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Hong Kong pro-democracy activist Joshua Wong to fight for seat in legislature defying security law 

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hong kong pro democracy activist joshua wong to fight for seat in legislature defying security law

Hong Kong’s leading pro-democracy activist Joshua Wong has filed candidacy papers for upcoming legislative elections in the city.

Mr Wong was one of the 16 candidates emerging from unofficial primaries held by the pro-democracy camp as it aims to win a majority of seats in the 70-seat legislature in the September elections.

But critics fear that the sweeping security law may be used by Beijing to thwart pro-democracy candidates of the semi-autonomous territory’s legislature. 

Hong Kong's leading pro-democracy activist Joshua Wong has filed candidacy papers for upcoming legislative elections in the city. Pictured, Mr Wong with the nomination papers on Monday as he files his candidacy in Hong Kong's Legislative Council elections in September

Hong Kong's leading pro-democracy activist Joshua Wong has filed candidacy papers for upcoming legislative elections in the city. Pictured, Mr Wong with the nomination papers on Monday as he files his candidacy in Hong Kong's Legislative Council elections in September

Hong Kong’s leading pro-democracy activist Joshua Wong has filed candidacy papers for upcoming legislative elections in the city. Pictured, Mr Wong with the nomination papers on Monday as he files his candidacy in Hong Kong’s Legislative Council elections in September

Mr Wong was one of the top candidates emerging from unofficial primaries held by the pro-democracy camp as it aims to win a majority of seats in the 70-seat legislature in the September elections. Pro-democracy activist Joshua Wong speaks to the press as he announces his intention to run for the Legislative Council general election in Hong Kong

Mr Wong was one of the top candidates emerging from unofficial primaries held by the pro-democracy camp as it aims to win a majority of seats in the 70-seat legislature in the September elections. Pro-democracy activist Joshua Wong speaks to the press as he announces his intention to run for the Legislative Council general election in Hong Kong

Mr Wong was one of the top candidates emerging from unofficial primaries held by the pro-democracy camp as it aims to win a majority of seats in the 70-seat legislature in the September elections. Pro-democracy activist Joshua Wong speaks to the press as he announces his intention to run for the Legislative Council general election in Hong Kong

Critics fear that the sweeping security law may be used by Beijing to thwart pro-democracy candidates of the semi-autonomous territory's legislature. This file picture taken on Sunday shows a riot police officer in Hong Kong detaining a man during a protest at a shopping mall

Critics fear that the sweeping security law may be used by Beijing to thwart pro-democracy candidates of the semi-autonomous territory's legislature. This file picture taken on Sunday shows a riot police officer in Hong Kong detaining a man during a protest at a shopping mall

Critics fear that the sweeping security law may be used by Beijing to thwart pro-democracy candidates of the semi-autonomous territory’s legislature. This file picture taken on Sunday shows a riot police officer in Hong Kong detaining a man during a protest at a shopping mall

The pro-democracy activist is seen on Monday posing with the nomination papers as he files for his candidacy in the Legislative Council elections in September.

Mr Wong told reporters: ‘We hope to let the world to know how we choose not to surrender, how we choose not to kowtow to China.’

The sweeping law bans secessionist, subversive and terrorist acts, as well as banning colluding with foreign forces to intervene in the city’s affairs.

The leading pro-democracy activist is pictured on Monday posing with the nomination papers as he files for his candidacy in the Legislative Council elections in September in Hong Kong

The leading pro-democracy activist is pictured on Monday posing with the nomination papers as he files for his candidacy in the Legislative Council elections in September in Hong Kong

The leading pro-democracy activist is pictured on Monday posing with the nomination papers as he files for his candidacy in the Legislative Council elections in September in Hong Kong

The picture taken on July 15 shows the activist Joshua Wong (left), along with 15 other winners of the democratic primaries, speaks to reporters during a press conference in Hong Kong

The picture taken on July 15 shows the activist Joshua Wong (left), along with 15 other winners of the democratic primaries, speaks to reporters during a press conference in Hong Kong

