Connect with us

Latest Stories

Hospitals cancel operations as Covid cases surge

Published

on

hospitals cancel operations as covid cases surge

Hospitals are cancelling non-urgent operations as the number of coronavirus outbreaks in the healthcare sector doubles in two weeks – with one heart surgeon calling it a ‘nightmare’.

Several hospitals are expecting a surge in Covid patients, leading to the cancellation of operations which have already been delayed for six months.

University Hospitals Plymouth NHS Trust, for example, said it was temporarily pausing non-critical planned surgery at Derriford Hospital, although day case procedures are still going ahead.

And Liverpool University Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust chief executive Steve Warburton told staff in a memo that it had reached a ‘critical point’ and would be scaling back planned procedures.

It comes as daily coronavirus deaths could reach up to 690 this month, scientists have warned as ONS data recorded a 50 per cent weekly rise in infections.

The Medical Research Council biostatistics unit at Cambridge University presented Sage with the bleak forecast as they published new predictions on how fast the virus is spreading.

They estimate that 47,000 people in England are contracting Covid-19 every day, with cases doubling in under seven days.

Hospitals are cancelling non-urgent operations as the number of coronavirus outbreaks in the healthcare sector doubles in two weeks. University Hospitals Plymouth NHS Trust (file image), for example, said it was temporarily pausing non-critical planned surgery at Derriford Hospital, although day case procedures are still going ahead

Hospitals are cancelling non-urgent operations as the number of coronavirus outbreaks in the healthcare sector doubles in two weeks. University Hospitals Plymouth NHS Trust (file image), for example, said it was temporarily pausing non-critical planned surgery at Derriford Hospital, although day case procedures are still going ahead

Hospitals are cancelling non-urgent operations as the number of coronavirus outbreaks in the healthcare sector doubles in two weeks. University Hospitals Plymouth NHS Trust (file image), for example, said it was temporarily pausing non-critical planned surgery at Derriford Hospital, although day case procedures are still going ahead

34519664 8851645 image a 17 1602983168875

34519664 8851645 image a 17 1602983168875

 

34510658 8851645 image a 16 1602983166894

34510658 8851645 image a 16 1602983166894

‘Honestly, it’s a nightmare telling these patients they are going to have to wait again,’ a heart surgeon who works in the northwest of England told The Times

A critical care nurse in Lancashire added: ‘We’re absolutely packed… I don’t even want to think about where we’ll be in two weeks’ time.’ 

It comes as Britain recorded its highest number of coronavirus deaths for more than four months on Saturday after another 150 victims were announced.

Department of Health statistics show this many deaths haven’t been registered since June 10, when 164 lab-confirmed fatalities were added to the toll.

Health chiefs also posted another 16,171 cases yesterday, up only six per cent on the figure recorded last week in a potential sign that the UK’s coronavirus outbreak may be slowing down.

Meanwhile, public health officials in Leeds said hospitals in the city were now ‘very close’ to having to cut back on non-Covid services.

The huge demand in services was forcing clinicians to consider ‘how to save the most lives, directly or indirectly from Covid’ one said.

Just days ago, the Royal College of Surgeons of England warned there could be a ‘tsunami’ of cancelled operations this winter as the NHS struggles to cope with a second wave of coronavirus.

The cancellations will add to the growing backlog – with more than 4.2million people on the waiting list and 110,000 of these having waited for over a year.

However, tens of thousands of NHS staff are absent from work because they are infected with Covid or they have to self-isolate. 

NHS England’s medical director recently warned hospitals in the North West and North East could end up treating more patients than they did during the peak of the first wave of Covid-19.

Professor Stephen Powis said the NHS remained open for all patients but keeping coronavirus infections under control is the key to other patients getting the treatment they need.   

Doctors ask grieving families to confirm their relative’s deaths via ZOOM so doctors don’t have to make house calls during pandemic

A doctor has asked a grieving family if they could confirm the death over video link amid the coronavirus pandemic.

Gillian Orman, from Southampton, rang the NHS after her mother Kathleen Bricknell, 86, died.

A doctor said everyone in the house – including her deceased mother – would have to wear a mask during an in-person visit to confirm the death.

