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If the Left has its way, we will be forced to renounce our past. So why is no one fighting back?

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if the left has its way we will be forced to renounce our past so why is no one fighting back

So you thought a Tory government with an 80-seat majority showed that the Corbynistas and Leftists were on the run? I’m afraid the extraordinary events of the past few days suggest otherwise.

Despite there being a Conservative Prime Minister in No 10, the Left continues its long march through our institutions. It sets the cultural agenda. The great evil of slavery is being used to mount an assault on Britain’s past, and subvert the sense of national identity of many people.

First we had the toppling of Edward Colston’s statue in Bristol on Sunday by a well-orchestrated mob. Although I’m sure most of those who have taken part in the Black Lives Matter demonstrations are motivated by idealism, I suspect they are being manipulated by more calculating people.

The violent activities of some protesters in demonstrations in London — often minimised with irksome monotony by the BBC — have confirmed that the Hard Left can still get its supporters out on the streets. 

A worker sits down as a statue of slave owner Robert Milligan is taken away at West India Quay in east London as Labour councils across England and Wales will begin reviewing monuments

A worker sits down as a statue of slave owner Robert Milligan is taken away at West India Quay in east London as Labour councils across England and Wales will begin reviewing monuments

A worker sits down as a statue of slave owner Robert Milligan is taken away at West India Quay in east London as Labour councils across England and Wales will begin reviewing monuments

What really made me shiver was the announcement that Sadiq Khan, the Labour Mayor of London, is setting up a new commission ‘for diversity in the public realm’, which will review the capital’s landmarks, including street names, to ensure they ‘suitably reflect its diversity’.

No less alarming was the news that 130 Labour councils in the country will examine the ‘appropriateness’ of monuments. Every statue will be scrutinised for links to slavery and plantation owners.

We can be certain that the cultural commissars engaged in this Soviet-sounding exercise will be overwhelmingly of the Left — a mixture of Labour apparatchiks and radical historians who abominate all aspects of the British Empire.

Brace yourself for large-scale changes. They won’t be proposing more maypole dancing. Mr Khan says: ‘Our capital’s diversity is our greatest strength, yet our statues, road names and public spaces reflect a bygone era.’

In other words, if the Left gets its way, the past will be reconfigured so that monuments and names reflecting Britain’s imperial past will be removed, and where possible replaced by more ‘relevant’ heroes of whom Mr Khan and his commissars approve.

My goodness, the process has already begun. The Labour Mayor of Liverpool, Joe Anderson, declares that he favours renaming all roads and buildings linked to the slave trade.

Rodney Street (named after Admiral George Rodney, an alleged supporter of slavery) may be for the chop. For the moment, Mr Anderson opposes re-christening Penny Lane, which some claim was named after the slave ship owner James Penny.

Meanwhile, the University of Liverpool is redesignating a hall of residence dedicated to the great Liberal prime minister William Gladstone. The reason? Until the abolition of slavery in 1833, Gladstone’s father was a slave owner. The irony is that Gladstone was the least imperialist of 19th-century leaders. 

The statue of 17th century slave trader Edward Colston is toppled into the water after protesters pulled it down and pushed it into the docks during a demonstration in Bristol

The statue of 17th century slave trader Edward Colston is toppled into the water after protesters pulled it down and pushed it into the docks during a demonstration in Bristol

The statue of 17th century slave trader Edward Colston is toppled into the water after protesters pulled it down and pushed it into the docks during a demonstration in Bristol

Mr Khan, pictured above, says: ¿Our capital¿s diversity is our greatest strength, yet our statues, road names and public spaces reflect a bygone era¿

Mr Khan, pictured above, says: ¿Our capital¿s diversity is our greatest strength, yet our statues, road names and public spaces reflect a bygone era¿

Mr Khan, pictured above, says: ‘Our capital’s diversity is our greatest strength, yet our statues, road names and public spaces reflect a bygone era’

Thirty miles away in Manchester, the statue of the enlightened Tory reforming prime minister Sir Robert Peel is being eyed up by iconoclasts. His crime is to have had a father who was a prominent advocate of slavery.

So we move on from slave traders such as Edward Colston and Robert Milligan (whose statue was ripped from its home on West India Quay in London on Tuesday at the behest of the Labour Mayor of Tower Hamlets) to Peel and Gladstone, who were merely connected to slave owners.

