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Father who marched his son to police says ‘it was the right thing to do’

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Jack Evans, 18, has been jailed for two years

Jack Evans, 18, has been jailed for two years

Jack Evans, 18, has been jailed for two years

The father of a teenage rapist who turned his son in said he ‘would do the same thing again’.    

The teenager who forced himself on a girl was jailed after his parents made him confess when they found he had texted his victim to say sorry.

Top grade student Jack Evans, 18, nearly escaped justice over the sex attack because the student never complained.

His father Jonathan, 47, told the Mirror: ‘I would do the same thing again, I would have to because that is my moral standing on it, it is painful but it is right.

‘You cannot get on with your life if you live your life under a lie, as much as this hurts it is the right thing to do.”

Evans apologised to the victim by text two months later and his appalled dad Jonathan and his stepmother Sarah Morris, 47, saw the message and told him to tell police.   

They marched him to a police station where he told officers his name and what he had done.

Evans (pictured) had escaped justice for the rape but when his parents discovered a text from him saying sorry to his victim, they marched him to the police station to confess

Evans (pictured) had escaped justice for the rape but when his parents discovered a text from him saying sorry to his victim, they marched him to the police station to confess

Evans (pictured) had escaped justice for the rape but when his parents discovered a text from him saying sorry to his victim, they marched him to the police station to confess

They tracked down his victim, who had been a virgin, who told them about the attack and he was charged with rape. 

She said she was left feeling ‘worthless’ and unable to trust men again. 

His father Jonathan said outside Merthyr Tydfil Crown Court: ‘I wanted him to tell the truth, he had to do the right thing and admit his guilt.

Jonathan Evans and his son Jack pictured in 2018 before he told him to confess to rape

Jonathan Evans and his son Jack pictured in 2018 before he told him to confess to rape

Jonathan Evans and his son Jack pictured in 2018 before he told him to confess to rape

‘It’s been difficult for all of us and it’s caused quite a few arguments.

‘I’ve said to him that the best thing for him is to show everyone that you’re doing your best to rectify what has happened.

Evans' father Jonathan told his son to tell the go to officers to tell them what he had done

Evans' father Jonathan told his son to tell the go to officers to tell them what he had done

Evans’ father Jonathan told his son to tell the go to officers to tell them what he had done

‘It has been a shock to the system for him – I’m hoping being in prison will give him time to reflect.’

The court heard Evans’ victim had told him to stop at the last minute but he had carried on during the attack in January last year.

At the time he had been a top grade student studying maths, computing and history in college.

Prosecutor Claire Pickthall said: ‘She didn’t make a complaint but two months later Evans and his stepmother turned up at a police station to say what had happened.’

Evans, of Pontypool, South Wales, was jailed for two years and ordered to register as a sex offender.

Jonathan Evans and wife Sarah Morris, both 47, who are Evans' dad and stepmother and who marched him to the police station to confess to the rape

Jonathan Evans and wife Sarah Morris, both 47, who are Evans' dad and stepmother and who marched him to the police station to confess to the rape

Jonathan Evans and wife Sarah Morris, both 47, who are Evans’ dad and stepmother and who marched him to the police station to confess to the rape

Evans' mother Deniz Stewart was the only parent allowed in court, because of social distancing rules. He mouthed 'I love you' to her as he was sent down

Evans' mother Deniz Stewart was the only parent allowed in court, because of social distancing rules. He mouthed 'I love you' to her as he was sent down

Evans’ mother Deniz Stewart was the only parent allowed in court, because of social distancing rules. He mouthed ‘I love you’ to her as he was sent down

He was watched by Deniz Stewart, his biological mother, who he told he loved as he was sent down. Only she was allowed into court because of strict social distancing rules.

Gareth Williams, defending, had asked for a suspended sentence because of the ‘exceptional circumstances.’

Jack Evans, 18, pictured in a smart dinner jacket and tie before he was convicted of rape

Jack Evans, 18, pictured in a smart dinner jacket and tie before he was convicted of rape

Jonathan Evans, 47, with his son Jack Evans, 18, pictured on holiday back in 2018

Jonathan Evans, 47, with his son Jack Evans, 18, pictured on holiday back in 2018

Jack Evans, pictured right in evening dress and left with his father Jonathan on holiday, has been convicted of rape after he was marched to a police station to confess

He said: ‘It is extremely rare for anyone to admit to such a serious offence without there being a complaint.’

