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Kate Garraway’s husband Derek Draper SPEAKS for the first time amid 7-month COVID-19 battle

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kate garraways husband derek draper speaks for the first time amid 7 month covid 19 battle

Kate Garraway’s husband Derek Draper has spoken for the first time in seven months amid his battle with coronavirus.

The former Blair lobbyist, 53, was able to whisper the word ‘pain’ to his wife, who watched on ‘in tears’ over FaceTime.

He was originally admitted to hospital with COVID-19 symptoms on March 30 and remains seriously ill. 

First word: Kate Garraway's husband Derek Draper has spoken for the first time in seven months amid his battle with coronavirus

First word: Kate Garraway's husband Derek Draper has spoken for the first time in seven months amid his battle with coronavirus

First word: Kate Garraway’s husband Derek Draper has spoken for the first time in seven months amid his battle with coronavirus 

Recounting the moment to The Sun, the Good Morning Britain, also 53, said: ‘We have had a breakthrough which was both amazing yet ­heartbreaking.

‘It happened when the nurses were moving Derek, as part of his treatment, to trigger the sensation of gravity because he’s been horizontal for so long. 

‘As they were shifting him, they asked if he could feel anything — not expecting a response as he hadn’t previously. But suddenly he mouthed in a whisper, “Pain”. 

‘They called me straight after and I burst into tears. The staff told me later that they were so emotional as well. He’s said it twice now and I was there for the second one, watching him over FaceTime.’

Glimmer of hope: The former Blair lobbyist, 53, was able to whisper the word 'pain' to his wife, who watched on 'in tears' over FaceTime

Glimmer of hope: The former Blair lobbyist, 53, was able to whisper the word 'pain' to his wife, who watched on 'in tears' over FaceTime

Glimmer of hope: The former Blair lobbyist, 53, was able to whisper the word ‘pain’ to his wife, who watched on ‘in tears’ over FaceTime

The Good Morning Britain presenter explained that the hospital staff have been constantly trying to engage Derek and get a response from him, but this is the first time.

Kate described it as a breakthrough due to the fact that Derek ‘has been able to connect the feeling in his body to his brain and mouth’.

is said to be determined to ensure people are aware how serious the virus is, after her family ‘had their lives turned upside down.’

Her husband – who has become the longest surviving patient in the UK, after 7 months in hospital – was taken into hospital with COVID-19 symptoms on March 30th and remains in intensive care after being in a coma for several months. 

Kate will reportedly look at other families who have been impacted by the pandemic as she investigates the effects of the virus on the UK. 

Kate said: 'They called me straight after and I burst into tears. The staff told me later that they were so emotional as well. He’s said it twice now and I was there for the second one, watching him over FaceTime'

Kate said: 'They called me straight after and I burst into tears. The staff told me later that they were so emotional as well. He’s said it twice now and I was there for the second one, watching him over FaceTime'

Kate said: ‘They called me straight after and I burst into tears. The staff told me later that they were so emotional as well. He’s said it twice now and I was there for the second one, watching him over FaceTime’ 

It’s claimed that the documentary will be produced by Flicker Productions, who were behind All Women – a recent documentary hosted by Kathy Burke. 

A source told The Sun: ‘Kate is keen to spread the message about how serious Covid-19 can be and was happy to talk about it if it meant people would take it seriously, as well as updating the thousands of fans who ask daily about Derek’s progress.

‘Kate and her family have had their lives turned upside down by the virus and want to show the effect it’s had on them, but also on others going through the same thing.’  

MailOnline has contacted ITV for comment. 

Devastating: The Good Morning Britain presenter is said to be determined to ensure people are aware how serious the virus is, after her family 'had their lives turned upside down'

Devastating: The Good Morning Britain presenter is said to be determined to ensure people are aware how serious the virus is, after her family 'had their lives turned upside down'

Devastating: The Good Morning Britain presenter is said to be determined to ensure people are aware how serious the virus is, after her family ‘had their lives turned upside down’

Earlier this month, Kate told GMB viewers of her husband’s condition, saying: ‘There are big ups and big downs, not big ups really, small improvements and worrying downs as well.

‘But the last few days have been pretty stable, so keeping everything crossed really.’  

