Connect with us

Latest Stories

EDEN CONFIDENTIAL: Mystery over the Duke of Rutland’s lover

Published

on

eden confidential mystery over the duke of rutlands lover

Home of the aristocracy’s most extraordinary living arrangements, Belvoir Castle has just become even more colourful.

I can disclose that the Duke of Rutland has a new lover — but his wife, Emma, will continue to live at the Leicestershire landmark in a separate wing.

The Duke, David Manners, is courting Tiggy Maconochie, agent to Helmut Newton, the late fashion photographer known for his stark, often sado-masochistic portraits of nude women in chains and bonds. ‘We’re very happy,’ the Duke tells me.

A friend of Tiggy’s tells me: ‘She and David have been seeing each other for some time. They are serious about each other, but I don’t think Emma would be very happy if they decided to get married.’

The Duke of Rutland, pictured, has a new lover, but his wife Emma will continue to live at his castle in a separate wing

The Duke of Rutland, pictured, has a new lover, but his wife Emma will continue to live at his castle in a separate wing

The Duke of Rutland, pictured, has a new lover, but his wife Emma will continue to live at his castle in a separate wing

Emma Manners, Duchess of Rutland, pictured with Phil Burtt, right, will continue to live at the 15,000-acre estate, having embarked on her own new relationship with the estate's manager

Emma Manners, Duchess of Rutland, pictured with Phil Burtt, right, will continue to live at the 15,000-acre estate, having embarked on her own new relationship with the estate's manager

Emma Manners, Duchess of Rutland, pictured with Phil Burtt, right, will continue to live at the 15,000-acre estate, having embarked on her own new relationship with the estate’s manager

The duke is currently dating Tiggy Maconochie, pictured, having previously split up with Brazilian-born Andrea Webb

The duke is currently dating Tiggy Maconochie, pictured, having previously split up with Brazilian-born Andrea Webb

The duke is currently dating Tiggy Maconochie, pictured, having previously split up with Brazilian-born Andrea Webb

When Emma’s 28-year marriage broke down after the Duke embarked on an affair with a woman who lived on his 15,000-acre estate, she declared they would continue to live under the same roof, in her roles as mother of their five children and chief executive of the estate. And she added that she had also embarked on a romance of her own — with her estate manager, Phil Burtt.

Two years ago, I disclosed that the Duke had split up with his Brazilian-born lover, Andrea Webb. Nine months earlier, police were called to Belvoir (pronounced ‘beaver’) following a row that flared up when Andrea was told by staff that she was excluded from a shooting party on the estate.

Andrea had reportedly refused to leave the castle grounds unless the Duke told her himself that she should go. Eventually she relented and left the castle followed by the police officers.

It was far from the only colourful incident in the love life of the Duke, who separated from his wife in 2012 when she found out about his affair — the second such straying.

The couple, whose estate is said to be worth £146 million, are the parents of Ladies Violet, Alice and Eliza Manners, stalwarts of the London social scene.

The duke lives at Belvoir Castle - however, it is pronounced beaver

The duke lives at Belvoir Castle - however, it is pronounced beaver

The duke lives at Belvoir Castle – however, it is pronounced beaver

Psst… who wants to go to a ‘prohibition party’?  

London appears to be turning into Al Capone’s 1920s Chicago.

I hear ‘prohibition parties’ are being held in breach of pandemic restrictions in some of the capital’s swankiest neighbourhoods.

Organisers are so brazen that they even invited the brother of Environment Minister Lord (Zac) Goldsmith to one illegal bash. ‘Just got asked to a prohibition party,’ reveals financier Ben Goldsmith.

‘Not going — not my thing, anyway,’ insists Ben, 39. ‘But quite cheerful they think I’m young and cool enough to be asked; and delighted the young haven’t had their spirit completely squashed.’

Booker Prize-winning author Sir Salman Rushdie, who has lived under a death sentence ever since a fatwa was issued against him in 1989, has become a grandfather.

His daughter-in-law, jazz singer Natalie Rushdie, has given birth to her first child with husband, PR boss Zafar.

‘The moment she was born we fell utterly in love with her,’ she says of her daughter, who’s not been named yet. ‘We can’t believe how lucky we are to have her in our life and feel overwhelmingly happy.’

This post first appeared on dailymail.co.uk

Latest Stories

Coronavirus UK: Independent scientists blast SAGE lockdown approach

Published

on

By

coronavirus uk independent scientists blast sage lockdown approach

A coronavirus lockdown row erupted today after Number 10‘s scientific advisers called for another national shutdown to curtail Britain’s Covid-19 resurgence.

Independent experts questioned why the ‘incredibly harmful intervention’ was being considered when Britain successfully squashed its epidemic earlier in the year and the NHS is still nowhere near full capacity. 

Oxford University’s Professor Carl Heneghan asked: ‘We flattened the curve and protected the NHS. So what happened to learning to live with the virus?’

It emerged today that SAGE – the Scientific Advisory Group for Emergencies, which is steering the Government through the Covid-19 crisis – has projected the winter wave of the virus will be more deadly than the first.

Modelling by the experts has predicted a smaller but more prolonged second peak, which could see a moderate number of daily deaths rumble on for months, eventually overtaking the death toll of 40,000 in spring. 

The forecast being circulated through Downing Street says deaths will hit 500 a day by the end of November. For comparison, about 200 Covid-19 patients are currently dying each day and more than 1,000 were being killed daily during the darkest spell in March and April. 

Mr Johnson has previously described the Government’s coronavirus graphs, which plot the number of deaths, as looking like a sombrero or a camel’s hump. But the latest SAGE modelling suggests there is likely to be a so-called ‘lampshade’ graph in the coming months as infections reach a peak and then remain at a high level for weeks or even moths before eventually falling. 

Sources within SAGE say there could be 25,000 people in hospital with Covid-19 by the end of November, more than double the 10,000 currently receiving care. Latest NHS England figures suggest the country has about 110,000 beds at its disposal, plus tens of thousands more in the Nightingale hospitals built during the first wave, which went unused. 

Thousands of private beds have also been commandeered to give the NHS some breathing room if it’s faced with a surge in Covid-19 admissions. The main justification for a national lockdown is to protect the NHS from being overwhelmed, but the latest data suggests that, even if the bleak prediction of 25,000 Covid-19 patients in hospitals by next month comes true, the health service will not be overstretched. 

Professor Heneghan, director of the University of Oxford’s Centre for Evidence-Based Medicine, told MailOnline: ‘Lockdown should be a last resort to protect the NHS. The fundamental aim [of the first lockdown] was to protect the NHS, at that time we didn’t have testing and we didn’t have any treatments or Test and Trace, so it was justified.

