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Emma Watson wades into J.K. Rowling ‘transphobia’ row

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emma watson wades into j k rowling transphobia row

Emma Watson has weighed in on the transphobia row sparked by J.K. Rowling hours after the best-selling author penned an essay defending her stance.

The actress, who played Hermione Granger in the Harry Potter films based on Rowling’s book series, took to Twitter on Wednesday evening.

The 30-year-old wrote: ‘Trans people are who they say they are and deserve to live their lives without being constantly questioned or told they aren’t who they say they are.

Speaking out: Emma Watson has weighed in on the transphobia row sparked by J.K. Rowling as the best-selling authored penned a lengthy statement explaining her views

Speaking out: Emma Watson has weighed in on the transphobia row sparked by J.K. Rowling as the best-selling authored penned a lengthy statement explaining her views

Speaking out: Emma Watson has weighed in on the transphobia row sparked by J.K. Rowling as the best-selling authored penned a lengthy statement explaining her views

‘I want my trans followers to know that I and so many other people around the world see you, respect you and love you for who you are.’ 

She went on to say that she was proud to donate to charities such as Mermaids and Mama Cash before encouraging her fans to do the same.

Emma concluded: ‘Happy #Pride2020 Sending love x.’  

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29463684 8408355 image a 52 1591827915779

Support: Emma Watson, who played Hermione Granger in the Harry Potter films based on Rowling's book series, took to Twitter on Wednesday evening

Support: Emma Watson, who played Hermione Granger in the Harry Potter films based on Rowling's book series, took to Twitter on Wednesday evening

Support: Emma Watson, who played Hermione Granger in the Harry Potter films based on Rowling’s book series, took to Twitter on Wednesday evening

It comes after JK Rowling, 54, was hit by what she described as ‘relentless attacks’ after she took issue with an online article ‘people who menstruate’.

She tweeted to her 14.5m followers on Saturday: ‘I’m sure there used to be a word for those people. Someone help me out. Wumben? Wimpund? Woomud?’

Her remarks sparked backlash from a range of other stars including Daniel Radcliffe, who played Harry Potter in the film franchise of the series, and Eddie Redmayne, who stars in Ms Rowling’s Fantastic Beasts films.

But she has since answered her critics with a 3,663 word essay posted on her website on Wednesday under the headline: ‘J.K. Rowling Writes about Her Reasons for Speaking out on Sex and Gender Issues.’ 

Disagreements: It comes after JK Rowling, 54, was hit by what she described as 'relentless attacks' after she took issue with an online article 'people who menstruate'

Disagreements: It comes after JK Rowling, 54, was hit by what she described as 'relentless attacks' after she took issue with an online article 'people who menstruate'

Disagreements: It comes after JK Rowling, 54, was hit by what she described as ‘relentless attacks’ after she took issue with an online article ‘people who menstruate’

Controversy: The Harry Potter author opened up after facing a barrage of criticism for questioning the phrase 'people who menstruate'

Controversy: The Harry Potter author opened up after facing a barrage of criticism for questioning the phrase 'people who menstruate'

Controversy: The Harry Potter author opened up after facing a barrage of criticism for questioning the phrase ‘people who menstruate’

She appeared mindful that her words might not be suitable for her younger fans by adding the sub-heading: ‘Warning: This piece contains inappropriate language for children.’

In it, the author revealed she was sexually assaulted in her 20s and told of her scars of domestic violence from her first marriage. 

She appeared to confirm for the first time that she had suffered domestic abuse, describing her first marriage to Portuguese journalism student Jorge Arantas as ‘violent’. 

Update: On Wednesday, the author revealed in a 3,500-word blog post that she was a 'domestic abuse and sexual assault survivor' and was in a 'violent' first marriage to Portuguese journalism student Jorge Arantes (pictured together with daughter Jessica who is now 26)

Update: On Wednesday, the author revealed in a 3,500-word blog post that she was a 'domestic abuse and sexual assault survivor' and was in a 'violent' first marriage to Portuguese journalism student Jorge Arantes (pictured together with daughter Jessica who is now 26)

Update: On Wednesday, the author revealed in a 3,500-word blog post that she was a ‘domestic abuse and sexual assault survivor’ and was in a ‘violent’ first marriage to Portuguese journalism student Jorge Arantes (pictured together with daughter Jessica who is now 26)

Candid: Ms Rowling made her astonishing revelations, describing herself as 'a domestic abuse and sexual assault survivor' in a 3,663 word essay posted on her personal website on Wednesday

Candid: Ms Rowling made her astonishing revelations, describing herself as 'a domestic abuse and sexual assault survivor' in a 3,663 word essay posted on her personal website on Wednesday

Candid: Ms Rowling made her astonishing revelations, describing herself as ‘a domestic abuse and sexual assault survivor’ in a 3,663 word essay posted on her personal website on Wednesday

She wrote: ‘On Saturday morning, I read that the Scottish government is proceeding with its controversial gender recognition plans, which will in effect mean that all a man needs to ‘become a woman’ is to say he’s one.

‘To use a very contemporary word, I was ‘triggered’. 

‘Ground down by the relentless attacks from trans activists on social media, when I was only there to give children feedback about pictures they’d drawn for my book under lockdown, I spent much of Saturday in a very dark place inside my head, as memories of a serious sexual assault I suffered in my twenties recurred on a loop. 

‘That assault happened at a time and in a space where I was vulnerable, and a man capitalised on an opportunity.

‘I couldn’t shut out those memories and I was finding it hard to contain my anger and disappointment about the way I believe my government is playing fast and loose with womens and girls’ safety.’

Ms Rowling also went on to describe her experience of domestic and sexual abuse. 

‘I’ve been in the public eye now for over twenty years and have never talked publicly about being a domestic abuse and sexual assault survivor,’ she wrote. 

Hitting out: Her remarks led to a backlash from stars including Daniel Radcliffe, who played Harry Potter in the film franchise of the series, and Eddie Redmayne, who stars in Rowling's Fantastic Beasts films

Hitting out: Her remarks led to a backlash from stars including Daniel Radcliffe, who played Harry Potter in the film franchise of the series, and Eddie Redmayne, who stars in Rowling's Fantastic Beasts films

Hitting out: Her remarks led to a backlash from stars including Daniel Radcliffe, who played Harry Potter in the film franchise of the series, and Eddie Redmayne, who stars in Rowling’s Fantastic Beasts films 

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29319688 0 image a 47 1591826672141

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29319696 0 image a 34 1591826671694

Defence: The wordsmith seemingly denied claims of transphobia, before retweeting a fan's comment which slammed 'extremists' for 'insisting biological sex is an illusion'

Defence: The wordsmith seemingly denied claims of transphobia, before retweeting a fan's comment which slammed 'extremists' for 'insisting biological sex is an illusion'

Defence: The wordsmith seemingly denied claims of transphobia, before retweeting a fan’s comment which slammed ‘extremists’ for ‘insisting biological sex is an illusion’

‘This isn’t because I’m ashamed those things happened to me, but because they’re traumatic to revisit and remember. I also feel protective of my daughter from my first marriage.’

The author had one child, daughter Jessica Isabel Rowling Arantes, 26, with her Portuguese ex-husband. They were married for just 13 months. 

Former drug addict Arantes admitted in 2000 that he had once slapped her ‘very hard’ early in the morning of November 17, 1993 and thrown her out of the house in Porto, Portugal.