Where will it end? To attract the ire of the mob, an association with slavery is no longer necessary. I heard a protester at Tuesday’s demonstration in Oxford assert that Cecil Rhodes used slaves, and read the same untruth in a newspaper. He was active in South Africa half a century after slavery had been abolished in the British Empire.

Rapacious capitalist? Certainly. Misguided believer in racial segregation? Absolutely. Founder of a system of scholarships which has benefited thousands of students for more than a hundred years, and was embraced by the great Nelson Mandela? Yes. But never a slave owner or trader.

A statue of two-time British Prime Minister Sir Robert Peel in Piccadilly Gardens, Manchester, as a petition has been launched calling for its removal by Manchester City Council

A statue of two-time British Prime Minister Sir Robert Peel in Piccadilly Gardens, Manchester, as a petition has been launched calling for its removal by Manchester City Council

A statue of two-time British Prime Minister Sir Robert Peel in Piccadilly Gardens, Manchester, as a petition has been launched calling for its removal by Manchester City Council

Slavery is in the foothills of the ambitions of many on the Left. What they want is a wholesale rejection of Britain’s past, and of the British Empire in particular. Anti-colonialist academics queue up on the BBC to denounce it.

How monstrously unfair the Beeb can be! On Tuesday’s edition of BBC2’s Newsnight, it assembled Stephen Bush, the Leftist political editor of the New Statesman, and an Oxford English literature professor called Ankhi Mukherjee, perhaps further to the Left, to debate these issues.

Bush stated that Britain had ‘plundered and impoverished’ countries, and Mukherjee looked pleased. Was this a fair-minded debate? No, it was a kangaroo court in which, as per usual on our national broadcaster, no one was invited to express a contrary view in partial defence of this country’s past.

That might go as follows. Yes, Britain did bad things in India but also good things, such as creating universities for Indians and building many railways, as the anti-imperialist George Orwell conceded. Suttee, the practice of burning widows alive on the funeral pyres of their husbands, was outlawed.

Of course slavery was a great sin, though we shouldn’t forget that some African tribes, such as the Ashanti in what later became Ghana, profited from it. Moreover, Britain abolished it earlier than America and other European empires.

Between 1808 and 1860, the Royal Navy freed an estimated 150,000 slaves who were being shipped across the Atlantic. Possibly 20,000 sailors died in this noble endeavour. I wonder how many Black Lives Matter marchers know that.

Protesters gather in front of Oriel College in Oxford during a protest for the 'Rhodes Must Fall' campaign calling for the removal of the statue of British imperialist Cecil Rhodes

Protesters gather in front of Oriel College in Oxford during a protest for the 'Rhodes Must Fall' campaign calling for the removal of the statue of British imperialist Cecil Rhodes

Protesters gather in front of Oriel College in Oxford during a protest for the ‘Rhodes Must Fall’ campaign calling for the removal of the statue of British imperialist Cecil Rhodes 

A statue of Sir Francis Drake is seen on Plymouth Hoe as Plymouth City Council has come under pressure to remove the statue due to the naval officer's links with slavery

A statue of Sir Francis Drake is seen on Plymouth Hoe as Plymouth City Council has come under pressure to remove the statue due to the naval officer's links with slavery

A statue of Sir Francis Drake is seen on Plymouth Hoe as Plymouth City Council has come under pressure to remove the statue due to the naval officer’s links with slavery

The truth about the British Empire is more complex than its detractors would have us believe. Against the undeniable excesses and cruelties, we should weigh the introduction of parliamentary democracy, the rule of law, modern medicine and Christianity.

The past is seldom divided neatly into goodies and baddies. But that is exactly the version of history which the Left wants us to accept — with the British exclusively playing the role of baddies.

Our heroes who defended this country against foreign powers are in danger of being brought down in ignominy. Toppling a monument is not chiefly a matter of destroying a physical object. Its real purpose is to ruin a reputation — and re-write history.

The statue of Sir Francis Drake — persecutor of the Spanish, great explorer, romantic icon of the 1588 Spanish Armada and all-round rogue — is being targeted in Plymouth because he sold slaves.

