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Japanese-inspired mansion belonging to Dave Brubeck hits the market in Connecticut for $2,750,000

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japanese inspired mansion belonging to dave brubeck hits the market in connecticut for 2750000

The scenic Connecticut home that belonged to jazz icon Dave Brubeck has gone on the market for a staggering $2,750,000. 

Brubeck, who grew in prominence in the 50s, tapped architect Beverly David Thorne to design the Japanese-inspired Wilton home as his stardom continued to grow. It was completed in 1963.

The abode is being shone by realtor Monica Webster of Douglas Elliman, the listing on Realtor.com reads.

Described as having a ‘sense of calm,’ the massive home is 6,200 square feet on two levels and situated on a 7.5acre lot. 

The massive Wilton, Connecticut, home that belonged to jazz icon Dave Brubeck has hit the market for $2,750,000

The massive Wilton, Connecticut, home that belonged to jazz icon Dave Brubeck has hit the market for $2,750,000

The massive Wilton, Connecticut, home that belonged to jazz icon Dave Brubeck has hit the market for $2,750,000

Brubeck (pictured with his wife Lola), who grew in prominence in the 50s, tapped architect Beverly David Thorne to design the Japanese-inspired Wilton home as his stardom continued to grow. It was completed in 1963

Brubeck (pictured with his wife Lola), who grew in prominence in the 50s, tapped architect Beverly David Thorne to design the Japanese-inspired Wilton home as his stardom continued to grow. It was completed in 1963

Brubeck (pictured with his wife Lola), who grew in prominence in the 50s, tapped architect Beverly David Thorne to design the Japanese-inspired Wilton home as his stardom continued to grow. It was completed in 1963

Plenty of privacy! Large moon gates separate the outside world and the two-story home. Most rooms have windows that don't face the street

Plenty of privacy! Large moon gates separate the outside world and the two-story home. Most rooms have windows that don't face the street

Plenty of privacy! Large moon gates separate the outside world and the two-story home. Most rooms have windows that don’t face the street

A 'sense of calm': The ginormous property has a number of zen gardens and bridges that lead to babbling brooks and a pond

A 'sense of calm': The ginormous property has a number of zen gardens and bridges that lead to babbling brooks and a pond

A ‘sense of calm’: The ginormous property has a number of zen gardens and bridges that lead to babbling brooks and a pond

It fits nicely on the land, with zen gardens and bridges placed throughout the property to give an ideal setting. The home also offers plenty of privacy as none of the main rooms have windows that show the street.

A moon gate separates the colossal home from the rest of the world.

There are eight bedrooms in total and the home also has five-and-a-half bathrooms inside. The master bedroom suite features a dressing room, full bathroom and even a charming porch. 

An elegant stone stairway curves into the step-down living room, the perfect space for relaxation with its contemporary fireplace that overlooks two brooks and a pond that is accented with fountains. 

An elegant stone stairway curves into the step-down living room, the perfect space for relaxation with its contemporary fireplace

An elegant stone stairway curves into the step-down living room, the perfect space for relaxation with its contemporary fireplace

An elegant stone stairway curves into the step-down living room, the perfect space for relaxation with its contemporary fireplace

Views: From the living room visitors can catch a spectacular view of the brooks and the pond

Views: From the living room visitors can catch a spectacular view of the brooks and the pond

Views: From the living room visitors can catch a spectacular view of the brooks and the pond

Listen to the tunes: Dave's music studio is still inside the mansion, featuring a colossal 20ft ceiling, sliding patio doors, clerestory walls that offer plenty of light and a balcony

Listen to the tunes: Dave's music studio is still inside the mansion, featuring a colossal 20ft ceiling, sliding patio doors, clerestory walls that offer plenty of light and a balcony

Listen to the tunes: Dave’s music studio is still inside the mansion, featuring a colossal 20ft ceiling, sliding patio doors, clerestory walls that offer plenty of light and a balcony

So much space! There are eight bedrooms in total and the home also has five-and-a-half bathrooms inside

So much space! There are eight bedrooms in total and the home also has five-and-a-half bathrooms inside

So much space! There are eight bedrooms in total and the home also has five-and-a-half bathrooms inside

Dave’s music studio is still inside the mansion, featuring a colossal 20ft ceiling, sliding patio doors, clerestory walls that offer plenty of light and a balcony. 

Natural light floods into the home through the solarium and wrap around porch that connect to the formal dining room. Shoji screen-doors connect the dining room to the outside world.

The kitchen has plenty of room and is accessorized with wood paneling, leading out to the patio. A breakfast rooms sits next to the kitchen.  