He said: ‘She refused to go without Jessica… there was a violent struggle. I had to drag her out of the house at five in the morning, and I admit I slapped her very hard in the street.’

A timeline of the controversy

Saturday, June 6 – Rowling’s speaks out against use of ‘people who menstruate’ phrase

Rowling retweets an opinion article published on website Devex which bore the headline, ‘Creating a more equal post-COVID-19 world for people who menstruate’.

Above the article, she slammed the use of the phrase, which was used to include transgender men who were born women and are still capable of menstruating. She wrote: ‘I’m sure there used to be a word for those people. Someone help me out. Wumben? Wimpund? Woomud?’

Her tweet immediately provoked a barrage of criticism from her LGBTQ followers. 

The author then responded to the criticism by retweeting a gay fan’s comment which slammed ‘extremists’ for ‘insisting biological sex is an illusion’.

Ms Rowling added: ‘If sex isn’t real, there’s no same-sex attraction.

‘If sex isn’t real, the lived reality of women globally is erased. 

‘I know and love trans people, but erasing the concept of sex removes the ability of many to meaningfully discuss their lives. It isn’t hate to speak the truth.’ 

Sunday, June 7 – Ms Rowling responds to critics

As the criticism continued, Ms Rowling spoke out again by adding to the same Twitter thread.

She wrote: ‘The idea that women like me, who’ve been empathetic to trans people for decades, feeling kinship because they’re vulnerable in the same way as women – ie, to male violence – ‘hate’ trans people because they think sex is real and has lived consequences – is a nonsense.’

‘I respect every trans person’s right to live any way that feels authentic and comfortable to them. I’d march with you if you were discriminated against on the basis of being trans. At the same time, my life has been shaped by being female. I do not believe it’s hateful to say so.’

Tuesday, June 9 – Daniel Radcliffe speaks out against Ms Rowling’s comments

Harry Potter star Daniel Radcliffe penned an opinion piece for The Trevor Project which criticised Rowling.  

He wrote: ‘To all the people who now feel that their experience of the books has been tarnished or diminished, I am deeply sorry for the pain these comments have caused you’.   

He added that ‘transgender women are women’ and said people should not view his words as evidence of ‘infighting’ between himself and Ms Rowling. 

Wednesday, June 10 – Eddie Redmayne adds to the criticism

Fantastic Beast And Where To Find Them star, 38, Eddie Redmayne joined in the chorus of critics towards Rowling. In a statement released to Variety, Eddie responded: ‘As someone who has worked with both J.K. Rowling and members of the trans community… 

‘I wanted to make it absolutely clear where I stand. I disagree with Jo’s comments. Trans women are women, trans men are men and non-binary identities are valid.’

Other stars, including Jameela Jamil and Jonathan Van Ness also rounded on the author. 

Wednesday, June  10 – Ms Rowling reveals she was sexually assaulted and details her ‘violent’ first marriage    

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He could not be contacted for comment on Wednesday. 

Ms Rowling returned the following day with a policeman to retrieve their four-month-old daughter Jessica and stayed in hiding with friends for two weeks before returning to the UK.   

In her post, Ms Rowling said she did not want to ‘claim ownership’ of a story which also belongs to her daughter.  

‘I didn’t want to claim sole ownership of a story that belongs to her, too. However, a short while ago, I asked her how she’d feel if I were publicly honest about that part of my life, and she encouraged me to go ahead,’ she added.

‘I’m mentioning these things now not in an attempt to garner sympathy, but out of solidarity with the huge numbers of women who have histories like mine, who’ve been slurred as bigots for having concerns around single-sex spaces.

‘I managed to escape my first violent marriage with some difficulty, but I’m now married to a truly good and principled man, safe and secure in ways I never in a million years expected to be.

‘However, the scars left by violence and sexual assault don’t disappear, no matter how loved you are, and no matter how much money you’ve made.

‘My perennial jumpiness is a family joke – and even I know it’s funny – but I pray my daughters never have the same reasons I do for hating sudden loud noises, or finding people behind me when I haven’t heard them approaching.’ 

Ms Rowling also declared she had ‘deep concerns’ about the pressures young people face to transition to another gender. 

She even suggested she might have become a man herself – ‘to turn myself into the son my father had openly said he’d have preferred’ – if she had been subjected to similar pressures. 

Mr Arantes not be contacted for comment.

The author’s post comes after her incendiary comments on Twitter last week. 

After writing her initial controversial tweet, the author continued with another thread speaking about the concept of biological sex. 

‘If sex isn’t real, there’s no same-sex attraction,’ she tweeted. ‘If sex isn’t real, the lived reality of women globally is erased. I know and love trans people, but erasing the concept of sex removes the ability of many to meaningfully discuss their lives. It isn’t hate to speak the truth.’

Ms Rowling’s tweets caused a firestorm of responses from the LGBTQ community and others who were upset with her words. 

A Harry Potter fan group tweeted its disapproval of Rowling’s post and encouraged followers to donate to a group that supports transgender women.

LGBT rights group GLAAD issued a response on Twitter, calling Ms Rowling’s tweets ‘inaccurate and cruel.’ 

The group then asked those upset by the author’s comments to support organizations that help transgender people.

‘JK Rowling continues to align herself with an ideology which willfully distorts facts about gender identity and people who are trans,’ GLAAD tweeted. ‘In 2020, there is no excuse for targeting trans people.’

In response, Radcliffe hit out at the author who made him famous, saying: ‘To all the people who now feel that their experience of the books has been tarnished or diminished, I am deeply sorry for the pain these comments have caused you’. 

Radcliffe wrote: ‘Transgender women are women. Any statement to the contrary erases the identity and dignity of transgender people and goes against all advice given by professional health care associations who have far more expertise on this subject matter than either Jo or I’. 

He continued: ‘I realize that certain press outlets will probably want to paint this as in-fighting between JK Rowling and myself, but that is really not what this is about, nor is it what’s important right now. 

‘While Jo is unquestionably responsible for the course my life has taken, as someone who has been honored to work with and continues to contribute to The Trevor Project for the last decade, and just as a human being, I feel compelled to say something at this moment.’

Radcliffe also reached out to loyal Harry Potter fans: ‘If these books taught you that love is the strongest force in the universe, capable of overcoming anything…

‘If they taught you that strength is found in diversity, and that dogmatic ideas of pureness lead to the oppression of vulnerable groups…

‘If you believe that a particular character is trans, nonbinary, or gender fluid, or that they are gay or bisexual; if you found anything in these stories that resonated with you and helped you at any time in your life — then that is between you and the book that you read, and it is sacred. 

‘And in my opinion nobody can touch that. It means to you what it means to you and I hope that these comments will not taint that too much. 

Discord: Fantastic Beast And Where To Find Them star Eddie Redmayne, 38, joined in the chorus of critics towards the author

Discord: Fantastic Beast And Where To Find Them star Eddie Redmayne, 38, joined in the chorus of critics towards the author

Discord: Fantastic Beast And Where To Find Them star Eddie Redmayne, 38, joined in the chorus of critics towards the author

Fantastic Beast And Where To Find Them star Redmayne, 38, joined in the chorus of critics towards the author.

In a statement released to Variety, Redmayne responded: ‘As someone who has worked with both J.K. Rowling and members of the trans community… 

‘I wanted to make it absolutely clear where I stand. I disagree with Jo’s comments. Trans women are women, trans men are men and non-binary identities are valid.’