‘We managed to flatten the curve and we have these now [knowledge of the virus and medicines and public health measures on how to prevent it spreading]. What happened to learning to live with the virus? People calling for lockdown need to realise that it is a blunt tool that will just kick the can down road, we need to get the message out now that this is not going away, it’s about managing Covid-19’s impact.’  

Sources within SAGE say there could be 25,000 people in hospital with Covid-19 by the end of November, more than double the 10,000 currently receiving care. Latest NHS England figures suggest the country has about 110,000 beds at its disposal, plus tens of thousands more in the Nightingale hospitals built during the first wave, which went unused. Its suggests that, even if the bleak prediction of 25,000 Covid-19 patients in hospitals by next month comes true, the health service will not be overstretched

Sources within SAGE say there could be 25,000 people in hospital with Covid-19 by the end of November, more than double the 10,000 currently receiving care. Latest NHS England figures suggest the country has about 110,000 beds at its disposal, plus tens of thousands more in the Nightingale hospitals built during the first wave, which went unused. Its suggests that, even if the bleak prediction of 25,000 Covid-19 patients in hospitals by next month comes true, the health service will not be overstretched

Sources within SAGE say there could be 25,000 people in hospital with Covid-19 by the end of November, more than double the 10,000 currently receiving care. Latest NHS England figures suggest the country has about 110,000 beds at its disposal, plus tens of thousands more in the Nightingale hospitals built during the first wave, which went unused. Its suggests that, even if the bleak prediction of 25,000 Covid-19 patients in hospitals by next month comes true, the health service will not be overstretched

According to internal analysis provided to Number 10 by the Scientific Advisory Group for Emergencies (SAGE), deaths will peak at a lower level than in the spring but could remain high for weeks or even months with a Christmas respite unlikely

According to internal analysis provided to Number 10 by the Scientific Advisory Group for Emergencies (SAGE), deaths will peak at a lower level than in the spring but could remain high for weeks or even months with a Christmas respite unlikely

According to internal analysis provided to Number 10 by the Scientific Advisory Group for Emergencies (SAGE), deaths will peak at a lower level than in the spring but could remain high for weeks or even months with a Christmas respite unlikely

The main justification for the first national shutdown in March was to protect the NHS from being overwhelmed and depriving non-virus patients from getting vital care. Covid-19 is a disease that primarily only kills the elderly and already-ill, so the majority of people who catch it will suffer mild or no symptoms. Therefore locking down the entire country and economy for a virus that kills just 0.1 per cent of sufferers was seen as many to be not enough of a reason on its own.

Boris Johnson said in spring he had no choice but to hit the nuclear button on lockdown to flatten the curve of the epidemic – or ‘squash the sombrero’, as he put it – to bring cases to manageable levels and bring hospitals back from the brink. 

Scientists, MPs and other health professionals claimed once this had been achieved the nation would have to ‘learn to live with the virus’ because a second lockdown would be too catastrophic on the economy and healthcare.

As well as the huge economic fallout – the number of people claiming unemployment benefits rose 120 per cent to 2.7 million between March and September –  the crude lockdown also took an almighty toll on healthcare. The  NHS was forced to shut down most services for the better part of six months earlier this year.

Charities estimate there could be an additional 35,000 cancer deaths due to people missing vital tests in spring and nearly 27million GP appointments were ‘lost’ – which could spur on the worsening of other conditions such as asthma and diabetes. 

Keith Neal, emeritus professor of the epidemiology of infectious diseases at University of Nottingham, questioned why ‘learning to live with the virus’ had been taken off the table, adding he was in favour of the tactic.

First the ‘sombrero’, then the ‘camel’s humps’, and now the ‘lampshade’

In the early days of Britain’s coronavirus outbreak, top scientists predicted the crisis would take a sombrero-hat shape on graphs. Boris Johnson told the nation the plan was to delay the peak of the outbreak, or ‘squash the sombrero’.

Then in September, when the virus started to make a resurgence when schools and universities returned, the Prime Minister warned tougher action would be needed if the country failed to ‘stop the second hump of the dromedary’.

Now, Whitehall insiders have resorted to another bizarre phrase to describe how the second Covid-19 wave could pan out — with startling projections presented by SAGE warning of a ‘lampshade’ curve.

The forecast being circulated through Government predicts deaths will hit 500 a day by the end of November. For comparison, more than 1,000 Covid-19 patients were dying each day during the darkest spell of the pandemic in March and April.

But experts fear daily coronavirus deaths will stay at a high level for a longer period of time — making the second wave more deadly overall than the first, which killed at least 40,000 people.

A source told the Daily Telegraph: ‘It’s going to be worse this time, more deaths. That is the projection that has been put in front of the Prime Minister, and he is now being put under a lot of pressure to lock down again.’

Dr Yvonne Doyle, Public Health England’s medical director, warned last night that the spike in fatalities would continue ‘for some time’, after the UK recorded another 367 Covid-19 victims — the highest daily death toll since the end of May.

It comes after a SAGE adviser last week warned the second wave of Covid-19 could peak at Christmas unless there is a national lockdown now. Professor John Edmunds, an epidemiologist based at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, told MPs that he couldn’t see a way out of the current crisis without ‘deaths in the tens of thousands’.

Deaths climbed quickly in Britain’s first wave, rising almost 15-fold in a fortnight. On average, 42 infected patients were succumbing to the illness every day on March 23 — when lockdown was imposed. This jumped to 627 just a fortnight later.

But fatalities have yet to take off in the second wave. Department of Health statistics show around 200 Britons are currently dying from Covid-19 each day. But the figure two weeks ago stood at 82.

Britain is only now starting to record more coronavirus victims because of a spike in cases in September and October, following a lull in transmission over the summer. It can take infected patients weeks to fall severely ill and die.

And despite warnings that the death toll will continue to soar, a raft of statistics have suggested the outbreak has already started to slow down. It could mean that deaths may start to tail off in the coming weeks.

 

<!—->Advertisement

He told MailOnline today: ‘Why should places with declining cases – like Cornwall – go into another lockdown? Rural towns are some of the poorest in the country and have been hit hardest by this pandemic.

‘There are too many health consequences [that come with a national lockdown]. There’s a knock-on effect on mental health and particularly for people who live alone. If we were to go into lockdown again we’d be treating these people like prisoners.’  

Squashing the sombrero in spring and then using targeted approaches through winter was supposed to keep cases squashed low enough for people to live relatively normal lives. 

Professor Neal said this strategy should have worked, but too few people have been complying with social distancing rules since the end of summer, which has caused the resurgence.

The expert, who is helping Public Health England monitor the outbreak in Nottingham, added: ‘I’ve seen data showing only 11 per cent of people are isolating properly and do the full 14 days. One in four aren’t answering the phone to contact tracers.

