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Escape from France: Chaos as thousands of Britons battle to return home before 4AM tomorrow

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escape from france chaos as thousands of britons battle to return home before 4am tomorrow

Heavy cost of heading home after France is put on UK quarantine list 

Travellers trying to return from France on Friday to avoid the quarantine restrictions face paying hundreds of pounds. 

Flights: Air fares are more than six times higher than normal from Paris to London today. The cheapest British Airways tickets are £452. 

Flight booking website Skyscanner suggested there were no direct flights from Biarritz to London.

The cheapest option it offered was to take one flight to Paris, another to Belfast and a third arriving at London Stansted shortly before midnight, at a total cost of £284.

The lowest priced ticket involving just two flights is £579 with Air France, changing in Paris.

Eurostar: Cheapest ticket on train from Paris to London is £210, compared with £165 on Saturday, a rise up almost 30 per cent. 

Ferries: P&O Ferries has limited availability, but one person travelling with a car from Calais to Dover can buy a ticket for £200.

Eurotunnel: The cost of taking a car through the Channel Tunnel on Eurotunnel Le Shuttle services on Friday morning is £260. All trains after midday are fully booked.   

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Hundreds of thousands of British tourists are facing a desperate scramble to get home today after France was added to the UK’s quarantine list, with prices for flights, trains and ferries soaring after the announcement was made. 

The quarantine is set to come in at 4am tomorrow – and with an estimated British 500,000 holidaymakers in France, a weekend of chaos looms as they try to get home and avoid having to isolate for 14 days. 

Travellers trying to return from France on Friday to avoid the quarantine restrictions face paying hundreds of pounds.

Air fares are more than six times higher than normal for flights from Paris to London today, with the cheapest British Airways tickets being sold for £452.

The cheapest ticket on a Eurostar train from Paris to London is £210, compared with £165 on Saturday, a rise up almost 30 per cent.  

The cost of taking a car through the Channel Tunnel on Eurotunnel Le Shuttle services on Friday morning is £260. All trains after midday are fully booked.

P&O Ferries has limited availability, but one person travelling with a car from Calais to Dover can buy a ticket for £200.

Meanwhile private jet charter company PrivateFly said demand for flights out of countries being removed from the UK’s quarantine-exemption list has trebled since the announcement was made on Thursday night. 

In more bad news for British holidaymakers, it has been suggested Greece could soon be added to the quarantine list, after a spike in its infection rate, with a record 235 cases recorded on August 12. Daily new cases in the country were in the 30s towards the end of July. 

Transport Secretary Grant Shapps insisted the Government had taken ‘a practical approach’ to the new restrictions.

However, the move was criticised by France’s secretary of state for European affairs, who said it would lead to ‘reciprocal measures’ across the Channel.

Clement Beaune tweeted: ‘A British decision which we regret and which will lead to reciprocal measures, all in hoping for a return for normal as soon as possible.’ 

As the government’s decision to put France on the quarantine list sparks chaos: 

  • Travellers in southern France face struggle getting back to UK before the 4am Saturday quarantine deadline;
  • Car-carrying Channel Tunnel trains and Eurotunnel Le Shuttle said they are fully booked until tomorrow;  
  • Transport Secretary said estimated 160,000 holidaymakers are expected to look to return to UK from France;
  • Grant Shapps said ‘in all of the things to do with coronavirus, there always has had to be a cut-off’
Passengers wearing face masks as a precaution against the spread of the novel coronavirus walk along the platform to an escalator after arriving on a Eurostar train from Paris at St Pancras International station in London

Passengers wearing face masks as a precaution against the spread of the novel coronavirus walk along the platform to an escalator after arriving on a Eurostar train from Paris at St Pancras International station in London

Passengers wearing face masks as a precaution against the spread of the novel coronavirus walk along the platform to an escalator after arriving on a Eurostar train from Paris at St Pancras International station in London

Passengers arrive at St Pancras International Station from Paris today on Eurostar. Passengers arrive at St Pancras International Station from Paris after it was announced people would have to self isolate after spending time in France

Passengers arrive at St Pancras International Station from Paris today on Eurostar. Passengers arrive at St Pancras International Station from Paris after it was announced people would have to self isolate after spending time in France

Passengers arrive at St Pancras International Station from Paris today on Eurostar. Passengers arrive at St Pancras International Station from Paris after it was announced people would have to self isolate after spending time in France

Passengers wearing face masks as a precaution against the spread of the novel coronavirus walk along the platform to an escalator after arriving on a Eurostar train from Paris at St Pancras International station in London

Passengers wearing face masks as a precaution against the spread of the novel coronavirus walk along the platform to an escalator after arriving on a Eurostar train from Paris at St Pancras International station in London

Passengers wearing face masks as a precaution against the spread of the novel coronavirus walk along the platform to an escalator after arriving on a Eurostar train from Paris at St Pancras International station in London

Passengers wearing face masks as a precaution against the spread of the novel coronavirus walk along the platform to an escalator after arriving on a Eurostar train from Paris at St Pancras International station in London

Passengers wearing face masks as a precaution against the spread of the novel coronavirus walk along the platform to an escalator after arriving on a Eurostar train from Paris at St Pancras International station in London

Passengers wearing face masks as a precaution against the spread of the novel coronavirus walk along the platform to an escalator after arriving on a Eurostar train from Paris at St Pancras International station in London

Pictured: Passengers arrive at St Pancras International Station from Paris today after it was announced Britons returning from France would have to isolate for 14 days from Saturday

Pictured: Passengers arrive at St Pancras International Station from Paris today after it was announced Britons returning from France would have to isolate for 14 days from Saturday

Pictured: Passengers arrive at St Pancras International Station from Paris today after it was announced Britons returning from France would have to isolate for 14 days from Saturday

Travellers trying to return from France on Friday to avoid the quarantine restrictions face paying hundreds of pounds

Travellers trying to return from France on Friday to avoid the quarantine restrictions face paying hundreds of pounds

Travellers trying to return from France on Friday to avoid the quarantine restrictions face paying hundreds of pounds

Air fares are more than six times higher than normal for flights from Paris to London today, with the cheapest British Airways tickets being sold for £452

Air fares are more than six times higher than normal for flights from Paris to London today, with the cheapest British Airways tickets being sold for £452

Air fares are more than six times higher than normal for flights from Paris to London today, with the cheapest British Airways tickets being sold for £452

Holiday makers arriving back on a ferry at Dover docks this morning after France was added to the UK quarantine list from Saturday

