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How to safely use someone else’s toilet

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how to safely use someone elses toilet

Experts have shared their top tips on how to safely use the toilet in another person’s household. 

Personal hygiene and medical experts based in the UK offered their advice to guests on how to safely use the facilities while visiting a friend or family member for a socially-distant garden get together.

They explained it is is key to ‘wait until the route is clear’ to reduce the risk of passing someone at close proximity and advised cleaning your hands before using the toilet, as well as after. 

Hand towels should also be swapped for disposable kitchen roll that can easily be thrown away and one expert suggested hosts provide disinfectant wipes so visitors can clean the key ‘touchpoints’ in the room after use.  

Personal hygiene and medical experts based in the UK offered their advice to guests on how to safely use the facilities while visiting a friend or family member. Stock image

Personal hygiene and medical experts based in the UK offered their advice to guests on how to safely use the facilities while visiting a friend or family member. Stock image

Personal hygiene and medical experts based in the UK offered their advice to guests on how to safely use the facilities while visiting a friend or family member. Stock image

 WAIT UNTIL THE ROUTE IS CLEAR

Dr Lisa Ackerley, Chartered Environmental Health Practitioner, said: ‘When visiting the toilets at our friends’ houses, take care to follow hygiene advice and social distancing measures. 

‘First of all, wait outside until the route to the bathroom is clear, so that you can practice social distancing. Before going inside, I suggest you leave all personal items such as mobile phones, handbags and wallets outside to prevent the spread of the virus.’ 

James Milnes, managing director at Zoonos, added: ‘Wait 30 minutes before entering the room after someone else to also reduce the airborne element of risk.’

WASH YOUR HANDS BEFORE USING THE TOILET

Dr Ackerley said: ‘Just before entering the bathroom, use hand sanitiser (with over 60 per cent alcohol) so that your hands are clean when you touch door handles and the flush. Once inside the bathroom and the door is closed, wash your hands for 20 seconds using soap and water before going to the loo.’

DON’T TURN ON THE LIGHT 

Mr Milnes explained: Many bathrooms have cord light switches. If the room is naturally lit, don’t be tempted to turn the light on unless you really need to, as germs will live on the string pull. This also applies to tradition switches; pathogens are easily transferred from your hands onto the plastic switch.

‘If the room is too dark, ask your host for an antibacterial wipe to wrap around the cord or disinfect the switch before you go inside.’

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Dr Michael Barnish said: ‘If you are visiting another loo, then it is best to do what you need to do sat down. This will save on the spray and also save you having to lift the toilet seat up.’ 

ASK TO SWAP THE HAND TOWEL FOR KITCHEN ROLL 

Mr Milnes said: ‘When the same towel is used by multiple guests, germs can quickly spread. Ask your host for disposable paper towels to dry your hands, or use loo roll, rather than drying your hands with a traditional cotton towel.

‘Use a disposable towel or piece of loo roll to turn on and off the tap before and after washing your hands thoroughly. Do the same when pressing down the top of the soap dispenser and dispose of all wipes and towels in the bin provided after use.’

LEAVE THE TOILET SEAT UP AND WIPE DOWN THE HANDLE 

Mr Milnes said: ‘Pathogens can survive on surfaces, such as door handles or loo handles, for several hours. In fact, door handles are among the most contaminated items in the home. Use a disposable antibacterial wipe on the handle of the door when opening and closing it again. Don’t forget the door lock too.

‘Use a separate wipe to clean down the flush handle and loo seat before you leave. Never use the same wipe on two different surfaces, as this may spread the bacteria.

‘Leave the lid of the loo seat up to reduce the number of people needing to touch it to lift the seat up and down. To be courteous to other guests, clean the loo seat with an antibacterial wipe after use.’

OPEN THE WINDOW AND DON’T LINGER

Mr Milnes said: ‘At present, it is unknown exactly how long coronavirus can live in the air, but to be safe it’s advised that you close the door and open the window when leaving the room.’

Dr Ackerley added: ‘Once you are done, go straight back outside, don’t be tempted to linger!’ 

Tips for the host: How YOU can make your home safer for guests 

HAVE A CHAT ABOUT RULES BEFORE GUESTS ARRIVE 

Dr Ackerley said: ‘For those who are hosting guests, it’s not a bad idea to have a chat before your guests come about how you are going to manage visits to the toilet during their visit.’