The doctor originally asked if she could confirm the death over video link, but Mrs Orman said she refused the ‘undignified’ offer.

‘The receptionist said a doctor would come out to confirm my mother’s death,’ said Mrs Orman.

Gillian Orman, from Southampton, rang the NHS after her mother Kathleen Bricknell (pictured), 86, died

Gillian Orman, from Southampton, rang the NHS after her mother Kathleen Bricknell (pictured), 86, died

Gillian Orman, from Southampton, rang the NHS after her mother Kathleen Bricknell (pictured), 86, died

‘The doctor rang and said she wanted to confirm her death via video link. I couldn’t believe it – what she was suggesting was so undignified.

‘I refused, saying I wanted the doctor to come out to the house. She said she would only come if everyone in the property was wearing a face mask, including my late mother.

‘I know we’re in the middle of a Covid epidemic but you expect support when something like this happens.’

Her mother was suffering from chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, a lung complaint characterised by long-term breathing problems, and her death came three months after the death of Mrs Orman’s daughter Katherine, 34.

Dr Dan Baylis, chief medical officer at Solent NHS Trust, said: ‘During the current pandemic, GP surgeries across the country are asked to consider offering remote consultations to patients and families, including to verify whether someone has passed away. This is to protect both staff and patients.

‘We understand that many families would prefer to be seen face-to-face and we will always accommodate this. Our family liaison officer will be contacting the family to discuss their concerns so they can receive the right support.

‘We will use their feedback so we can actively improve our services and the level of care we offer to all patients and their families.’

Rachel Power, chief executive of the Patients’ Association, said ‘We’d expect the NHS to carry out such sensitive processes as certifying a death in person, in a way that respects the dignity of the person who has died.’

<!—->Advertisement

This post first appeared on dailymail.co.uk

Latest Stories

Amazon, Facebook, Google and Apple see profits climb

Published

on

By

amazon facebook google and apple see profits climb

The big four technology firms have produced a record £29billion in profits and £177billion of sales during the coronavirus pandemic. 

In a blowout set of earnings, Amazon, Apple, Google, and Facebook all reported quarterly results within minutes of each other – unveiling combined revenues of £177billion ($220.28billion) and profits of £29billion ($38billion) for July to September.

The figures stand in stark contrast to the fortunes of many traditional businesses, which have been devastated by the Covid-19 crisis, as consumers flock online to buy goods and switch to working from home. 

Big Tech’s earnings are also continuing to soar despite increased regulatory scrutiny across the four companies – including federal antitrust charges against Google’s parent company Alphabet Inc and user and advertiser boycotts of Facebook Inc. 

Amazon CEO Jeff Bezos is seen in a file photo. The company on Thursday reported record sales and profits for the quarter ended in September

Amazon CEO Jeff Bezos is seen in a file photo. The company on Thursday reported record sales and profits for the quarter ended in September

Amazon CEO Jeff Bezos is seen in a file photo. The company on Thursday reported record sales and profits for the quarter ended in September

Amazon shares initially rose 2 per cent in after-hours trading, but then slumped 1 per cent as the company forecast £3.97billion ($4 billion) in COVID-19 related costs for the fourth quarter

Amazon shares initially rose 2 per cent in after-hours trading, but then slumped 1 per cent as the company forecast £3.97billion ($4 billion) in COVID-19 related costs for the fourth quarter

Amazon shares initially rose 2 per cent in after-hours trading, but then slumped 1 per cent as the company forecast £3.97billion ($4 billion) in COVID-19 related costs for the fourth quarter

Making a fortune: Jeff Bezos – pictured with partner Lauren Sanchez

Making a fortune: Jeff Bezos – pictured with partner Lauren Sanchez

Making a fortune: Jeff Bezos – pictured with partner Lauren Sanchez

On Wednesday, a day before the earnings were published, Republican senators in a virtual Senate commerce committee tongue-lashed Facebook, Google and Twitter, accusing them of censoring conservative content on their platforms.  

Google has also been sued by the Department of Justice for anti-competitive behaviour and Apple is being watched after it emerged that it was charging a premium for companies to advertise through its App Store.   