Holiday makers arriving back on a ferry at Dover docks this morning after France was added to the UK quarantine list from Saturday

Holiday makers arriving back on a ferry at Dover docks this morning after France was added to the UK quarantine list from Saturday

Transport Secretary Grant Shapps insisted the Government had taken 'a practical approach' to the new restrictions. However, the move was criticised by France's secretary of state for European affairs

Transport Secretary Grant Shapps insisted the Government had taken 'a practical approach' to the new restrictions. However, the move was criticised by France's secretary of state for European affairs

Transport Secretary Grant Shapps insisted the Government had taken ‘a practical approach’ to the new restrictions. However, the move was criticised by France’s secretary of state for European affairs

Near deserted check in lanes for holiday makers leaving Dover docks after France is added to the UK quarantine list

Near deserted check in lanes for holiday makers leaving Dover docks after France is added to the UK quarantine list

Near deserted check in lanes for holiday makers leaving Dover docks after France is added to the UK quarantine list

Ferries are seen in the Port of Dover, as Britain imposes a 14-day quarantine on arrival from France from Saturday

Ferries are seen in the Port of Dover, as Britain imposes a 14-day quarantine on arrival from France from Saturday

Ferries are seen in the Port of Dover, as Britain imposes a 14-day quarantine on arrival from France from Saturday

Ferries are seen in the Port of Dover, as Britain imposes a 14-day quarantine on arrival from France from Saturday

Ferries are seen in the Port of Dover, as Britain imposes a 14-day quarantine on arrival from France from Saturday

Ferries are seen in the Port of Dover, as Britain imposes a 14-day quarantine on arrival from France from Saturday

The quarantine is set to come in at 4am tomorrow – and with an estimated British 500,000 holidaymakers in France, a weekend of chaos looms as they try to get home

The quarantine is set to come in at 4am tomorrow – and with an estimated British 500,000 holidaymakers in France, a weekend of chaos looms as they try to get home

The quarantine is set to come in at 4am tomorrow – and with an estimated British 500,000 holidaymakers in France, a weekend of chaos looms as they try to get home

Visitors wearing protective face masks queue to enter the Louvre Pyramid in Paris yesterday, hours before the quarantine announcement

Visitors wearing protective face masks queue to enter the Louvre Pyramid in Paris yesterday, hours before the quarantine announcement

Visitors wearing protective face masks queue to enter the Louvre Pyramid in Paris yesterday, hours before the quarantine announcement

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Pictured: A graph showing the countries from which travellers arriving in the UK are currently exempt from the 14-day coronavirus quarantine, and the number of Covid-19 cases per 100,000 people in each country. Speculation is mounting that France could be removed from the list of exempt countries, but there a number of others that have higher or similar figures

Pictured: A graph showing the countries from which travellers arriving in the UK are currently exempt from the 14-day coronavirus quarantine, and the number of Covid-19 cases per 100,000 people in each country. Speculation is mounting that France could be removed from the list of exempt countries, but there a number of others that have higher or similar figures

Pictured: A graph showing the countries from which travellers arriving in the UK are currently exempt from the 14-day coronavirus quarantine, and the number of Covid-19 cases per 100,000 people in each country. Speculation is mounting that France could be removed from the list of exempt countries, but there a number of others that have higher or similar figures

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Travellers returning to Britain from France today told of their scramble home to avoid having to quarantine. 

Student Yasmine Sellay, 24, from Wimbledon, South London, was among a packed Eurostar train that arrived at St Pancras station from Paris this morning. 

She said: ‘I wanted to get home before the restrictions are enforced. ‘I didn’t know that France had been added to the UK quarantine list until last night and as I don’t want to isolate for a fortnight I came home today. 

‘I’d been in Paris for a month and a half because it’s where I’m originally from and I was visiting family and friends.   

‘When I arrived in France at the end of June, I had to stay in with my relatives for more than a week and couldn’t go out. 

‘I found it really hard to do so I was keen not to have to do the same when I came back to London.  The Eurostar was full so I think many other people had the same idea as me.’  

Engineers Carolina Monteiro, 24, and Douglas Pagani, 29, who live in France, told PA of their relief at arriving in the UK for a 10-day campervan trip to the Lake District and Yorkshire – just before quarantine measures come into effect on Saturday morning.

Speaking outside St Pancras station, Mr Pagani said: ‘We’re very happy to have the correct ticket just in time. At first I was scared looking at all the information to make sure we could enter here, then we saw it was perfect.

‘It was a relief that we could meet our friends here.’

Ms Monteiro added: ‘We have had this trip planned for three or four months, so we’re lucky to be here just in time.’

Travellers in the south of France face a struggle getting back to the UK before the 4am Saturday quarantine deadline. 

Flight booking website Skyscanner suggested there were no direct flights from Biarritz to London.

The cheapest option it offered was to take one flight to Paris, another to Belfast and a third arriving at London Stansted shortly before midnight, at a total cost of £284.

France quarantine Q&A: What are my refund rights and can I claim on my travel insurance? 

What are my holiday refund rights?

If you have booked a package holiday in France, or any other quarantine country, your tour operator should cancel the holiday. You can then claim a full refund.

Will I get a refund on my flight, ferry or train ticket?

If the airlines continue to operate the route, there is no right although they may offer money back as a goodwill gesture. Ferry operators and Eurostar may offer refunds but most firms will give customers a voucher to rebook at a later date. Eurotunnel says it will give refunds up to 24 hours before travel.

And accommodation?

If a hotel or villa remains open and available, there is no legal right to cancel and get a refund, although some booking websites, such as Airbnb and Booking.com, do offer last-minute cancellation on some listings.

Can I claim on insurance for flights and accommodation?

These are unlikely to be covered if the policy was bought after March 10 when most insurers removed cover for Covid-19-related cancellations.

Can I claim statutory sick pay in quarantine?

No – there is no automatic eligibility to statutory sick pay, unless you meet the required conditions, such as displaying coronavirus symptoms.

What happens if you pass through a country on the quarantine list?

You don’t have to quarantine as long as passengers remain in the car for the whole journey and no one joins them.

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The lowest priced ticket involving just two flights is £579 with Air France, changing in Paris.

Whichever mode of transport travellers use, they will need to move quickly as many services will be fully booked by Friday afternoon. 

Undeterred passengers at London St Pancras made their way onto the 10.24am Eurostar service to Paris, including lawyer John Strange, 60, from Reading.

He said he was going to the French capital for 10 days and it was possible for him to work from home on his return.