And Bonnie Wright, 29, who played Ginny Weasley in the Harry Potter series, also added: ‘If Harry Potter was a source of love and belonging for you, that love is infinite and there to take without judgment or question. 

‘Transwomen are Women. I see and love you, Bonnie x.’

Together: Bonnie Wright, who played Ginny Weasley in the Harry Potter series, also added: 'If Harry Potter was a source of love and belonging for you, that love is infinite and there to take without judgment or question'

Together: Bonnie Wright, who played Ginny Weasley in the Harry Potter series, also added: 'If Harry Potter was a source of love and belonging for you, that love is infinite and there to take without judgment or question'

Together: Bonnie Wright, who played Ginny Weasley in the Harry Potter series, also added: ‘If Harry Potter was a source of love and belonging for you, that love is infinite and there to take without judgment or question’

In her blog post, Ms Rowling also referred to her controversial tweet on Saturday.

She wrote: ‘Late on Saturday evening, scrolling through children’s pictures before I went to bed, I forgot the first rule of Twitter – never, ever expect a nuanced conversation – and reacted to what I felt was degrading language about women. 

‘I spoke up about the importance of sex and have been paying the price ever since. I was transphobic, I was a c***t, a b***h, a TERF, I deserved cancelling, punching and death. You are Voldemort said one person, clearly feeling this was the only language I’d understand.’ 

‘Huge numbers of women are justifiably terrified by the trans activists; I know this because so many have got in touch with me to tell their stories. They’re afraid of doxxing, of losing their jobs or their livelihoods, and of violence.

‘But endlessly unpleasant as its constant targeting of me has been, I refuse to bow down to a movement that I believe is doing demonstrable harm in seeking to erode ‘woman’ as a political and biological class and offering cover to predators like few before it.

‘I stand alongside the brave women and men, gay, straight and trans, who’re standing up for freedom of speech and thought, and for the rights and safety of some of the most vulnerable in our society: young gay kids, fragile teenagers, and women who’re reliant on and wish to retain their single sex spaces.

‘Polls show those women are in the vast majority, and exclude only those privileged or lucky enough never to have come up against male violence or sexual assault, and who’ve never troubled to educate themselves on how prevalent it is.

Ms Rowling, who also writes crime novels under the pen name Robert Galbraith, also referred to the backlash she received in December last year after supporting researcher Maya Forstater, who was sacked for tweeting that transgender people cannot change their biological sex. 

History: Ms Rowling previously faced a backlash after supporting researcher Maya Forstater, who was sacked for tweeting that transgender people cannot change their biological sex

History: Ms Rowling previously faced a backlash after supporting researcher Maya Forstater, who was sacked for tweeting that transgender people cannot change their biological sex

History: Ms Rowling previously faced a backlash after supporting researcher Maya Forstater, who was sacked for tweeting that transgender people cannot change their biological sex 

She wrote: ‘I knew perfectly well what was going to happen when I supported Maya.

‘I must have been on my fourth or fifth cancellation by then. 

‘I expected the threats of violence, to be told I was literally killing trans people with my hate, to be called c**t and b***h and, of course, for my books to be burned, although one particularly abusive man told me he’d composted them.’

But Ms Rowling revealed that she had also had widespread support with an ‘avalanche of emails and letters that came showering down upon me, the overwhelming majority of which were positive, grateful and supportive.’

She added: ‘They came from a cross-section of kind, empathetic and intelligent people, some of them working in fields dealing with gender dysphoria and trans people, who’re all deeply concerned about the way a socio-political concept is influencing politics, medical practice and safeguarding.

‘They’re worried about the dangers to young people, gay people and about the erosion of women’s and girl’s rights. Above all, they’re worried about a climate of fear that serves nobody – least of all trans youth – well.’

She accused activists of ‘assuming a right to police my speech, accuse me of hatred, call me misogynistic slurs and, above all – as every woman involved in this debate will know – TERF.’

Ms Rowling told her fans: ‘If you didn’t already know – and why should you? – ‘TERF’ is an acronym coined by trans activists, which stands for Trans-Exclusionary Radical Feminist.

‘In practice, a huge and diverse cross-section of women are currently being called TERFs and the vast majority have never been radical feminists.’

Ms Forstater was fired over ‘offensive’ tweets questioning government plans to allow people to self-identify as another gender. 

Ms Rowling was accused of being a ‘TERF’ or trans exclusionary radical feminist after claiming Ms Forstater was ‘forced out of her job for stating sex is real’. 

Using the hashtag #IStandWithMaya, Ms Rowling tweeted: ‘Dress however you please. 

‘Call yourself whatever you like. Sleep with any consenting adult who’ll have you. Live your best life in peace and security.

‘But force women out of their jobs for stating that sex is real? #IStandWithMaya #ThisIsNotADrill’.     

JK Rowling’s blog post in full which she she published on her personal website

This isn’t an easy piece to write, for reasons that will shortly become clear, but I know it’s time to explain myself on an issue surrounded by toxicity. I write this without any desire to add to that toxicity.

For people who don’t know: last December I tweeted my support for Maya Forstater, a tax specialist who’d lost her job for what were deemed ‘transphobic’ tweets. She took her case to an employment tribunal, asking the judge to rule on whether a philosophical belief that sex is determined by biology is protected in law. Judge Tayler ruled that it wasn’t.

My interest in trans issues pre-dated Maya’s case by almost two years, during which I followed the debate around the concept of gender identity closely. I’ve met trans people, and read sundry books, blogs and articles by trans people, gender specialists, intersex people, psychologists, safeguarding experts, social workers and doctors, and followed the discourse online and in traditional media. On one level, my interest in this issue has been professional, because I’m writing a crime series, set in the present day, and my fictional female detective is of an age to be interested in, and affected by, these issues herself, but on another, it’s intensely personal, as I’m about to explain.

All the time I’ve been researching and learning, accusations and threats from trans activists have been bubbling in my Twitter timeline. This was initially triggered by a ‘like’. When I started taking an interest in gender identity and transgender matters, I began screenshotting comments that interested me, as a way of reminding myself what I might want to research later. On one occasion, I absent-mindedly ‘liked’ instead of screenshotting. That single ‘like’ was deemed evidence of wrongthink, and a persistent low level of harassment began.

Months later, I compounded my accidental ‘like’ crime by following Magdalen Burns on Twitter. Magdalen was an immensely brave young feminist and lesbian who was dying of an aggressive brain tumour. I followed her because I wanted to contact her directly, which I succeeded in doing. However, as Magdalen was a great believer in the importance of biological sex, and didn’t believe lesbians should be called bigots for not dating trans women with penises, dots were joined in the heads of twitter trans activists, and the level of social media abuse increased.

I mention all this only to explain that I knew perfectly well what was going to happen when I supported Maya. I must have been on my fourth or fifth cancellation by then. I expected the threats of violence, to be told I was literally killing trans people with my hate, to be called cunt and bitch and, of course, for my books to be burned, although one particularly abusive man told me he’d composted them.

What I didn’t expect in the aftermath of my cancellation was the avalanche of emails and letters that came showering down upon me, the overwhelming majority of which were positive, grateful and supportive. They came from a cross-section of kind, empathetic and intelligent people, some of them working in fields dealing with gender dysphoria and trans people, who’re all deeply concerned about the way a socio-political concept is influencing politics, medical practice and safeguarding. They’re worried about the dangers to young people, gay people and about the erosion of women’s and girl’s rights. Above all, they’re worried about a climate of fear that serves nobody – least of all trans youth – well.