But Judge Tracey Lloyd-Clarke said there were aggravating features and Evans had to be locked up.

She told him: ‘Two months after the rape you apologised to your victim and said you understood why she was upset.

Parc Young Offenders Institute in Bridgend, where Evans is understood to have been sent to serve his two-year sentence

Parc Young Offenders Institute in Bridgend, where Evans is understood to have been sent to serve his two-year sentence

Parc Young Offenders Institute in Bridgend, where Evans is understood to have been sent to serve his two-year sentence

‘But that text came came to the attention of your father and mother who took you to a police station.

‘You told an officer your name and said you’d has sex with the young woman.’

He was sent to a Young Offenders’ Institute for two years after being given discount for his age and his guilty plea. 

It is understood he is currently in Parc Young Offenders’ Institution in Bridgend, which is in HMP Parc which has a capacity of up to 1,300. 

His father Jonathan wants him to join his software engineering company when he released next year. 

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Painting of Waterloo hero in Queen’s collection is altered to include slavery link

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The Queen’s portrait of a Battle of Waterloo hero that she has hanging in Windsor Castle has been changed to include his links to slavery.

Historical details of the painting of Sir Thomas Picton have now been altered to include a link to his torturing of a slave girl when he was the ‘Tyrant of Trinidad’. 

It comes in the wake of the Black Lives Matter campaign which has called for statues and memorials of figures linked to slavery to be reviewed. 

Picton was revered for generations as the most senior British soldier to be killed defeating Napoleon at the Battle of Waterloo. 

Sir Thomas Picton was a hero of the Battle of Waterloo but was also known as the 'Tyrant of Trinidad' for his part in torturing a young slave girl

Sir Thomas Picton was a hero of the Battle of Waterloo but was also known as the 'Tyrant of Trinidad' for his part in torturing a young slave girl

Sir Thomas Picton was a hero of the Battle of Waterloo but was also known as the ‘Tyrant of Trinidad’ for his part in torturing a young slave girl

The Waterloo Chamber in Windsor Castle is home to the controversial portrait

The Waterloo Chamber in Windsor Castle is home to the controversial portrait

The Waterloo Chamber in Windsor Castle is home to the controversial portrait

But campaigners said his links to the slave trade should be highlighted – and a call has been made to remove a grand statue of Picton from Cardiff’s City Hall to be replaced with a memorial to a 14-year-old slave girl he tortured.

Lieutenant-General Picton was the highest-ranking British officer killed at Waterloo after Duke of Wellington called him ‘a rough foul-mouthed devil as ever lived’ but ‘very capable.’

Picton’s is the first to be amended in The Royal Collection Trust which has a 250,000-strong art collection includes exhibits at Buckingham Palace and Windsor Castle.

It now reads: ‘Picton’s punitive administration of Trinidad and his subjects’ enforced adherence to strict penal codes were the subject of contemporary controversy in Britain and the West Indies.

‘He was brought to trial in London in 1806, accused of carrying out torturous practices in jails under his jurisdiction. He was later partially exonerated, on the grounds that while he had committed illegal acts not befitting his role as military governor, the right to torture prisoners was recognised under the Spanish laws still enforced at the time.’

It is known as the largest art collection in the world and it is considering altering other notes online and at exhibitions.

A campaign is also underway to get a statue of Sir Thomas Picton at Cardiff City Hall removed over his slavery links as the 'Tyrant of Trinidad'

A campaign is also underway to get a statue of Sir Thomas Picton at Cardiff City Hall removed over his slavery links as the 'Tyrant of Trinidad'

A campaign is also underway to get a statue of Sir Thomas Picton at Cardiff City Hall removed over his slavery links as the ‘Tyrant of Trinidad’

A trust spokesman said: ‘In terms of other records, work is underway within our curatorial teams to improve and update them, which will happen in the coming weeks and months’

A campaign has been launched to remove his statue from pride of place in a City Hall to be replaced with a memorial to Luisa Calderon.

Sir Thomas was convicted convicted of ordering the illegal torture of 14-year-old girl Luisa after she accused of stealing.

He admitted to the charge but the conviction was later overturned. He returned to Britain and was a sitting MP when he was killed by the Napoleon’s troops in 1815.