He said: ‘It’s not a disaster for me but it seems for many people it will be, particularly those with young families, it’s going to be catastrophic.

‘I’m sure many will have to cancel their plans and have to accept all that pain and cost that goes with it.’

A traveller who gave her name as Sonata K, a 39-year-old dentist, was due to head to Paris for four nights with her mother – but cancelled her plans after finding out about the quarantine measures at St Pancras on Friday morning.

She said: ‘It’s not worth it to go out and have to self isolate. With my work I can’t do the procedures from home.

‘We were too late to get the news, we’re just finding out here but it’s better than on the train.

‘We’re looking at going to Cardiff and checking trains now, but the weather is changing a bit.’

She added that for £30 they could change their Eurostar tickets to another day and said one hotel had charged them one night’s stay for late cancellation. 

Jack Birkbeck, 23, and George Raybould, 24, were travelling to France to spend five days in the commune of Bantanges, eastern France between Lyon and Dijon to celebrate Jack’s 24th birthday on Saturday with his parents.

The friends, who both work in retail from Maidstone, Kent, are flying out to Geneva with EasyJet today.

They went to sleep thinking they would not have to quarantine but woke up to the news they would have to self isolate for 14 days.

Despite considering cancelling the trip, they decided to go ahead with it due to the money already spent on the break.

Jack said: ‘I literally woke up at 6am to my mum texting me saying ‘are you still coming?’ as they’ve introduced a quarantine. I went to sleep thinking we were safe.

‘The last case where we are going was on July 27 so they’re going strong for the past few weeks. It’s probably even safer than Maidstone.

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Pictured: Estelle Blanc aged 37

Pictured: Estelle Blanc aged 37

Pictured: Dylan Jones

Pictured: Dylan Jones

Passengers arrive at St Pancras International Station from Paris. Last night it was announced that people would have to self isolate after spending time in France, to help stop the spread of Covid 19 (pictured: Estelle Blanc, left, Dylan Jones, right)

Bertie Lawrence, 33, and Elske Koelman, 29, project managers within international development, have already had relatives cancel attendance of their wedding following the new rules

Bertie Lawrence, 33, and Elske Koelman, 29, project managers within international development, have already had relatives cancel attendance of their wedding following the new rules

Bertie Lawrence, 33, and Elske Koelman, 29, project managers within international development, have already had relatives cancel attendance of their wedding following the new rules

Robert Lawrence, 65, from Islington, retired broadcast worker. He was catching the 11am Eurostar today on an interrail to visit friends in the Netherlands and Germany

Robert Lawrence, 65, from Islington, retired broadcast worker. He was catching the 11am Eurostar today on an interrail to visit friends in the Netherlands and Germany

Robert Lawrence, 65, from Islington, retired broadcast worker. He was catching the 11am Eurostar today on an interrail to visit friends in the Netherlands and Germany

Family-of-five cut short holiday in France and drove 12 hours non-stop in desperate bid to beat quarantine deadline

A family-of-five cut short their France holiday and drove 12 hours non-stop in a desperate bid to beat the quarantine deadline.

Eurotunnel and Brittany Ferries have warned people not to turn up at terminals unless they have a booking.

But Julia Burnett, 35, and husband Craig, 36, had already cut short their camping holiday fearing the worst and were just 60 miles from Calais when the announcement was made.

They drove yesterday for 12 hours from the South of France to Calais with their three children Rory, seven, Isabella, five and Finley, one.

They were due to come back next Wednesday but yesterday decided to set off from Biarritz, after reading rumours about a potential quarantine.

The family, from Taunton in Somerset, managed to book onto a ferry less than an hour before the government announcement.

When they were 60 miles from Calais they discovered their gamble had paid off when they saw news of the rule change.

They were in the queue for the ferry crossing feeling ‘tired but relieved’ this morning. 

Julia told the Mirror: ‘We’d been trying to book onto the Channel tunnel but we eventually booked on the ferry instead.

‘Then I checked back on the tunnel website straight after the announcement and I was 5,310th in the queue – it was crazy.

‘Quarantine would have really affected Craig’s work as he runs a dental services business and can’t do it from home.’

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‘If we had more time to think about it then maybe we would have cancelled going but we didn’t even have time to change our mind really.

‘I hope the government are doing their best and believe they’ve introduced this now in the best interests of everyone.

‘My boss will probably be angry at me having to isolate. But I’m going to spend quarantine doing work training to make up for it.’

George added: ‘It’s just our luck that the day we go they announce quarantine just hours before we jet off.

‘As bad as it sounds, where we are going is super rural. It’s not exactly the epicentre of the French pandemic. We are not going out and socialising and will be self contained.

‘Of course we’re still going to quarantine when we return home but I like to think the chances of us getting it are very low and if anything, we are more likely to give it to them. That would be the classic British thing to do.

‘I’ve only just come off furlough so I don’t think work will take it too well. I feel bad for my colleagues but theres not much I could have done at such short notice.’

A Heathrow spokesman said: ‘The UK needs a more sustainable long-term plan for the resumption of travel than quarantine roulette.

‘Testing could provide an opportunity to safely reduce the length of quarantine in certain circumstances, protecting both the health and wealth of the nation as we pave a path towards a new normal.

‘As ever, our teams will be on hand to support passengers impacted by the travel restrictions but we urge Government to work with us to trial a solution which could help to provide more certainty.’

Car-carrying Channel Tunnel trains are fully booked until Saturday.

Eurotunnel Le Shuttle said in a statement: ‘Due to the recent Government announcement, our shuttles are now fully booked until tomorrow morning.

‘There is no more ticket availability and we are not selling tickets at check-in.

‘Please do not arrive at the terminal unless you have a ticket valid for travel today.’

Private jet charter company PrivateFly said demand for flights out of countries being removed from the UK’s quarantine-exemption list has trebled since the announcement was made on Thursday night. 

Chief executive Adam Twidell said: ‘Following the changes to the UK’s quarantine list overnight, we’ve received a surge in demand for private jet travel out of affected countries, with three times the average number of enquiries and bookings for flights to the UK from France, the Netherlands and Malta, before 4am on Saturday morning.

Endurance swimmer looking to break men’s record for number of Channel crossings hopes her challenge isn’t scupper by quarantine 

An endurance swimmer looking to break the men’s record for the number of English Channel crossings is hoping the UK Government does not scupper her post-challenge celebrations.