I’d stepped back from Twitter for many months both before and after tweeting support for Maya, because I knew it was doing nothing good for my mental health. I only returned because I wanted to share a free children’s book during the pandemic. Immediately, activists who clearly believe themselves to be good, kind and progressive people swarmed back into my timeline, assuming a right to police my speech, accuse me of hatred, call me misogynistic slurs and, above all – as every woman involved in this debate will know – TERF.

If you didn’t already know – and why should you? – ‘TERF’ is an acronym coined by trans activists, which stands for Trans-Exclusionary Radical Feminist. In practice, a huge and diverse cross-section of women are currently being called TERFs and the vast majority have never been radical feminists. Examples of so-called TERFs range from the mother of a gay child who was afraid their child wanted to transition to escape homophobic bullying, to a hitherto totally unfeminist older lady who’s vowed never to visit Marks & Spencer again because they’re allowing any man who says they identify as a woman into the women’s changing rooms. Ironically, radical feminists aren’t even trans-exclusionary – they include trans men in their feminism, because they were born women.

But accusations of TERFery have been sufficient to intimidate many people, institutions and organisations I once admired, who’re cowering before the tactics of the playground. ‘They’ll call us transphobic!’ ‘They’ll say I hate trans people!’ What next, they’ll say you’ve got fleas? Speaking as a biological woman, a lot of people in positions of power really need to grow a pair (which is doubtless literally possible, according to the kind of people who argue that clownfish prove humans aren’t a dimorphic species).

So why am I doing this? Why speak up? Why not quietly do my research and keep my head down?

Well, I’ve got five reasons for being worried about the new trans activism, and deciding I need to speak up.

Firstly, I have a charitable trust that focuses on alleviating social deprivation in Scotland, with a particular emphasis on women and children. Among other things, my trust supports projects for female prisoners and for survivors of domestic and sexual abuse. I also fund medical research into MS, a disease that behaves very differently in men and women. It’s been clear to me for a while that the new trans activism is having (or is likely to have, if all its demands are met) a significant impact on many of the causes I support, because it’s pushing to erode the legal definition of sex and replace it with gender.

The second reason is that I’m an ex-teacher and the founder of a children’s charity, which gives me an interest in both education and safeguarding. Like many others, I have deep concerns about the effect the trans rights movement is having on both.

The third is that, as a much-banned author, I’m interested in freedom of speech and have publicly defended it, even unto Donald Trump.

The fourth is where things start to get truly personal. I’m concerned about the huge explosion in young women wishing to transition and also about the increasing numbers who seem to be detransitioning (returning to their original sex), because they regret taking steps that have, in some cases, altered their bodies irrevocably, and taken away their fertility. Some say they decided to transition after realising they were same-sex attracted, and that transitioning was partly driven by homophobia, either in society or in their families.

Most people probably aren’t aware – I certainly wasn’t, until I started researching this issue properly – that ten years ago, the majority of people wanting to transition to the opposite sex were male. That ratio has now reversed. The UK has experienced a 4400% increase in girls being referred for transitioning treatment. Autistic girls are hugely overrepresented in their numbers.

The same phenomenon has been seen in the US. In 2018, American physician and researcher Lisa Littman set out to explore it. In an interview, she said:

‘Parents online were describing a very unusual pattern of transgender-identification where multiple friends and even entire friend groups became transgender-identified at the same time. I would have been remiss had I not considered social contagion and peer influences as potential factors.’

Littman mentioned Tumblr, Reddit, Instagram and YouTube as contributing factors to Rapid Onset Gender Dysphoria, where she believes that in the realm of transgender identification ‘youth have created particularly insular echo chambers.’

Her paper caused a furore. She was accused of bias and of spreading misinformation about transgender people, subjected to a tsunami of abuse and a concerted campaign to discredit both her and her work. The journal took the paper offline and re-reviewed it before republishing it. However, her career took a similar hit to that suffered by Maya Forstater. Lisa Littman had dared challenge one of the central tenets of trans activism, which is that a person’s gender identity is innate, like sexual orientation. Nobody, the activists insisted, could ever be persuaded into being trans.

The argument of many current trans activists is that if you don’t let a gender dysphoric teenager transition, they will kill themselves. In an article explaining why he resigned from the Tavistock (an NHS gender clinic in England) psychiatrist Marcus Evans stated that claims that children will kill themselves if not permitted to transition do not ‘align substantially with any robust data or studies in this area. Nor do they align with the cases I have encountered over decades as a psychotherapist.’

The writings of young trans men reveal a group of notably sensitive and clever people. The more of their accounts of gender dysphoria I’ve read, with their insightful descriptions of anxiety, dissociation, eating disorders, self-harm and self-hatred, the more I’ve wondered whether, if I’d been born 30 years later, I too might have tried to transition. The allure of escaping womanhood would have been huge. I struggled with severe OCD as a teenager. If I’d found community and sympathy online that I couldn’t find in my immediate environment, I believe I could have been persuaded to turn myself into the son my father had openly said he’d have preferred.

When I read about the theory of gender identity, I remember how mentally sexless I felt in youth. I remember Colette’s description of herself as a ‘mental hermaphrodite’ and Simone de Beauvoir’s words: ‘It is perfectly natural for the future woman to feel indignant at the limitations posed upon her by her sex. The real question is not why she should reject them: the problem is rather to understand why she accepts them.’

As I didn’t have a realistic possibility of becoming a man back in the 1980s, it had to be books and music that got me through both my mental health issues and the sexualised scrutiny and judgement that sets so many girls to war against their bodies in their teens. Fortunately for me, I found my own sense of otherness, and my ambivalence about being a woman, reflected in the work of female writers and musicians who reassured me that, in spite of everything a sexist world tries to throw at the female-bodied, it’s fine not to feel pink, frilly and compliant inside your own head; it’s OK to feel confused, dark, both sexual and non-sexual, unsure of what or who you are.

I want to be very clear here: I know transition will be a solution for some gender dysphoric people, although I’m also aware through extensive research that studies have consistently shown that between 60-90% of gender dysphoric teens will grow out of their dysphoria. Again and again I’ve been told to ‘just meet some trans people.’ I have: in addition to a few younger people, who were all adorable, I happen to know a self-described transsexual woman who’s older than I am and wonderful. Although she’s open about her past as a gay man, I’ve always found it hard to think of her as anything other than a woman, and I believe (and certainly hope) she’s completely happy to have transitioned. Being older, though, she went through a long and rigorous process of evaluation, psychotherapy and staged transformation. The current explosion of trans activism is urging a removal of almost all the robust systems through which candidates for sex reassignment were once required to pass. A man who intends to have no surgery and take no hormones may now secure himself a Gender Recognition Certificate and be a woman in the sight of the law. Many people aren’t aware of this.

We’re living through the most misogynistic period I’ve experienced. Back in the 80s, I imagined that my future daughters, should I have any, would have it far better than I ever did, but between the backlash against feminism and a porn-saturated online culture, I believe things have got significantly worse for girls. Never have I seen women denigrated and dehumanised to the extent they are now. From the leader of the free world’s long history of sexual assault accusations and his proud boast of ‘grabbing them by the pussy’, to the incel (‘involuntarily celibate’) movement that rages against women who won’t give them sex, to the trans activists who declare that TERFs need punching and re-educating, men across the political spectrum seem to agree: women are asking for trouble. Everywhere, women are being told to shut up and sit down, or else.