Amazon said yesterday that its sales surged 37 per cent for the quarter to a record $96.2 billion (£74.4billion), generating a $6.3 billion (£4.87billion) profit, roughly three times its profits from the same period last year. 

Shares in iPhone maker Apple fell by more than four per cent as the firm reported a one per cent rise in revenues to £50billion ($64.7 billion) and a seven per cent drop in profits to £9.8billion ($7billion). 

This was slightly better than expectations but Apple did not offer any forecasts of sales for Christmas, leaving investors in the dark about how well the firm thinks its new iPhone 12 handset will sell. 

Handout photo issued by Apple of Tim Cook during the Apple Event for the unveiling of the iPhone 12 Pro, which was introduced along with the iPhone 12 Pro Max by the technology company earlier this month

Handout photo issued by Apple of Tim Cook during the Apple Event for the unveiling of the iPhone 12 Pro, which was introduced along with the iPhone 12 Pro Max by the technology company earlier this month

Handout photo issued by Apple of Tim Cook during the Apple Event for the unveiling of the iPhone 12 Pro, which was introduced along with the iPhone 12 Pro Max by the technology company earlier this month 

Shares in iPhone maker Apple also fell by more than four per cent as the firm reported a one per cent rise in revenues to £50billion and a seven per cent drop in profits to £9.8billion

Shares in iPhone maker Apple also fell by more than four per cent as the firm reported a one per cent rise in revenues to £50billion and a seven per cent drop in profits to £9.8billion

Shares in iPhone maker Apple also fell by more than four per cent as the firm reported a one per cent rise in revenues to £50billion and a seven per cent drop in profits to £9.8billion

However the company reported a 21 per cent drop in iPhone sales in the July to September quarter, worse than analysts had predicted, with strong sales of its Macbook computers and iPad tablets failing to make up for the decline.  

At the same time, Google parent Alphabet’s shares roared almost eight per cent higher. 

It reported a 14 per cent rise in third-quarter revenues to £35.7billion ($46.1 billion) and a 60 per cent rise in profits to £8.7billion ($11.25 billion). 

Sundar Pichai, CEO of Google's Alphabet Inc., is seen as he testifies remotely during a Senate Commerce hearing on Wednesday

Sundar Pichai, CEO of Google's Alphabet Inc., is seen as he testifies remotely during a Senate Commerce hearing on Wednesday

Sundar Pichai, CEO of Google’s Alphabet Inc., is seen as he testifies remotely during a Senate Commerce hearing on Wednesday 

Google parent Alphabet's shares roared almost eight per cent higher in post-session trading after the firm blew analysts' expectations out of the water

Google parent Alphabet's shares roared almost eight per cent higher in post-session trading after the firm blew analysts' expectations out of the water

Google parent Alphabet’s shares roared almost eight per cent higher in post-session trading after the firm blew analysts’ expectations out of the water

The company, which makes most of its income from digital ads, benefited from higher spending by businesses seeking to attract online shoppers over the summer as well as a 45 per cent rise in sales at its cloud computing division. 

Elsewhere, the return to higher advertising spending by businesses also buoyed the rival ad businesses of social networks Facebook and Twitter. 

Facebook reported a 22 per cent rise in revenues to £16.6billion ($21.2billion) and a 29 per cent rise in profits to £6.1billion ($7.84 billion). 

It said daily users rose 12 per cent to 1.82billion during the quarter.    

Founder and CEO of US online social media and social networking service Facebook Mark Zuckerberg is pictured in February

Founder and CEO of US online social media and social networking service Facebook Mark Zuckerberg is pictured in February

Founder and CEO of US online social media and social networking service Facebook Mark Zuckerberg is pictured in February 

Facebook reported a 22 per cent rise in revenues to £16.6billion and a 29 per cent rise in profits to £6.1billion

Facebook reported a 22 per cent rise in revenues to £16.6billion and a 29 per cent rise in profits to £6.1billion

Facebook reported a 22 per cent rise in revenues to £16.6billion and a 29 per cent rise in profits to £6.1billion

Since the start of the virus outbreak in the United States eight months ago, consumers have turned increasingly to Amazon for delivery of groceries, home goods and medical supplies. 