Kate added that due to hospital restrictions she’s the only person in her family that’s been able to visit Derek.

Using her journalism skills: Kate will reportedly look at other families who have been impacted by the pandemic as she investigates the effects of the virus on the UK

Using her journalism skills: Kate will reportedly look at other families who have been impacted by the pandemic as she investigates the effects of the virus on the UK

Using her journalism skills: Kate will reportedly look at other families who have been impacted by the pandemic as she investigates the effects of the virus on the UK

‘It’s tough, it’s very hard. You completely understand why hospitals have to do it, they have to protect those inside who may be recovering from COVID or maybe dealing with other serious conditions,’ she explained. 

‘But to do that, they have to decrease footfall, so Darcy hasn’t been able to see Derek, his mum and dad haven’t been able to see him for a long time now.

‘The fact they live in Lancashire and that might go into tier two will have an effect because it will be very tough for them to argue the case to be able to visit. It is difficult.’ 

Heartbreaking: The presenter recently revealed that their children haven't seen their father since he was first admitted to hospital seven months ago (Pictured December 2019)

Heartbreaking: The presenter recently revealed that their children haven't seen their father since he was first admitted to hospital seven months ago (Pictured December 2019)

Heartbreaking: The presenter recently revealed that their children haven’t seen their father since he was first admitted to hospital seven months ago (Pictured December 2019)

Back in July, Kate told Piers Morgan and Susanna Reid during a GMB interview: ‘It is a very desperate situation, it’s very very difficult, of course there’s fantd astic hope he’s still alive, the doctors do keep saying it’s a miracle he’s still alive. 

‘I was speaking to a doctor yesterday who said he’s sick as anyone I’ve ever seen in 35 years of medicine, and some of those people who were as sick as him aren’t here. 

A timeline of Derek’s coronavirus battle  

MARCH  

Kate revealed she and Prince Charles had got ‘relatively close’ at the Prince’s Trust Awards on March 11 – Charles was diagnosed with coronavirus in mid-March.  

She said: ‘Around the 29/30 March, I came home came in and said [to Derek] ‘god you look ill.’

 ‘He said he had a headache, numbness in his right hand, and was struggling to breathe,

‘I rang Dr Hilary (Jones) and tried to get through, he talked to Derek. He said put me back on, I think you need to call an ambulance’

Derek, 52, was taken into hospital on March 30 and remained in an unresponsive condition. 

APRIL  

Kate and her children isolated at home after she displayed ‘mild symptoms’.

Kate said: ‘Derek remains in intensive care and is still very ill. I’m afraid it remains an excruciatingly worrying time.

‘I’m afraid he is still in a deeply critical condition, but he is still here, which means there is hope.’ 

MAY 

Kate said: ‘The journey for me and my family seems to be far from over as every day my heart sinks as I learn new and devastating ways this virus has more battles for Derek to fight. 

‘But he is still HERE & so there is still hope.’

That month, Kate and her family took part in the final clap for carers

She said: ‘I’ll never give up on that because Derek’s the love of my life but at the same time I have absolute uncertainty’

JUNE 

On June 5, Kate revealed Derek is now free from coronavirus but continues to fight against the damage inflicted on his body

JULY 

On July 5, Kate revealed Derek has woken from his coma but he remains in a serious yet critical condition.

On July 8, she announced she would be returning to GMB, after being urged by doctors to ‘get on with life’ during Derek’s recovery.   

She added that Derek had ‘opened his eyes’ after waking from his coma, but has been told his recovery could take years.  

On July 13, Kate returned to GMB for the first time since Derek was hospitalised.    

 

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‘Six times they said he’s not going to make it, and obviously you couldn’t visit. So he’s been very very sick, but it’s a new disease, there’s no data, so what they can say is it’s great he’s here. 

‘There’s flickers of hope, his lungs are starting to recover, his kidneys are doing better, his liver, but they don’t know how much better he can get.’   

Asked whether there had been any explanation for why Derek had been so badly affected by the virus, Kate admitted doctors are still unsure.

She said: ‘There isn’t, he was a little bit overweight, I’m a bit of a feeder! Zero underlying conditions, he’s young comparatively, he’s 52, so there is no explanation. 