A study in the two-story home doubles as a au pair suite and a family room provides the perfect space to get together with loved ones.

The kitchen has plenty of room and is accessorized with wood paneling, leading out to the patio

The kitchen has plenty of room and is accessorized with wood paneling, leading out to the patio

The kitchen has plenty of room and is accessorized with wood paneling, leading out to the patio

A breakfast rooms sits nearby the kitchen, still getting ample light

A breakfast rooms sits nearby the kitchen, still getting ample light

A breakfast rooms sits nearby the kitchen, still getting ample light

Natural light floods into the home through the solarium and wrap around porch that connect to the formal dining room

Natural light floods into the home through the solarium and wrap around porch that connect to the formal dining room

Natural light floods into the home through the solarium and wrap around porch that connect to the formal dining room

Extra amenities include a playroom that doubles as an exercise room, an indoor pool and a heated spa. 

A two car garage also sits on the property. The house has blue and orange walls, reminiscent of the 60s and in contrast to the greys and whites of today.

The home has retained its historic feel because following the musicians death in 2012, the home went to his children. They kept the home the same, up until now, Curbed reports. 

Brubeck was a part of the Dave Brubeck Quartet when he had the home built, and it was with the group that he became a U.S. State Department–sanctioned ‘Jazz Ambassador.’ The musician toured the world, eventually seeing and falling in love with Japan. He even recorded the album, Jazz Impressions of Japan, and several others about his time abroad.

Let's take a dip! Those looking to enjoy the water but not the weather can enjoy the home's indoor pool and steam room

Let's take a dip! Those looking to enjoy the water but not the weather can enjoy the home's indoor pool and steam room

Let’s take a dip! Those looking to enjoy the water but not the weather can enjoy the home’s indoor pool and steam room

The wrap around porch allows one to get from one part of the humongous house to another in a matter of seconds

The wrap around porch allows one to get from one part of the humongous house to another in a matter of seconds

The wrap around porch allows one to get from one part of the humongous house to another in a matter of seconds

Windows provide much of the lighting that does get into the home

Windows provide much of the lighting that does get into the home

Windows provide much of the lighting that does get into the home

Fountains seen out on the pond. A small gazebo sits out on a small island on the water

Fountains seen out on the pond. A small gazebo sits out on a small island on the water

 Fountains seen out on the pond. A small gazebo sits out on a small island on the water

Following the musician's (front center) death in 2012, the home went to his children

Following the musician's (front center) death in 2012, the home went to his children

Following the musician’s (front center) death in 2012, the home went to his children

This post first appeared on dailymail.co.uk

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Cyclist, 70, brain-damaged after dog ran into his path could get up to £50k damages

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cyclist 70 brain damaged after dog ran into his path could get up to 50k damages

A cyclist could be awarded up to £50,000 after successfully suing a woman when her dog ran in front of him, causing a crash which left him brain damaged.   

David Crane says he suffered a brain haemorrhage when he flew over the handlebars after braking to avoid Carina Read’s cocker spaniel on Acton Green Common in west London.

The publishing executive, 70, took his fight to the Central London County Court where his lawyers claimed investment banker Ms Read was negligent in failing to properly control her dog, Felix.

Ms Reid, 48, denied all blame and insisted the accident was a ‘freak occurrence’ and said Felix only ran in front of the bike because he was ‘stunned’ after the ball hit him on the head.

She also claimed Mr Crane was going too fast and should not have been riding on the path which was out of bounds to cyclists in line with local bylaws.

But Judge Patrick Andrews has now ruled that Ms Read was negligent, having failed to call back Felix as he shot towards the path and the oncoming cyclist.

Dog owner Carina Read outside Central London County Court

Dog owner Carina Read outside Central London County Court

David Crane outside Central London County Court

David Crane outside Central London County Court

Dog owner Carina Read outside Central London County Court, left, and right, David Crane who has won his fight for damages from Ms Read

Mr Crane sued Ms Read under the 1972 Animals Act, but her lawyers said the Act only relates to damage done by a dangerous animal and that Felix (pictured) was not remotely dangerous

Mr Crane sued Ms Read under the 1972 Animals Act, but her lawyers said the Act only relates to damage done by a dangerous animal and that Felix (pictured) was not remotely dangerous

Mr Crane sued Ms Read under the 1972 Animals Act, but her lawyers said the Act only relates to damage done by a dangerous animal and that Felix (pictured) was not remotely dangerous

Mr Crane sued Ms Read for negligence as well as under the 1972 Animals Act, which her lawyers argued only relates to damage done by a dangerous animal. 

Her legal team said Felix was not remotely dangerous. 