Horatio Nelson, who arguably saved this country from French invasion, and gave up his life, stands perilously on his column in Trafalgar Square. His crime is to have defended his slave-owning friends in Parliament some years before the trading of slaves was abolished in the British Empire in 1807. Not a good thing for him to have done. But he was still a hero.

If the Left has its way, we will be forced to renounce our past, and hang our heads in shame. New figures will be introduced for us to admire. Our sense of national identity will be undermined. It has been done before, in other countries.

Does the decent silent majority want such an outcome? Of course not. But although we have a Tory government in power — and a highly educated Prime Minister, perfectly aware of what is going on — almost no one is fighting back.

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Tesla stocks fall seven percent after investors slashed $50 billion from its market value

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tesla stocks fall seven percent after investors slashed 50 billion from its market value

Stocks in Tesla Inc tumbled more than seven percent as markets opened on Wednesday after CEO Elon Musk failed to impress with his promise to cut electric vehicle costs at the much awaited ‘Battery Day’ event on Tuesday.

Investors slashed $50 billion from Tesla Inc’s market value on Tuesday after Musk admitted it would be at least three years before it will cut electric vehicle costs so radically that a $25,000 car that drives itself will be possible.

Tesla’s market cap dropped $20 billion in just two hours after trading closed Tuesday, as Musk and other Tesla executives presented their new battery and manufacturing strategies. 

Shares closed down 5.6 percent and had dropped another 6.9 percent after hours. They opened Wednesday at 5.4 percent and had dropped to 7.45 percent just after 11.30am ET. 

‘Nothing Musk discussed about batteries is a done deal,’ said Roth Capital Partners analyst Craig Irwin. ‘There was nothing tangible.’

The dip in share price came as Tesla’s internal systems went down and some customer connectivity features were not accessible on Wednesday morning.  

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33534296 8764531 image a 28 1600875742571

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33534294 8764531 image a 29 1600875747646

The outage appeared around 11am ET, with some Tesla owners saying they could not connect to their car through the mobile app.

Sources told Electrek that Tesla’s internal systems are also down, making it impossible to process deliveries and orders. 

According to Down Detector,  the outage is stretching across the US and over into parts of Europe. 

Investors had expected two significant announcements at Musk’s oft-touted ‘Battery Day’: The development of a ‘million mile’ battery good for 10 years or more, and a specific cost reduction target – expressed in dollars per kilowatt-hour – that would finally drop the price of an electric vehicle below that of a gasoline car. 

Musk offered neither. Instead, he promised over the next several years to slash battery costs in half with new technology and processes and deliver an ‘affordable’ electric car. 

‘In three years . . . we can do a $25,000 car that will be basically on par (with), maybe slightly better than, a comparable gasoline car,’ Musk said. 

Investors slashed $50 billion from Tesla Inc's TSLA.O market value on Tuesday after Musk admitted it would be at least three years before it will cut electric vehicle costs so radically that a $25,000 car that drives itself will be possible. Musk is pictured above on Tuesday

Investors slashed $50 billion from Tesla Inc's TSLA.O market value on Tuesday after Musk admitted it would be at least three years before it will cut electric vehicle costs so radically that a $25,000 car that drives itself will be possible. Musk is pictured above on Tuesday

Investors slashed $50 billion from Tesla Inc’s TSLA.O market value on Tuesday after Musk admitted it would be at least three years before it will cut electric vehicle costs so radically that a $25,000 car that drives itself will be possible. Musk is pictured above on Tuesday 

Meanwhile, The S&P 500 and the Nasdaq retreated on Wednesday as data showed domestic business activity nudged down in September, while a record high for Nike following a strong quarterly earnings report boosted the blue-chip Dow.

Data from IHS Markit showed gains at factories were offset by a retreat at services industries in September, suggesting a loss of momentum in the economy as the third quarter draws to a close.

Bets of a stable economic rebound from a pandemic-driven recession, combined with historic fiscal and monetary stimulus, had driven a rally in the three main U.S. stock indexes since March.

However, doubts over the next coronavirus relief bill as well as a selloff in heavyweight technology-related stocks have weighed on investor sentiment this month, with Wall Street favorites including Facebook Inc, Apple Inc and Amazon.com Inc bearing the brunt of the losses.