I’ve read all the arguments about femaleness not residing in the sexed body, and the assertions that biological women don’t have common experiences, and I find them, too, deeply misogynistic and regressive. It’s also clear that one of the objectives of denying the importance of sex is to erode what some seem to see as the cruelly segregationist idea of women having their own biological realities or – just as threatening – unifying realities that make them a cohesive political class. The hundreds of emails I’ve received in the last few days prove this erosion concerns many others just as much. It isn’t enough for women to be trans allies. Women must accept and admit that there is no material difference between trans women and themselves.

But, as many women have said before me, ‘woman’ is not a costume. ‘Woman’ is not an idea in a man’s head. ‘Woman’ is not a pink brain, a liking for Jimmy Choos or any of the other sexist ideas now somehow touted as progressive. Moreover, the ‘inclusive’ language that calls female people ‘menstruators’ and ‘people with vulvas’ strikes many women as dehumanising and demeaning. I understand why trans activists consider this language to be appropriate and kind, but for those of us who’ve had degrading slurs spat at us by violent men, it’s not neutral, it’s hostile and alienating.

Which brings me to the fifth reason I’m deeply concerned about the consequences of the current trans activism.

I’ve been in the public eye now for over twenty years and have never talked publicly about being a domestic abuse and sexual assault survivor. This isn’t because I’m ashamed those things happened to me, but because they’re traumatic to revisit and remember. I also feel protective of my daughter from my first marriage. I didn’t want to claim sole ownership of a story that belongs to her, too. However, a short while ago, I asked her how she’d feel if I were publicly honest about that part of my life, and she encouraged me to go ahead.

I’m mentioning these things now not in an attempt to garner sympathy, but out of solidarity with the huge numbers of women who have histories like mine, who’ve been slurred as bigots for having concerns around single-sex spaces.

I managed to escape my first violent marriage with some difficulty, but I’m now married to a truly good and principled man, safe and secure in ways I never in a million years expected to be. However, the scars left by violence and sexual assault don’t disappear, no matter how loved you are, and no matter how much money you’ve made. My perennial jumpiness is a family joke – and even I know it’s funny – but I pray my daughters never have the same reasons I do for hating sudden loud noises, or finding people behind me when I haven’t heard them approaching.

If you could come inside my head and understand what I feel when I read about a trans woman dying at the hands of a violent man, you’d find solidarity and kinship. I have a visceral sense of the terror in which those trans women will have spent their last seconds on earth, because I too have known moments of blind fear when I realised that the only thing keeping me alive was the shaky self-restraint of my attacker.

I believe the majority of trans-identified people not only pose zero threat to others, but are vulnerable for all the reasons I’ve outlined. Trans people need and deserve protection. Like women, they’re most likely to be killed by sexual partners. Trans women who work in the sex industry, particularly trans women of colour, are at particular risk. Like every other domestic abuse and sexual assault survivor I know, I feel nothing but empathy and solidarity with trans women who’ve been abused by men.

So I want trans women to be safe. At the same time, I do not want to make natal girls and women less safe. When you throw open the doors of bathrooms and changing rooms to any man who believes or feels he’s a woman – and, as I’ve said, gender confirmation certificates may now be granted without any need for surgery or hormones – then you open the door to any and all men who wish to come inside. That is the simple truth.

On Saturday morning, I read that the Scottish government is proceeding with its controversial gender recognition plans, which will in effect mean that all a man needs to ‘become a woman’ is to say he’s one. To use a very contemporary word, I was ‘triggered’. Ground down by the relentless attacks from trans activists on social media, when I was only there to give children feedback about pictures they’d drawn for my book under lockdown, I spent much of Saturday in a very dark place inside my head, as memories of a serious sexual assault I suffered in my twenties recurred on a loop. That assault happened at a time and in a space where I was vulnerable, and a man capitalised on an opportunity. I couldn’t shut out those memories and I was finding it hard to contain my anger and disappointment about the way I believe my government is playing fast and loose with womens and girls’ safety.

Late on Saturday evening, scrolling through children’s pictures before I went to bed, I forgot the first rule of Twitter – never, ever expect a nuanced conversation – and reacted to what I felt was degrading language about women. I spoke up about the importance of sex and have been paying the price ever since. I was transphobic, I was a cunt, a bitch, a TERF, I deserved cancelling, punching and death. You are Voldemort said one person, clearly feeling this was the only language I’d understand.

It would be so much easier to tweet the approved hashtags – because of course trans rights are human rights and of course trans lives matter – scoop up the woke cookies and bask in a virtue-signalling afterglow. There’s joy, relief and safety in conformity. As Simone de Beauvoir also wrote, ‘… without a doubt it is more comfortable to endure blind bondage than to work for one’s liberation; the dead, too, are better suited to the earth than the living.’

Huge numbers of women are justifiably terrified by the trans activists; I know this because so many have got in touch with me to tell their stories. They’re afraid of doxxing, of losing their jobs or their livelihoods, and of violence.

But endlessly unpleasant as its constant targeting of me has been, I refuse to bow down to a movement that I believe is doing demonstrable harm in seeking to erode ‘woman’ as a political and biological class and offering cover to predators like few before it. I stand alongside the brave women and men, gay, straight and trans, who’re standing up for freedom of speech and thought, and for the rights and safety of some of the most vulnerable in our society: young gay kids, fragile teenagers, and women who’re reliant on and wish to retain their single sex spaces. Polls show those women are in the vast majority, and exclude only those privileged or lucky enough never to have come up against male violence or sexual assault, and who’ve never troubled to educate themselves on how prevalent it is.

The one thing that gives me hope is that the women who can protest and organise, are doing so, and they have some truly decent men and trans people alongside them. Political parties seeking to appease the loudest voices in this debate are ignoring women’s concerns at their peril. In the UK, women are reaching out to each other across party lines, concerned about the erosion of their hard-won rights and widespread intimidation. None of the gender critical women I’ve talked to hates trans people; on the contrary. Many of them became interested in this issue in the first place out of concern for trans youth, and they’re hugely sympathetic towards trans adults who simply want to live their lives, but who’re facing a backlash for a brand of activism they don’t endorse. The supreme irony is that the attempt to silence women with the word ‘TERF’ may have pushed more young women towards radical feminism than the movement’s seen in decades.

The last thing I want to say is this. I haven’t written this essay in the hope that anybody will get out a violin for me, not even a teeny-weeny one. I’m extraordinarily fortunate; I’m a survivor, certainly not a victim. I’ve only mentioned my past because, like every other human being on this planet, I have a complex backstory, which shapes my fears, my interests and my opinions. I never forget that inner complexity when I’m creating a fictional character and I certainly never forget it when it comes to trans people.

All I’m asking – all I want – is for similar empathy, similar understanding, to be extended to the many millions of women whose sole crime is wanting their concerns to be heard without receiving threats and abuse.   

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Justice Department brands NYC an ‘anarchist jurisdiction’ targeted for defunding 

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justice department brands nyc an anarchist jurisdiction targeted for defunding

The Justice Department declared New York City, Portland and Seattle as ‘anarchist jurisdictions that can have federal funding ripped away for failing to clamp down on violence according to its criteria. 

It listed the three cities as among those ‘that have permitted violence and destruction of property to persist and have refused to undertake reasonable measures to counteract criminal activity.’