MAKE A NOTE OF KEY ‘TOUCHPOINTS’ 

Jamie Woodhall, UK Technical & Innovation Manager, Initial Washroom Hygiene and Rentokil Specialist Hygiene, said: To be thorough, we’d recommend walking through your home and noting down the most common touchpoints that would need to be cleaned regularly. 

‘While the bathroom is a more obvious area to disinfect, you should not forget about items such as TV remote controls and phone chargers, or surfaces such as the fridge door, kettle handle, or light switches.’ 

DON’T FORGET TO DISINFECT THE TOILET ROLL HOLDER 

Dr Ackerley said: ‘It is very important that you regularly disinfect frequently touched surfaces in the bathroom – such as bathroom taps, loo roll holder and toilet handles or flush button – before your guests arrive. Then disinfect again, before and after someone has used it, using products that are known to kill SARS-CoV-2 such as Domestos Thick Bleach (1:8 dilution) and Cif Antibacterial Spray that ave recently been tested in a lab to confirm this.’

PUT HAND SANITISER AT THE DOOR 

Mr Woodhall said: ‘Keeping hand sanitiser at the entrance of your home and outside your bathroom can also help prevent cross contamination through shared touchpoints.’ 

SWITCH YOUR HAND TOWEL FOR KITCHEN ROLL 

Dr Ackerley said: ‘Lastly, provide paper towels or kitchen roll for hand drying rather than a cloth towel, and make sure there is a bin handy for the used towels.’

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First migrants arrive at Kent army barracks converted into asylum seeker ‘dispersal facility’

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first migrants arrive at kent army barracks converted into asylum seeker dispersal facility

The first migrants have arrived in taxis at an army barracks in Kent which has been converted into a ‘dispersal facility’.

Around 20 migrants were brought to Napier Barracks in Folkestone today where they could be housed for the up to a year.

At 7.45pm this evening a black BMW saloon arrived at the barracks with the driver slamming his dashboard with his hand and shouting: “It’s urgent”. 

A security guard opened the gates to the barracks and the saloon entered, closely followed by three dark unmarked taxis – two black Mercedes and one grey Volkswagen.

The first migrants have arrived in unmarked taxis at the Napier Barracks in Folkestone, Kent, which has been converted into a 'dispersal facility'

The first migrants have arrived in unmarked taxis at the Napier Barracks in Folkestone, Kent, which has been converted into a 'dispersal facility'

The first migrants have arrived in unmarked taxis at the Napier Barracks in Folkestone, Kent, which has been converted into a ‘dispersal facility’

Around 20 migrants were brought to the barracks in taxis today where they could be housed for the up to a year

Around 20 migrants were brought to the barracks in taxis today where they could be housed for the up to a year

Around 20 migrants were brought to the barracks in taxis today where they could be housed for the up to a year

A black BMW saloon entered the barracks, closely followed by three dark unmarked taxis - two black Mercedes and one grey Volkswagen

A black BMW saloon entered the barracks, closely followed by three dark unmarked taxis - two black Mercedes and one grey Volkswagen

A black BMW saloon entered the barracks, closely followed by three dark unmarked taxis – two black Mercedes and one grey Volkswagen

Each people carrier had around six men inside, most of whom wore blue face masks.

There did not appear to be any women among the group.

The taxis left the former military base only five minutes after entering, with final accommodation preparations being carried out until dark.  

Two more black Mercedes people carrier taxis sped into the barracks at 8.15pm carrying around 10 migrants. 

Security guards held the gates open in preparation this time around as the black BMW saloon raced inside leading the convoy.

People thought to be migrants arrive in a dark taxi at Napier Barracks this evening

People thought to be migrants arrive in a dark taxi at Napier Barracks this evening

People thought to be migrants arrive in a dark taxi at Napier Barracks this evening

Staff at Napier Barracks outside Folkestone in Kent, were preparing for the arrival of asylum seekers, earlier today

Staff at Napier Barracks outside Folkestone in Kent, were preparing for the arrival of asylum seekers, earlier today

Staff at Napier Barracks outside Folkestone in Kent, were preparing for the arrival of asylum seekers, earlier today

Both taxis had blacked out windows and left the premises again around five minutes later.

A catering cash and carry van was the last commercial vehicle to enter the premises shortly before 7pm.

Staff put up green wire sheeting along the perimeter of the fencing to obscure the view inside.

One of the taxis appeared to be from Crawley in West Sussex suggesting the group had been brought to Napier Barracks from the Brook House Asylum removal centre at Gatwick Airport.

