital

Wreckage lies in front of destroyed grain silos in the port of Beirut,  three days after the devastating explosion in the Lebanese capital

Wreckage lies in front of destroyed grain silos in the port of Beirut,  three days after the devastating explosion in the Lebanese capital 

A helicopter tries to put out a fire at the scene of last Tuesday's blast, which is thought to have been caused by a stockpile of ammonium nitrate which had been left unsecured at the port since 2013

A helicopter tries to put out a fire at the scene of last Tuesday's blast, which is thought to have been caused by a stockpile of ammonium nitrate which had been left unsecured at the port since 2013

A helicopter tries to put out a fire at the scene of last Tuesday’s blast, which is thought to have been caused by a stockpile of ammonium nitrate which had been left unsecured at the port since 2013

Some Lebanese doubt change is possible in a country where sectarian politicians have dominated since the 1975-90 conflict.

‘It won’t work, it’s just the same people. It’s a mafia,’ said Antoinette Baaklini, an employee of an electricity company that was demolished in the blast.

Workers picked up fallen masonry near the building where wall graffiti mocked Lebanon’s chronic electricity crisis: ‘Everyone else in the world has electricity while we have a donkey.’

‘It will always be the same. It is just a political game, nothing will change,’ said university student Marilyne Kassis.

An emergency international donor conference on Sunday raised pledges worth nearly 253 million euros ($298 million) for immediate humanitarian relief.

But foreign countries demand transparency over how the aid is used, wary of writing blank cheques to a government perceived by its own people as deeply corrupt. 

Some are concerned about the influence of Shi’ite movement Hezbollah, which is designated as a terrorist group by the United States.

Iranian Foreign Ministry spokesman Abbas Mousavi said on Monday that countries should refrain from politicising the port blast. He called on the United States to lift sanctions against Lebanon.

Lebanese, meanwhile, are struggling to come to terms with the scale of losses. Entire neighbourhoods were wrecked.

‘It is very sad. We are burying people every day. Forty percent of my church have lost their businesses,’ said a priest.

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Finding Freedom author says Meghan was the victim of ‘racist and sexist tropes’

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finding freedom author says meghan was the victim of racist and sexist tropes

The Duchess of Sussex was the victim of ‘racist and sexist tropes’ in Britain amid a belief she was ‘too loud, too demanding and too difficult’, it was claimed today.

A narrative that Meghan Markle was the ‘Duchess Difficult’ was perpetuated by both the media and royal aides, according to an author of the new book Finding Freedom.

Omid Scobie told ITV’s Lorraine that commentary about Meghan ‘used every kind of sexist and racist trope that we attach to successful women and women of colour’.

And he added on BBC Radio 4 that ‘ultimately it was the institution that turned back on them’ when Meghan tried to ‘make it work’ before quitting royal duties this year.

Asked by Lorraine host Andi Peters this morning whether Meghan's heritage had anything to do with 'Megxit', Omid Scobie said today: 'I think there are a number of themes at play here'

Asked by Lorraine host Andi Peters this morning whether Meghan's heritage had anything to do with 'Megxit', Omid Scobie said today: 'I think there are a number of themes at play here'

Asked by Lorraine host Andi Peters this morning whether Meghan’s heritage had anything to do with ‘Megxit’, Omid Scobie said today: ‘I think there are a number of themes at play here’

Asked by Lorraine host Andi Peters whether Meghan’s heritage had anything to do with ‘Megxit’, Scobie said today: ‘I think there are a number of themes at play here.

‘Certainly what we saw in a lot of the media commentary was the emergence of this sort of ‘Duchess Difficult’ narrative, that used every kind of sexist and racist trope that we attach to successful women and women of colour.

Finding Freedom by Omid Scobie and Carolyn Durand was released this morning

Finding Freedom by Omid Scobie and Carolyn Durand was released this morning

Finding Freedom by Omid Scobie and Carolyn Durand was released this morning

‘She was too loud, too demanding, too difficult – and what was more ugly about that situation is that there were people within the institution that were briefing a lot of that information to the tabloids.