The judge told the court today: ‘After considering all the facts and evidence, I find that on balance of probabilities, in failing to call back Felix, which she clearly had time to do, Ms Reid exposed Mr Crane to risk of injury.’

The ruling means Mr Crane, who claimed up to £50,000, is entitled to a damages payout, with the amount due to be assessed at another hearing.

The ‘seasoned cyclist’, who said he has ridden a bike around London for over 40 years without mishap, said he was cycling with care and at no more than five miles per hour when the dog ran in front of him in March 2016.

He said the accident occurred in a ‘split second’, adding: ‘The first time I was aware of the dog was when it was right in front of me’.

He denied claims he was hurrying to get to work on time or that he was riding too fast, saying he was incapable of speeding along because he had weighed 18 stone. 

His barrister Helen Pooley said he sustained a ‘not insignificant brain injury’, affecting his hearing, memory, concentration and ability to drive, leaving him with headaches and impairing his sense of taste and smell.

Mr Crane, from Chiswick, declared himself ‘100% a dog lover’, and said outside court that he now walks friends’ dogs for exercise because he can no longer ride his bike or go skiing.

Insisting Ms Read should be cleared of blame for the accident, her barrister Nigel Lewers told the judge that when she threw the ball for Felix the path was clear. 

In documents filed at Central London County Court, Ms Read (pictured) argues cycling across the park's path was barred by a local borough bye-law

In documents filed at Central London County Court, Ms Read (pictured) argues cycling across the park's path was barred by a local borough bye-law

David Crane, 70, was riding to work across a park on his morning commute when Carina Read's cocker spaniel ran into his path while chasing a ball

David Crane, 70, was riding to work across a park on his morning commute when Carina Read's cocker spaniel ran into his path while chasing a ball

In documents filed at Central London County Court, Ms Read (left) argues cycling across the park’s path was barred by a local borough bye-law

He said the ball bounced off the dog’s head as he chased it, deflecting it towards the path: ‘At that point, she became aware of Mr Crane cycling at speed with his head down.

‘She tried to warn him, but Felix chased the ball across the path and was struck by the front wheel of the bicycle.

‘She was doing what she and no doubt many others had done in the same or similar areas of the common – throwing a ball for her dog down an open strip of grass and not in the direction of the path.’

Felix had seemed ‘momentarily stunned’ when he was accidentally hit on the head by the ball, Ms Read had said in her evidence.

‘The chance of Felix deflecting the ball beyond the daffodils and across the path must have been remote,’ her barrister said.

Mr Crane denied claims he had 'sped' down the path to get to work on time and failed to keep a proper look out. He insists he had no time to avoid the spaniel (pictured), despite riding at no more than 5mph

Mr Crane denied claims he had 'sped' down the path to get to work on time and failed to keep a proper look out. He insists he had no time to avoid the spaniel (pictured), despite riding at no more than 5mph

Mr Crane denied claims he had ‘sped’ down the path to get to work on time and failed to keep a proper look out. He insists he had no time to avoid the spaniel (pictured), despite riding at no more than 5mph

And exercising dogs on the common was ‘part of the way of life of the residents in the locality,’ he added.

But giving his ruling on the case, Judge Andrews found that Ms Read should have done more to keep Felix in check.

The dog should have been warned and called back, he said, also questioning whether it was safe to have thrown the ball when Felix was so close to the path.

The cyclist ‘had no time to take any evasive action when Felix ran across his path’, explained the judge.

Judge Andrews noted Felix was a ‘well trained dog who returned when called’, but concluded Ms Read had not called the dog back and so was liable to pay damages.  

This post first appeared on dailymail.co.uk

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Bodies of mother and ‘her young son and daughter’ are found at a home in Dublin 

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bodies of mother and her young son and daughter are found at a home in dublin

The bodies of a mother and her two young children have been found at a home in Dublin. 

Gardai have sealed off a property on the Llewelyn estate in Ballinteer, South Dublin, where the bodies were found.  

The victims are a woman, said to be the children’s mother, and a young boy and girl, both aged between six and 11, the Irish Post reports. 

Gardai at a house in Llewellyn estate in Ballinteer, south Dublin, following the discovery of bodies of a woman and two young children

Gardai at a house in Llewellyn estate in Ballinteer, south Dublin, following the discovery of bodies of a woman and two young children

Gardai at a house in Llewellyn estate in Ballinteer, south Dublin, following the discovery of bodies of a woman and two young children

‘Gardaí are currently at the scene of an incident at a residential property in South Dublin where the bodies of two children and an adult have been discovered,’ Garda Headquarters told the Irish Times in a statement. 