As brick-and-mortar shops closed their doors under lockdown orders, Amazon moved to recruit over 400,000 more workers and earned the largest profits in its 26-year history.

It has kept the world’s largest online retailer at the center of workplace and political tumult. Democratic politicians this month accused Amazon of holding ‘monopoly power’ over merchants on its platform, which the company disputes. 

Meanwhile, more than 19,000 of Amazon’s U.S. employees contracted COVID-19, and some staff protested for site closures.

Amazon has responded with an array of precautions and a virus testing program for employees that have helped the company stay operational.

Jeff Bezos, Amazon’s chief executive and richest person in the world, said in a press release, ‘We’re seeing more customers than ever shopping early for their holiday gifts, which is just one of the signs that this is going to be an unprecedented holiday season.’

At the same time, logistics costs have been rising in recent months as Amazon worked to cut standard delivery times for Prime loyalty club customers — and the pandemic has only added to its challenges.  

This post first appeared on dailymail.co.uk

Continue Reading

Latest Stories

Is YOUR mask safe? New research shows some stop just seven per cent of bacteria

Published

on

By

is your mask safe new research shows some stop just seven per cent of bacteria

A health alert has been issued over some reusable facemasks with evidence that some filter out just 7per cent of harmful bacteria.

The warning comes from consumer experts at Which? after a survey of 15 masks which suggest some offer little or no protection.

Three of the masks, available online and in the high street, were so flimsy that they have been issued with a ‘Don’t Buy’ rating.

These include the Etiquette mask, which is sold by Superdrug, the Termin8 Lightweight Breathable, available at Lloyds Pharmacy and elsewhere, and the Asda White Patterned.

Asda has pulled its face covering from sale as a result of the findings.

Three of the masks, available online and in the high street, were so flimsy that they have been issued with a ‘Don’t Buy’ rating

Three of the masks, available online and in the high street, were so flimsy that they have been issued with a ‘Don’t Buy’ rating

Three of the masks, available online and in the high street, were so flimsy that they have been issued with a ‘Don’t Buy’ rating

Asda has pulled this face covering from sale as a result of the findings.

Asda has pulled this face covering from sale as a result of the findings.

The Termin8 Lightweight Breathable

The Termin8 Lightweight Breathable

Asda has pulled its face covering (left) from sale as a result of the findings. Right, the Termin8 Lightweight Breathable mask did not fare well in the tests

Why you really aren’t washing your mask enough and CAN’T wear a disposable one more than once 

As many as 85 per cent of us aren’t washing our fabric face coverings properly in between uses, and 15 per cent have never washed theirs, suggests a YouGov survey from August.

And among those who opt for disposable masks, more than half aren’t binning them after use, but re-wearing them multiple times.

UK Government guidelines advise washing reusable masks ‘in line with manufacturers’ instructions at the highest temperature appropriate for the fabric’, while the World Health Organisation recommends washing them ‘at least once a day’. 

Enzymes in the detergents break down the protective envelope around the virus and so destroy it — they work in the same way as 70 per cent alcohol hand sanitisers.

Washing by hand at lower temperatures also means you are less likely to degrade the material and damage the mask — which could make it less effective as a barrier to virus droplets. 

To avoid contamination in between uses, you should store your fabric mask, or your spare disposable ones, in a clean, resealable plastic bag.

<!—->Advertisement

Termin8 and Superdrug disputed the findings and said that their masks conform to government guidelines for fabric face coverings and that the guidance doesn’t require them to have bacterial filtration.  

Scientists tested the masks for how well they filter bacteria, how breathable they are, and how they fare after multiple washes.

Perhaps surprisingly, Which? found that many of the masks performed better after they were put through a hot wash as this meant the fibres became more compressed.

Which? said reusable fabric face coverings are not designed to block ultra-fine particles such as Covid-19 like a higher-grade medical respirator mask would.

However, they can help because they are intended to help block larger droplets and aerosols breathed out by the wearer, who may be infected but asymptomatic.

In theory, this should help protect the wider community by minimising exhalation of virus particles in enclosed spaces.

Masks with multiple layers were much more effective than single layer versions at filtering particles. 

However, the fact they had more layers meant it was more difficult to breathe easily through them.