The picture taken on July 15 shows the activist Joshua Wong (left), along with 15 other winners of the democratic primaries, speaks to reporters during a press conference in Hong Kong

The 23-year-old Mr Wong has been imprisoned twice for participating in 2014 pro-democracy protests. The file picture taken on July 11 shows Joshua Wong posing with other candidates while campaigning during a primary election held by democratic parties in Hong Kong

The 23-year-old Mr Wong has been imprisoned twice for participating in 2014 pro-democracy protests. The file picture taken on July 11 shows Joshua Wong posing with other candidates while campaigning during a primary election held by democratic parties in Hong Kong

The 23-year-old Mr Wong has been imprisoned twice for participating in 2014 pro-democracy protests. The file picture taken on July 11 shows Joshua Wong posing with other candidates while campaigning during a primary election held by democratic parties in Hong Kong

The law also states that anyone convicted of endangering national security will be disqualified from running in city elections or holding public office. 

The 23-year-old Mr Wong has been imprisoned twice for participating in 2014 pro-democracy protests. He also regularly speaks out against Beijing’s tightening control over the city and often meets with elected officials and politicians from the US and other countries.

He said: ‘With the threat of being extradited to China, with the uncertainty of being sent to a black jail in Beijing, with the possibility of facing a life sentence … I still hope to run for office and receive people’s mandate, and let the world know that we will continue our fight until our last breath.’

Pro-democracy activist Joshua Wong is pictured in Hong Kong on Monday as he files for his candidacy in the Legislative Council elections in September in defiance of the security law

Pro-democracy activist Joshua Wong is pictured in Hong Kong on Monday as he files for his candidacy in the Legislative Council elections in September in defiance of the security law

Pro-democracy activist Joshua Wong is pictured in Hong Kong on Monday as he files for his candidacy in the Legislative Council elections in September in defiance of the security law

A woman points her finger at police officers during a protest in a shopping mall in Hong Kong

A woman points her finger at police officers during a protest in a shopping mall in Hong Kong

A woman points her finger at police officers during a protest in a shopping mall in Hong Kong

In 2017, four pro-democracy legislators including Nathan Law were unseated from the legislature after a court found that they had not taken their oaths and pledged allegiance to Beijing appropriately.

Two other pro-democracy representatives were disqualified in 2016 for invalidated oaths.

Mr Law fled Hong Kong for the UK after the security law was enacted and has said he will continue advocating for democracy in Hong Kong while abroad.

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DOMINIC SANDBROOK: Students at low risk are paying such a high price

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dominic sandbrook students at low risk are paying such a high price

There is nothing quite like your first few weeks at university. A new life outside the parental home, a new city, new friends and new experiences.

A chance to challenge yourself: to find new interests, make lasting friends and take those magical first steps into adulthood. Pubs and nightclubs, sports and societies, late-night conversations and mid-morning hangovers — these are memories that stay with you for decades.

However, this year’s students will remember things rather differently. For reports from Britain’s universities in the autumn of 2020 read like desperate appeals from some city under siege, or the plaintive entreaties of political prisoners, thrown into crowded cells with no hope of escape.

Five of the 1,700 students under lockdown at the Manchester Metropolitan University (MMU) campuses of Birley and Cambridge Halls

Five of the 1,700 students under lockdown at the Manchester Metropolitan University (MMU) campuses of Birley and Cambridge Halls

Five of the 1,700 students under lockdown at the Manchester Metropolitan University (MMU) campuses of Birley and Cambridge Halls

‘On Thursday night, there was just widespread panic … It was utter chaos … There was a mad rush to the train stations and airports … Why would anyone want to stay?’

‘It feels a bit like a prison… I’m sharing with 12 people… We’ve seen the police circulating outside a few times … It’s been a bit of a shock. I felt really trapped.’

Bleak

Such are the words of Glasgow’s university students, imprisoned in their halls of residence after the Scottish Government ordered a total lockdown. And they are not, of course, alone. In Manchester, 1,700 students have been ordered to stay inside their bleak accommodation blocks for two weeks after a spate of coronavirus cases.