‘I think what’s happened is at every stage they’ve been learning. One of the wonderful things is that they’ve changed medical practices, they’ve changed pathways because of Derek. I keep telling him on the Facetime he would be very pleased about that.’

Now that Derek has been declared COVID-free, Kate admitted she fears for the long-term damage the virus may have done, and whether that will affect Derek in his recovery.

‘When he went into hospital, I got some texts saying ”oh I’m definitely not gonna die, tell the children I’m doing great,” but there was a feeling of terror because he had COVID and suddenly it escalated.  

‘And then suddenly it became everything, and each stage has been sort of a new terror and just when I thought we were moving forward suddenly it can now affect your body everywhere. 

‘There’s a huge post-viral syndrome, damage done in ways we didn’t know. I was sitting with Dr Hilary and he said it’s the lungs, it’s respiratory you’re fearing from COVID.’ 

Kate also reiterated that doctors had urged her to ‘get on with life’ while Derek continues to recover, insisting she had to be present for their two children Darcey, 14, and Billy, 10.

‘I have had moments, you know when you get abs gripped with fear and everything was going so well, but it’s happened to the world it’s happened to everybody, in this time you’ve seen people, I know people, you know people who have been watching this show who have been diagnosed with terrible illnesses,’ Kate added.

‘The doctors are saying to me now, ”You’ve got to get on, you’ve got to get on with life”. For Darcey and Billy effectively right now, they’ve lost their dad, they haven’t, he’s there.. he’s not a presence as he should be in their lives.’ 

Kate’s husband has been in hospital since March, and while Kate sparked hope in July by revealing he has awoken from a coma, the star has been told his recovery could take years.     

She told Hello! ‘The doctors have been urging me not to put my life on pause. They’ve told me that I need to go back to work and create a routine in our lives again.

‘The children and Derek are all I’ve thought about and they’re the most important people in my life, but I must create structure and normality for the children, to clean the bath, put the plates in the dishwasher and tidy the house.

‘I also need to get back to work so that I can provide for the children and we can do things together, to make them feel that the light hasn’t gone out of their lives, that there’s hope for the future.’

During an appearance on GMB last month, Kate spoke about the start of Derek’s devastating illness, saying: ‘Derek had a painful shoulder for a couple months, and had been taking medication and having scans. 

Tough times: Kate sparked hope in July by revealing he has awoken from a coma, the star has been told his recovery could take years

Tough times: Kate sparked hope in July by revealing he has awoken from a coma, the star has been told his recovery could take years

Tough times: Kate sparked hope in July by revealing he has awoken from a coma, the star has been told his recovery could take years

‘He was due to have a steroid injection, he felt unwell and was home tutoring the kids. I got back and said ”you don’t you look right babe, I think it’s the painkillers.”   

‘I just had this weird feeling, asked if he had a cough. He didn’t, he said ‘I think I’ve got weird sinusitis.” I rang the doctor, I said ‘you don’t look great, no real feeling that it’s COVID, he had none of those symptoms.’

‘Around the 29/30 March, I came home came in and said ‘god you look ill. He said he had a headache, numbness in his right hand, and was struggling to breathe, 

‘I rang Dr Hilary (Jones) and tried to get through, he talked to Derek. He said put me back on, I think you need to call an ambulance. I said ‘I can’t believe I’m calling an ambulance’, I was very scared.’ 

Sad: Kate's husband Derek remains hospitalised while recovering from COVID-19, seven months after being admitted (pictured in 2019)

Sad: Kate's husband Derek remains hospitalised while recovering from COVID-19, seven months after being admitted (pictured in 2019)

Sad: Kate’s husband Derek remains hospitalised while recovering from COVID-19, seven months after being admitted (pictured in 2019)

Derek has previously credited Kate for saving him from depression which started during his career as a political advisor and led to a nervous breakdown and a stint in The Priory in the late 1990s.    

After moving to Los Angeles for three years and retraining as a therapist, his friend GMTV’s political correspondent, Gloria De Piero, offered to set him up with her friend and colleague Kate. 

Kate and Derek have been married since 2005, with the former lobbyist cheering his wife on for the duration of her stint on I’m A Celebrity last year.