Military personnel arriving from the nearby barracks as preparations take place to receive migrants at Napier Barracks in Folkestone, Kent

Military personnel arriving from the nearby barracks as preparations take place to receive migrants at Napier Barracks in Folkestone, Kent

Military personnel arriving from the nearby barracks as preparations take place to receive migrants at Napier Barracks in Folkestone, Kent

But this has not been confirmed by the Home Office.      

Earlier today, glimpses were caught of the inside of Napier Barracks as it prepared to house the asylum seekers. 

The barracks has been turned into an ‘assessment and dispersal facility’ for around 400 people.

The asylum seekers are expected from today and on a daily basis thereafter, according to Folkestone and Hythe District Council.

The Home Office is also planning to open a similar facility in the Penally Army centre near Tenby, Wales.

A row of beds at the former disused barracks in Folkestone, Kent, that will now house asylum seekers

A row of beds at the former disused barracks in Folkestone, Kent, that will now house asylum seekers

A row of beds at the former disused barracks in Folkestone, Kent, that will now house asylum seekers

A view of Napier Barracks in Folkestone, Kent, where migrants who have crossed the Channel in small boats are to be housed

A view of Napier Barracks in Folkestone, Kent, where migrants who have crossed the Channel in small boats are to be housed

A view of Napier Barracks in Folkestone, Kent, where migrants who have crossed the Channel in small boats are to be housed

Staff in Folkestone were seen today walking around the disused military base surveying the large open facility and its multiple accommodation buildings.

A member of staff wearing a Hi Vis jacket was seen pointing out where a shower block is going to be installed in the outside space between the housing blocks.

Contractors swept up leaves from the kerb and heaved away black bin bags full of foliage from the concrete pavement.

Others piled hundreds of pink fire panel sheets to be installed inside the numbered dormitories.

Behind the turquoise fire doors was a metal structure setting out at least seven single beds on either side. Fresh bedding was placed upon each blue mattress.

One security guard wearing a Hi Vis jacket and face mask manned the entrance to the barracks while another man patrolled the perimeter of the barb wired fence.

A number of lorries entered and left the park during the afternoon including logistics, recycling and land management.  

Council leader David Monk initially expressed ‘great concerns’ in a co-signed letter with local MP Damian Collins and Sandgate Parish Council leader Cllr Tim Prater.

They asked Home Secretary Priti Patel to halt the plans after blasting ‘exceptionally poor communication,’ claiming to have been given ‘very little notice of this decision and it’s one we cannot support’.

Police officers are escorted around Napier Barracks in Folkestone, Kent, where migrants who have crossed the Channel in small boats are expected to be housed in the military barracks from this week

Police officers are escorted around Napier Barracks in Folkestone, Kent, where migrants who have crossed the Channel in small boats are expected to be housed in the military barracks from this week

Police officers are escorted around Napier Barracks in Folkestone, Kent, where migrants who have crossed the Channel in small boats are expected to be housed in the military barracks from this week

Electrical equipment, including vacuum cleaners, are unloaded at Napier Barracks in Folkestone, Kent, where migrants who have crossed the Channel in small boats are expected to be housed in the military barracks from this week

Electrical equipment, including vacuum cleaners, are unloaded at Napier Barracks in Folkestone, Kent, where migrants who have crossed the Channel in small boats are expected to be housed in the military barracks from this week

Electrical equipment, including vacuum cleaners, are unloaded at Napier Barracks in Folkestone, Kent, where migrants who have crossed the Channel in small boats are expected to be housed in the military barracks from this week

A security guard patrols the facility at Folkestone, Kent, today as it prepares to welcome a group of asylum seekers

A security guard patrols the facility at Folkestone, Kent, today as it prepares to welcome a group of asylum seekers

A security guard patrols the facility at Folkestone, Kent, today as it prepares to welcome a group of asylum seekers

A police van arrives at Napier Barracks as prepares to welcome migrants in Folkestone, Kent

A police van arrives at Napier Barracks as prepares to welcome migrants in Folkestone, Kent

A police van arrives at Napier Barracks as prepares to welcome migrants in Folkestone, Kent 

The letter read: ‘We have great concerns about the impact this large open camp will have on the welfare of the local residential community and also those people in the asylum system who will be placed in the barracks itself.’

But Mr Monk later backtracked and said: ‘It was never a question of this council being against the principle of asylum seekers living in our community.