‘We were getting ready to go out,’ one girl told the BBC, ‘and looked out to [find] security and police outside the halls. They say we can’t leave … They seem to be holding us in against our will.’

Even allowing for youthful exaggeration, these stories are a national embarrassment. But they merely reflect a much bigger and more disgraceful story.

University managers and lecturers’ unions have had months to prepare for the beginning of the academic year, as has the Government. Yet, as more than 2 million students flood back to campuses, the higher education system is on the verge of collapse.

A sign on a closed gate at the Birley student halls of residence in Manchester

A sign on a closed gate at the Birley student halls of residence in Manchester

A sign on a closed gate at the Birley student halls of residence in Manchester

Some 40 institutions are now reporting Covid-19 cases. There is talk of students not being allowed home for Christmas, and some are demanding fee refunds. Students don’t always get a good press, I know. I’ve written about the mad excesses of student activists, the kind of people who pull down statues and howl at visiting speakers. However, they are only a noisy minority.

Most students are simply ordinary, decent youngsters, who have worked hard to win their places. Rarely has any generation been so comprehensively short-changed.

Of course, the pandemic is a trial without precedent, and even the most robust system would struggle to cope. But if you talk to any student, the sense of betrayal is overwhelming.

For months, it has been obvious that universities were facing a colossal challenge, with millions of youngsters flocking back at the point when scientists feared a second Covid wave. Some academics wanted to switch to online-only courses, which would mean students staying at home. The universities said no, because they were banking on students’ rent money.

The Government also said no, because ministers believe many towns — not just blue-chip St Andrews, Durham and Exeter, but also blue-collar Wolverhampton, Derby and Sunderland — have become dependent on student spending.

And students said no, too. After months in lockdown, most were desperate to get away from Mum and Dad. They wanted a full university experience, with friends and clubs and all the rest of it.

So the universities duly prepared for the students to come back. Or rather, they didn’t.

Bottles of alcohol lined up in a window of the Birley student halls in Manchester

Bottles of alcohol lined up in a window of the Birley student halls in Manchester

Bottles of alcohol lined up in a window of the Birley student halls in Manchester

As academics will tell you, they’ve never been given a clear plan. Most institutions have ordered them to teach each course twice: face-to-face, for students on campus; and online, for students at home.

As the universities refused to invest in proper technology, such as Zoom, their systems are crashing under the strain. Some academics told me that they begged their bosses for technical support, or for part-time tutors to shoulder some of the burden.

But most universities got rid of their part-time tutors as soon as coronavirus struck. Oxford put hundreds of academics on furlough — yet its vice chancellor, Louise Richardson, refused to forego a penny of her gigantic £452,000 pay package. That says it all.

Of course, vice chancellors’ greed is nothing new. However, these failings have been compounded by the attitude of the lecturers’ union, the University and College Union (UCU), which has behaved disgracefully throughout.

Tasteless

Under its hard-Left chief Jo Grady — armed with her degree in ‘industrial relations’ — the UCU has discouraged its members from going back to work.

Last month, Ms Grady claimed the Government was deliberately ‘turning universities into the care homes of a Covid second wave’ — a staggeringly tasteless and irresponsible thing to say, given the risk to students is so small.

I spoke to one friend, a head of department in a northern university, after he had come out of an online meeting with the union. ‘Basically,’ he said, ‘they don’t want us to come into work at all.’ What about the students? ‘Oh, they don’t give a **** about the students.’

None of this, though, is very surprising. The risible ineptitude of university bosses, the stroppiness and stupidity of the union — these are not glitches. They have long been built into the system.

The real blame belongs at the top, with the Government. For all of this was foreseen long ago. For months, university leaders have been begging ministers for guidance.

But from the universities minister, Michelle Donelan, and the hapless Education Secretary, Gavin Williamson — the least impressive Cabinet minister in my lifetime — there has come no lead at all.

Instead, ministers insisted universities resume business as usual. Yet they never gave them the resources to do it properly, and never made contingency plans for the inevitable coronavirus outbreaks at the beginning of term.