The designation comes with billions of dollars in federal funding at stake, following President Donald Trump‘s order to make the designations amid violence and property damage that occurred during a summer of protests over the killing of George Floyd by Minneapolis police during his arrest. 

Attorney General Bill Barr's Justice Department is calling out New York, Portland, and Seattle as 'anarchist jurisdictions' with billions in federal funding at stake

Attorney General Bill Barr's Justice Department is calling out New York, Portland, and Seattle as 'anarchist jurisdictions' with billions in federal funding at stake

Attorney General Bill Barr’s Justice Department is calling out New York, Portland, and Seattle as ‘anarchist jurisdictions’ with billions in federal funding at stake

The agency made the designation in a document it titled: ‘Memorandum on Reviewing Funding to State and Local Government Recipients That Are Permitting Anarchy, Violence, and Destruction in American Cities.’

It comes weeks before Election Day while President Trump campaigns across the country on ‘law and order.’ 

The White House Office of Management and Budget is to make further determinations in the coming month.

The financial stakes for a city of New York’s size are huge. Federal funding accounts for $7 billion in funding as it faces shortfalls amid the coronavirus, NBC New York reported. 

Protesters clash with police during a rally against the death of Minneapolis, Minnesota man George Floyd at the hands of police on May 28, 2020 in Union Square in New York City

Protesters clash with police during a rally against the death of Minneapolis, Minnesota man George Floyd at the hands of police on May 28, 2020 in Union Square in New York City

Protesters clash with police during a rally against the death of Minneapolis, Minnesota man George Floyd at the hands of police on May 28, 2020 in Union Square in New York City

Protests turn into looting and destructions in Manhattan before first curfew imposed. Firefighter extinguished fire set by protesters on garbage recepticle Wide looting before curfew begins in NYC, New York, New York, 01 Jun 2020

Protests turn into looting and destructions in Manhattan before first curfew imposed. Firefighter extinguished fire set by protesters on garbage recepticle Wide looting before curfew begins in NYC, New York, New York, 01 Jun 2020

Protests turn into looting and destructions in Manhattan before first curfew imposed. Firefighter extinguished fire set by protesters on garbage recepticle Wide looting before curfew begins in NYC, New York, New York, 01 Jun 2020

The memo lists Portland (above), Seattle , and New York City

The memo lists Portland (above), Seattle , and New York City

The memo lists Portland (above), Seattle , and New York City

A protester kicks a police vehicle in an attempt to break its side mirror during a "Solidarity with Portland" protest Saturday, July 25, 2020, in New York. The memo faults DAs in the city for failing to prosecute disorderly conduct

A protester kicks a police vehicle in an attempt to break its side mirror during a "Solidarity with Portland" protest Saturday, July 25, 2020, in New York. The memo faults DAs in the city for failing to prosecute disorderly conduct

A protester kicks a police vehicle in an attempt to break its side mirror during a ‘Solidarity with Portland’ protest Saturday, July 25, 2020, in New York. The memo faults DAs in the city for failing to prosecute disorderly conduct

Police officers break up a fight between supporters of U.S. President Donald Trump and Black Lives Matter protesters outside the Oregon State Capitol building in Salem, Oregon, U.S. September 7, 2020

Police officers break up a fight between supporters of U.S. President Donald Trump and Black Lives Matter protesters outside the Oregon State Capitol building in Salem, Oregon, U.S. September 7, 2020

Police officers break up a fight between supporters of U.S. President Donald Trump and Black Lives Matter protesters outside the Oregon State Capitol building in Salem, Oregon, U.S. September 7, 2020

Mayhem and chaos in the CHAD/CHAZ zone of Seattle, at midnight of the day that police took back their precinct and arrested over 40 protestors who were occupying the Capitol Hill area, following the first set of riotous protests following the murder of George Floyd

Mayhem and chaos in the CHAD/CHAZ zone of Seattle, at midnight of the day that police took back their precinct and arrested over 40 protestors who were occupying the Capitol Hill area, following the first set of riotous protests following the murder of George Floyd

Mayhem and chaos in the CHAD/CHAZ zone of Seattle, at midnight of the day that police took back their precinct and arrested over 40 protestors who were occupying the Capitol Hill area, following the first set of riotous protests following the murder of George Floyd

The decision was accompanied by a statement from Trump loyalist Attorney General Bill Barr, who recently visited Chicago, another city Trump and the White House repeatedly single out for being saddled with violent crime. 

‘When state and local leaders impede their own law enforcement officers and agencies from doing their jobs, it endangers innocent citizens who deserve to be protected, including those who are trying to peacefully assemble and protest,’ Barr said.

‘We cannot allow federal tax dollars to be wasted when the safety of the citizenry hangs in the balance. It is my hope that the cities identified by the Department of Justice today will reverse course and become serious about performing the basic function of government and start protecting their own citizens.’ 

In the case of New York, DOJ cites a 177 per cent jump in shootings in July compared to the prior year. 

‘While the city faced increased unrest, gun violence, and property damage, the New York City Council cut $1 billion from NYPD’s FY21 budget,’ it noted. 

It called out DAs in Manhattan and Brooklyn who have ‘declined to prosecute charges of disorderly conduct and unlawful assembly arising from the protests.’

It also called out Portland for the way it handled 100 nights of consecutive protests, and Seattle for allowing protesters to set up and maintain the ‘Capitol Hill Autonomous Zone’ (CHAZ) downtown. 

The release states that they have ‘permitted violence and destruction of property to persist and have refused to undertake reasonable measures to counteract criminal activities.’

Trump has regularly gone after New York City and his surrogates tore into Mayor Bill DeBlasio at the Republican National Convention. DeBlasio and local officials painted ‘Black Lives Matter’ on Fifth Avenue in front of Trump Tower in July following protests. 

DeBlasio fired back at both the designation and the move to strip away funding a press conference Monday.

‘It’s just another of president Trump’s games. It’s not based on facts and it’s insulting to the people of New York City,’ he said. 

‘It’s all about race and it’s all about attempts to divide and to enthrall his base by attacking the other. It’s the only trick in his book. You’ve got to go back to the 1980s when he called for the execution of the Central Park Five,’ DeBlasio said.

‘Remember who taught him; Roy Cohn, Joe McCarthy’s right hand man. We’ve just got to get real about this guy. It is always divide and create hatred and move people to voter based on that hatred. He turns his attention to urban areas that he wants to associate with people of color, in another way he wants to associate with Democrats and progressives. He treats them as the other, he tries to convince people in the country that we are the problem and he will save his voters from all of us. There has been no president in history that has been this irresponsible and divisive. But it’s the only trick he knows,’ he said. 

‘He has been threatening to take away our funding more times than I can count. We beat him in court every time or they just go away because they don’t have a leg to stand on.’ 

New York State Attorney General Letitia James also blasted the move – and indicated an imminent lawsuit. 

‘This designation is nothing more than a pathetic attempt to scare Americans into voting for a commander-in-chief who is actually incapable of commanding our nation. President Trump failed to listen to scientists, failed to steer our economy through this pandemic, and has repeatedly failed to bring our nation together. The president should be prepared to defend this illegal order in court, which hypocritically lays the groundwork to defund New York and the very types of law enforcement President Trump pretends to care about. We have beat the president and the illegal actions of his DOJ in court before and have no doubt we will beat them again,’ she said.