Following her stint on I’m A Celebrity, the couple were planning to renew their vows in the coming months after Kate revealed Derek had proposed for a second time. 

Touching: Derek has credited Kate for saving him from depression which started during his career as a political advisor and led to a nervous breakdown (pictured in 2006)

Touching: Derek has credited Kate for saving him from depression which started during his career as a political advisor and led to a nervous breakdown (pictured in 2006)

Touching: Derek has credited Kate for saving him from depression which started during his career as a political advisor and led to a nervous breakdown (pictured in 2006)

This post first appeared on dailymail.co.uk

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Extravagant bank designed by Edinburgh Dome architect David Rhind goes on sale for £700,000

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extravagant bank designed by edinburgh dome architect david rhind goes on sale for 700000

A 19th century former bank house, complete with its own safe room, has gone up for sale for £700,000.

The stunning seven bedroom home in Blairgowrie, Perthshire, was originally built for the former Commercial Bank of Scotland.

It was designed by prominent Scottish architect David Rhind, the mastermind behind Edinburgh’s Dome – the former Commercial Bank of Scotland’s headquarters – as well as Stewart’s Melville College

The 183-year-old building, known as The Old Bank House, is now on the market as a home, having been carefully restored.

The quirky three-storey property features its original 18sqft strong room, alongside other features such as the domestic staff internal bell system and authentic fireplaces. 

The former bank house (pictured) in Scotland, complete with its own 19th century safe room, has gone up for sale for £700,000

The former bank house (pictured) in Scotland, complete with its own 19th century safe room, has gone up for sale for £700,000

The former bank house (pictured) in Scotland, complete with its own 19th century safe room, has gone up for sale for £700,000

The stunning seven bedroom home in Blairgowrie, Perthshire, was originally built for the former Commercial Bank of Scotland. Pictured: The dining rooms in the house

The stunning seven bedroom home in Blairgowrie, Perthshire, was originally built for the former Commercial Bank of Scotland. Pictured: The dining rooms in the house

The stunning seven bedroom home in Blairgowrie, Perthshire, was originally built for the former Commercial Bank of Scotland. Pictured: The dining rooms in the house

It was designed by prominent Scottish architect David Rhind, the mastermind behind Edinburgh's Dome - the former Commercial Bank of Scotland's headquarters - and Stewart's Melville College. Pictured: One of the living rooms inside the house

It was designed by prominent Scottish architect David Rhind, the mastermind behind Edinburgh's Dome - the former Commercial Bank of Scotland's headquarters - and Stewart's Melville College. Pictured: One of the living rooms inside the house

It was designed by prominent Scottish architect David Rhind, the mastermind behind Edinburgh’s Dome – the former Commercial Bank of Scotland’s headquarters – and Stewart’s Melville College. Pictured: One of the living rooms inside the house

The master bedroom features a grand four poster bed, with views out into the back garden of the 183-year-old property

The master bedroom features a grand four poster bed, with views out into the back garden of the 183-year-old property

The master bedroom features a grand four poster bed, with views out into the back garden of the 183-year-old property

The quirky three-storey home features its original 18sqft strong room, alongside other original features such as the domestic staff internal bell system and original fireplaces (such as the one pictured here)

The quirky three-storey home features its original 18sqft strong room, alongside other original features such as the domestic staff internal bell system and original fireplaces (such as the one pictured here)

The quirky three-storey home features its original 18sqft strong room, alongside other original features such as the domestic staff internal bell system and original fireplaces (such as the one pictured here)

The house features a safe room (pictured) where the money would have been kept while the building was in use as a bank house

The house features a safe room (pictured) where the money would have been kept while the building was in use as a bank house

The house features a safe room (pictured) where the money would have been kept while the building was in use as a bank house

Images of the property show the lavishly decorated interior decorated in rich golds and reds.

Ornate fireplaces and traditional sash windows adorn the rooms, which maintain their distinctive Victorian character.

The master bedroom features a grand four poster bed, with views out into the foliage.

Outside, the property is equally impressive and boasts an attractive garden area. 