First-year students pose from behind fencing at a campus of MMU on Saturday evening

First-year students pose from behind fencing at a campus of MMU on Saturday evening

First-year students pose from behind fencing at a campus of MMU on Saturday evening

For the universities, this is a disaster. Some may go bust; and let’s be honest, that might not be such a bad thing. For too long we have shovelled youngsters into glorified degree factories, and a sweeping rethink is long overdue.

Random

But the implications are, I think, even wider. Depressingly, this is one example of a deeper malaise. It is nine months since the first coronavirus cases were reported in China, but the Government still flounders from crisis to crisis in a state of befuddlement.

There is no hint of strategy. Another Prime Minister would have used the summer as a chance to sit down, plan for the worst and brief the nation. Instead, Boris Johnson appears to be making it up as he goes along. So new lockdown regulations are invented every week, apparently at random.

Meanwhile, students are locked in their halls and told they may not be allowed out for weeks. That, I think, is the cruellest irony of all this. The people who are paying the biggest price are those least at risk — the young, who’ve already sacrificed so much to protect their elders.

Imagine being an eager 18-year-old, just off to university. You’ve dreamed of this moment for years: a taste of freedom, a chance to discover yourself … and here you are, locked in your room, with security men outside to stop you leaving.

If it happened abroad, we’d think it a shambles. But it’s happening here. And everybody involved — the universities, the union and yes, the Government — should hang their heads in shame.

This post first appeared on dailymail.co.uk

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Unpaid carers spent extra 92 MILLION hours looking after relatives with dementia since lockdown

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unpaid carers spent extra 92 million hours looking after relatives with dementia since lockdown

Unpaid carers have spent an additional 92million hours looking after loved ones with dementia since lockdown –and women are bearing the brunt, figures reveal today.

The Alzheimer’s Society has found that families and friends have been forced to dramatically increase their caring responsibilities since the end of March.

This is partly because paid caring services have contracted during the pandemic just at the point many dementia patients have seen their symptoms worsen due to isolation and anxiety, the charity says.

Unpaid carers have spent an additional 92million hours looking after loved ones with dementia since lockdown

Unpaid carers have spent an additional 92million hours looking after loved ones with dementia since lockdown

Unpaid carers have spent an additional 92million hours looking after loved ones with dementia since lockdown

It estimates that women carried out 62million of these 92million extra hours and are more inclined to have caring responsibilities.

Of 1,102 unpaid carers polled, it was found that 68 per cent of women felt more anxious, 52 per cent had developed problems sleeping and 71 per cent were constantly exhausted.

Among the men, 50 per cent felt more anxious, 46 per cent had problems sleeping and 63 per cent were constantly exhausted.

Women comprise about 67 per cent of all unpaid carers and are more likely to give up work to look after older parents, in-laws or spouses.

Kate Lee, chief executive of the Alzheimer’s Society, said: ‘I’m so angry that families and friends out in the community have been left to fend for themselves as the people they love with dementia have declined in front of their eyes. 

‘They have been fighting against the odds to give decent care to their loved ones. The Government must never abandon families with dementia again. 

‘Lessons must be learnt to prevent any further tragedy this winter.

‘Coronavirus has laid bare the dire state of social care for all to see – the lasting legacy from this crisis must be a universal social care system, free at the point of use, that provides quality care for every person with dementia who needs it.’

She added that the charity’s helpline was speaking to family carers every day who were ‘completely burnt out’ and working all hours. 

The charity has accused ministers of failing to do enough to protect dementia patients and their loved ones throughout the pandemic.

Previous figures have shown that 25,000 patients with the disease died in March and April alone – twice as many compared to previous years.

Although a significant number of dementia patients succumbed to the virus itself, others died from conditions caused by social isolation and a lack of medical care.

The additional hours of care were calculated after 953 unpaid carers were asked how much time they spent looking after their loved ones a week before and after the lockdown. 

This figure was then multiplied by the number of weeks since lockdown and then again by the estimated 470,757 unpaid carers across the UK.