‘Lockdown wouldn’t even be a consideration if Test and Trace was working better and more people were adhering to the rules.’ 

After referring to the crisis as a sombrero-hat shape on graphs, the Prime Minister warned tougher action would be needed if the country failed to ‘stop the second hump of the dromedary’ when the virus started to make a resurgence when schools and universities returned in September. 

Now, Whitehall insiders have resorted to another bizarre phrase to describe how the second Covid-19 wave could pan out — with startling projections presented by SAGE warning of a ‘lampshade’ curve.

Professor Paul Hunter, an epidemiologist at the University of East Anglia, said Britain didn’t flatten its first epidemic well enough or keep it squashed long enough, which was explaining the sudden rise in cases.

He said as recently as last month he was ‘absolutely sure’ deaths could not reach spring-like levels this winter, but he said the mid-September surge in cases had made him ‘uneasy’ about this prediction.

Professor Hunter told MailOnline: ‘The ultimate number of deaths will depend on how many cases we have over winter, and that is difficult to be certain about. 

‘Since spring we’ve seen 10 to 15 per cent of the population catch and recover from Covid-19, and we know most of these people probably won’t fall ill again.

‘And the other thing is we’re a lot better at keeping people alive now, certainly those under 70. The death rate in people going to ICU with Covid-19 has almost halved since the first wave and that’s because of drugs like dexamethasone [a cheap steroid proven to benefit the most ill virus sufferers] and because we’ve learnt how to care for patients who have it .  

‘In April – due to a lack of testing – a lot of people died from Covid but doctors couldn’t put the virus on their death certificates, which meant there was a big underestimate in the number of fatalities. 

‘Now we don’t have that problem and we can more accurately record deaths. For these reasons, I lean towards believing deaths can never reach the levels in April, but I’m starting to think it could be plausible.

‘What’s made me uneasy is the very rapid increase [last month]. We’re approaching the real number of new cases per day that we were seeing at the end of March, I cant be certain but it’s round about the same figure now.’

Scientists have estimated that up to 100,000 people were getting infected per day in spring, though it’s been difficult to prove due to a lack of testing at the time. SAGE thinks around 60,000 people are getting infected every day at the moment.

Although he is against a full shutdown again, Professor Neal sympathises with the challenge the Government is facing. ‘With normal conditions, it is normally only the patient and their family who has to suffer. With Covid-19, if someone catches it they can pass it on to someone else who will then pass it to someone seriously vulnerable who could die through no fault of their own.

‘If it [the winter wave of infections] goes wildly out of control then the NHS will get stressed. Even if it’s not overwhelmed, it may have to cancel operations that would benefit people’s lives – like getting hip and knee replacements.’

Professor Neal said he was in favour of continued targeted approaches in hotspot areas, but said the current three-tier system was not strict enough. 

Sir Patrick Vallance, the Chief Scientific Adviser, is said to be leading calls within Government for Boris Johnson to take drastic action as soon as possible to halt the spread of infection

Sir Patrick Vallance, the Chief Scientific Adviser, is said to be leading calls within Government for Boris Johnson to take drastic action as soon as possible to halt the spread of infection

But Mr Johnson is having to perform a balancing act, with SAGE experts calling for tougher lockdowns while Tory MPs press for a road map out of restrictions

But Mr Johnson is having to perform a balancing act, with SAGE experts calling for tougher lockdowns while Tory MPs press for a road map out of restrictions

Sir Patrick Vallance, the Chief Scientific Adviser, is said to be leading calls within Government for Boris Johnson to take drastic action as soon as possible to halt the spread of infection. But Mr Johnson is having to perform a balancing act, with SAGE experts calling for tougher lockdowns while Tory MPs press for a road map out of restrictions

34911748 8887775 image a 83 1603880125620

34911748 8887775 image a 83 1603880125620

34911744 8887775 image a 86 1603880125627

34911744 8887775 image a 86 1603880125627

A Government source told The Sun the latest SAGE numbers are ‘utterly bleak’ with projections reportedly showing there could be 25,000 people in hospital with Covid-19 by the end of November. 

That would represent an even higher number than the peak in hospitalisations during the first wave. The number of people in hospital with Covid-19 is currently just below 10,000. 

However, latest NHS England figures suggest the country has about a 110,000 bed capacity. Health bosses also have thousands of free beds in the Nightingale hospitals built during the first wave, which went unused. Thousands of private beds have also been commandeered to give the NHS some breathing room if it’s faced with a surge in Covid-19 admissions. So even at 25,000, it would suggest the health service will be nowhere near overstretched in the winter.

Even at the peak of the crisis in Britain, only a quarter of all beds were occupied by virus patients. On April 7, 26.5 per cent of the 67,206 people in England’s hospitals were being treated for coronavirus — the highest proportion on record. 

Emmanuel Macron could announce new nationwide French lockdown TODAY

French President Macron could announce a new nationwide lockdown today as a growing wave of anti-lockdown protests sweep Europe.

The French government is envisaging a month-long national lockdown to combat the coronavirus resurgence which could take effect from midnight on Thursday, France’s BFM TV reported yesterday.

Macron is due to make a televised address at 8pm today which is expected to see a national lockdown imposed or a host of local measures and curfews extended.

His office did not comment on whether Macron would announce such a measure then.

The national lockdown under consideration would be ‘more flexible’ than the strict restrictions on movement imposed in France in March this year, reported BFM TV.

France has had a big spike in the number of daily deaths from COVID-19, recording an additional 523 deaths in 24 hours this evening, the highest daily death total since April.

The French government also reported an additional 33,417 new infections.

<!—->Advertisement

Lib Dems urge Boris Johnson to hold four-nation summit to save Christmas

Boris Johnson is being urged by the Liberal Democrats to convene a four-nation summit to save Christmas as the party warned it is ‘inevitable’ people will travel to be with their loved ones. 

The party has written to Mr Johnson as well as Scottish leader Nicola Sturgeon, Welsh First Minister Mark Drakeford and Northern Ireland First Minister Arlene Foster calling for them to work together on a blueprint for the festive period. 

Lib Dem leader Sir Ed Davey said that because family members are often split up across the different nations of the UK it makes sense for there to be one set of coronavirus rules during Christmas to avoid confusion. 

The party wants the four nations to agree ‘uniform guidance’ on the number of people who can gather, to cooperate on the safe return of students and to explore how to expand travel options to allow people to move around the country while complying with social distancing.  

Such a unified approach would represent a dramatic departure from the current way of working which has seen the four nations act largely independently in response to the coronavirus crisis. 

But Environment Secretary George Eustice rejected the idea this morning, saying it is ‘far too early’ to set out guidelines about Christmas.