Campaigners are also keen to remove the memorial to Picton at Carmarthen taken down

Campaigners are also keen to remove the memorial to Picton at Carmarthen taken down

Campaigners are also keen to remove the memorial to Picton at Carmarthen taken down

The first black Lord Mayor of Cardiff Dan De'Ath wants a marble monument to Picton removed from the council's 'hall of heroes'

The first black Lord Mayor of Cardiff Dan De'Ath wants a marble monument to Picton removed from the council's 'hall of heroes'

The first black Lord Mayor of Cardiff Dan De’Ath wants a marble monument to Picton removed from the council’s ‘hall of heroes’

A marble statue of Sir Thomas stands proudly in Cardiff City Hall – but calls to remove it have been led by the city’s own Lord Mayor.

Sir Thomas Picton:  Hero of Waterloo who became ‘Tyrant of Trinidad’  

Where is the statue?

Inside Cardiff City Hall

Who wants his statue removed?

Cardiff Lord Mayor Daniel De’Ath asked the council to remove the state in an open letter which has received support from council leader Huw Thomas.  

Who was he?

A military officer who enjoyed a prolific career before being killed at the Battle of Waterloo. He was the Governor of Trinidad from (1797–1803).

What did he do?

The bad:

  • Known as the ‘tyrant of Trinidad’ for his ‘arbitrary and brutal’ rule of the island
  • His motto was ‘let them hate so long as they fear’
  • Ordered the torture of a 14-year-old girl accused of theft

The good:

  • Highest ranking officer killed fighting with Wellington at Waterloo 
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Dan De’Ath – the first black Lord Mayor of Cardiff – called for the marble monument to be removed from an array of the heroes of Wales in the council’s Marble Hall.

He said: ‘I feel that it is no longer acceptable for Picton’s statue to be amongst the ‘Heroes of Wales’ in City Hall.’

An open letter to the Leader of Cardiff Council calls for the statue of Sir Thomas Picton to be replaced with a memorial to his most famous victim.

Calderon was accused of being involved in the theft of money from a businessman who her mother had arranged for her to live with as a ‘mistress’ at age 11.

Unable to get a confession through interrogation, Picton issued the order to ‘Inflict the torture on Louisa Calderon’. Calderon did not confess and was imprisoned for a further eight months before being released.

The statue was unveiled by former Prime Minister David Lloyd George in 1916.. The hall also includes an iconic painting of Diana, Princess of Wales.

Council leader Huw Thomas is also backing calls for the sculpture to be taken down from Cardiff City Hall next to the other Welsh heroes.

Cardiff Council is set to discuss the removal at ‘the earliest opporutunity’.

Picton, born in Haverfordwest, west Wales, is still the only Welshman to be buried at St Paul’s Cathedral.

Dr Douglas Jones, of the National Library of Wales, said: ‘Picton admitted ordering the torture, but claimed that it was legal under the Spanish law still being administered in Trinidad at the time, despite the island being under British rule.’

Dr Jones said Picton’s governorship was ‘authoritarian and brutal’ as he increased the number of lashes given to slaves and authorised executions.

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Woman, 29, with incredible 52.8-inch legs says she loves showing them off

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A woman with incredible 52.8-inch legs says she loves showing them off in shorts and high heels despite her 6ft9 height.  

Rentsenkhorloo ‘Ren’ Bud, who was born in Mongolia and now lives in Chicago, is believed to have one of the longst sets of legs in the world and insists she isn’t afraid to show them off.

The 29-year-old comes from a tall family, with her father reaching 6ft 10in and her mother a slender 6ft 1in – but still struggled adapting to her height during her younger years.

She confessed that finding ‘cute’ clothes has always been a challenge and hated constantly hitting her head on doorways.  