‘Our concern was that as we had not been consulted we had no way of being able to allay the fears and address the questions raised by our residents.’

Minister for Immigration Compliance and the Courts Chris Philp MP offered reassurances in a written reply on Friday about the temporary accommodation expected to be in place for 12 months.

He said the Government is making use of Section 9 of the Immigration and Asylum Act 1999 to provide safe accommodation for people who have claimed asylum who would otherwise be destitute, whilst the merits of their asylum claims are being considered.

Covid-19 has a ‘major impact’ on the asylum support system, according to Mr Philp, and Napier Barracks was identified among a range of options to ease the pressure.

Members of staff and police officers patrolling the new facility for asylum seekers in Folkestone, Kent, today

Members of staff and police officers patrolling the new facility for asylum seekers in Folkestone, Kent, today

Members of staff and police officers patrolling the new facility for asylum seekers in Folkestone, Kent, today

Britain's Home Secretary Priti Patel arrives for a cabinet meeting at the Foreign and Commonwealth office on September 15

Britain's Home Secretary Priti Patel arrives for a cabinet meeting at the Foreign and Commonwealth office on September 15

Britain’s Home Secretary Priti Patel arrives for a cabinet meeting at the Foreign and Commonwealth office on September 15

Workers are on site today making finishing touches to the facility in Folkestone, Kent, before

Workers are on site today making finishing touches to the facility in Folkestone, Kent, before

Workers are on site today making finishing touches to the facility in Folkestone, Kent, before 

An aerial view of Penally Army Training camp (left) in Penally, Wales

An aerial view of Penally Army Training camp (left) in Penally, Wales

An aerial view of Penally Army Training camp (left) in Penally, Wales

Equipment was installed during the final preparations over the weekend at the site which will be run by a UK based ‘experienced accommodation and support provider’.

Those coming to the former military base will have spent a quarantine period elsewhere with personal welfare and security checks undertaken.

A spokesman for Folkestone and Hythe District Council said: ‘The focus will be on the welfare of those based at the accommodation, the provision of wraparound services and wider considerations relating to the local area and its residents.

‘There will be on-site security and, in order to reduce any additional pressure on local health services, on-site medical services will also be provided.

‘Particular attention will be paid to safeguarding and any concerns addressed by the contractor with input from the Home Office safeguarding team.

The first arrivals are expected from today and on a daily basis thereafter, according to Folkestone and Hythe District Council

The first arrivals are expected from today and on a daily basis thereafter, according to Folkestone and Hythe District Council

The first arrivals are expected from today and on a daily basis thereafter, according to Folkestone and Hythe District Council

Staff are seen at the Penally Training Camp which was transformed to a temporary camp for asylum seekers arriving in the UK, outside the village of Penally near Tenby, Wales

Staff are seen at the Penally Training Camp which was transformed to a temporary camp for asylum seekers arriving in the UK, outside the village of Penally near Tenby, Wales

Staff are seen at the Penally Training Camp which was transformed to a temporary camp for asylum seekers arriving in the UK, outside the village of Penally near Tenby, Wales

Staff are seen at the Penally Training Camp which was transformed to a temporary camp for asylum seekers arriving in the UK, outside the village of Penally near Tenby, Wales

Staff are seen at the Penally Training Camp which was transformed to a temporary camp for asylum seekers arriving in the UK, outside the village of Penally near Tenby, Wales

Staff are seen at the Penally Training Camp which was transformed to a temporary camp for asylum seekers arriving in the UK, outside the village of Penally near Tenby, Wales

‘We understand that every effort is being made for the facility to be COVID-19 secure and Public Health England is closely involved with the operational plan to ensure the safety of its users and local residents.’

A multi-agency task force has been meeting to ensure appropriate support measures are in place at the barracks.

The council is expected to announce volunteering opportunities in the near future after receiving offers for help from local residents and councillors.

The Government said they were exploring opportunities for further accommodation with a range of partners and other government departments.

They added that following the submission of request, the MOD and the Army have been fully supportive in trying to reach a workable solution.

A spokesman said: ‘During these unprecedented times the government is working with a range of partners and across departments to secure further accommodation and the MOD has offered use of some of its sites.

‘When using contingency accommodation we work closely with organisations, including local authorities and law enforcement, throughout the process to ensure value for money and that vulnerable asylum seekers, who would otherwise be destitute, have suitable accommodation while their claims are processed.’