‘Now it’s always hard to know what the agenda is for something like that, but it clearly didn’t come from a good place.’

Scobie continued: ‘Harry’s very aware of what goes on behind the scenes behind palace walls, and I think the couple really found themselves in a position where they were told they couldn’t defend themselves.

‘We heard ‘no comment’ time and time again from the palace, but their reputations were being destroyed by the words of other people using, sort of, third, fourth, fifth hand information that wasn’t always necessarily true.’

Scobie also spoke on BBC Radio 4’s Today programme today, during which he was asked about negative coverage in the media towards the Duchess.

Omid Scobie told ITV's Lorraine this morning that commentary about Meghan Markle 'used every kind of sexist and racist trope that we attach to successful women and women of colour'

Omid Scobie told ITV's Lorraine this morning that commentary about Meghan Markle 'used every kind of sexist and racist trope that we attach to successful women and women of colour'

Omid Scobie told ITV’s Lorraine this morning that commentary about Meghan Markle ‘used every kind of sexist and racist trope that we attach to successful women and women of colour’

He said: ‘I think what we did see was a lot of unsavoury coverage directed towards Meghan – and the type of coverage we’ve often seen attached to powerful and strong women of colour, this ‘Duchess Difficult’ narrative, that really stems for her supposedly being too difficult, too loud, too everything.

‘These are tropes that we’ve often see attached to successful women, and it’s really unfortunate because I think that behind the scenes was really far from the truth.’

He added that this was one of the reasons why he and co-author Carolyn Durand wanted to write the book so they could ‘really present what the other side was’.

Scobie also told BBC Radio 4 presenter Nick Robinson how he felt Harry and Meghan had ‘clearly tried to do their best to make it work’ before Megxit took place.

He added: ‘They even went as far as presenting a potential roadmap for how they would navigate their roles moving forward, and ultimately it was the institution that turned back on them and told them what they had presented just wasn’t an option.

The Duke and Duchess of Sussex wave on a visit to Cape Town in South Africa last September

The Duke and Duchess of Sussex wave on a visit to Cape Town in South Africa last September

The Duke and Duchess of Sussex wave on a visit to Cape Town in South Africa last September

‘And so this is a couple that really wanted to make it work, but ultimately I think the setup of the royal institution just isn’t built for change on that dramatic a level.’

Scobie also told ITV’s Lorraine that the process of writing the book began two years ago and the story of what he was writing changed dramatically over this time.

He added that he and Meghan are ‘absolutely in no way friends’ and said there was ‘always that line’ between journalists and members of the royal family.

He denied asking them for an interview, adding that ‘it was important to have a little distance from the couple’ to have a balanced and objective view of who they are.

Scobie said: ‘The really unique situation that came out of it was a lot of the people working for Harry and Meghan were frustrated at what was being printed.’

He said that the couple’s friends had become ‘desperate’ to defend them so they could ‘reframe the narrative a little bit’ and ‘shed a light on who they really were’.

Harry and Meghan leave St George's Chapel in Winsdsor after their wedding in May 2018

Harry and Meghan leave St George's Chapel in Winsdsor after their wedding in May 2018

Harry and Meghan leave St George’s Chapel in Winsdsor after their wedding in May 2018

Scobie added it was interesting to see ‘how the palace may deal with something and how Meghan felt at the time’.

Peters also asked Scobie if he knew the person who called Meghan ‘Harry’s showgirl’ – and he said he did, but could not say who it was for legal reasons.

Scobie said the couple are ‘very much forward focused at the moment’ and ‘they have been able to already start establishing their charitable brand moving forward’.

He also said that Meghan had ‘clearly found a much stronger and louder voice than she had before within the institution’.

On Radio 4, Scobie added: ‘I think the restrictions of the institution of the monarchy often didn’t allow them to venture down the paths that they long wanted to do.

‘And now we’re seeing them speak in a very different way when it comes to the work that they’re doing as you can see, and the move definitely did them good.’