He told BBC Radio 4’s Today programme: ‘It’s far too early to say exactly where things will be by Christmas, but the Prime Minister’s made clear he wants people to be able to have a Christmas that’s as close to possible as normal.’ 

<!—->Advertisement

SAGE has separately warned that it believes all of England will have to be put into the top tier of restrictions by mid-December, putting Christmas get-togethers at risk of being cancelled completely. But Mr Johnson is facing a difficult balancing act with advisers calling for tougher restrictions while Tory MPs demand the PM set out a lockdown exit strategy. 

The Northern Research Group of more than 50 Conservative MPs, many from constituencies in the so-called Red Wall, is adamant the PM must announce a road map for how areas can get out of Tier Three as rebels warned the north of England is being unfairly treated. 

The group’s efforts received a boost from Chancellor Rishi Sunak yesterday as he said he shared the MPs’ frustrations at rules being imposed and ‘you want to know when it is going to be over’ in an apparent hint at his opposition to a national shutdown. 

Despite the warnings from SAGE, Environment Secretary George Eustice insisted this morning a national lockdown is ‘not appropriate’ because there is ‘no point having a lockdown in those parts of the country where the incidence of the disease is very low’. 

A further 367 deaths were announced yesterday, the highest daily number since May, with the official UK death toll now at 43,365.

Health chiefs believe the daily total could rise to 500 within weeks, still significantly below the 1,000-plus recorded during the peak of the first wave, amid fears that the Government’s tier system is not enough to get infections back under control.

Professor Sir Mark Walport, a member of SAGE, said this morning there is currently ‘little to feel reassured about’ and that it is ‘certainly not unrealistic to think’ there could be 25,000 people in hospital by the end of the November.

He told BBC Radio 4’s Today programme: ‘We are still relatively early in the second wave and, as we know, there’s a significant lag – two to three, two to four weeks – between actually getting an infection and people potentially dying, and so the number of deaths is always lagging the number of cases that are reported at any one time, so there’s little to feel reassured about.’

He added: ‘There are still an awful lot of people out there who are vulnerable, it’s not, as it were, that the disease has killed off everyone who is vulnerable, there are still very many people that are vulnerable and we know that only still a relatively small proportion of the population has had this infection.’ However, Sir Mark said he hoped improved treatments for coronavirus could keep the death toll down. 

He said: ‘The number of cases is rising very significantly – it was 22,800 on 27 October and the seven-day average was just over 22,000, so there are an awful lot of cases.

‘One of the differences of course is that we are better at looking after people with coronavirus now and so hopefully the case fatality rate will be lower than it was in the first wave, but at the end of the day the fatality rate, the number of people who die is a product of the number of people who are infected and their vulnerability.’

More than eight million people across England are now in Tier Three areas, with almost all of them located in the north of the country. 

Mr Johnson has repeatedly refused to rule out imposing a nationwide circuit-breaker lockdown. 

But he is reluctant to push the nuclear button because of the damage it would do to the economy and because of a growing Tory revolt over lockdown measures

The Northern Research Group of more than 50 Conservative MPs wrote to the PM yesterday to demand he set out a ‘road map’ for how areas can get out of Tier Three. 

The group was given a boost as Mr Sunak, who represents a constituency in Yorkshire, lined up to sympathise with the argument it had made. 

He told the BBC: ‘I absolutely share my colleague’s frustration at restrictions, of course that is frustrating if you’re having to live under these things and you want to know when it is going to be over.’ 

Growing Tory disquiet over current coronavirus restrictions means Mr Johnson is likely to face a furious backlash if he does opt to impose a national lockdown, even if it is only for a few weeks. 

However, the NRG demands for an exit strategy were given short shrift by some in Whitehall who said it is not possible to set out simple criteria for leaving Tier Three as they stressed it has to be a judgement call based on myriad factors. 

This post first appeared on dailymail.co.uk

Continue Reading

Latest Stories

Orangetheory Islington sends expletive-filled messages to customers

Published

on

By

orangetheory islington sends expletive filled messages to customers

An employee of a trendy fitness chain has apparently woken up today with a sore head and a lot of explaining to do after sending an expletive-laden rant to customers, claiming it’s ‘f***** closing’ because ‘the f***** virus won’t go away.’

TV writer Christine Rose, a customer at the Islington branch of Orangetheory Fitness shared screenshots of her text exchange to Twitter joking: ‘so someone in charge of my gym’s messaging is having a breakdown’. 

Sent a 10.42pm last night, the messages from the account dubbed all customers ‘fools’ ‘b******’ and ‘f******’.

After a chain of strongly-worded messages, which told customers to come for a workout because ‘being fat can be a no longer problem’, Orangtheory sent a note to say its system had been hacked.   

But the expletive-ridden exchange was taken well by many on Twitter, who dubbed it relatable and even said it made them want to join the gym, which is a favourite with A-listers and former First Lady Michelle Obama. 

TV writer Christine Rose, a customer at the Islington branch of Orangetheory Fitness shared screenshots of her text exchange to Twitter joking: 'so someone in charge of my gym¿s messaging is having a breakdown'.

TV writer Christine Rose, a customer at the Islington branch of Orangetheory Fitness shared screenshots of her text exchange to Twitter joking: 'so someone in charge of my gym¿s messaging is having a breakdown'.

Sent a 10.42pm last night, the messages from the account dubbed all customers 'fools' and 'f******'.

Sent a 10.42pm last night, the messages from the account dubbed all customers 'fools' and 'f******'.

TV writer Christine Rose, a customer at the Islington branch of Orangetheory Fitness shared screenshots of her text exchange to Twitter joking: ‘so someone in charge of my gym’s messaging is having a breakdown’.

Orangetheory Fitness (OTF) boasts 800,000 members across 1,100 studios in 49 American states and 22 countries. Pictured is their London branch

Orangetheory Fitness (OTF) boasts 800,000 members across 1,100 studios in 49 American states and 22 countries. Pictured is their London branch

Orangetheory Fitness (OTF) boasts 800,000 members across 1,100 studios in 49 American states and 22 countries. Pictured is their London branch 

The message read: ‘HEY YOU FOOOLS, 

‘GUESS WHAT!!!! We are closing the studio again as this f***** virus is not ending. f****** China!!!! Alright so all your memberships are going to be cancelled because we are not going to reopen. we don’t have the fund. so BOOM! listen we are going to miss you. bye you little f*****’.

It followed with a message that read.

‘Hey everyone!  apologies for the last message. someone is drunk. im sorry’.  

Then followed a series of short messages which read: 

‘come oft. work out is great. you being fat can be a no longer problem’.