Caroline Abrahams, charity director at Age UK, said: ‘We know that many carers have gone to extreme lengths to protect their loved ones, including cancelling their care packages to reduce the risk of this deadly virus being brought into their home.

‘The impact of this extra stress on their bodies and minds has been increasingly significant, as the weeks have turned into months.’

The Alzheimer's Society has found that families and friends have been forced to dramatically increase their caring responsibilities since the end of March

The Alzheimer's Society has found that families and friends have been forced to dramatically increase their caring responsibilities since the end of March

The Alzheimer’s Society has found that families and friends have been forced to dramatically increase their caring responsibilities since the end of March

Liz Kendall, Labour’s social care spokesman, said: ‘Families have at best been an afterthought and at worst ignored. 

‘This report provides yet more evidence of the terrible strain Covid-19 has put on families whose loved ones have dementia.

‘Many families have been pushed to breaking point taking on extra responsibilities for caring for their relatives and thousands more have been unable to visit their loved ones in residential homes.’

A spokesman for the Department of Health and Social Care said: ‘We know this has been a particularly challenging time for people with dementia and we remain committed to providing them, their families and their carers with the information, advice and support they need.

‘Through our adult social care winter plan, we are testing care home residents and staff regularly, providing free PPE to care homes and we have ring-fenced over £1.1billion to support providers through our infection control fund.’

This post first appeared on dailymail.co.uk

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What a sight to sea! Britain’s best coastal photographs battle it out for prestigious prize 

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what a sight to sea britains best coastal photographs battle it out for prestigious prize

 Stunning photographs of Britain’s coast battle it out for the prestigious prize in a photography competition run by a national maritime charity.   

The eighth annual Ultimate Sea View competition, run by the Shipwrecked Mariners’ Society, was on the lookout for photographers to submit their favourite images of the ocean.  

The Overall Winner of the UK’s ultimate sea view photography competition was won by ‘Landing Mackerel’ by Laurence Hartwell, showing a bird’s-eye view of a fisherman with his catch.  

A photograph titled ‘A Nice Day For A Cruise’ by David Lyon showing a ferry swamped by waves has been crowned the United Kingdom’s ‘ultimate sea view’ and beat 800 other entries in the competition. 

Applicants were encouraged to look back through their photo albums to submit images of the UK coastline – as the pandemic had a great impact on travel plans – as well as putting forward images taken more recently. 

The society, which provides financial support to former seafarers and their dependants, launched a £1million Covid response fund to provide support for working maritime professionals impacting by the pandemic.  

This bird's-eye view of a fisherman with his catch was taken in the port of Newlyn, Cornwall, by Laurence Hartwell. 'Landing Mackerel' is the Shipwrecked Mariners' Society's Overall Winner of the UK's ultimate sea view competition

This bird's-eye view of a fisherman with his catch was taken in the port of Newlyn, Cornwall, by Laurence Hartwell. 'Landing Mackerel' is the Shipwrecked Mariners' Society's Overall Winner of the UK's ultimate sea view competition

This bird’s-eye view of a fisherman with his catch was taken in the port of Newlyn, Cornwall, by Laurence Hartwell. ‘Landing Mackerel’ is the Shipwrecked Mariners’ Society’s Overall Winner of the UK’s ultimate sea view competition

'Mylor Harbour' by Ian Butler was the winner in the Ships and Wrecks category of the eighth 2020 Ultimate Sea View photography competition

'Mylor Harbour' by Ian Butler was the winner in the Ships and Wrecks category of the eighth 2020 Ultimate Sea View photography competition

‘Mylor Harbour’ by Ian Butler was the winner in the Ships and Wrecks category of the eighth 2020 Ultimate Sea View photography competition

The launch of the Cromer Lifeboat captured by Stephen Duncombe titled 'To the Rescue' was the winner in the Industry category of the 2020 Ultimate Sea View photography contest showing a boat crashing through the waves

The launch of the Cromer Lifeboat captured by Stephen Duncombe titled 'To the Rescue' was the winner in the Industry category of the 2020 Ultimate Sea View photography contest showing a boat crashing through the waves