A woman with incredible 52.8-inch legs (pictured) says she loves showing them off in shorts and high heels despite her 6ft 9in height

A woman with incredible 52.8-inch legs (pictured) says she loves showing them off in shorts and high heels despite her 6ft 9in height

A woman with incredible 52.8-inch legs (pictured) says she loves showing them off in shorts and high heels despite her 6ft 9in height

Rentsenkhorloo 'Ren' Bud (pictured), who was born in Mongolia, has some of the longest legs in the world and insists she isn't afraid to show them off

Rentsenkhorloo 'Ren' Bud (pictured), who was born in Mongolia, has some of the longest legs in the world and insists she isn't afraid to show them off

Rentsenkhorloo ‘Ren’ Bud (pictured), who was born in Mongolia, has some of the longest legs in the world and insists she isn’t afraid to show them off

The 29-year-old (pictured with a friend) comes from a tall family, with her father reaching 6ft 10in and her mother a slender 6ft 1in

The 29-year-old (pictured with a friend) comes from a tall family, with her father reaching 6ft 10in and her mother a slender 6ft 1in

But Ren (above) still struggled adapting to her height during her younger years

But Ren (above) still struggled adapting to her height during her younger years

The 29-year-old (pictured left with a friend, and right) comes from a tall family, with her father reaching 6ft10 and her mother a slender 6ft1 – but still struggled adapting to her height during her younger years

But after embracing her long legs, Ren now admits: ‘I like to wear shorts and high heels, especially so my legs look more long. I love my long legs, and I think they make me more beautiful.’

The woman with the longest legs in the world is said to be teenager Maci Currin, from Austin, Texas, who has pins measuring 53 inches – smashing the previous record of 52.2 inches held by Ekaterina Lisina, of Russia.  

Being an extraordinary height comes with many hurdles, including finding clothes that fit to being too tall for doorways. 

Recalling some of the challenges she often faces, Ren said: ‘The doorways are so short for me. I hate to hit my head on doorways! 

Ren (above) confessed that finding 'cute' clothes has always been a challenge and hated constantly hitting her head on doorways

Ren (above) confessed that finding 'cute' clothes has always been a challenge and hated constantly hitting her head on doorways

Ren (above) confessed that finding ‘cute’ clothes has always been a challenge and hated constantly hitting her head on doorways

But after embracing her long legs, Ren now admits: 'I like to wear shorts and high heels especially so my legs look more long (pictured)'

But after embracing her long legs, Ren now admits: 'I like to wear shorts and high heels especially so my legs look more long (pictured)'

Ren wears red high heels and shorts as poses on a chair

Ren wears red high heels and shorts as poses on a chair

But after embracing her long legs, Ren now admits: ‘I like to wear shorts and high heels especially so my legs look more long (pictured)’

Being an extraordinary height comes with many hurdles, including finding clothes that fit to being too tall for doorways. Pictured: Ren with her mother

Being an extraordinary height comes with many hurdles, including finding clothes that fit to being too tall for doorways. Pictured: Ren with her mother

Being an extraordinary height comes with many hurdles, including finding clothes that fit to being too tall for doorways. Pictured: Ren with her mother

‘Finding clothes is really challenging. My shoe size is US 13 and you can’t find any shoes in Asia and even in Mongolia and Korea.

‘I tried to go shopping in the United States a few times when I came here, but I couldn’t find any clothes. I just try to buy some clothes online.

‘Even when I was in the first grade, I was the same height as my teacher – 168cm. I was a little girl and I wanted cute clothes, but you can’t find any.’

Although Ren wasn’t bullied at school, she confessed that she felt less positive about her height when she was younger.

Recalling some of the challenges she often faces, Ren (pictured) said: 'The doorways are so short for me. I hate to hit my head on doorways!'

Recalling some of the challenges she often faces, Ren (pictured) said: 'The doorways are so short for me. I hate to hit my head on doorways!'

Ren (pictured) added: 'Finding clothes is really challenging. My shoe size is US 13 and you can't find any shoes in Asia and even in Mongolia and Korea'

Ren (pictured) added: 'Finding clothes is really challenging. My shoe size is US 13 and you can't find any shoes in Asia and even in Mongolia and Korea'

Recalling some of the challenges she often faces, Ren (pictured) said: ‘The doorways are so short for me. I hate to hit my head on doorways!’

But having been tall all her life, Ren (above) couldn't imagine being any other way, adding: 'I live with my long legs, and my height my entire life. So, I think it's just a normal thing for me.'

But having been tall all her life, Ren (above) couldn't imagine being any other way, adding: 'I live with my long legs, and my height my entire life. So, I think it's just a normal thing for me.'

But having been tall all her life, Ren (above) couldn’t imagine being any other way, adding: ‘I live with my long legs, and my height my entire life. So, I think it’s just a normal thing for me.’