Prince Harry, Meghan, Kate and Prince William all sit together at an event in February 2018

Prince Harry, Meghan, Kate and Prince William all sit together at an event in February 2018

Prince Harry, Meghan, Kate and Prince William all sit together at an event in February 2018

His co-author Durand also spoke on Radio 4, and said she thought the couple’s decision to step down as senior royals was made ‘in the interests of their family’.

She added: ‘They did this because they wanted more privacy, they wanted to step back, they wanted to put Archie first, and it was the right decision for this time of their lives, and Her Majesty has already said that they’re welcome back at any time.

‘I don’t think it was doomed to failure and I don’t see this as a failure either. I think that Harry and Meghan have created a world where many people identify with them.

‘They are a great draw in the Commonwealth. Many people who didn’t feel a connection to the Royal Family before do. They’re great role models for the country.

‘Harry of course is a distinguished military hero. He’s had enormous charitable and humanitarian legacy, and I don’t see any of this as an individual failure on their part at all. I think that they’re just putting their family first at the moment.’

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ITV faces ANOTHER watchdog probe after postal entries for six contests had NO chance of winning

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itv faces another watchdog probe after postal entries for six contests had no chance of winning

ITV is facing another watchdog probe after revealing postal entries for six prize draws had no chance of winning after a phone-in scandal.

Ofcom announced yesterday that it had started an investigation after the broadcaster handed itself over to the regulator following an internal review.

The six contests for which postal entries, which are usually sent for free instead of a £2 text, call or online submission, were eliminated from the draw was between 2014 and 2019.

Ofcom announced yesterday that it had started an investigation after the broadcaster handed itself over to the regulator following an internal review (file photo)

Ofcom announced yesterday that it had started an investigation after the broadcaster handed itself over to the regulator following an internal review (file photo)

Ofcom announced yesterday that it had started an investigation after the broadcaster handed itself over to the regulator following an internal review (file photo)

ITV pinpointed ‘isolated incidences of unintentional administrative errors’ as the cause and said the discarded entries were a ‘very small proportion’ of each competition’s total, according to The Times.

In a previous scandal, callers’ entries were excluded despite their payment being taken over premium phone lines in 2007 from ITV shows including Ant and Dec’s Saturday Night Takeaway.

The public wasted £7.8million on the phone calls and ITV was forced to stop all voting via interactive TV and over text.

In 2007 it was revealed entries from Saturday Night Takeaway viewers for the contest 'Piggy Bank' could only win if they lived within an hour of the production team's location (file photo)

In 2007 it was revealed entries from Saturday Night Takeaway viewers for the contest 'Piggy Bank' could only win if they lived within an hour of the production team's location (file photo)

In 2007 it was revealed entries from Saturday Night Takeaway viewers for the contest ‘Piggy Bank’ could only win if they lived within an hour of the production team’s location (file photo)

In a previous scandal, callers' entries were excluded despite their payment being taken over premium phone lines for shows including Ant and Dec's Saturday Night Takeaway (file photo)

In a previous scandal, callers' entries were excluded despite their payment being taken over premium phone lines for shows including Ant and Dec's Saturday Night Takeaway (file photo)

In a previous scandal, callers’ entries were excluded despite their payment being taken over premium phone lines for shows including Ant and Dec’s Saturday Night Takeaway (file photo)

It was revealed that entries from Saturday Night Takeaway viewers for a competition called Piggy Bank could only win if they lived within an hour of the production team’s location.

Votes for Soapstar Superstar were discarded around one fifth of the time and, in a separate incident, two competitors were eliminated despite not coming last.

Meanwhile, entries for Gameshow Marathon’s Prize Mountain made it to the winner’s selection process on the basis of whether they ‘sounded lively’ and the final draw included people from the same area.

An Ofcom spokesperson said: ‘We are investigating whether ITV breached our rules and licence requirements on viewer competitions.’ 

MailOnline has contacted ITV for comment. 

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