Which? awarded two of the products tested ‘Best Buy’ status because they were comfortable and breathable without compromising on filtration. 

These are the NEQI reusable face mask (£15 for 3), which is available from retailers including Boots and Ocado, as well as Bags of Ethics Great British Designer face coverings (£15 for 3), available at Asos and John Lewis.

Head of Home Products and Services at Which?, Natalie Hitchins, said: ‘With face coverings now such an important part of daily life, they not only need to be durable and comfortable, but also provide effective filtration from harmful particles in order to keep us and others safe.

‘We would urge manufacturers to use our findings to up their game and improve their products.’

The Etiquette mask, which is sold by Superdrug

The Etiquette mask, which is sold by Superdrug

The NEQI reusable face mask was awarded 'Best Buy' status

The NEQI reusable face mask was awarded 'Best Buy' status

Three of the masks were issued with a ‘Don’t Buy’ rating. These include the Etiquette mask, which is sold by Superdrug (left). Right, The NEQI reusable face mask was awarded ‘Best Buy’ status

What is ‘bacterial filtration efficiency’?

This is the standard test used to measure the effectiveness of disposable surgical masks at blocking particles. Coronavirus particles can be much smaller than bacterial particles (as little as 0.1 micrometre in diameter). 

Face coverings aren’t intended to block all particles down to these ultra-fine particles, but instead to help capture larger droplets and aerosols that the wearer breathes out, which can carry the virus. 

Collectively, this reduction in particles escaping is thought to reduce the risk of community transmission in enclosed public spaces.

Source: Which? 

<!—->Advertisement

Lloyds Pharmacy said: ‘We take the quality and efficacy of the products we sell very seriously and work with our suppliers to ensure they comply with UK regulations and standards. 

‘We have confirmed with the supplier of the Termin8 mask in question that it is compliant with all necessary requirements as set out by the Department for Health & Social Care and the British Retail Consortium, for use as a face covering in numerous public settings as required by UK law.’

Superdrug said: ‘We dispute the testing methods that have been used by Which? and are disappointed that the fabric Face Cover by our supplier Etiquette Super Mask has been given a ‘Don’t Buy’ rating because it has been tested against the EN 14683 standard for surgical masks and the CEN Workshop Agreement which is not an official standard. 

‘This product was clearly retailed as a fabric face covering and not a surgical mask – designed to help the wearer reduce the spread of a cold or virus, as per Government guidelines.’

Asda said: ‘Product safety is our key priority and all of our George face coverings comply with and British Retail Consortium guidance and the Office for Product Safety and Standards. 

‘The covering that featured in this review was produced before the CWA17533 guidelines were published and is no longer on sale.’

35033606 8896379 image a 18 1604051477236

35033606 8896379 image a 18 1604051477236

FACE MASK POLICY IN THE UK

Face masks must be worn on public transport and in many indoor spaces, including shops, shopping centres, indoor transport hubs, museums, galleries, cinemas and public libraries. 

It is currently the law for passengers to wear face coverings in taxis and private hire vehicles, in hospitality venues, like restaurants and bars, other than when you are eating and drinking. Staff in retail and hospitality settings are also legally required to wear face coverings. 

If necessary, the police and Transport for London (TfL) officers have enforcement powers including issuing fines of £200 (halving to £100 if paid within 14 days).

It comes after the World Health Organisation and numerous studies suggested they are beneficial.

As announced, the Government will bring forward changes to mean that for repeat offenders these fines would double at each offence up to a maximum value of £6,400.  

The Prime Minister has also announced tougher enforcement measures, with businesses facing fines or closure for failing to comply with coronavirus rules, meaning there will be consequences for pubs that try to serve you at the bar.

National Police Chiefs’ Council chairman Martin Hewitt said: ‘Individuals, businesses and households all have a responsibility to ensure the virus is suppressed and police will play their part in supporting the public to navigate the measures in place for our safety.

‘Our approach of engaging with people and explaining the regulations in place will remain. The vast majority of situations are resolved following those two stages, with little need for further encouragement or enforcement action to be taken,’ he said.

‘Police will continue to work with their communities and only issue fines as a last resort.