Ren (pictured above at her home) has even had the opportunity to do some modelling work

Ren (pictured above at her home) has even had the opportunity to do some modelling work

Ren (pictured above at her home) has even had the opportunity to do some modelling work

She said: ‘When I was younger, I felt so bad because of my height. Some people made me feel uncomfortable, but nowadays it seems like I’m seen more as unique, so that’s why I feel so good.

‘In the last 15 years, I started to like my height and I’m really comfortable with my body and also long legs.’

And having been tall all her life, Ren couldn’t imagine being any other way, adding: ‘I live with my long legs, and my height my entire life. So, I think it’s just a normal thing for me.’

Ren has even had the opportunity to do some modelling work, explaining: ‘I just started to work with one brand, which is leggings for tall girls. Being tall is beautiful, and you can look so unique from other people.’

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Beijing’s troops remove structures from contested Himalayan valley

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Chinese troops have started removing tents and other structures from a contested Himalayan valley where they fought a deadly battle with Indian soldiers last month.

20 Indian soldiers were killed in brutal hand-to-hand fighting on June 15 in the Galwan Valley in Ladakh, sending tensions soaring between the nuclear-armed neighbours. China has acknowledged it suffered casualties but not given figures.

The two sides have since held military and diplomatic talks and said they want a negotiated settlement.

China’s People’s Liberation Army soldiers were ‘seen removing tents and structures’ and there was a ‘rearward movement’ of military vehicles in the Galwan Valley, an Indian army source told AFP on Monday.

Chinese troops have started removing tents and other structures from a contested Himalayan valley where they fought a deadly battle with Indian soldiers last month. Above, Indian Army personnel drive vehicles as they take part in a war exercise at Thikse in Leh district of the union territory of Ladakh on July 4

Chinese troops have started removing tents and other structures from a contested Himalayan valley where they fought a deadly battle with Indian soldiers last month. Above, Indian Army personnel drive vehicles as they take part in a war exercise at Thikse in Leh district of the union territory of Ladakh on July 4

Chinese troops have started removing tents and other structures from a contested Himalayan valley where they fought a deadly battle with Indian soldiers last month. Above, Indian Army personnel drive vehicles as they take part in a war exercise at Thikse in Leh district of the union territory of Ladakh on July 4

20 Indian soldiers were killed in brutal hand-to-hand fighting on June 15 in the Galwan Valley in Ladakh, sending tensions soaring between the nuclear-armed neighbours. Above, an Indian Army convoy moves along a highway leading to Ladakh, at Gagangeer in Kashmir's Ganderbal district

20 Indian soldiers were killed in brutal hand-to-hand fighting on June 15 in the Galwan Valley in Ladakh, sending tensions soaring between the nuclear-armed neighbours. Above, an Indian Army convoy moves along a highway leading to Ladakh, at Gagangeer in Kashmir's Ganderbal district

20 Indian soldiers were killed in brutal hand-to-hand fighting on June 15 in the Galwan Valley in Ladakh, sending tensions soaring between the nuclear-armed neighbours. Above, an Indian Army convoy moves along a highway leading to Ladakh, at Gagangeer in Kashmir’s Ganderbal district

China's People's Liberation Army soldiers were 'seen removing tents and structures' and there was a 'rearward movement' of military vehicles in the Galwan Valley, an Indian army source told AFP on Monday. Above, Indian army soldiers drive vehicles along mountainous roads as they take part in a military exercise at Thikse in Leh district of the union territory of Ladakh on July 4

China's People's Liberation Army soldiers were 'seen removing tents and structures' and there was a 'rearward movement' of military vehicles in the Galwan Valley, an Indian army source told AFP on Monday. Above, Indian army soldiers drive vehicles along mountainous roads as they take part in a military exercise at Thikse in Leh district of the union territory of Ladakh on July 4

China’s People’s Liberation Army soldiers were ‘seen removing tents and structures’ and there was a ‘rearward movement’ of military vehicles in the Galwan Valley, an Indian army source told AFP on Monday. Above, Indian army soldiers drive vehicles along mountainous roads as they take part in a military exercise at Thikse in Leh district of the union territory of Ladakh on July 4

‘Disengagement with the PLA has started as per agreed terms in the Corps Commanders’ meeting,’ the source added.

The source said the Indian army was ‘verifying’ how far back Chinese forces had withdrawn.