The move follows a directive by President Trump for the agency to designate ‘anarchist jurisdictions.’

It was not immediately clear what federal funds the feds would hold up.

New York is a top recipient of counterterrorism funding for high-threat urban areas. It also receives funding for child welfare, food assistance, HIV, and other benefits. The state has long chafed at being among the top ‘donor’ states – those that pay out much more in taxes than it receives in benefits on a per capita basis as an economic powerhouse.

The move to have DOJ call out local police forces for changes to their police budgets comes after the Republican Party spent decades building the brand as the party of federalism and local control.

‘For the past few months, several state and local governments have contributed to the violence and destruction in their jurisdictions by failing to enforce the law, disempowering and significantly defunding their police departments, and refusing to accept offers of federal law enforcement assistance,’ Trump said earlier this month announcing the program. 

‘To ensure that Federal funds are neither unduly wasted nor spent in a manner that directly violates our Government’s promise to protect life, liberty, and property, it is imperative that the Federal Government review the use of Federal funds by jurisdictions that permit anarchy, violence, and destruction in America’s cities,’  said.  

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Mother, 23, reveals drop of MILK got onto newborn baby’s lungs and he suffered three cardiac arrests

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mother 23 reveals drop of milk got onto newborn babys lungs and he suffered three cardiac arrests

A mother has told of the emotional moment she said goodbye to her baby son after a drop of milk got into his lungs and he suffered three cardiac arrests. 

Bertie Spencer choked on his bottle and inhaled the liquid, but his mother Tonicha, 23, from Grantham, Lincolnshire, thought nothing of it until he started to turn blue half an hour later.

The 17-day-old baby boy was rushed to hospital on July 21, where he suffered three cardiac arrests and Tonicha and his father, David, 25, were told to say their goodbyes.

The liquid had made its way to his lungs had stopped him breathing properly, starving him of oxygen and making his heart stop pumping.

But miraculously, as mother-of-two Tonicha urged him not to die, his heart rate picked up and against all the odds Bertie pulled through.

Tonicha Spencer, 23, from Grantham, Lincolnshire, has told of the emotional moment she said goodbye to her miracle baby son, Bertie, pictured, after a drop of milk got into his lungs and he suffered three cardiac arrests

Tonicha Spencer, 23, from Grantham, Lincolnshire, has told of the emotional moment she said goodbye to her miracle baby son, Bertie, pictured, after a drop of milk got into his lungs and he suffered three cardiac arrests

Tonicha Spencer, 23, from Grantham, Lincolnshire, has told of the emotional moment she said goodbye to her miracle baby son, Bertie, pictured, after a drop of milk got into his lungs and he suffered three cardiac arrests

Little Bertie Spencer choked on his bottle and inhaled the liquid, but Tonicha thought nothing of it until he started to turn blue half an hour later. Pictured: Bertie in hospital after his ordeal

Little Bertie Spencer choked on his bottle and inhaled the liquid, but Tonicha thought nothing of it until he started to turn blue half an hour later. Pictured: Bertie in hospital after his ordeal

Little Bertie Spencer choked on his bottle and inhaled the liquid, but Tonicha thought nothing of it until he started to turn blue half an hour later. Pictured: Bertie in hospital after his ordeal

Doctors told his astonished family that little fighter Bertie was a ‘miracle’. 

Bertie’s mother Tonicha, a former customer services advisor, said that he had been suffering from gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) prior to the incident, something which is very common in newborns, and was often sick after taking a bottle.

She had taken him to the doctor the day before the choking incident to have his chest checked – but after listening to Bertie’s chest the doctor deemed it clear and diagnosed the baby with bad reflux.

The mother who also has a daughter Darcie, one, said: ‘You never think this sort of thing could ever happen to you.

‘When we were in hospital, I remember thinking that it’s the sort of thing you see on TV.But I just feel so lucky that Bertie made it. We didn’t think he was going to survive at all. 

Doctors told his astonished family that little fighter Bertie was a 'miracle'. Pictured: Tonicha and David with Bertie and their daughter Darcie

Doctors told his astonished family that little fighter Bertie was a 'miracle'. Pictured: Tonicha and David with Bertie and their daughter Darcie

Doctors told his astonished family that little fighter Bertie was a ‘miracle’. Pictured: Tonicha and David with Bertie and their daughter Darcie 

‘The doctors just keep telling me Bertie is a miracle and they can’t believe he’s done so well, but it’s all down to the doctors and nurses that saved him. I owe them my life, because they saved his.

What is gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD)?

When a baby or child has gastro-oesophageal reflux, the food and drink travels down the foodpipe as normal. 

However, some of the mixture of food, drink and acid travels back up the foodpipe, instead of passing through to the large and small intestines.

As the food and drink is mixed with acid from the stomach, it can irritate the lining of the foodpipe, making it sore.

This is gastro-oesophageal reflux disease, which is common in the first few weeks and months of life, as the sphincter (ring of muscle) at the base of the oesophagus has not matured yet.

Some children also breathe some of the mixture into the windpipe (aspiration), which can irritate the lungs and cause chest infections. 

It is believed this particular condition is what caused milk to enter Bertie’s lungs after he vomited following a feed. 

Source: www.gosh.nhs.uk

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‘Because of them, we’ll be able to watch him grow up, and Darcie still has her beloved younger brother. I can never put into words how grateful I am.’

Bertie was born healthy, aside from the very common reflux condition. He was just 17-days-old when he choked on his bottled milk, causing him to inhale it, on July 21.  

Initially his mother was not overly concerned but half an hour later his lips and mouth started to turn blue, before the colour spread across his face.

‘I just felt so sick with worry – I kept telling David that something wasn’t right,’ she explained. ‘We rang an ambulance, and as soon as the paramedics arrived and told us he urgently needed to get to A&E, we realised how serious it was.’

Tonicha rode in the ambulance with Bertie, while David, a food supply factory worker, dropped her daughter Darcie, then aged 20 months, at her grandparents.

He then joined Tonicha at Queen’s Medical Centre in Nottingham, just as Bertie went into his first cardiac arrest, eight minutes after arriving.

The milk on his lungs stopped him breathing properly so his brain was starved of oxygen – causing the arrests.

‘It all happened at once,’ she said. ‘I was asked to leave the room just as about fifteen doctors and nurses sprinted in.

‘I was panicking and hysterical because I had no idea what was going on – but that was the moment he first went into cardiac arrest.

‘I just kept repeating ‘is he going to survive?’, but nobody could tell me, because they didn’t know the answer.’

After being in cardiac arrest for eight minutes, doctors managed to start little Bertie’s heart again.

He then suffered two more attacks, lasting three minutes each, and a nurse told the family they didn’t know what was going to happen.

‘I could barely believe what was happening. I was hysterical. I was in total shock,’ said Tonicha.

An MRI scan showed Bertie's brain had been starved of oxygen during the arrests, and there was some damage to the part that controls movement. But despite his ordeal, Tonicha said he still moves like a normal baby

An MRI scan showed Bertie's brain had been starved of oxygen during the arrests, and there was some damage to the part that controls movement. But despite his ordeal, Tonicha said he still moves like a normal baby

An MRI scan showed Bertie’s brain had been starved of oxygen during the arrests, and there was some damage to the part that controls movement. But despite his ordeal, Tonicha said he still moves like a normal baby 

The family, including Tonicha’s mum, Claire Fitt, 46, were finally allowed in to see Bertie – but they were told to prepare themselves for the worst, and say their goodbyes.