‘It’s just this constant push-and-pull in the face of uncertainty where we’re waiting on information about the election, earnings and stimulus,’ said Thomas Hayes, managing member at Great Hill Capital LLC in New York.

The Tesla outage appeared around 11am ET, with some Tesla owners saying they cannot connect to their car through the mobile app. According to Down Detector, the outage is stretching across the US and over into parts of Europe

The Tesla outage appeared around 11am ET, with some Tesla owners saying they cannot connect to their car through the mobile app. According to Down Detector, the outage is stretching across the US and over into parts of Europe

The Tesla outage appeared around 11am ET, with some Tesla owners saying they cannot connect to their car through the mobile app. According to Down Detector, the outage is stretching across the US and over into parts of Europe

Seven of the 11 major S&P indexes were down in morning trading, with energy leading declines. Industrial stocks were among the biggest gainers.

The Dow Jones Industrial Average was up 70.47 points, or 0.26 percent, at 27,358.65. The S&P 500, however, was down 2.26 points, or 0.07 percent, at 3,313.31, while the Nasdaq Composite was down 46.23 points, or 0.42 percent, at 10,917.41.

‘When the Dow outperforms the Nasdaq, it’s telling you that the market believes the reopening (and) vaccines are on track, and that’s going to help the type of large industrial stocks,’ Hayes said.

Nike Inc surged 9.7 percent to a record high as its digital sales, especially in North America, helped offset a fall in sales at traditional brick-and-mortar stores.

Oracle Corp fell 1 per cent after a report by a state-backed Chinese newspaper said Beijing was unlikely to approve a proposed deal by the software maker and Walmart for ByteDance’s TikTok.

Travel-related stocks including Delta Air Lines, American Airlines, Carnival Corp and Royal Caribbean Cruises rose more than 1 percent after being hammered earlier this week.

Johnson & Johnson gained 1.3 percent after kicking off a final 60,000-person trial of a single-shot COVID-19 vaccine that potentially would simplify distribution of millions of doses, compared with leading rivals using two doses.

Advancing issues nearly matched decliners on the NYSE and the Nasdaq.

The S&P index recorded three new 52-week highs and no new low, while the Nasdaq recorded 23 new highs and 10 new lows. 

Tesla on Tuesday also introduced a new Model S Plaid, a 520-mile range sedan that can reach top speeds of up to 320kph, with deliveries starting in 2021. The Plaid was listed on Tesla’s website on Tuesday at a price of nearly $140,000. It won’t be available outside of the U.S. 

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No room for granny? Lockdown Christenings limited to just SIX people – including baby and the vicar

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no room for granny lockdown christenings limited to just six people including baby and the vicar

Parents having their children baptised face an agonising decision over having grandparents present after Christenings were limited to just six people. 

Downing Street confirmed today that the Christian rite of faith will be subject to the Rule of Six. 

The decision has been taken despite weddings being allowed to go ahead with 15 guests from Monday and funerals allowed up to 30 mourners.

The decision will leave some parents in a quandary. The baby is included in the total, plus a priest. 

If both parents are present that could leave only two more places to cover godparents and grandparents – or any other friends and family they wish to have present. 

The Church of England website suggests those being baptised should have ‘at least three’ godparents, although the parents can take up two of those roles, plus one other. 

But the rules only cover standalone ceremonies. The majority take place as part of regular Sunday services.

Under separate rules these are allowed to be attended by more than six people as long as they are in groups of no more than six, and are socially distanced. 

Downing Street confirmed today that the Christian rite of faith will be subject to the Rule of Six

Downing Street confirmed today that the Christian rite of faith will be subject to the Rule of Six

Downing Street confirmed today that the Christian rite of faith will be subject to the Rule of Six

The rule change comes days after Boris Johnson (pictured today) had his own son baptised.

The rule change comes days after Boris Johnson (pictured today) had his own son baptised.

The rule change comes days after Boris Johnson (pictured today) had his own son baptised.

The Church of England has updated its guidance on Christenings to say: ‘Baptisms are possible providing appropriate steps are taken to minimise risk.

‘If the baptism is taking place as part of a regular act of worship the usual requirements for public worship apply.

‘From September 28, standalone life events will be subject to the ”rule of six” limits. 

‘We are seeking Government clarification on this and will update our guidance once detailed documentation is published.’