There was no comment on whether there was a similar withdrawal by Indian troops.

Chinese foreign ministry spokesman Zhao Lijian told reporters in Beijing on Monday that both sides had made ‘positive progress… to disengage frontline troops and ease the border situation’.

‘We hope that the Indian side will go with the Chinese side to implement the consensus reached by both sides with practical actions,’ Zhao added.

The Galwan Valley incident was the first time in 45 years that soldiers had died in combat on the Asian giants’ long-disputed border.

India and China fought a war over the frontier in 1962.

Prime Minister of India Narendra Modi and army officials arrving in Leh, Ladakh, India on July 3. Modi visited Army, Air Force and Indo-Tibetan Border Police personnel

Prime Minister of India Narendra Modi and army officials arrving in Leh, Ladakh, India on July 3. Modi visited Army, Air Force and Indo-Tibetan Border Police personnel

Prime Minister of India Narendra Modi and army officials arrving in Leh, Ladakh, India on July 3. Modi visited Army, Air Force and Indo-Tibetan Border Police personnel

Prime Minister of India Narendra Modi and top Indian army officials in Leh, Ladakh, India. Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi made an unannounced visit Friday to a military base in a remote region bordering China where troops from the two countries have been facing off for nearly two months

Prime Minister of India Narendra Modi and top Indian army officials in Leh, Ladakh, India. Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi made an unannounced visit Friday to a military base in a remote region bordering China where troops from the two countries have been facing off for nearly two months

Prime Minister of India Narendra Modi and top Indian army officials in Leh, Ladakh, India. Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi made an unannounced visit Friday to a military base in a remote region bordering China where troops from the two countries have been facing off for nearly two months

Soldiers await a visit by India's Prime Minister Narendra Modi in India's Himalayan desert region of Ladakh, India, July 3. Modi chanted 'Long live mother India!' while addressing troops at the Nimu military base, insisting that 'after every crisis, India has emerged stronger'

Soldiers await a visit by India's Prime Minister Narendra Modi in India's Himalayan desert region of Ladakh, India, July 3. Modi chanted 'Long live mother India!' while addressing troops at the Nimu military base, insisting that 'after every crisis, India has emerged stronger'

Soldiers await a visit by India’s Prime Minister Narendra Modi in India’s Himalayan desert region of Ladakh, India, July 3. Modi chanted ‘Long live mother India!’ while addressing troops at the Nimu military base, insisting that ‘after every crisis, India has emerged stronger’ 

Anti-China sentiment has been growing in India since the high-altitude clash, with the government banning Chinese mobile apps including the wildy popular TikTok. 

Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi made an unannounced visit Friday to a military base in a remote region bordering China where troops from the two countries have been facing off for nearly two months.

Modi, accompanied by India’s military leadership, interacted with troops in Ladakh region. A photo on his Instagram account showed him sitting in a camouflage tent at the base. ‘Interacting with our brave armed forces personnel,’ he wrote. 

Modi chanted ‘Long live mother India!’ while addressing troops at the Nimu military base, insisting that ‘after every crisis, India has emerged stronger.’

He praised the valor of Indian soldiers and said: ‘Enemies of India have seen your fire and fury.’

‘Days of expansionism are over. Expansionism creates danger for world peace. This is an era of development. Expansionist force have either lost or forced to turn back,’ he said in an oblique reference to China.

It comes after China appeared to be building new structures near the site of a deadly border clash with Indian troops last month – despite both sides pledging to ‘disengage’. 

Satellite images taken on June 22 showed what appeared to be a new Chinese encampment and road under construction on a terrace overlooking a bend in the Galwan River, where previously there was nothing.

Meanwhile defensive positions appeared to have been built on the Indian side, and a nearby forward operating base appears to have been significantly scaled back when compared with images taken of the same area on March 22.  