‘Chiefs will be stepping up patrols in high-risk areas and will proactively work with businesses, licensing authorities and local authorities to ensure the rules are being followed.

‘If members of the public are concerned that the law is being broken or they are experiencing anti-social behaviour, they can report this to the police, who will consider the most appropriate response and will target the most problematic behaviour.’  

<!—->Advertisement

This post first appeared on dailymail.co.uk

Continue Reading

Latest Stories

Tracey Emin, 57, reveals she lost her mother to a bladder tumour four years ago

Published

on

By

tracey emin 57 reveals she lost her mother to a bladder tumour four years ago

Tracey Emin today revealed she lost her mother four years ago to the same bladder cancer that left her critically ill and claimed she predicted her own diagnosis in a painting. 

The artist, 57, discovered she had a tumour in her bladder in June and feared she would be dead by Christmas, but is now in remission after doctors removed the growth and put her on chemotherapy.  

Miss Emin was diagnosed with squamous-cell bladder cancer, an illness she was tragically familiar with. ‘My mother died of the same cancer,’ she told the Telegraph. ‘Four years ago today.’ 

Her mother, Pam, died in October 2009 aged 88, after doctors decided following a course of radiotheraphy that it would not be possible to operate.

Tracey Emin is pictured with her mother Pam in 2009, who died from the same cancer she has been diagnosed with four years ago

Tracey Emin is pictured with her mother Pam in 2009, who died from the same cancer she has been diagnosed with four years ago

Tracey Emin is pictured with her mother Pam in 2009, who died from the same cancer she has been diagnosed with four years ago 

Pam was regularly seen supporting her daughter at shoots, and the artist has described how losing her felt unreal and ‘so untrue’. 

She took the surname Cashin, and admitted in an interview that because of this ‘not many people’ knew she was Miss Emin’s mother.  

The artist realised something was wrong with her own body when she began to feel tired in the spring, and would wake up in the morning after dinner the night before hungover and vomiting. 

She added: ‘During lockdown, I realised it would be impossible for me to have a UTI, because I hadn’t been out of the house for 12 weeks. Then, during lockdown, I became more and more ill.

‘I got an appointment with my urogynaecologist, and she found a giant tumour. I had an MRI scan the next day, and a phone call that night saying, ‘You’re going nowhere, you’re doing nothing – you’re going straight to hospital.’

The artist was working on a large red canvas at the time she saw her urogynaecologist, and felt that in some way it predicted the terrible news she was to receive. 

WHAT IS BLADDER CANCER?

Bladder cancer is caused by a tumour developing in the lining of the bladder or the organ’s muscle.

Around 10,200 new cases are diagnosed in the UK each year and 81,400 people in the US, according to figures.

It is the 10th most common cancer in the UK – but a little more prevalent in the US – and accounts for about three per cent of all cases.

The cancer is more common in men and has a 10-year survival rate of about 50 per cent. Around half of cases are considered preventable.

Symptoms of the disease include blood in the urine, needing to urinate more often or more urgently than normal and pelvic pain.

However, unexpected weight loss and swelling of the legs can also be signs of the killer disease.

Smoking and exposure to chemicals in plastics and paints at work can increase the risk of getting bladder cancer.

Treatment varies depending on how advanced the cancer is, and may include surgery, radiotherapy or chemotherapy.

Source: NHS Choices

<!—->Advertisement

After returning home from the MRI scan, she walked over the painting to inspect it. 

‘It looked finished, but it wasn’t – I could paint more on it, paint over it,’ she said. ‘I was wondering what it was, looking at it, for something like two hours.’

Shortly afterwards Miss Emin heard the news, she was suffering with very aggressive squamous cell cancer, which surgeons feared would kill her in months if it spread to her lymph nodes.

As a result, a decision was made to remove not only her bladder but also her uterus, fallopian tubes, ovaries, lymph nodes, urethra and part of her colon and vagina.

Prior to the surgery, Miss Emin said, she stayed up for 24 hours with her solicitor rewriting her will before sending an email to 70 friends breaking the news of her cancer and instructing them: ‘Do not contact me’. 

But now, following a six-and-a-half-hour operation carried out by 12 surgeons in July, she is in remission.