Chloe McCardel, 35, is due to leave British shores at around 10am on Sunday, arriving in Calais around 10 hours and 21 miles (34km) later.

It would be her 35th successful Channel crossing, passing the men’s record of 34 held by British athlete Kevin Murphy.

The Australian said she will spend less than 10 minutes on French soil, and is hoping she will not have to quarantine when she returns to Dover with her support crew later that evening.

It follows an announcement on Thursday evening that people arriving in the UK from France after 4am on Saturday will be required to spend 14 days in self-isolation due to rising numbers of coronavirus cases across the Channel.

Ms McCardel told the PA news agency: ‘I have made some inquiries about what happens when I get to France.

‘Literally, I reach the shore and stand up on land for a couple of minutes, then it’s back in the water, swim to the support boat, and head back to England.

‘We don’t go anywhere near the border officials or passport control, so I’m hoping technically the quarantine thing won’t apply.

‘I’ve got a little celebration planned in England with the support crew, the team, the volunteers who have been so supportive throughout this.

‘So I am hoping the Government allow us to do that without having to quarantine.’

Ms McCardel was given special dispensation from Australian authorities to travel to the UK to complete three Channel crossings in recent weeks, taking her level with Mr Murphy.

The Melbourne-raised athlete still has some way to go until she reaches the record of 43 crossings set by English swimmer Alison Streeter.

But instead of thinking about the next target, Ms McCardel said she will spend the swim focusing on women trapped in abusive relationships.

She said: ‘I have had a lot of friends and people in my network who have experience of domestic violence, and I want to sort of give them a voice.

‘During lockdown people have been told to stay at home, but that is the worst place for someone suffering domestic violence can be.

‘So it will be going through my head a lot.’

Ms McCardel also said she has been made acutely aware of the privilege of being able to swim across the Channel for pleasure, while so many refugees are making the perilous journey to the UK in search of a better life.

She said: ‘On my last swim we actually had to divert because the coastguard was pulling people out of the water.

‘I think it’s a luxury for me to be able to swim the Channel when so many people are trying to get out of a dangerous situation.

‘I have the chance to have dreams and go chase them when others are struggling to get to dry land.’

Ms McCardel holds multiple world records for endurance swimming including the longest ever unassisted ocean swim in the Bahamas in 2014.

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‘We’ve also had a number of inquiries from clients booked to travel to these destinations in the coming weeks to change their travel plans in order to avoid quarantine zones.

‘We can arrange flights at very short notice with the flexibility to change route at the last minute, however availability is limited as the spike in demand coincides with what is already the peak summer season for private leisure travel.’ 

Explaining the quarantine decision on BBC Breakfast this morning, Mr Shapps said: ‘The reality is that in all of the things to do with coronavirus, there always has had to be a cut-off and we’ve seen this throughout, haven’t we, in the way that rules have had to be implemented and, so, ‘if we can do this, why can’t we do that?’, that’s always going to be the case.

‘What we have to do is provide clear guidance and, in this case, clear law in order to require people to quarantine.

‘I just want to stress it is very important that people do quarantine. Everybody returning to the UK, no matter where from, doesn’t matter whether you’re in a travel corridor country or a quarantine country, must at this stage fill in a passenger locator form.

‘That is the law and you may well find that people call up to check where you are, and you’ll be breaking the law if you were not quarantining, if that was a requirement for the country you’d come from.’

Mr Shapps said it will not be necessary for people to quarantine on their return to the UK from France if they do so before Saturday at 4am.

The Transport Secretary told BBC Breakfast an estimated 160,000 holidaymakers are expected to look to return to the UK from France.

He added: ‘It’s a practical approach as well which has enabled all fours parts of the United Kingdom – Scotland, Wales, Northern Ireland and England – to implement the same time at 4am where there are no flights in the air at least tomorrow.

‘But, look, I accept your point, you can always argue one way or the other. We have to make a decision on it and we have to do that based on science and medicine, and that’s what we’ve done, we’ve taken the advice and implemented on that basis.’

Asked if he would encourage those returning to the UK if they should self-isolate, even if they fall outside of the official quarantine deadline, Mr Shapps said: ‘That’s not legally required.

‘But what I would say to everybody is look out for the signs, everyone knows what we’re talking about – the persistent cough, the high temperature, the change in taste or smell, so everyone should look out for those signs.

‘But, no, it’s not necessary to quarantine unless you’re coming back after 4am on Saturday and those are the rules.

‘I think the truth of this is, as everyone watching realises, there’s no perfect way to deal with coronavirus.

‘Unless you were going to have a sliding scale that sort of said if you stay another 24 hours the you must quarantine for X amount of time, another 36 hours for Y amount of time, you know, clearly there has to be a cut-off somewhere.’

Mr Shapps added: ‘To be clear, the Joint Biosecurity centre have cleared our approach to this.’

The boss of Channel Tunnel operator has Getlink warned many travellers may not be able to get back to the UK – and told them not to turn up at terminals without a booking as trains are ‘already pretty much fully booked’. 

John Keefe, Getlink’s director of public affairs, told BBC’s Newsnight: ‘We just haven’t got the space to take everybody who might suddenly want to come up to the coast. So what we are saying to people is amend your booking online, make sure there’s space before you travel to the terminal.’ 

After a week of speculation ministers acted on a worsening coronavirus situation across the Channel, ministers ordered travellers returning from the popular destination to isolate for 14 days. 

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The Prime Minister spoke as he visited Northern Ireland this afternoon ahead of an expected decision on which nations will be placed on the restricted travel list

The Prime Minister spoke as he visited Northern Ireland this afternoon ahead of an expected decision on which nations will be placed on the restricted travel list

The Prime Minister spoke as he visited Northern Ireland this afternoon ahead of an expected decision on which nations will be placed on the restricted travel list

The quarantine is set to come in at 4am on Saturday – and with an estimated British 500,000 holidaymakers in France, a weekend of chaos looms. Pictured: Beachgoers enjoy a hot day at a beach in Bormes-les-Mimosas, southern France

The quarantine is set to come in at 4am on Saturday – and with an estimated British 500,000 holidaymakers in France, a weekend of chaos looms. Pictured: Beachgoers enjoy a hot day at a beach in Bormes-les-Mimosas, southern France

The quarantine is set to come in at 4am on Saturday – and with an estimated British 500,000 holidaymakers in France, a weekend of chaos looms. Pictured: Beachgoers enjoy a hot day at a beach in Bormes-les-Mimosas, southern France

More than two-thirds of Britons would NOT  go on holiday if they have to quarantine for 14 days when they come back 

Most holidaymakers would be put off going abroad if they faced 14 days of quarantine on their return – but 10 per cent would still be up for travelling overseas, a survey has suggested.