Slide me

Escalating tensions: The left-hand satellite image shows a region of the Galwan Valley on May 22, before clashes between Indian and Chinese troops, where there appears to be a single structure with a large Indian base nearby. The image on the right shows the same area on June 22, with a new road and camp on the Chinese side, and what appear to be new defensive positions on the Indian side along with a much-smaller base

Slide me

No backing down: This area is thought to have been the site of vicious hand-to-hand fighting between Indian and Chinese troops on June 15, that saw at least 20 killed. Indian analysts say the new Chinese camp, shown right, appears to be a mile over their side of the border – though China claims the whole region rightfully belongs to them

Road to ruin? A satellite image taken on June 22 shows a road under construction on the Chinese side of the border, including several trucks, tents, diggers and cranes, along with a newly-constructed culvert over the river

Road to ruin? A satellite image taken on June 22 shows a road under construction on the Chinese side of the border, including several trucks, tents, diggers and cranes, along with a newly-constructed culvert over the river

Road to ruin? A satellite image taken on June 22 shows a road under construction on the Chinese side of the border, including several trucks, tents, diggers and cranes, along with a newly-constructed culvert over the river

While the images were taken a month apart, Reuters news agency – which has access to more photos from space technology firm Maxar – reports most of the construction has happened in the last week.

Both sides have repeatedly pledged to pull back from the disputed region, with the latest statement issued just yesterday – when India was pictured sending more troops and jets to the frontlines. 

India says the area where the structures have sprung up are on its side of the poorly defined, undemarcated Line of Actual Control or the de facto border between the two Asian giants.

China says the whole of Galwan valley, located at about 14,000ft above sea level, is its territory and blames Indian troops for triggering the clashes.

Nathan Ruser, a satellite data expert at the Australian Strategic Policy Institute, said the buildup suggested there was little sign of de-escalation.

‘Satellite imagery from the Galwan Valley on June 22nd shows that ‘disengagement’ really isn’t the word that the (Indian) government should be using,’ he said in a post on Twitter. 

Show of force: This newly-released image shows a Chinese base further along the valley. Both sides have officially agreed to 'disengage' in the region, though observers say forces are building on both sides

Show of force: This newly-released image shows a Chinese base further along the valley. Both sides have officially agreed to 'disengage' in the region, though observers say forces are building on both sides

Show of force: This newly-released image shows a Chinese base further along the valley. Both sides have officially agreed to ‘disengage’ in the region, though observers say forces are building on both sides

Indian soldiers walk at the foothills of a mountain range near Leh, the largest town close to the disputed border, on Thursday. Locals say forces have been massing despite governments promising to back off

Indian soldiers walk at the foothills of a mountain range near Leh, the largest town close to the disputed border, on Thursday. Locals say forces have been massing despite governments promising to back off

Indian soldiers walk at the foothills of a mountain range near Leh, the largest town close to the disputed border, on Thursday. Locals say forces have been massing despite governments promising to back off

An Indian Air Force's Chinook helicopter is seen flying over the arid terrain of Ladakh, the region where the disputed border - officially known as the Actual Line of Control - is located

An Indian Air Force's Chinook helicopter is seen flying over the arid terrain of Ladakh, the region where the disputed border - officially known as the Actual Line of Control - is located

An Indian Air Force’s Chinook helicopter is seen flying over the arid terrain of Ladakh, the region where the disputed border – officially known as the Actual Line of Control – is located

Indian fighter jets fly over Leh on Thursday as part of a show of strength following what military sources say has been a Chinese takeover of contested territory

Indian fighter jets fly over Leh on Thursday as part of a show of strength following what military sources say has been a Chinese takeover of contested territory

Indian fighter jets fly over Leh on Thursday as part of a show of strength following what military sources say has been a Chinese takeover of contested territory

China’s foreign ministry did not immediately respond to requests for comment on the apparent activity.

India’s defence ministry also did not respond to a request for a comment.

Indian military officials have previously said they will be closely monitoring the planned disengagement process and verify it on the ground.

‘There is a trust deficit so far as the Chinese are concerned,’ said former Indian army chief Deepak Kapoor.

‘So if they are telling us verbally they are ready to pull back, we will wait to see it on the ground. Until then the armed forces will be on alert.’

Patch of uninhabitable desert that India and China have been fighting over for centuries 

The Himalayan border between India and China has been disputed for centuries, but the two countries have been fighting over it most recently since the 1960s.

In the 18th century it was fought over by the Russian, Chinese and British empires, and after India gained independence ownership of the region became more confused.

China values the region because it provides a trading route to Pakistan, and recent hostilities have been sparked by fears in Beijing that India will cut it off from the crucial overland corridor.

The current official border between the two was set by Britain and is known as the McMahon line. It is recognised by India but not by China.