She has been left with a stoma bag as a result of having ‘half my body chopped out’ and is still struggling to find the energy to paint.

In another frank interview with The Times, Miss Emin admitted that if she had received the diagnosis last year she ‘probably would have topped myself’.

But, she said, she was now glad finally to be talking about the illness, as it would stop people assuming she was just hungover when too unwell to attend events.

Discussing her ordeal she said: ‘It was squamous cell cancer, which means it’s really rapid, really aggressive. It’s known as bad cancer.’

She recalled her surgeon telling her: ‘We have to move fast. But the good news is, your bladder is really c**p and what we’re going to do is just take all your bladder out and the cancer will be gone.’ But, she added: ‘It didn’t turn out like that.’ 

Miss Emin was told if they found cancer in her lymph nodes during surgery she would be dead before Christmas. ‘That’s what the stakes were.’

Remembering her conversation with the surgeon, she recounted: ‘He said, ‘So we’re going to remove your bladder and we’re going to remove your uterus, your fallopian tubes, your ovaries, your lymph nodes, part of your colon, your urethra.’

‘I said to him, ‘Oh my God, anything else?’ And he said, ‘Yes, part of your vagina.’ And I went, ‘Oh ****ing hell’.’  

Miss Emin was diagnosed with cancer earlier this year and is in remission after an operation. She is picture (above) in a selfie taken in August but released yesterday

Miss Emin was diagnosed with cancer earlier this year and is in remission after an operation. She is picture (above) in a selfie taken in August but released yesterday

Miss Emin was diagnosed with cancer earlier this year and is in remission after an operation. She is picture (above) in a selfie taken in August but released yesterday

Miss Emin had suffered from frequent bladder infections as a result of having to self-catheterise since doctors discovered her bladder had ‘blown out and stopped working’ when she was in hospital for appendicitis five years ago.

However she decided to seek help from a Harley Street urologist in June after finding her catheters blood-stained and experiencing pain that felt ‘really wrong’.

An MRI scan detected the growth and she underwent the dramatic surgery a month later, she told The Times. 

Following the diagnosis Miss Emin joked: ‘I said to the doctors, ‘So I’m going to lose a load of weight and have a really tight vagina – and this is bad?’ ‘ Of the surgery, she added: ‘I managed to keep all of my clitoris. Not that it’s working.

‘But they had to cut away a whole side of the vaginal wall and sew it back together, so it’s really, really sealed.’

She said she hoped that would not be permanent but will require a series of therapies. Despite her upbeat attitude to her ordeal, Miss Emin admitted: ‘If it was a year ago I probably would have topped myself anyway, because I was so depressed.’

She added that while she was now on the road to recovery she had not yet been able to do the thing she loves most – paint.

Miss Emin told The Times it had been a relief to her that she was childless, explaining: ‘There was one big problem I didn’t have to face, did I? Didn’t have to look my children in the face and say, ‘Mummy might be dying’.’ 

In a separate interview, with art website Artnet, she said: ‘Yesterday, I was crying because I wanted to paint and I didn’t have the energy to do it.’ 

The artist said that following her recovery she was hoping to find love.

When asked about her future ambitions she said: ‘Well, it’s a lot different from what it was before.

‘To get past Christmas would be a good one. I would like to be with someone who really, really loved me for who I am. But also they’d have to really love my art.’

Pictured, arriving at the annual British Book Awards (known as the Nibbies) at Grosvenor House, Park Lane on April 20, 2005 in London

Pictured, arriving at the annual British Book Awards (known as the Nibbies) at Grosvenor House, Park Lane on April 20, 2005 in London

Pictured, arriving at the annual British Book Awards (known as the Nibbies) at Grosvenor House, Park Lane on April 20, 2005 in London

Miss Emin said: ‘I can feel more than ever that love is allowed. At my age now, love is a completely different dimension and level of understanding. I don’t want children, I don’t want all the things that you might subconsciously crave when you’re young – I just want love.

‘And as much love as I can possibly have. I want to be smothered in it, I want to be devoured by it. And I think that is okay.’

Squamous cell cancer of the bladder accounts for about five in 100 of all bladder cancers.