The launch of the Cromer Lifeboat captured by Stephen Duncombe titled ‘To the Rescue’ was the winner in the Industry category of the 2020 Ultimate Sea View photography contest showing a boat crashing through the waves

'Beam Trawlers Landing to the Fish Market at Night' by Laurence Hartwell is the overall winner of the 2020 Ultimate Sea View photography competition

'Beam Trawlers Landing to the Fish Market at Night' by Laurence Hartwell is the overall winner of the 2020 Ultimate Sea View photography competition

‘Beam Trawlers Landing to the Fish Market at Night’ by Laurence Hartwell is the overall winner of the 2020 Ultimate Sea View photography competition 

The highly commended winner of the Coastal Views category was captured by Liam Holley called 'Start Point Lighthouse' shows a remote lighthouse at the end of a cliff on a beautiful coastal setting

The highly commended winner of the Coastal Views category was captured by Liam Holley called 'Start Point Lighthouse' shows a remote lighthouse at the end of a cliff on a beautiful coastal setting

The highly commended winner of the Coastal Views category was captured by Liam Holley called ‘Start Point Lighthouse’ shows a remote lighthouse at the end of a cliff on a beautiful coastal setting 

Highly commended in the People and Recreation category was won by Thomas Salway for 'Findhorn Beach' showing a dog running through the sea in a perfect action shot

Highly commended in the People and Recreation category was won by Thomas Salway for 'Findhorn Beach' showing a dog running through the sea in a perfect action shot

Highly commended in the People and Recreation category was won by Thomas Salway for ‘Findhorn Beach’ showing a dog running through the sea in a perfect action shot

A photograph of a ferry swamped by waves has been crowned the UK's 'ultimate sea view'. Titled 'A Nice Day For A Cruise' was taken in Newhaven, East Sussex, and beat 800 other entries in the contest

A photograph of a ferry swamped by waves has been crowned the UK's 'ultimate sea view'. Titled 'A Nice Day For A Cruise' was taken in Newhaven, East Sussex, and beat 800 other entries in the contest

A photograph of a ferry swamped by waves has been crowned the UK’s ‘ultimate sea view’. Titled ‘A Nice Day For A Cruise’ was taken in Newhaven, East Sussex, and beat 800 other entries in the contest 

Photograph 'Sunrise Through The Wave' by John Alderson won the People category of the contest, and beautifully captured the orange wave crashing against the promenade silhouetting a person walking past

Photograph 'Sunrise Through The Wave' by John Alderson won the People category of the contest, and beautifully captured the orange wave crashing against the promenade silhouetting a person walking past

Photograph ‘Sunrise Through The Wave’ by John Alderson won the People category of the contest, and beautifully captured the orange wave crashing against the promenade silhouetting a person walking past 

'Sunrise over The Cobb' by Noel Bennett which has been highly commended in the Coastal Views category shows a single striped deck chair facing out towards the sea and the morning sun

'Sunrise over The Cobb' by Noel Bennett which has been highly commended in the Coastal Views category shows a single striped deck chair facing out towards the sea and the morning sun

‘Sunrise over The Cobb’ by Noel Bennett which has been highly commended in the Coastal Views category shows a single striped deck chair facing out towards the sea and the morning sun 

Laurence Hartwell's picture called 'Keeping Things Running Safely' of a man working on equipment on the side of a dock has won highly commended in the People category

Laurence Hartwell's picture called 'Keeping Things Running Safely' of a man working on equipment on the side of a dock has won highly commended in the People category

Laurence Hartwell’s picture called ‘Keeping Things Running Safely’ of a man working on equipment on the side of a dock has won highly commended in the People category

A photograph of ships against a stormy grey backdrop called 'Heading for Harbour' by Gary Richardson has been awarded highly commended in the Ships and Wrecks category in the competition

A photograph of ships against a stormy grey backdrop called 'Heading for Harbour' by Gary Richardson has been awarded highly commended in the Ships and Wrecks category in the competition