Almost two-thirds of people, 62 per cent, said they were very unlikely to travel if they had to self-isolate for two weeks when they got back to the UK, the Office for National Statistics (ONS) said.

One in 10 said they were still likely or very likely to travel, knowing they would have to quarantine.

The survey results were published hours after Britons holidaying in France were told that from 4am on Saturday they will be required to quarantine due to rising numbers of coronavirus cases in the country.

The condition will also apply to travellers returning from the Netherlands, Monaco, Malta, Turks & Caicos and Aruba.

The ONS said a fifth of adults reported having cancelled their foreign travel plans due to the possibility of quarantine restrictions, while 14 per cent said they would holiday in the UK instead this year.

Overall, a little more than a quarter, 28 per cent, of adults said they were either likely or very likely to take a staycation this year, while just 9% said they were likely or very likely to go abroad.

A third of people said their household would not be able to afford a week’s holiday away from home this year, but 59 per cent said they could, the ONS said.

– The data is based on the ONS’s Opinions and Lifestyle Survey of 1,424 adults in Great Britain who responded between August 5 and 9.

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The move came after Boris Johnson said the UK would be ‘ruthless’ when it came to travel quarantine even with its ‘closest and dearest friends’. 

Mr Keefe said there was ‘some possibility of adding additional trains in the off-peak periods’ but would-be travellers must check online before heading to the terminal.

‘The important thing is that people understand that it’s not going to be easy to get back and they have to be sensible about this and not get themselves into difficulties,’ he said.  

France recorded 2,669 new cases of coronavirus yesterday, up from 2,524 on Wednesday. It is a record figure for the nation since it came out of lockdown. 

The review of the rules saw the Netherlands, Monaco and Malta added to the quarantine list – and Portugal remains on it, along with Spain.

The Turks and Caicos Islands and Aruba in the Caribbean have also lost their places. 

‘We have got to be absolutely ruthless about this, even with our closest and dearest friends and partners. I think everybody understands that,’ Mr Johnson told reporters as he visited Northern Ireland yesterday. 

‘We will be looking at the data a bit later on this afternoon – looking exactly where France and other countries are getting to.

‘We can’t be remotely complacent about our own situation. 

‘Everybody understands that in a pandemic you don’t allow our population to be reinfected or the disease to come back in.

‘That is why the quarantine measures are very important and we have to apply them in very strict way.’

Speculation has been mounting about quarantine exemptions being scrapped as infections rise across much of Europe. 

Hundreds of thousands of Britons are either on holiday in France or planning to go there, but yesterday it recorded more than 2,500 cases – a record since lockdown was eased.

The country appears to be perilously close to the yardstick of 20 cases per 100,000 population in a seven-day period. 

But ministers are believed to be prepared to hold off on restrictions when changes are announced, with the situation kept under close observation. 

Hundreds of thousands of Britons are either on holiday in France or planning to go there, but yesterday it recorded more than 2,500 cases - a record since lockdown was eased. Pictured, Cergy-Pontoise, north west of Paris

Hundreds of thousands of Britons are either on holiday in France or planning to go there, but yesterday it recorded more than 2,500 cases - a record since lockdown was eased. Pictured, Cergy-Pontoise, north west of Paris

Hundreds of thousands of Britons are either on holiday in France or planning to go there, but yesterday it recorded more than 2,500 cases – a record since lockdown was eased. Pictured, Cergy-Pontoise, north west of Paris

The quarantine list already includes Spain and Portugal. Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland are not believed to have signed off on the adjustments yet. 

Travellers are expected to be given around 30 hours notice of any changes coming into force, so they can make new arrangements if required.  

The Netherlands (23.1 per 100,000), Gibraltar (35.6), Monaco (38.2), Malta (46.7), San Marino (53.0), the Faroe Islands (198.5), Turks and Caicos (278.9) and Aruba (547.9) all have higher rates of new cases per 100,000 than France.

Those on the list with a slightly lower rate than France are Denmark (15.3 per 100,000), Iceland (14.7), the Czech Republic (14.0), Switzerland (13.3) and Poland (12.7).

Hundreds of thousands faced a stampede to get home from France after it was added to the UK quarantine list last night. Travellers have 30 hours to make it back to the UK before the quarantine comes into effect. Pictured: Departures at Lyon-Saint-Exupery Airport

Hundreds of thousands faced a stampede to get home from France after it was added to the UK quarantine list last night. Travellers have 30 hours to make it back to the UK before the quarantine comes into effect. Pictured: Departures at Lyon-Saint-Exupery Airport

Hundreds of thousands faced a stampede to get home from France after it was added to the UK quarantine list last night. Travellers have 30 hours to make it back to the UK before the quarantine comes into effect. Pictured: Departures at Lyon-Saint-Exupery Airport

All the above have now overtaken Portugal’s rate of 12.4 new cases per 100,000 people in the last seven days, but despite this, Portugal remains on the list of countries from which all arrivals to the UK, including those returning from holiday, must quarantine for two weeks.

Downing Street reminded potential holidaymakers this week that ‘there is no risk free way of travelling overseas’ with Boris Johnson adding that he ‘would not hesitate’ to bring in travel restrictions for other countries. 

The latest data on coronavirus cases on foreign soil is being analysed by the Government’s Joint Biosecurity Centre (JCB), which reports to Health Secretary Matt Hancock. 

Britons in France and other countries could be forced to make a dash home or risk being forced to quarantine on their return to the UK, should the government decide to remove more countries from the list. 