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Mother-to-be lost her baby after being thrown from the bonnet of her own car

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mother to be lost her baby after being thrown from the bonnet of her own car

A woman who was unaware she was pregnant suffered a miscarriage after she was thrown from the bonnet of her own car by a friend in a ‘practical joke gone wrong’.

Keeley Harrison, 20, jumped into Megan Meredith’s parked Ford Ka and decided to drive away as her friend clung to the windscreen wipers and tried to stop the car from escaping in Bargoed, South Wales, last year.

Ms Meredith, 22, was then flung from the bonnet and onto the road as the car accelerated to 19mph, Cardiff Crown Court heard. 

Prosecutor Nigel Fryer said Ms Meredith found out she was pregnant when she was taken to hospital but lost the baby after a five-hour surgery for her injures – which included a broken right ankle and right tibia.

On the day of the incident, which took place on March 22 last year, Ms Meredith had picked up Harrison and two other friends and parked her car in the high street.   

Keeley Harrison (pictured outside Cardiff Crown Court), 20, jumped into Megan Meredith's parked Ford Ka and started to drive as her friend clung to the bonnet

Keeley Harrison (pictured outside Cardiff Crown Court), 20, jumped into Megan Meredith's parked Ford Ka and started to drive as her friend clung to the bonnet

Keeley Harrison (pictured outside Cardiff Crown Court), 20, jumped into Megan Meredith’s parked Ford Ka and started to drive as her friend clung to the bonnet

The group purchased some cakes when Ms Meredith took rubbish from the car to put in a bin nearby, leaving her keys in the ignition.

When she looked back she saw Harrison in the driver’s seat and when she tried to open the door she found they were locked.

Harrison, who was egged on by friends in the back seat, then attempted to drive away but Ms Meredith tried to stop the car from leaving by holding onto the bonnet as it drove along the street. 

She was then flung onto the road as Harrison hit the brakes abruptly on the high street. 

Prosecutor Nigel Fryer said: ‘The car started to roll backwards and Ms Meredith lent on the bonnet, shouting at her not to drive the car, and there was laughing and joking in the vehicle. She also believed they were filming her on a phone.

‘She felt the car move forward and was gripping onto the car to try and stop herself from falling. The defendant pulled out of the parking space while she was still on the bonnet and she accelerated up Upper High Street with Ms Meredith’s legs dangling down.

‘She felt the car was being driven fast and she tried to grab hold of the windscreen wipers but she fell off the front of the car onto her right-hand side.

‘She felt confused initially and didn’t know if she had passed out but when she tried to get up she described feeing horrific pain in her right leg.’ 

Cardiff Crown Court heard CCTV footage showed Harrison crouching down to check on her friend.

But Ms Meredith said her friends did not believe she had broken her ankle and told her to get up.  

An elderly man rushed to the scene and began arguing with the friends for the way they had acted.

Following the incident, Ms Meredith suffered a broken right ankle and broken right tibia which required lengthy surgery – and was later told her leg may never recover.

She spent two weeks at the Prince Charles Hospital in Merthyr Tydfil and had to take six months off work.

In a victim personal statement, she said: ‘This incident has ruined my life and I am worried about the future, my leg function, and employment.

Harrison accelerated to 19mph when her friend was flung from the bonnet of the car and onto the road, Cardiff Crown Court heard

Harrison accelerated to 19mph when her friend was flung from the bonnet of the car and onto the road, Cardiff Crown Court heard

Harrison accelerated to 19mph when her friend was flung from the bonnet of the car and onto the road, Cardiff Crown Court heard

The defendant later pleaded guilty to causing serious injury by dangerous driving

The defendant later pleaded guilty to causing serious injury by dangerous driving

The defendant later pleaded guilty to causing serious injury by dangerous driving 

At Cardiff Crown Court, Harrison was banned from driving for two years and ordered to carry out 180 hours of unpaid work

At Cardiff Crown Court, Harrison was banned from driving for two years and ordered to carry out 180 hours of unpaid work

At Cardiff Crown Court, Harrison was banned from driving for two years and ordered to carry out 180 hours of unpaid work

‘I’m not the person I was before and I don’t think I’ll ever be the same person again. I now have to live with these injuries for the rest of my life.’

Support worker Harrison, of Brithdir, Caerphilly, told police she was driving the vehicle but claimed both parties were responsible.

She said her intention was to play a ‘practical joke’ on Miss Meredith – by driving around the coroner to make her think they were leaving.