Each Orangetheory class consists of a 60-minute, full-body workout that is taught by highly-trained coaches. The workout is technology tracked, so everyone wears an 'OTbeat' heart rate monitor which supplies information on how your body is responding in real time

Each Orangetheory class consists of a 60-minute, full-body workout that is taught by highly-trained coaches. The workout is technology tracked, so everyone wears an 'OTbeat' heart rate monitor which supplies information on how your body is responding in real time

Each Orangetheory class consists of a 60-minute, full-body workout that is taught by highly-trained coaches. The workout is technology tracked, so everyone wears an ‘OTbeat’ heart rate monitor which supplies information on how your body is responding in real time 

After the three unprofessional messages, an apology was sent which read: ‘Apologies our systems have been hacked. We completely apologies for any messages that have been sent. These are by no means correct or a statement from Orangetheory fitness. We hope no offence has been taken.

‘Please be reassured that this matter is being looked into by the authories and that all personal data is encrypted and safe’.

But moments after another messaged followed in all caps: ‘IM JOKING, THERES BEEN NO HACKING, WE ARE CLOSING. I WANTED TO MAKE YOU HAVE HOPE AND THEN BREAK IT. WE ARE CLOSING B****!!!! PACK YOUR S*** AND GO 

34948006 8888373 image m 67 1603888745299

34948006 8888373 image m 67 1603888745299

34947996 8888373 image m 75 1603888806254

34947996 8888373 image m 75 1603888806254

34947990 8888373 image m 80 1603888854879

34947990 8888373 image m 80 1603888854879

34947992 8888373 image m 82 1603888871437

34947992 8888373 image m 82 1603888871437

34947986 8888373 image m 78 1603888839760

34947986 8888373 image m 78 1603888839760

34947998 8888373 image a 73 1603888790445

34947998 8888373 image a 73 1603888790445

34948004 8888373 image m 71 1603888778506

34948004 8888373 image m 71 1603888778506

Many replied to the tweets finding it hilarious, saying it was 'relatable' and what they needed in 2020'

Many replied to the tweets finding it hilarious, saying it was 'relatable' and what they needed in 2020'

Many replied to the tweets finding it hilarious, saying it was ‘relatable’ and what they needed in 2020′

Femail has contacted Orangetheory for comment. Orangetheory Islington is still listed as open on their website.

Christine who shared the messages said the gym were ‘not happy’ about the texts, that were sent by a ‘disgruntled employee’. 

Many replied to the tweets finding it hilarious, saying it was ‘relatable’ and what they needed in 2020′. 

‘My best mate goes to the same place and sent me these this morning we’re loving this,’ one Twitter user wrote. 

‘Oh my god this is fascinating,’ said another, adding a popcorn emoji.

‘Howling at this!’ said another.

‘This had made me laugh so much,’ wrote a third.

‘It sounds as though someone there is having a breakdown,’ commented one.

‘This is SO great,’ another Twitter user said.

‘I want to join,’ joked one. 

‘Please send them a hug from me. This is all truly bull**** (though not china’s fault)’ another said. 

The former First Lady (pictured) has received much curiosity from mid-life women about how she achieved her killer biceps, and revealed it's from Orangetheory workouts

The former First Lady (pictured) has received much curiosity from mid-life women about how she achieved her killer biceps, and revealed it's from Orangetheory workouts

The former First Lady (pictured) has received much curiosity from mid-life women about how she achieved her killer biceps, and revealed it’s from Orangetheory workouts

Made in Chelsea star Ryan Libbey, a personal trainer, is also a fan of the OrangeTheory workout

Made in Chelsea star Ryan Libbey, a personal trainer, is also a fan of the OrangeTheory workout

Made in Chelsea star Ryan Libbey, a personal trainer, is also a fan of the OrangeTheory workout

 Orangetheory Fitness (OTF) boasts 800,000 members across 1,100 studios in 49 American states and 22 countries, with its exercise program loved by the likes of former First Lady Michelle Obama and Made in Chelsea‘s Ryan Libbey.

Each Orangetheory class consists of a 60-minute, full-body workout that is taught by highly-trained coaches. 

The workout is technology tracked, so everyone wears an ‘OTbeat’ heart rate monitor which supplies information on how your body is responding in real time. 

The workouts are designed in a fitness lab in Florida with a medical advisory board weighing in regularly, and OTF coaches offer a different workout everyday.

The hour-long interval-based classes are an extremely efficient form of whole-body exercise, delivering benefits more quickly than typical solely cardio or weights workouts. 

Every session incorporates both cardio and weights, with the aim that you see results from head to toe. 

 There are currently six OrangeTheory studios in the UK, with plans for further expansion

This post first appeared on dailymail.co.uk

Continue Reading

Latest Stories

Police officer jailed 10 years after admitting to murder of mistress

Published

on

By

police officer jailed 10 years after admitting to murder of mistress
Dorset Police issued this mugshot of Timothy Brehmer after he was acquitted of murdering his long-term lover

Dorset Police issued this mugshot of Timothy Brehmer after he was acquitted of murdering his long-term lover

Dorset Police issued this mugshot of Timothy Brehmer after he was acquitted of murdering his long-term lover

The husband of the nurse choked to death by her married police officer lover told of his agony after her killer was cleared of murder, declaring him a ‘well-practised liar with years of experience’.

Andrew Parry, the husband of Claire Parry, said former PC Timothy Brehmer, 41, pretended he had been stabbed, causing a delay to what could have been life-saving treatment for his wife.

He hit out after Brehmer, described as a ‘man wh**e’ and ‘womaniser’ in court, after he was jailed for ten years and six months for manslaughter.

Mr Parry said: ‘I am incredibly disappointed at the verdict of this trial. I believe Brehmer’s account of that day to be inconsistent and untruthful.

‘As the murder trial heard, he conducted a factory reset on his mobile telephone which has hindered the police investigation and leaves us with an incomplete picture of events on that day.

‘I feel we will never truly know exactly what happened.

‘What we do know is that Brehmer used such force against Claire that she suffered fractures to her neck, lost consciousness, went into cardiac arrest and eventually died.

‘Having used that amount of force, he has failed to render any assistance to her which could have saved her life. As a trained police officer, he would have had the ability to do this.

‘Instead, he chose to tell lies from the moment he was discovered by witnesses, stating that Claire had stabbed him.

‘He has since admitted that this was a lie and that he inflicted those injuries on himself.

‘This lie led to a delay in Claire receiving what could have been lifesaving treatment, a fact that remains incredibly distressing. Brehmer is a well-practised liar with years of experience.

‘He has shown himself – as the trial exposed – to be consistently dishonest, deceitful and devious. We do not accept his version of events and all the inconsistencies that it contains.’

‘Claire was a caring nurse practitioner who helped many people in a career of over 20 years. She was a loving family member and a doting mother who leaves behind two young children. Her energy and enthusiasm for life were infectious and our lives are poorer without her in them. This trial has been a horrendous ordeal for all of Claire’s family and friends.’