Despite Portugal having a lower rate of new Covid-19 cases in the past seven days than a number of countries on the government's exemption list, travellers entering the UK from Portugal are required to self-isolate on their arrival in the UK. Pictured: Beachgoers crowd Praia da Duquesa, in Cascais, Portugal. on August 09, 2020 as tourism slowly returns

Despite Portugal having a lower rate of new Covid-19 cases in the past seven days than a number of countries on the government's exemption list, travellers entering the UK from Portugal are required to self-isolate on their arrival in the UK. Pictured: Beachgoers crowd Praia da Duquesa, in Cascais, Portugal. on August 09, 2020 as tourism slowly returns

Despite Portugal having a lower rate of new Covid-19 cases in the past seven days than a number of countries on the government’s exemption list, travellers entering the UK from Portugal are required to self-isolate on their arrival in the UK. Pictured: Beachgoers crowd Praia da Duquesa, in Cascais, Portugal. on August 09, 2020 as tourism slowly returns

UK Ministers are believed to be planning new measures for a swathe of countries amid a surge in European coronavirus cases

UK Ministers are believed to be planning new measures for a swathe of countries amid a surge in European coronavirus cases

UK Ministers are believed to be planning new measures for a swathe of countries amid a surge in European coronavirus cases

The Netherlands is among the countries exempt from the UK's quarantine rules, but saw a rate of 23.1 new cases per 100,000 people in the last week- a higher rate than France

The Netherlands is among the countries exempt from the UK's quarantine rules, but saw a rate of 23.1 new cases per 100,000 people in the last week- a higher rate than France

The Netherlands is among the countries exempt from the UK’s quarantine rules, but saw a rate of 23.1 new cases per 100,000 people in the last week- a higher rate than France

On Tuesday, the UK updated its travel ‘green list’, but did not take Portugal off the quarantine list, in a blow to the country’s economy that benefits greatly from tourism from the UK.

The UK Government was warned that cases in Portugal had not fallen fast enough to be able to safely add the country to the ‘green list’.  

On Monday, France reported the first significant rise in the number of coronavirus patients in hospital since the lockdown was lifted, although it fell again on Tuesday before rising two days on the bounce.  

France's prime minister Jean Castex (pictured at a hospital in Montpellier this week) has told his citizens to 'pull themselves together' amid a fresh surge in coronavirus cases in France

France's prime minister Jean Castex (pictured at a hospital in Montpellier this week) has told his citizens to 'pull themselves together' amid a fresh surge in coronavirus cases in France

France’s prime minister Jean Castex (pictured at a hospital in Montpellier this week) has told his citizens to ‘pull themselves together’ amid a fresh surge in coronavirus cases in France

Earlier this week France‘s prime minister told his citizens to ‘pull themselves together’ amid a fresh surge in coronavirus cases. 

Jean Castex said the public was becoming careless and raised the spectre of a second lockdown after a rise of more than 10,000 cases in the last week. 

‘If we don’t act collectively, we expose ourselves to the heightened risk that the rebound in the epidemic becomes hard to control,’ Castex said on a visit to an intensive care ward in the South of France. 

Some parts of France have tightened their mask rules despite the summer heatwave, with police now set to ramp up checks on face coverings – while neighbouring Belgium yesterday made masks compulsory in all public spaces including outdoors.

Travel chiefs: This is a devastating blow to the industry 

ByTom Payne Transport Correspondent For The Daily Mail

The bombshell decision to reimpose quarantine on France is a ‘devastating blow’ to Britain’s crippled travel sector, industry leaders said last night.

Airlines and tour operators have suffered colossal losses during the pandemic as a result of plummeting passenger numbers and sweeping global travel restrictions.

A long-awaited announcement on travel corridors brought some respite in mid-July – but a steady yet sharp rise in coronavirus cases on the continent has brought hopes of a revived travel season to a sudden end.

Travel bosses last night said the decision to reimpose quarantine on France – weeks after Spain, Belgium, Andorra and the Bahamas were also kicked off the ‘safe’ country list – effectively signals the death knell for foreign holidays for the rest of the year.

But ministers are believed to be prepared to hold off on restrictions when changes are announced, with the situation kept under close observation

But ministers are believed to be prepared to hold off on restrictions when changes are announced, with the situation kept under close observation

But ministers are believed to be prepared to hold off on restrictions when changes are announced, with the situation kept under close observation

It also spells misery for millions of Britons with ruined trips, who now face a battle to claim refunds from airlines which may refuse to give them their money back.

Most holidaymakers are unlikely to be covered on travel insurance as the majority of policies bought after March 10 carry no cover for Covid 19-related cancellations.

Travel bosses last night criticised the Government’s inaction on airport testing – seen by many as a viable alternative to blanket quarantine measures – and blasted ministers’ ‘chaotic approach’ for throwing the industry into chaos and uncertainty.

One senior industry figure told the Daily Mail: ‘It has been chaos at every turn. The latest announcement on France is a watershed moment and a dark day for our industry. We are in uncharted waters. It is hard to see where we go from this.’

Gloria Guevara, president of the World Travel and Tourism Council, said the ‘worst fears’of the industry were coming true, and estimated three million UK jobs could be lost due to the ongoing uncertainty.

Tim Alderslade of trade body Airlines UK added: ‘It’s another devastating blow to the travel industry already reeling from the worst crisis in its history.

‘Having the political will to move to a sub-national approach to quarantine, in addition to a testing regime for arriving passengers so that those testing negative can avoid having to self-isolate – which other countries like Germany have already implemented – is urgently needed.’

He said this would ‘provide carriers and customers with additional certainty around the ability to operate this autumn and winter’.

Karen Dee of the Airport Operators Association said: ‘Our airports are facing pressures that were unimaginable six months ago and it is essential that the Government work with the industry to introduce regional travel corridors to low-risk areas and agree a package of financial measures that support our airports who have already lost over £2billion since the start of the pandemic.

‘We have consistently called for support including relief from business rates and an extension to employment support beyond October and it is long overdue that the Government provides the same level of support to aviation that it has provided to other sectors.’

Rory Boland of consumer group Which? said: ‘It’s understandable that the Government wants to restrict travel to these countries at this time, but the burden of this decision disproportionally falls on holidaymakers – thousands of whom are likely to be left significantly out of pocket because their airline will refuse to refund them.

‘Unlike tour operators, airlines now routinely ignore Foreign and Commonwealth Office travel warnings and refuse refunds because, they argue, the flight is still operating. Some major airlines, like Ryanair, won’t even allow customers to rebook without charging a hefty fee.

‘The Government wants us to act responsibly and not travel to countries with an FCO warning, but it needs to make it clear to airlines that they too need to act responsibly and not ignore government travel advice in an effort to pocket customer cash.’ 

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DAN HODGES: Why Dishy Rishi is turning into Ruthless Rishi, the Iron Chancellor

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dan hodges why dishy rishi is turning into ruthless rishi the iron chancellor

Dishy Rishi is about to be put on furlough. ‘People have lost perspective,’ an ally of the Chancellor tells me. 

‘We’ve spent £350billion protecting the economy, but we’ve now reached the point where this isn’t even registering.

‘Someone said to him last week, ‘Why aren’t you doing anything for the theatre?’ We’ve given the theatres £1.6billion. Things are going to have to change.’