In reality, the border between the two countries is on Line of Actual Control (LAC) where Indian and Chinese forces finished after the Sino-Indian War of 1962.

At least 20 Indian soldiers, including a colonel, were killed and at least 43 Chinese men were wounded or killed last Monday night along the Line of Actual Control (LAC), a disputed border in the Himlayas (the red territory is controlled by India, and the beige and grey stripes, Aksai Chin, is Chinese but claimed by India, the white line which surrounds is what Indian believes its border should be, whereas the black line was agreed after then 1962 Sino-Indian War - a heavy defeat for India)

At least 20 Indian soldiers, including a colonel, were killed and at least 43 Chinese men were wounded or killed last Monday night along the Line of Actual Control (LAC), a disputed border in the Himlayas (the red territory is controlled by India, and the beige and grey stripes, Aksai Chin, is Chinese but claimed by India, the white line which surrounds is what Indian believes its border should be, whereas the black line was agreed after then 1962 Sino-Indian War - a heavy defeat for India)

At least 20 Indian soldiers, including a colonel, were killed and at least 43 Chinese men were wounded or killed last Monday night along the Line of Actual Control (LAC), a disputed border in the Himlayas (the red territory is controlled by India, and the beige and grey stripes, Aksai Chin, is Chinese but claimed by India, the white line which surrounds is what Indian believes its border should be, whereas the black line was agreed after then 1962 Sino-Indian War – a heavy defeat for India)

Aksai Chin, the site of the latest tensions, is located in India according to the official border but is claimed as part of the Chinese region of Xinjiang by Beijing.

It is an almost uninhabited high-altitude scrubland traversed by the Xinjiang-Tibet Highway.

The other disputed territory is hundreds of miles away to the east of Tibet.

The 1962 Sino-Indian War was fought on these two frontiers as Indian Prime Minister Jawaharlal Nehru put it, a struggle over land where ‘not even a blade of grass grows.’ 

In addition to the disputed border, China had seized Tibet ten years before and accused India of trying to to subvert Beijing’s interests by granting asylum to the Dalai Lama.

There was also a Cold War element and India wanted to see if the US would back it in a confrontation against communist China.

Delhi had ignored the desolate corner of the subcontinent which allowed the Chinese to build a military road through it during the 1950s to connect the province of Xinjiang to Tibet.

The Indian discovery of this highway was a major factor which led to ferocious clashes leading up to the war. 

Yet the Indians had just two divisions posted at the border when the Chinese invaded, never suspecting that Beijing would be so bold as to cross the McMahon Line. 

The war lasted for one month and left more than 2,000 dead on both sides. It was a heavy defeat for India and led to the new border, the LAC, being established and pushing India back from McMahon line.

Uninhabitable desert: The Galwan Valley where the mass brawl between the Indian and Chinese forces took place. The Chinese interest in the region surrounds President Xi Jinping's centrepiece 'Belt and Road' policy to have vast infrastructure throughout the old Silk Road. Beijing fears that increased Indian presence in the region will cut off its trade route to Pakistan

Uninhabitable desert: The Galwan Valley where the mass brawl between the Indian and Chinese forces took place. The Chinese interest in the region surrounds President Xi Jinping's centrepiece 'Belt and Road' policy to have vast infrastructure throughout the old Silk Road. Beijing fears that increased Indian presence in the region will cut off its trade route to Pakistan

Uninhabitable desert: The Galwan Valley where the mass brawl between the Indian and Chinese forces took place. The Chinese interest in the region surrounds President Xi Jinping’s centrepiece ‘Belt and Road’ policy to have vast infrastructure throughout the old Silk Road. Beijing fears that increased Indian presence in the region will cut off its trade route to Pakistan

Much of the reason for the ongoing conflict is the ill-defined border, the result of a confused status the region had during the colonial era, which was made more murky by India’s war with Pakistan in 1947.

Chinese interest in the region surrounds President Xi Jinping’s centrepiece ‘Belt and Road’ foreign policy to have vast infrastructure throughout the old Silk Road. 

Beijing fears that increased Indian presence in the region will cut off its trade route to Pakistan.

The two sides have blamed each other for recent hostilities but analysts say India’s building of new roads in the region may have been the fuse for May’s standoff.

Both sides have dispatched reinforcements and heavy equipment to the zone. 

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