Brehmer killed Mrs Parry in his car in West Parley, Dorset, in May – moments after she texted his detective wife ‘I’m cheating on you’ from his phone.

But although the police constable used enough force to fracture her neck in three places, jurors in Salisbury Crown Court decided he had not intended to kill her. 

Timothy Brehmer, described as a 'man wh**e' and 'womaniser' in court, with his wife Martha at the family home

Timothy Brehmer, described as a 'man wh**e' and 'womaniser' in court, with his wife Martha at the family home

Timothy Brehmer, described as a ‘man wh**e’ and ‘womaniser’ in court, with his wife Martha at the family home

Brehmer had been accused of the murder of nurse Claire Parry (pictured) in a Dorset car park

Brehmer had been accused of the murder of nurse Claire Parry (pictured) in a Dorset car park

Brehmer had been accused of the murder of nurse Claire Parry (pictured) in a Dorset car park

Salisbury Crown Court heard Brehmer had at least three affairs outside of his 14-year marriage. Detective Constable Kate Rhodes (pictured earlier in the trial), who 'quickly fell in love' with Brehmer, branded him a 'man w***e'

Salisbury Crown Court heard Brehmer had at least three affairs outside of his 14-year marriage. Detective Constable Kate Rhodes (pictured earlier in the trial), who 'quickly fell in love' with Brehmer, branded him a 'man w***e'

Kate Rhodes

Kate Rhodes

The court heard Brehmer had at least three affairs outside of his 14-year marriage. Detective Constable Kate Rhodes (left, earlier in the trial’ and, right, on her wedding day), who ‘quickly fell in love’ with Brehmer, branded him a ‘man w***e’

A Dorset Police source told MailOnline: ‘A lot of Tim’s former colleagues were surprised that he was found not guilty of murder.

‘He will now only serve ten years for her manslaughter but will likely be out in half that time on licence.

‘When you think that Andrew Parry will never see his wife again and his children will never see their mum again, you have to question if 10-years is a suitable punishment.

‘I don’t think anybody would think it’s nearly enough.

‘He has taken a life and in the process left a whole family devastated.’ 

The outrage came after the police officer of 17 years was sentenced after he admitted killing mother-of-two Mrs Parry by manslaughter. 

Mr Justice Jacobs said Bremner would serve two-thirds of his sentence in prison before he could apply for parole.

In an pointed remark at the killer police officer he said he did not believe evidence he gave that he had not realised she was dying. 

He added: ‘This is a case where I should sentence you on the basis you lost your self-control following the sending of the text message to your wife where the affair was revealed, rather than on the basis that you had no intention to kill or cause really serious harm.

‘I am sure that you did deliberately take Claire Parry by the neck applying significant force with your forearm or the crook of your elbow for a period of time while she struggled against you, thereby causing the severe neck injuries which the pathologist described.

‘The evidence from the pathologist was that those injuries which she described as ‘severe’ on a scale of mild, moderate or severe resulted from the application of significant force to the neck for a period of a minimum 10 to 30 seconds and possibly longer.

‘She said it was difficult to envisage a situation where a struggle in the car imparted the necessary degree of force or could explain the extent and severity of the neck injuries.

‘You were a trained and experienced police officer and your character witnesses described how you would help others.

‘Yet you did nothing to try to help Claire Parry. You did not ask her how she was. That was because you knew how she was.

‘You could not possibly thought, as you said in your police interview, that she was simply taking a breath.

‘You must have known that her body had gone limp after your assault on her. Before you walked to the car park entrance you must have seen how she was – hanging half out of the car.

‘It must have been obvious to you as a trained police officer with extensive experience of casualties in traffic accidents that she was not breathing.

‘In evidence you said you did not realise she was poorly. I consider that you appreciated that she was much worse than that.  

‘There was a significant mental and physical suffering caused to the deceased who must have appreciated that her life was being taken from her and who, on the evidence of the bruising to her body, must have fought hard against you, if only for a short while.

‘You sought at the scene to blame her for stabbing you and thereby lied to the police and others who are asking you what has happened.

‘These lies were in my view particularly serious, bearing in mind that you were a service police officer and the public is entitled to expect a person in your position to tell other police officers the truth.’

Outside court Detective Chief Inspector Richard Dixey, of Dorset Police, today condemned his colleague for breaking ‘all policing values’. 

Brehmer sobbing as he is arrested by police in the back of an ambulance in Dorset on May 9

Brehmer sobbing as he is arrested by police in the back of an ambulance in Dorset on May 9

Brehmer sobbing as he is arrested by police in the back of an ambulance in Dorset on May 9

Brehmer (pictured) worked for Dorset Police and had been a police officer for 17 years

Brehmer (pictured) worked for Dorset Police and had been a police officer for 17 years

Brehmer (pictured) worked for Dorset Police and had been a police officer for 17 years 

Brehmer claimed Mrs Parry (pictured) accidentally suffered the fatal injury in a 'kerfuffle' in his car

Brehmer claimed Mrs Parry (pictured) accidentally suffered the fatal injury in a 'kerfuffle' in his car

Claire Parry

Claire Parry

Brehmer said Mrs Parry (above) accidentally suffered the fatal injury in a ‘kerfuffle’ in his car 

Brehmer's sister Kirsten (left) and his mother Rosalyn Chivers (right) at Salisbury Crown Court on October 22

Brehmer's sister Kirsten (left) and his mother Rosalyn Chivers (right) at Salisbury Crown Court on October 22

Brehmer’s sister Kirsten (left) and his mother Rosalyn Chivers (right) at Salisbury Crown Court on October 22

He said: ‘This is a case where there are no winners. The actions of Mr Brehmer… have caused devastation and pain for two families. The loss of Claire is something that Andy Parry, his children and her extended family and friends will have to live with for the rest of their lives.’ 

It was revealed yesterday that Brehmer was known by his colleagues in the force as a ‘sexual predator’ who preyed on ‘vulnerable’ emergency workers.

A source within Dorset Police told MailOnline how well-spoken Brehmer had a reputation at work as a ladies’ man who managed to charm a number of lovers from within his own unit.

They said the smooth-talking officer, who is married to a detective in the same force, told each woman ‘you are the only one for me’ and sent song lyrics and sexualised messages to ‘suck them in’.

Brehmer’s mother, Rosalyn Chivers, and his sister Kirsten cried and hugged each other moments after the verdict was delivered.

In his trial, Brehmer said he was trying to push Mrs Parry out of his car in a struggle after she confronted him because she was ‘angry’ at discovering his previous affairs.

He described the incident as a ‘kerfuffle’, claiming he ‘fell on top of her by accident more than anything’ and his arms must have ‘slipped up’ around her neck while he was behind her in a ‘piggy-back position’.