‘There is no further information available at this time.’ 

Officers are said to have broken into the property after neighbours reported they were concerned for the mother and children inside earlier this morning. 

The Irish Times confirmed the woman was married and lived with her children at the property. 

Gardai are pictured at the house in Ballinteer, south Dublin. Officers are said to have broken into the property after becoming concerned about the welfare of the people inside

Gardai are pictured at the house in Ballinteer, south Dublin. Officers are said to have broken into the property after becoming concerned about the welfare of the people inside

Gardai are pictured at the house in Ballinteer, south Dublin. Officers are said to have broken into the property after becoming concerned about the welfare of the people inside 

Locator map shows the location where the mother and her two children were found in south Dublin

Locator map shows the location where the mother and her two children were found in south Dublin

Locator map shows the location where the mother and her two children were found in south Dublin 

News of the tragedy comes just two days after a father and his two grown-up sons were found dead on a farm in an alleged dispute over inheritance money.   

The father, 59, and his two sons, aged 22 and 25, were discovered at Assolas near Kanturk, County Cork, on Monday.

Neighbours called the police at around 6.30am to report that a distraught woman was saying that gunshots had gone off in her home.

The shootings were related to simmering tensions over a will and the inheritance of the 150-acre farm, the Irish Times reported. 

Detectives said that one of the sons and his mother had returned to the family home on Sunday night after spending time away.

That son was shot dead in his bedroom, according to The Times. The mother, in her 60s, managed to flee the home and raise the alarm.

While the police were on their way to the home, they were informed that further gunfire had been heard.  

This post first appeared on dailymail.co.uk

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Coronavirus Wales: Student’s kidney transplant postponed second time

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coronavirus wales students kidney transplant postponed second time

A student’s kidney transplant from her brother has been postponed for the second time due to the Covid-19 pandemic. 

Mali Elwy, of the Conwy Valley in North Wales, was due for the operation with her sibling Morgan last week after a previous postponement in August at the Royal Liverpool Hospital.

The 19-year-old, who lives with chronic renal failure after her right kidney had post-operational failure following cancer treatment as a child, will have her situation reassessed in six weeks. 

Mali Elwy (above, during an interview), 19, from Conwy Valley in North Wales, lives with chronic renal failure after her right kidney had post-operational failure when she was a child

Mali Elwy (above, during an interview), 19, from Conwy Valley in North Wales, lives with chronic renal failure after her right kidney had post-operational failure when she was a child

Mali Elwy (above, during an interview), 19, from Conwy Valley in North Wales, lives with chronic renal failure after her right kidney had post-operational failure when she was a child

was due for the operation with her sibling Morgan (both pictured above) last week after a previous postponement from August at the Royal Liverpool Hospital

was due for the operation with her sibling Morgan (both pictured above) last week after a previous postponement from August at the Royal Liverpool Hospital

was due for the operation with her sibling Morgan (both pictured above) last week after a previous postponement from August at the Royal Liverpool Hospital

She told BBC Wales: ‘They thought it would be too much of a risk for us to go in. It was cancelled three days before because of the situation with the coronavirus.

‘We were both absolutely gutted, and everyone around us.’

She is currently taking a year out from Bangor University to be able to recover from the operation at home.

As a result of the delay, she is worried about the recovery time affecting her return to university next year. 

Mali said: ‘Obviously we understood why it’s been cancelled because we’ve been seeing how bad it has been and how many cases they’ve been having there.

‘We’ve got to the point again where they’re cancelling major operations with treatment being refused because it’s more of a risk in the hospital.’

The student, above, is taking a year out from Bangor University to be able to recover from the operation at home. She is worried about her return next year being affected by the delay

The student, above, is taking a year out from Bangor University to be able to recover from the operation at home. She is worried about her return next year being affected by the delay

The student, above, is taking a year out from Bangor University to be able to recover from the operation at home. She is worried about her return next year being affected by the delay

It follows Liverpool councillor Paul Brant previously claiming the city’s critical-care units were already 95 per cent full and ‘filling up very fast’ amid a spike in Covid-19 cases. 

But Liverpool University Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust dismissed the claim, insisting that its units were only 80 per cent full with just 47 of 61 critical-care beds occupied. The trust’s intensive care unit is normally 85 per cent full in October. 

Dr Tristan Cope, the NHS trust’s medical director, has also said beds occupied by Covid-19 patients had already surpassed levels in April and that they were ‘continuing to rise’, but did not offer any data to back it up. 

There were 390 beds occupied by Covid-19 patients at the peak of the city’s crisis on April 13, official figures show. 

This post first appeared on dailymail.co.uk

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