As Covid threatens to plunge Britain into a double-dip lockdown, Sunak is only too aware he cannot simply turn off the spending taps. 

But over the past few weeks, he’s become increasingly concerned that the country – and even some of his own colleagues – have started to believe there is an unlimited supply of public cash to be thrown at the coronavirus crisis.

33385950 8751789 image m 17 1600561990652

33385950 8751789 image m 17 1600561990652

As Covid threatens to plunge Britain into a double-dip lockdown, Chancellor Rishi Sunak is only too aware he cannot simply turn off the spending taps

‘We can’t chuck people to the wolves,’ a Minister explains, ‘but everyone is going to have to start to realise that over the medium term this sort of spending can’t continue. It’s not economically sustainable and it’s not politically sustainable.’

So as he prepares for a combined autumn Budget and spending review, Dishy Rishi is set to be replaced by Ruthless Rishi.

The Government will continue to provide support. But, as an ally frames it: ‘We’re going to get back to a situation where every pound we spend is going to have to be replaced somewhere else.’

To reassert fiscal prudence, Sunak had been eyeing the ‘triple lock’ on pensions introduced by David Cameron and George Osborne. But I understand Boris Johnson has baulked at unpicking such a totemic policy commitment.

So instead he will be looking for other significant – and politically explosive – savings. First there will be a major squeeze on public-sector pay.

‘It just wouldn’t be right if 16 per cent of the workforce were seeing big pay increases just at the time when everyone else in the economy is having to tighten their belts,’ a Minister explains.

There will also be a freeze on welfare. Ministers have been working on a worst-case scenario of four million unemployed as the existing levels of support for businesses and workers begins to unwind.

Some remain hopeful that a jobs apocalypse on this scale can be averted.

But they believe that whatever final toll Covid wreaks on employment, there is no scope – or public appetite – for an uprating of individual benefits.

And I’m told there’s significant Treasury pushback on Boris’s cherished Operation Moonshot – or Operation Moonf***, as some of the more hard-bitten Treasury civil servants have started branding it.

The Chancellor is said to be supportive of investment on health measures that can get Britain safely back to work.

But he is resisting releasing huge amounts of public money on what could turn out to be nothing more than a bottomless petri dish, until tried and tested technology is available to support the programme.

The Chancellor believes what is needed is an end to Covid-inspired fiscal complacency. Dishy Rishi has been sent home. It's now Ruthless Rishi who's sitting behind the Chancellor's desk

The Chancellor believes what is needed is an end to Covid-inspired fiscal complacency. Dishy Rishi has been sent home. It's now Ruthless Rishi who's sitting behind the Chancellor's desk

The Chancellor believes what is needed is an end to Covid-inspired fiscal complacency. Dishy Rishi has been sent home. It’s now Ruthless Rishi who’s sitting behind the Chancellor’s desk

Over the past few months, Sunak’s growing legion of fans on the Tory backbenches have come to view him as something of a fiscal magician – a swirl of the cape and flourish of the wand, and their constituents’ problems vanish in a puff of smoke.

But even though he is aware there will inevitably be damage to his personal brand, he is said by friends to have decided it’s time to present his colleagues with some harsh economic truths.

‘This Dishy Rishi stuff has got a bit out of hand,’ an ally concedes. ‘We’re facing a serious crisis. And were going to need to introduce a note of reality into all this.’

This chimes in part with the Chancellor’s own personal ideology. As a 15-year-old, he used to do the accounts in his mother’s pharmacy. ‘He’s been balancing the books since he was a teenager,’ says a friend.

He also spent the summer flicking through Nigel Lawson’s memoirs.

‘He tells me he’s a Lawsonian,’ one MP tells me. ‘He’s very hot on fiscal responsibility.’

An example of this is Sunak’s growing alarm at the UK’s debt-to-GDP ratio, which now exceeds 100 per cent.

‘Rishi is very, very worried about how vulnerable this makes us to even small variations in interest rates,’ a Minister reveals. ‘He thinks we’re in a very precarious position.’

But there is also a political calculation behind the Chancellor’s desire to damp down expectations that Britain can painlessly spend its way out of the Covid crisis.

Sunak is one of a growing number of Tory MPs who are becoming worried there is insufficient ‘blue water’ between them and Keir Starmer’s increasingly effective Labour Opposition.

‘There is not enough fiscal demarcation between us and Starmer,’ a Sunak supporter says. ‘We’re Conservatives. We’re going to have to draw a much clearer line between ourselves and Labour on the economy and spending.’

All of which is why Sunak has begun a major charm offensive of Tory backbenchers.

Sunak had been eyeing the 'triple lock' on pensions introduced by David Cameron and George Osborne. But Boris Johnson has baulked at unpicking such a totemic policy commitment

Sunak had been eyeing the 'triple lock' on pensions introduced by David Cameron and George Osborne. But Boris Johnson has baulked at unpicking such a totemic policy commitment

Sunak had been eyeing the ‘triple lock’ on pensions introduced by David Cameron and George Osborne. But Boris Johnson has baulked at unpicking such a totemic policy commitment

Last week saw the growing discontent at Boris’s faltering leadership explode into open revolt over the statement that No 10 was preparing to break international law to kick-start the Brexit negotiations. 

‘I don’t mind dying in the ditch over Brexit,’ one exasperated MP tells me, ‘but I do expect No 10 to at least dig me the ditch before the bullets start flying.’

Rishi Sunak is going to spend the next few weeks rolling up his sleeves, and digging in with his colleagues.

He knows that hard times are coming. That the crushing burden of Covid-19 on the UK economy can no longer be resisted by one-off loans and eye-catching restaurant discounts. And that when economic gravity finally reasserts itself, there will be a political backlash.

Some of his opponents think there is no place for him to hide.

‘We don’t think we’ll be fighting Boris at the next Election,’ one of Keir Starmer’s aides told me a few weeks ago, ‘but I’m not sure we’re going to be facing Rishi either. He’s very popular now, but let’s see how popular he is when the furlough scheme is taken away.’

But it isn’t popularity the Chancellor craves at the moment. He believes what is needed is an end to Covid-inspired fiscal complacency.

Dishy Rishi has been sent home. It’s now Ruthless Rishi who’s sitting behind the Chancellor’s desk.