He sobbed as he told jurors: ‘I’m responsible for her death. I must have [used too much force]. I absolutely did not want to kill her or cause serious bodily harm. I didn’t intend to kill her.’ 

Mrs Parry was left with ‘unsurvivable brain injuries’ after she was strangled in the car park of the Horns Inn pub at about 3pm on May 9 and died in hospital the next day.

Her marriage to Dorset Police officer Andrew Parry was falling apart as he discovered her relationship with Brehmer, also of Dorset Police, however Brehmer’s detective wife, also from the same force, had no idea about his flings.

Brehmer said: ‘Never for one second did I ever intend to hurt her, we’d been seeing each other on and off for 11 years, I can’t say that I loved her but I definitely cared for her.

‘Things had changed recently, it had all gone so wrong. It was always the unwritten rule of the affair that you don’t ask about the other people but all of a sudden she wanted to know all about my life.’ 

A sketch of Timothy Brehmer giving evidence in his trial at Salisbury Crown Court last week

A sketch of Timothy Brehmer giving evidence in his trial at Salisbury Crown Court last week

Brehmer gives evidence in court last week

Brehmer gives evidence in court last week

Two sketches of Brehmer giving evidence in his trial at Salisbury Crown Court last week

Detective Chief Inspector Richard Dixey, of Dorset Police, said that Bremner acted '‘contrary to all policing values’

Detective Chief Inspector Richard Dixey, of Dorset Police, said that Bremner acted '‘contrary to all policing values’

Detective Chief Inspector Richard Dixey, of Dorset Police, said that Bremner acted ”contrary to all policing values’

Police bodycam footage of Brehmer being attended to by paramedics in West Parley in May 

Recalling the struggle, he added: ‘She was on her front in a press-up position. I didn’t mean to hurt her, I fell on top of her by accident more than anything.

‘I was trying to grab hold of her, my arm was around her.. it was just a kerfuffle. If you imagine a piggy-back.. to hold on you have to have your arms around them.

‘I was directly on top of her like a piggy-back, I was trying to bump her out of the car. I was trying so hard to get her out and she was actively doing all she could to stay in.

‘My left arm was around the top of her chest, by the collarbone, but it must have slipped up in all the melee. 

Police body cam footage showing the arrest of Brehmer outside the pub in West Parley in May

Police body cam footage showing the arrest of Brehmer outside the pub in West Parley in May

Police body cam footage showing the arrest of Brehmer outside the pub in West Parley in May

‘I was slowly getting her out of the car but I don’t know how long it went on for.

‘I’ve tried to think about this every day since I’ve been in prison, maybe she was trapped in the car I don’t know. There’s so many ‘what if’s’ that go through my brain.’

Salisbury Crown Court heard Brehmer had at least three affairs outside of his 14-year marriage.

Detective Constable Kate Rhodes, who ‘quickly fell in love’ with Brehmer, branded him a ‘man w***e’ and the police officer even described himself as a ‘devious b*****d’ who kept his wedding ring on during affairs.

Brehmer and Mrs Parry used ‘secret chats’ to communicate, had sex as often as twice a week and just days before the incident the pair had an ‘intimate quickie’. 

A police photograph of Brehmer's grey Citroen car in which Claire Parry died at the Horns Inn

A police photograph of Brehmer's grey Citroen car in which Claire Parry died at the Horns Inn

A police photograph of Brehmer’s grey Citroen car in which Claire Parry died at the Horns Inn

Brehmer is seen on CCTV at the Horns Inn in West Parley after meeting Parry on May 9

Brehmer is seen on CCTV at the Horns Inn in West Parley after meeting Parry on May 9

Brehmer is seen on CCTV at the Horns Inn in West Parley after meeting Parry on May 9

Brehmer’s wife has not seen her husband since he killed Mrs Parry. Brehmer’s family and friends have insisted he is a ‘true gent’.

It can also be revealed today that, so distressing was the trial, one juror had to be discharged because of the impact it was having on her mental health.

Brehmer, who admitted manslaughter but denied murder, is a former traffic officer who was seconded to the National Police Air Service and lived with his wife and their nine-year-old son in the village of Hordle in Hampshire’s New Forest National Park.

Mrs Parry, who had an eight-year-old girl and a six-year-old boy with her husband Andrew, a Dorset Police officer, was a nurse practitioner at a medical centre in Bournemouth, Dorset. 

The judge said on Tuesday afternoon that he wished to have a ‘little time’ to consider the ‘appropriateness of the sentence’.

Last month Brehmer was dismissed without notice from Dorset Police following a disciplinary hearing.

Chief Constable James Vaughan said today: ‘As police officers our duty, first and foremost, is to protect the public and for a serving officer to take a life of another in this way is incomprehensible.

‘His conduct fell dramatically below that which I, his colleagues and the public expect from a police officer and he clearly has no place holding the office of constable.

‘Our thoughts very much remain with Claire Parry’s family, friends and loved ones. Our commitment to supporting her family and all those good officers in the Dorset Police family who have been affected by this incident will continue.

‘I would like to thank the investigation team for the fair, dispassionate and professional manner in which they approached this extremely difficult case.’

Revealed: Mistress strangled by married lothario PC Timothy Brehmer in a pub car park colluded with ANOTHER of his lovers to ’embark on his long and slow downfall’

By Jake Wallis Simons and James Fielding For MailOnline 

The police officer who killed his mistress after she revealed their ten-year affair to his wife was known by his colleagues in the force as a ‘sexual predator’ who preyed on ‘vulnerable’ emergency workers.

PC Timothy Brehmer strangled nurse Claire Parry in his car after she used his phone to text his detective wife of 14 years, telling her: ‘I’m cheating on you’.

During his trial the court was told that Brehmer had charmed a series of women and was dubbed Mr Smooth by one because he was a ‘professional at grooming them’.

Claire Parry, who had a ten year affair with Tim Brehmer, plotted his downfall with another of his lovers

Claire Parry, who had a ten year affair with Tim Brehmer, plotted his downfall with another of his lovers

Detective Constable Kate Rhodes

Detective Constable Kate Rhodes

Claire Parry (left), who had a ten year affair with Tim Brehmer, contacted another of his mistresses Detective Constable Kate Rhodes (right) on Facebook to plot his downfall 

DC Kate Rhodes, a former lover of Brehmer, told the jury she ‘quickly fell in love with him’ after they met at work but that she finished the relationship once she discovered he was married.

And a source within Dorset Police told MailOnline how well-spoken Brehmer had a reputation at work as a ladies’ man who managed to charm a number of lovers from within his own unit.

They said the smooth-talking officer, who is married to a detective in the same force, told each woman ‘you are the only one for me’ and sent song lyrics and sexualised messages to ‘suck them in’.