A photograph of ships against a stormy grey backdrop called ‘Heading for Harbour’ by Gary Richardson has been awarded highly commended in the Ships and Wrecks category in the competition

This breathtaking photograph of the ocean captured at Gwithian, Cornwall, by Mark Dobson called 'Wild Seas' won the Coastal Views category

This breathtaking photograph of the ocean captured at Gwithian, Cornwall, by Mark Dobson called 'Wild Seas' won the Coastal Views category

This breathtaking photograph of the ocean captured at Gwithian, Cornwall, by Mark Dobson called ‘Wild Seas’ won the Coastal Views category

This picture of a boat sailing perfectly between the panes of a waiting area taken by Stanley Pearson titled 'Jet Rides' won highly commended in the Recreation category

This picture of a boat sailing perfectly between the panes of a waiting area taken by Stanley Pearson titled 'Jet Rides' won highly commended in the Recreation category

This picture of a boat sailing perfectly between the panes of a waiting area taken by Stanley Pearson titled ‘Jet Rides’ won highly commended in the Recreation category 

Highly commended winner in the Industry category shows fishing boats and wind turbines in a dramatic backdrop captured by George Hodgson called 'Bringing In The Catch'

Highly commended winner in the Industry category shows fishing boats and wind turbines in a dramatic backdrop captured by George Hodgson called 'Bringing In The Catch'

Highly commended winner in the Industry category shows fishing boats and wind turbines in a dramatic backdrop captured by George Hodgson called ‘Bringing In The Catch’ 

Winner of the People and Recreation category was a photograph of this paddle boarder titled 'Into the Mist' was photographed by Katie Vincent

Winner of the People and Recreation category was a photograph of this paddle boarder titled 'Into the Mist' was photographed by Katie Vincent

Winner of the People and Recreation category was a photograph of this paddle boarder titled ‘Into the Mist’ was photographed by Katie Vincent 

'Fate of the Mersey Ferry' by Amanda Burgess won the Ships and Wrecks category of the UK's ultimate sea view competition showing an old rusty ship moored under a thundery grey sky

'Fate of the Mersey Ferry' by Amanda Burgess won the Ships and Wrecks category of the UK's ultimate sea view competition showing an old rusty ship moored under a thundery grey sky

‘Fate of the Mersey Ferry’ by Amanda Burgess won the Ships and Wrecks category of the UK’s ultimate sea view competition showing an old rusty ship moored under a thundery grey sky  

Alan Humphries' photograph 'Brighton Sussex Display' won the Recreation category where a coastguard rescue helicopter lowers a member of the team just above the ocean

Alan Humphries' photograph 'Brighton Sussex Display' won the Recreation category where a coastguard rescue helicopter lowers a member of the team just above the ocean

Alan Humphries’ photograph ‘Brighton Sussex Display’ won the Recreation category where a coastguard rescue helicopter lowers a member of the team just above the ocean 

The phenomenal photograph titled 'Under The Stars' by David Jenner showing an old boat stranded on the marshes at Hoo Marina near Rochester, Kent, under the Milky Way which won highly commended in the Ships and Wrecks category

The phenomenal photograph titled 'Under The Stars' by David Jenner showing an old boat stranded on the marshes at Hoo Marina near Rochester, Kent, under the Milky Way which won highly commended in the Ships and Wrecks category

The phenomenal photograph titled ‘Under The Stars’ by David Jenner showing an old boat stranded on the marshes at Hoo Marina near Rochester, Kent, under the Milky Way which won highly commended in the Ships and Wrecks category 

Winner of the Coastal Views category was won by Caroline Walker's photograph 'Heugh Breakwater' and captured a stunning wave fanned out in a perfect action shot

Winner of the Coastal Views category was won by Caroline Walker's photograph 'Heugh Breakwater' and captured a stunning wave fanned out in a perfect action shot

Winner of the Coastal Views category was won by Caroline Walker’s photograph ‘Heugh Breakwater’ and captured a stunning wave fanned out in a perfect action shot 

This post first appeared on dailymail.co.uk

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