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Senior Tories plot ‘Parliamentary lock’ to subject Covid emergency measures to a vote by MPs

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senior tories plot parliamentary lock to subject covid emergency measures to a vote by mps

Senior Tories are planning a parliamentary lock to prevent Boris Johnson having the final say on new lockdown measures, according to The Sunday Telegraph

Altrincham and Sale West MP Sir Graham Brady is planning to table an amendment that would force ministers to put any new measures to a vote first.

MPs will vote next week on reauthorising the government’s use of such emergency powers under the Coronavirus Act 2020.

Sir Graham Brady (centre) is looking to force a vote by MPs on emergency coronavirus measures amid concerns that restrictions on the public's freedom are being imposed without parliamentary scrutiny. Senior Tory MPs are said to be angry that they are not able to debate new measures, such as the Rule of Six and £1000 fines for flouting self-isolation, which takes effect next week. Brady said there was 'no justification for ministers ruling by emergency powers without reference to normal democratic processes' now parliament is in session (file photo).

Sir Graham Brady (centre) is looking to force a vote by MPs on emergency coronavirus measures amid concerns that restrictions on the public's freedom are being imposed without parliamentary scrutiny. Senior Tory MPs are said to be angry that they are not able to debate new measures, such as the Rule of Six and £1000 fines for flouting self-isolation, which takes effect next week. Brady said there was 'no justification for ministers ruling by emergency powers without reference to normal democratic processes' now parliament is in session (file photo).

Sir Graham Brady (centre) is looking to force a vote by MPs on emergency coronavirus measures amid concerns that restrictions on the public’s freedom are being imposed without parliamentary scrutiny. Senior Tory MPs are said to be angry that they are not able to debate new measures, such as the Rule of Six and £1000 fines for flouting self-isolation, which takes effect next week. Brady said there was ‘no justification for ministers ruling by emergency powers without reference to normal democratic processes’ now parliament is in session (file photo).

A Downing Street spokesman told The Telegraph: ‘It’s absolutely vital that MPs are engaged in this process as these decisions will have a huge impact on them and their constituents and we will continue to discuss these plans with all MPs.’

But some senior Tory MPs are angry about new restrictions on the public’s freedom, such as the Rule of Six, being introduced without a debate in the Commons.

Drinkers are seen out on the town in Nottingham on Saturday. Fears of a second wave of coronavirus have prompted Boris Johnson to institute harsh new rules to limit the virus' spread. But some in his party are displeased with changes that they feel unfairly restrict the freedom of their constituents.

Drinkers are seen out on the town in Nottingham on Saturday. Fears of a second wave of coronavirus have prompted Boris Johnson to institute harsh new rules to limit the virus' spread. But some in his party are displeased with changes that they feel unfairly restrict the freedom of their constituents.

Drinkers are seen out on the town in Nottingham on Saturday. Fears of a second wave of coronavirus have prompted Boris Johnson to institute harsh new rules to limit the virus’ spread. But some in his party are displeased with changes that they feel unfairly restrict the freedom of their constituents.

Fines of up to £1000 for breaching self-isolation were also approved without parliamentary scrutiny.

Sir Brady, who is chairman of the 1922 Committee of Tory backbenchers, said that parliament has been sitting since April.

‘There is now no justification for ministers ruling by emergency powers without reference to normal democratic processes.’ 
 

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Parliamentary staff write poems about their privilege after Black Lives Matter protests

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parliamentary staff write poems about their privilege after black lives matter protests

Parliamentary staff have been urged to admit their ‘privilege’ through an online platform that has been set up in the wake of the Black Lives Matter protests.

Officials have reportedly been issued with an ‘inclusivity toolkit’ by senior figures which encourages white workers to acknowledge their ‘internalised racism’.

The digital wall was set up by Parliament’s diversity group Parli-REACH for staff to profess their privilege, write poetry and give their ‘support’ for Black, Asian and Minority Ethnic (BAME) colleagues, according to the Telegraph.

Parliamentary staff have reportedly been urged to admit their 'privilege' on a new digital wall set up by Parliament's diversity group Parli-REACH

Parliamentary staff have reportedly been urged to admit their 'privilege' on a new digital wall set up by Parliament's diversity group Parli-REACH

Parliamentary staff have reportedly been urged to admit their ‘privilege’ on a new digital wall set up by Parliament’s diversity group Parli-REACH

After the Edward Colston statue was toppled in Bristol in June (above), parliamentary staff were given advice on expressing support for Black Lives Matter protests

After the Edward Colston statue was toppled in Bristol in June (above), parliamentary staff were given advice on expressing support for Black Lives Matter protests

After the Edward Colston statue was toppled in Bristol in June (above), parliamentary staff were given advice on expressing support for Black Lives Matter protests

This comes soon after staff were given advice on how to support Black Lives Matter protests, such as ‘attending protests and social media use’, after Edward Colston’s statue was pulled down in Bristol in June.

Messages posted on the digital ‘solidarity and support’ wall include one woman saying: ‘As a white woman I acknowledge my privilege and continue to educate myself.’

One person posted on the platform arguing that staff could no longer watch American comedy series Brooklyn Nine-Nine, which stars Andy Samberg, because it sold a ‘cosy lie’ about policing.

And another wrote that ‘as a white man I am conscious of the privilege I have’, the Telegraph reported.

One person said that staff could no longer watch American comedy series Brooklyn Nine-Nine, which stars Andy Samberg, because it sold a 'cosy lie' about policing

One person said that staff could no longer watch American comedy series Brooklyn Nine-Nine, which stars Andy Samberg, because it sold a 'cosy lie' about policing

One person said that staff could no longer watch American comedy series Brooklyn Nine-Nine, which stars Andy Samberg, because it sold a ‘cosy lie’ about policing

33384126 8751573 image a 2 1600557018480

33384126 8751573 image a 2 1600557018480

House of Commons staff leaders have reportedly promised that the death of George Floyd would be a ‘catalyst for change’ in Parliament

But the admissions have been described as ‘divisive’ by some MPs, who are calling for a review of public institutions.

Tory MPs Danny Kruger and Miram Caters told the Telegraph that a ‘woke consensus’ has ‘taken hold’ of ‘parts of Whitehall’, warning the party not to ‘pander’ to its supporters with policy.

Documents obtained by the Telegraph reportedly show the House of Commons staff leaders promising that George Floyd’s death in May would be a ‘catalyst for change’ in Parliament.

It was also revealed that new unconscious bias training and more online resources have been given out to staff, including the new digital wall.  

A Minneapolis police officer knelt on the neck of George Floyd, 46, for nearly nine minutes and his death has led to global protests against racism, colonialism and police brutality.

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