Yet despite his ‘streak of arrogance’ the father-of-two, who was born in Zimbabwe and raised by his mother and stepfather in Hampshire, was well-liked and good at his job, which helped him to ‘hide a multitude of sins’ and meant bosses often turned a blind eye to his womanising.

‘Dorset is a small force, everyone knows everyone, and Tim had this reputation as a serial womaniser,’ said the source.

‘He was said to be a proper sexual predator who targeted mainly vulnerable women who he worked with both in the police and in other emergency services.

‘I personally know at least one officer he had a drunken kiss and fumble with. She had just split from someone at the time and he wormed his way into her affections but it was all just a lie and he was a married man.

Brehmer, pictured with his wife Martha, he was acquitted of murder at Salisbury Crown Court

Brehmer, pictured with his wife Martha, he was acquitted of murder at Salisbury Crown Court

Brehmer, pictured with his wife Martha, he was acquitted of murder at Salisbury Crown Court

‘There are others, although exactly how many I can’t tell you. He had a streak of arrogance which helped him lie and cover his tracks over his affairs.

‘Tim was well-spoken and was often mocked by his colleagues because of it but he used it to his advantage when it came to chatting up women.

‘He could lay on the charm and was pretty well-liked by his colleagues and that, coupled with the fact that he was good at his job, helped to hide a multitude of sins.’

Bosses turned a blind eye to his fling with DC Rhodes in 2011. She tearfully described him to jurors as a ‘groomer who has a tool kit he uses on every woman he encounters.’

She said that in 2016, years after they had last seen each other, Brehmer made her ‘feel like a piece of meat’ by texting while she was on holiday with her husband, calling her a ‘dirty b***h’ and suggesting they meet for sex.

News of his affair with DC Rhodes had got back to his long-term on off lover Mrs Parry.

She had become angry that she wasn’t Brehmer’s ‘only other woman’ and plotted his downfall.

She set up a fake Facebook account using the name ‘Louisa Morgan’ and contacted his only other known lover, DC Rhodes.

The pair established that Brehmer was likely to have had more lovers in the emergency services, including another police officer.

Mrs Parry said she intended to ruin his life by confessing to his wife, Martha, referring him to the police watchdog and reporting him to the taxman for failing to declare a second income he made from gardening and odd jobs.

In messages to DC Rhodes, Mrs Parry, a fitness fanatic, wrote ‘hell hath no fury’ and said she was ’embarking on a long and slow downfall of Mr ‘man-whore’ Brehmer.

Her fling with Brehmer had begun in 2006 when she worked at the Royal Bournemouth Hospital and although their relationship was no more than ‘sexually flirtatious’ to begin with they eventually began sleeping with each other.

Mrs Parry's husband Andrew, also a police officer has been left to bring up the couple's two children alone

Mrs Parry's husband Andrew, also a police officer has been left to bring up the couple's two children alone

Mrs Parry, a fitness fanatic, had threatened to tell Brehmer's wife as her own marriage collapsed over it

Mrs Parry, a fitness fanatic, had threatened to tell Brehmer's wife as her own marriage collapsed over it

Mrs Parry’s husband Andrew (left), also a police officer has been left to bring up the couple’s two children alone. He had confronted his wife (right) about the affair before her death

Brehmer told the court his affair was ‘its own little bubble of niceness.’

But he said things had ‘gone bonkers’ between them in Mrs Parry’s final as he marriage collapsed and she had broken their ‘golden rule’ by asking him about his home life.

Mrs Parry’s husband Andrew told the court that by that time he had started tracking his wife when he became suspicious about the affair by hiding their daughter’s mobile in her car and tracing her whereabouts using an app.

He had found an email she had sent to Brehmer in which she said she would never love someone as much as him, as well as Travelodge bookings on their joint bank account and a man’s rugby shirt under the couple’s marital bed.

Mr Parry confronted his wife in February and she confessed that she had slept with Brehmer once.

The couple had counselling sessions but Mr Parry said he had accepted the marriage was over.

In the weeks leading up to her death, Brehmer told the court that he and Mrs Parry had met six times on dog walks before work, and that she had threatened to tell his wife. 

Married cop Brehmer sobbed 'What’s my mum going to say?' in the ambulance after strangling his lover Mrs Parry to death

Married cop Brehmer sobbed 'What’s my mum going to say?' in the ambulance after strangling his lover Mrs Parry to death

Married cop Brehmer sobbed ‘What’s my mum going to say?’ in the ambulance after strangling his lover Mrs Parry to death 

He was desperate to cover up their affair and on May 9 told Mrs Brehmer he was going to pick up some steaks for a family barbecue they were having later that day.

Instead, he drove to the car park of The Horns Inn in West Parley, Dorset, where he met mother-of-two Mrs Parry, to dissuade her from revealing their affair.

Just after 3pm that Saturday afternoon, she got into Brehmer’s Citroen C1 car and the pair began arguing, with Mrs Parry asking for his phone so she could look through his social media apps and see who else he had been in contact with.

After sending the message to his wife, he said she had refused to leave his vehicle so he tried to robustly force her out.

The court heard that Brehmer had strangled Mrs Parry so forcefully that a bone in her neck had broken and that a passer-by had found her body hanging half in and half out of his car.

One leg was wrapped around the gearstick and the other was on the passenger seat

At some point, Brehmer, who said he was severely depressed as his life started to unravel and had planned to kill himself after meeting with Mrs Parry, stabbed himself three times in the arm with a penknife.

He was seen on CCTV walking shoeless across the car park to the entrance where he sat down covered in his own blood, sobbing, before asking passers-by for help.

He initially told colleagues who arrested him that Mrs Parry had stabbed him only to later change his story.

He admitted her manslaughter but denied any intent to cause harm, claiming that he had ended up on top of her, with his left arm around the top of her chest, and that she had died accidentally as a result of that struggle.

The jury at Salisbury Crown Court believed him and he was cleared of her murder. 

Brehmer joined the police in 2003, first working in Bournemouth as a beat officer before joining the road traffic policing unit in 2010.

In 2015, he suffered a serious thumb injury after being assaulted by a 56-year-old motorist he had pulled over, which prevented him from driving.

After some time off work, he was seconded to the National Police Air Service (NPAS) and became part of the police helicopter crew, operating the camera and assisting with navigation.

He had met Martha in 2003 and the couple married three years later. They have a nine-year-old son together who she lives with at the former marital home in Lymington, Hampshire.Publicly Mrs Brehmer has declined requests to comment on her husband’s case. However, the court was told that the last time she spoke to her husband was on May 9 when he told her he was going to buy steaks for the barbecue. 

This post first appeared on dailymail.co.uk

Continue Reading

Trending

Copyright © 2020 DiazHub.