What is cerebral palsy and how common is it in the UK?

Cerebral palsy is a neurological disorder that affects a patient’s movement, motor skills and muscle tone.

It is the name for a group of lifelong conditions that affect movement and co-ordination and is caused by a problem with the brain that develops before, during or soon after birth. 

It affects around one in 400 children born in the UK to some extent.

In the US, approximately 8,000-to-10,000 infants are born with the condition each year. 

The symptoms of cerebral palsy are not usually obvious just after a baby is born. They normally become noticeable during the first two or three years of a child’s life.

Symptoms can include:

  • delays in reaching development milestones – for example, not sitting by 8 months or not walking by 18 months
  • seeming too stiff or too floppy  
  • weak arms or legs  
  • fidgety, jerky or clumsy movements  
  • random, uncontrolled movements  
  • walking on tiptoes  
  • a range of other problems – such as swallowing difficulties, speaking problems, vision problems and learning disabilities 

The severity of symptoms can vary significantly. Some people only have minor problems, while others may be severely disabled.

Speak to your health visitor or a GP if you have any concerns about your child’s health or development. There’s currently no cure for cerebral palsy, but treatments are available to help people with the condition be as active and independent as possible.

Source: NHS 

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Tonicha added: ‘He was lying on his bed completely naked, with wires sticking out of him while people did CPR. It felt like I was watching through somebody else’s eyes. 

‘Even though he was unconscious, and wouldn’t have been able to understand me anyway, I felt like I should talk to him, so I did.’

At the sound of Tonicha’s voice, Bertie’s heart rate began to pick up.

She said: ‘That was surreal. I remember at one point saying to him “Come on Bertie, you can’t die yet! We’re seeing Nanny and Grandad next week!” As his heart rate picked up, I just kept talking.’

He became stable, and after six hours in A&E, was moved to the intensive care unit, where he spent five days fighting for his life.

‘I had been asking constantly if he would be ok, because I had no idea,’ she said. ‘Finally, after five days, a doctor said to me that if he had to put money on it, his bet would be that Bertie would survive and get to go home.

‘Although he made it clear there was no guarantee, when he said that, I just burst into tears.

‘It was all I wanted to hear and it meant the world to me. I just needed something to give me hope.’ 

An MRI scan showed Bertie’s brain had been starved of oxygen during the arrests, and there was some damage to the part that controls movement.

Medics said he might have developed cerebral palsy, and struggle to walk or talk, but only time will tell.

Bertie had also sustained a severe chemical burn in his groin area, after an emergency adrenaline line put into his vein during his cardiac arrest leaked onto his skin.

Initially, medics feared they’d have to amputate his right leg, but instead he has had a successful skin graft.

Tonicha added: ‘Whatever the outcome was, the doctors and nurses did what they had to do to save my baby.

‘The doctors couldn’t tell us how severe his cerebral palsy will be when he’s older, but he’s doing well, which is a good sign.

‘They said he might not be able to drink properly or smile – but he’s already started drinking from a bottle again, and he smiles every day.

‘We don’t know how he’ll walk yet, but he moves like a normal baby, so it’s encouraging. Seeing him now, you’d never suspect anything was wrong with him! ‘Bertie really is a miracle, and we’re so proud of him.’

Now, a friend of the family has set up an online fundraiser on Go Fund Me for the family, to help cover the costs of building a sensory room for Bertie.

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Off-road biker, 21, is jailed for nine years for killing ‘peacemaker’ with single punch

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off road biker 21 is jailed for nine years for killing peacemaker with single punch

An off-road biker has been jailed for nine years for killing a ‘peacemaker’ with a single punch after he asked him to stop ‘dangerous’ nuisance riding near children.

James Rowley, 21, attacked Joe Higgins, 41, in front of youngsters in Radford, Coventry as the victim returned home from celebrating St Patrick’s Day on March 17.

The father-of-two fled the scene of the killing, where he had been noisily ‘showing off’ on grassland despite having no licence or insurance, and was arrested two days later.

Mr Higgins, who lived in Bedford but was originally from Coventry, died in hospital a day after suffering a head injury. 

Joe Higgins, 41, was attacked in front of children in Radford, Coventry, as he returned home from celebrating St Patrick's Day on March 17

Joe Higgins, 41, was attacked in front of children in Radford, Coventry, as he returned home from celebrating St Patrick's Day on March 17

Joe Higgins, 41, was attacked in front of children in Radford, Coventry, as he returned home from celebrating St Patrick’s Day on March 17

James Rowley, 21, killed Mr Higgins with one punch before fleeing the scene of the crime

James Rowley, 21, killed Mr Higgins with one punch before fleeing the scene of the crime

James Rowley, 21, killed Mr Higgins with one punch before fleeing the scene of the crime

Rowley initially claimed to have acted in self-defence but later pleaded guilty to unlawful killing at Warwick Crown Court.

Judge Sylvia de Bertodano was told Rowley, who also admitted dangerous driving, had previously been given a referral order as a teenager for an assault in which his victim lost consciousness.

Passing sentence today, the judge said he had given police a false account of what happened as Mr Higgins returned home from celebrating St Patrick’s Day with his cousin.

She said: ‘You were riding your motorbike in a way that was clearly dangerous and aggressive.

‘You shouldn’t in fact have been driving it at all as you had no licence and no insurance.

‘Having ridden it on the wrong side of the road and through a red light… you arrived at Jubilee Crescent. You started riding the bike on the grassed area there.

‘The bike had no lights and the danger you were causing was obvious – so obvious that a bystander called the police.

‘It was this behaviour that caused Joe Higgins to come over and speak to you.’

Addressing the attack itself, the judge added: ‘He tried to speak to you politely and tell you to stop.

‘In the words of his brother, he was being a good citizen. You however refused to listen. You revved the engine and asked him if he ‘wanted to get battered’.

‘You then got off the bike with the clear intention of inflicting violence on Joe Higgins.

‘You were described by one witness as bouncing on your toes like a boxer. Joe Higgins had his hands down.

Rowley initially claimed to have acted in self-defence but later pleaded guilty to unlawful killing at Warwick Crown Court

Rowley initially claimed to have acted in self-defence but later pleaded guilty to unlawful killing at Warwick Crown Court

Rowley initially claimed to have acted in self-defence but later pleaded guilty to unlawful killing at Warwick Crown Court

‘One witness described it as the most vicious punch he had ever seen.

‘The punch caused him to fall to the ground and hit his head, whereupon you rode off dangerously and at speed, taking, as you went, his hat.’

The judge, who ordered Rowley to serve a two-year driving ban after his release from prison, added: ‘On the facts of this case, the defendant was behaving in an aggressive manner well before he came across Joe Higgins.

‘It [the punch] was sufficiently hard to bring a 17-stone man to the ground, a man who was acting as peacemaker, had his hands down and was unable to react to the blow.’

Prior to sentence, defence QC Kevin Hegarty, offering mitigation, said Mr Higgins had become concussed because he had hit his head on the ground.

Victim impact statements were also read to the court, including from the victim’s partner and his twin brother Chris Higgins.

In his statement, Mr Higgins described his brother, a stepfather to three children, as a ‘gentle giant’ and true gentleman who was kind, caring and fun.

‘At 41 he had his whole life ahead of him,’ Mr Higgins said of his sibling.

‘The happy future that Joe had planned has been cruelly taken away from him.’

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