The rule change comes days after Boris Johnson had his own son baptised.  

Boris Johnson and his fiancee Carrie Symonds had their baby son Wilfred christened a Catholic, the largest Catholic cathedral in England and Wales has confirmed

Boris Johnson and his fiancee Carrie Symonds had their baby son Wilfred christened a Catholic, the largest Catholic cathedral in England and Wales has confirmed

Boris Johnson and his fiancee Carrie Symonds had their baby son Wilfred christened a Catholic, the largest Catholic cathedral in England and Wales has confirmed 

Westminster Cathedral said the couple had their four-month-old son baptised there in a ceremony on September 12 by Father Daniel Humphreys

Westminster Cathedral said the couple had their four-month-old son baptised there in a ceremony on September 12 by Father Daniel Humphreys

Westminster Cathedral said the couple had their four-month-old son baptised there in a ceremony on September 12 by Father Daniel Humphreys

The Prime Minister and fiancee Carrie Symonds had Wilfred christened a Catholic, it was confirmed this week.

Westminster Cathedral said the couple had their four-month-old son baptised there in a ceremony on September 12, conducted by Father Daniel Humphreys.

There was a small ceremony held in the cathedral’s Lady Chapel, according to The Daily Telegraph.

It is understood the christening was a small ceremony held in the Henry VII Lady Chapel, a 16th-century building which is the burial place of 15 monarchs including Elizabeth I, Mary Queen of Scots and James I 

The Prime Minister and Ms Symonds, who has previously talked about her Catholic faith on social media, were reportedly holding Wilfred as he was baptised.

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Ocado tell 200 call centre staff who worked through lockdown they must move 250 miles to keep jobs 

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ocado tell 200 call centre staff who worked through lockdown they must move 250 miles to keep jobs

Up to 200 jobs are at risk in Ocado’s flagship call centre after the online supermarket announced staff will be expected to move to a new centre 250 miles away. 

Staff at their Hatfield Centre in Hertfordshire are being asked to relocate to Sunderland in Tyne and Wear.

Call centre workers claim they will either be forced to accept alternative lower paid logistics roles with Ocado, or face redundancy.   

Ocado insisted there ‘may be redundancies’ but their aim ‘is to keep as many people in our business as possible.’

The news comes in the wake of Ocado signing a £750 million deal with M&S, switching from their longstanding relationship with Waitrose. 

Ocado's Hatfield call centre in Hertfordshire (pictured) where staff were asked to relocate to Sunderland 250 miles away on Monday, leaving staff in tears and sparking a  mass walkout

Ocado's Hatfield call centre in Hertfordshire (pictured) where staff were asked to relocate to Sunderland 250 miles away on Monday, leaving staff in tears and sparking a  mass walkout

Ocado’s Hatfield call centre in Hertfordshire (pictured) where staff were asked to relocate to Sunderland 250 miles away on Monday, leaving staff in tears and sparking a  mass walkout

The online supermarket wants to move their call centre operations to their Tyne and Wear centre (pictured above)

The online supermarket wants to move their call centre operations to their Tyne and Wear centre (pictured above)

The online supermarket wants to move their call centre operations to their Tyne and Wear centre (pictured above) 

The company blindsighted staff with the announcement in a meeting at 2.40pm on Monday, leaving some staff in tears. 

Many of the staff affected worked for the online supermarket throughout the pandemic and the nationwide lockdown earlier this year. 

One call centre staff member, who wished to remain anonymous, said: ‘No one knew what was going on. We actually believed we would get a thank you for working during the pandemic. But that wasn’t the case.

‘There were people crying. There are people who have just started families, moved out of their parents, stuff like that, trying to get back to normal life, and then they go and drop this.  

Ocado say all those affected will be offered alternative logistics roles, but staff believe these will be lower paid 'picking and packing' jobs (pictured above, stock image), or delivery roles

Ocado say all those affected will be offered alternative logistics roles, but staff believe these will be lower paid 'picking and packing' jobs (pictured above, stock image), or delivery roles

Ocado say all those affected will be offered alternative logistics roles, but staff believe these will be lower paid ‘picking and packing’ jobs (pictured above, stock image), or delivery roles

The Ocado warehouse in Hatfield, which is over one million square feet, has been extremely busy as shoppers turn to online shopping as coronavirus restrictions tighten

The Ocado warehouse in Hatfield, which is over one million square feet, has been extremely busy as shoppers turn to online shopping as coronavirus restrictions tighten

The Ocado warehouse in Hatfield, which is over one million square feet, has been extremely busy as shoppers turn to online shopping as coronavirus restrictions tighten

‘We knew that the Sunderland contact centre was opening and we were always assured that our jobs would be safe. 