Harrison pleaded guilty to causing serious injury by dangerous driving.

Defence barrister Jenny Yeo said the pair were no longer friends.

She added: ‘This is a tragic case for all concerned. It was a prank between two friends that went horribly wrong and my client takes full responsibility for her stupidity and her actions.’

Sentencing Judge Jeremy Jenkins handed Harrison an 18 month suspended sentence.

He said: ‘Causing injury to your friend was the last thing on your mind, I have no doubt, but you have acknowledged how dangerous and foolish your actions were.’

Harrison was also banned from driving for two years and ordered to carry out 180 hours of unpaid work. 

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Jo Malone reveals she felt ‘ashamed’ of her crippling anxiety attacks after her cancer battle

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jo malone reveals she felt ashamed of her crippling anxiety attacks after her cancer battle

Businesswoman Jo Malone has revealed she felt ‘ashamed’ of crippling anxiety attacks she started suffering after fighting cancer.

Speaking on The Joe Wicks podcast, the fragrance entrepreneur, 56, told how she began experiencing mental health issues during her five year period out of the beauty business.

Malone, who sold her company Jo Malone in 1999 but left in 2006 after beating breast cancer, was out of work until she started new brand Jo Loves in 2011.

In that period, Malone says she ‘spiralled into anxiety’ because she ‘lost control of her life’ and became ‘so ashamed’. 

Fragrance entrepreneur Jo Malone, 56, revealed she felt 'ashamed' of the crippling anxiety attacks she started suffering after fighting cancer. Her mental health issues started when she took five years out of the beauty industry

Fragrance entrepreneur Jo Malone, 56, revealed she felt 'ashamed' of the crippling anxiety attacks she started suffering after fighting cancer. Her mental health issues started when she took five years out of the beauty industry

Fragrance entrepreneur Jo Malone, 56, revealed she felt ‘ashamed’ of the crippling anxiety attacks she started suffering after fighting cancer. Her mental health issues started when she took five years out of the beauty industry

Malone sold her company Jo Malone in 1999 but left the industry completely for five years in 2006 after beating breast cancer. She was out of work until she started new brand Jo Loves in 2011

Malone sold her company Jo Malone in 1999 but left the industry completely for five years in 2006 after beating breast cancer. She was out of work until she started new brand Jo Loves in 2011

Malone sold her company Jo Malone in 1999 but left the industry completely for five years in 2006 after beating breast cancer. She was out of work until she started new brand Jo Loves in 2011

‘I hadn’t created fragrance for five years,’ she explained. ‘A bit like exercise, if you suddenly come out of something after you do it for five years and then step back into it, you’re completely different person.

‘You have to get yourself back in that rhythm again of building a business again and creating. I just wanted to go back to where I’d left, that moment in time, five years previous.

‘I was very ashamed at the time, but I’m not now I’ve come through it, but I had a really horrible breakdown during that time.

She continued: ‘I could have sat on a beach every day, I didn’t have to [go back to work], I was in a really privileged position…but I suffer from anxiety and I know what my flick switch is – it’s control.

Mum-of-one Jo, pictured after being made a CBE at Buckingham Palace in November 2018, said 'you would have thought cancer would have brought me to my knees' but 'five years with nothing around me' had a devastating impact on her mental health.

Mum-of-one Jo, pictured after being made a CBE at Buckingham Palace in November 2018, said 'you would have thought cancer would have brought me to my knees' but 'five years with nothing around me' had a devastating impact on her mental health.

Mum-of-one Jo, pictured after being made a CBE at Buckingham Palace in November 2018, said ‘you would have thought cancer would have brought me to my knees’ but ‘five years with nothing around me’ had a devastating impact on her mental health.

‘So the minute I lost that sense of control over my own life I just spiralled into anxiety and it manifested itself in really terrifying ways.

‘It took a year for me to recover and seek help and once I started to understand where anxiety came from, and stop being frightened of it, it stopped having its hold over me.’

Malone went on to say that she starts hyperventilating when she suffers an anxiety attack.

‘The very first time it happened I thought I was having a heart attack… it was utterly terrifying,’ she added. 

‘I was so ashamed. Why should I feel anxiety? I was so ashamed of not being able to control it and not pull myself together. It’s so important to seek and help and talk to somebody.’

Now, after therapy, Malone says she still has anxiety attacks but because she has learnt to live with them and is not frightened of them, ‘they are nothing like they were and I’m not frightened of them’.

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