The survival rate for women at one year is 64.5 per cent and falls to 43.9 per cent at five years. Miss Emin, who lives in Margate, Kent, was nominated for the Turner Prize in 1999. Her famous works include her unmade bed installation.

She is gearing up for the launch of her latest exhibition Details Of Love, but she will not be at the opening in Brussels this Friday.

Next month Miss Emin will exhibit her never-before-seen paintings alongside works by Norwegian expressionist Edvard Munch as part of a ‘landmark exhibition’ at the Royal Academy. 

Tracey Emin/Edvard Munch: The Loneliness Of The Soul will focus on themes of grief, loss and longing, with Miss Emin picking 19 oil paintings and watercolours by Munch, including his 1907 painting The Death Of Marat, to explore his complex relationship with women.

These will sit alongside 25 of her own pieces, including paintings – some of which will be on display for the first time – neons and sculpture.        

Highlights of Tracey Emin’s career 

1995, Everyone I Have Ever Slept With 1963-95: This piece first brought Tracey Emin to wider fame, both in the art world and among the general public

1995, Everyone I Have Ever Slept With 1963-95: This piece first brought Tracey Emin to wider fame, both in the art world and among the general public

1995, Everyone I Have Ever Slept With 1963-95: This piece first brought Tracey Emin to wider fame, both in the art world and among the general public

1999, My Bed: The piece is Emin's record of several days spent in bed in the grip of depression. The bed is unmade and the sheets are stained. All around are strewn a variety of items such as condoms, contraceptive pills, underwear stained with menstrual blood, money, and cigarette ends. The work was nominated for the Turner prize in 1999 and received a hugely mixed response from the public and press

1999, My Bed: The piece is Emin's record of several days spent in bed in the grip of depression. The bed is unmade and the sheets are stained. All around are strewn a variety of items such as condoms, contraceptive pills, underwear stained with menstrual blood, money, and cigarette ends. The work was nominated for the Turner prize in 1999 and received a hugely mixed response from the public and press

1999, My Bed: The piece is Emin’s record of several days spent in bed in the grip of depression. The bed is unmade and the sheets are stained. All around are strewn a variety of items such as condoms, contraceptive pills, underwear stained with menstrual blood, money, and cigarette ends. The work was nominated for the Turner prize in 1999 and received a hugely mixed response from the public and press

2001, The Perfect Place to Grow: This work pays homage to the artist’s Turkish Cypriot father who, she says, is a fantastic gardener but a terrible carpenter. It consists of a wooden birdhouse-like structure on wooden stilts

2001, The Perfect Place to Grow: This work pays homage to the artist’s Turkish Cypriot father who, she says, is a fantastic gardener but a terrible carpenter. It consists of a wooden birdhouse-like structure on wooden stilts

2001, The Perfect Place to Grow: This work pays homage to the artist’s Turkish Cypriot father who, she says, is a fantastic gardener but a terrible carpenter. It consists of a wooden birdhouse-like structure on wooden stilts

2004, Hate and Power Can be a Terrible Thing: This appliquéd blanket work is a blistering attack Margaret Thatcher, and her participation in the Falklands War of 1982

2004, Hate and Power Can be a Terrible Thing: This appliquéd blanket work is a blistering attack Margaret Thatcher, and her participation in the Falklands War of 1982

2004, Hate and Power Can be a Terrible Thing: This appliquéd blanket work is a blistering attack Margaret Thatcher, and her participation in the Falklands War of 1982

2011, I Promise To Love You: In the 2000s, Emin began working extensively with neon lighting. These works feature words and phrases in her handwriting. Pictured, 2011's neon sculpture I Promise To Love You

2011, I Promise To Love You: In the 2000s, Emin began working extensively with neon lighting. These works feature words and phrases in her handwriting. Pictured, 2011's neon sculpture I Promise To Love You

2011, I Promise To Love You: In the 2000s, Emin began working extensively with neon lighting. These works feature words and phrases in her handwriting. Pictured, 2011’s neon sculpture I Promise To Love You

 

<!—->Advertisement

This post first appeared on dailymail.co.uk

Continue Reading

Trending

Copyright © 2020 DiazHub.