‘On the floor there was a feeling we would be told that there would be redundancies or job losses after Christmas, an extremely busy time, due to this new contact centre. 

‘But for them to do it mid pandemic, while the UK are scared there’s going to be a second wave and panic buying is going up, it was just dropped as a bombshell.’   

Calls from customers were left unanswered for up to an hour as staff came to terms with the news, while more than 200 live chats were reportedly waiting for responses on the centre’s live chat system.

Queries on social media were also left unanswered for up to 15 hours, where the usual target response time expected is said to be within 10 minutes.  

Hatfield has been the flagship Ocado Group call centre for 20 years. 

Staff were shocked that Ocado made the anouncement at such a busy time for the online supermarket, as more people turn to online shopping as coronavirus restrictions tighten and fears of panic buying spread.

The announcement comes in the wake of a £750 million deal between Ocado and M&S, which launched on September 1 and sparked an online shopping frenzy

The announcement comes in the wake of a £750 million deal between Ocado and M&S, which launched on September 1 and sparked an online shopping frenzy

The announcement comes in the wake of a £750 million deal between Ocado and M&S, which launched on September 1 and sparked an online shopping frenzy

It also follows the launch of the M&S Ocado partnership which launched on September 1, with demand outstripping even the stockpiling frenzy in March.  

Ocado’s £750m tie-up with Marks & Spencer

M&S signed a £750 million deal in 2019 to own half of Ocado’s retail business and launched its products on the delivery website in September 2020. 

Ocado revealed that the switch from Waitrose to M&S led to a surge in its shares, as well as a significant rise in sales.

The online grocer had its busiest-ever day for orders when the M&S partnership launched on September 1, with demand outstripping even the stockpiling frenzy in March.

Average shopper baskets grew by about five items since the switch and shares in Ocado also hit a record high amid the new partnership.

The move marked the end of a 20-year partnership with Waitrose. 

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‘It was quite frustrating,’ added the Ocado worker. 

‘We came into work during the pandemic and helped them make money. 

‘They have profited from this pandemic, and all the internal emails were all “Ocado is doing great, we’ve made this much, we’ve got all this stock, and a new venture with Marks & Spencers,” and then ‘”oh, we’re going to make you redundant”. 

‘They’ve made all this money but are still going to cut costs by getting rid of 200 people.’

Ocado inisited that there would be no overall change in their staff headcount and that everyone affected will be offered other roles at Ocado. 

Call centre staff believe these are likely to be ‘picking and packing’ or delivery driving jobs.

They say they are concerned these positions are lower paid than their current call centre positions. 

 ‘What the other roles would be wasn’t announced to us on Monday, but it’s likely to be picking and packing and driving jobs, which are a lot less money,’ the cell celntre worker added.

‘It’s a huge reduction in wage. In Sunderland the wage is only £19,200 instead of almost £24,000 that we’re on.

‘I know a few people who have accepted Sunderland roles and they have been dropped. 

‘I think then they can get away with when they want to employ more people in Sunderland to keep the headcount the same.’

A spokesperson for Ocado said: ‘Over the last few months, we have been reviewing our Contact Centre operations to ensure we continue to offer the best customer service.

‘As part of this review, it has been determined that the Contact Centre operations would be more effective if they were operated from a single location.

‘On this basis, we are proposing that our Hatfield Contact Centre close, and the roles transfer to our existing purpose-built contact centre in Sunderland. 

‘The proposal will keep the overall headcount the same, but have the entire contact service operation operate under one roof.

‘Should the proposal go ahead, all Hatfield Contact Centre colleagues would be offered a relocation package to Sunderland, or have the option to be redeployed into other Ocado Logistics roles. 

‘In the event that a colleague chooses not to take these options, there may be redundancies although our ultimate aim is to keep as many people in our business as possible.’

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