Images of the property show the lavishly decorated interior decorated in rich golds and reds, such as rich red carpets and gold ornaments

Images of the property show the lavishly decorated interior decorated in rich golds and reds, such as rich red carpets and gold ornaments

Images of the property show the lavishly decorated interior decorated in rich golds and reds, such as rich red carpets and gold ornaments

The 183-year-old building, known as The Old Bank House, is on the market as a home, having been carefully restored to include its features - such as the authentic columns (pictured)

The 183-year-old building, known as The Old Bank House, is on the market as a home, having been carefully restored to include its features - such as the authentic columns (pictured)

The 183-year-old building, known as The Old Bank House, is on the market as a home, having been carefully restored to include its features – such as the authentic columns (pictured)

Ornate fireplaces and traditional sash windows adorn the rooms, which maintain their distinctive Victorian character

Ornate fireplaces and traditional sash windows adorn the rooms, which maintain their distinctive Victorian character

Ornate fireplaces and traditional sash windows adorn the rooms, which maintain their distinctive Victorian character 

Outside, the property is equally impressive and boasts an attractive garden area behind the lovely three storey house

Outside, the property is equally impressive and boasts an attractive garden area behind the lovely three storey house

Outside, the property is equally impressive and boasts an attractive garden area behind the lovely three storey house 

The building was one of the first buildings created by Rhind before he went on to create the headquarters to the Commercial Bank of Scotland in George Street in 1847 which is now the Dome bar and restaurant. 

Arguably his most iconic creation was the Daniel Stewart’s hospital in 1855, which was later turned into a fee paying school in 1870 and eventually merged with Stewart’s Melville College.

The impressive home is being sold by Strutt and Parker for offers in the region of £695,000.

The three storey building was one of the first buildings created by Rhind before he went on to create the headquarters to the Commercial Bank of Scotland in George Street in 1847 which is now the Dome bar and restaurant. Pictured: One of the property's bathrooms

The three storey building was one of the first buildings created by Rhind before he went on to create the headquarters to the Commercial Bank of Scotland in George Street in 1847 which is now the Dome bar and restaurant. Pictured: One of the property's bathrooms

The three storey building was one of the first buildings created by Rhind before he went on to create the headquarters to the Commercial Bank of Scotland in George Street in 1847 which is now the Dome bar and restaurant. Pictured: One of the property’s bathrooms

The impressive home is being sold by Strutt and Parker for offers in the region of £695,000. Pictured: One of the living room spaces in the property

The impressive home is being sold by Strutt and Parker for offers in the region of £695,000. Pictured: One of the living room spaces in the property

The impressive home is being sold by Strutt and Parker for offers in the region of £695,000. Pictured: One of the living room spaces in the property

The sellers say that it has the potential to become a business or a family home, as well as the opportunity to develop the partially floored attic and basement of the property.

Strutt and Parker describe the property on their site as a, ‘Light-filled, flexible accommodation arranged over three floors with period features.

‘Concealed within the property is the original 18 sq. ft. secure walk in safe room which could be utilised for wine, valuables or gun storage.’

David Rhind: The prominent 19th century Scottish architect who left a lasting legacy in his home town

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36046354 8981477 image m 59 1606223426378

David Rhind was a prominent Scottish architect in the 1800s. Born in Edinburgh in 1808, was the son of a lawyer, John Rhind, while his mother was Marion Anderson.

Rhind is believed to have left Edinburgh for London, learning his trade at the drawing office of Augustus Charles Pugin – an Anglo-French artist, architectural draughtsman and writer.

He later returned to his home town of Edinburgh, where he set up practice, working in conjunction with sculpture Alexander Handyside Ritchie.

Rhind’s main bulk of work was for the Commercial Bank of Scotland – now part of Royal Bank of Scotland – designing a number of their buildings.

But by far his most prominent design was that of the Edinburgh Dome. Located on George Street, in the heart of the city’s New Town district, the building was once the headquarters of Commercial Bank of Scotland.

The building is in a Graeco-Roman style and stands on the site of the former Physicians Hall, home to the Royal College of Physicians of Edinburgh. 

By far his most prominent design was that of the Edinburgh Dome (pictured). Located on George Street, in the heart of the city's New Town district, the building was once the headquarters of Commercial Bank of Scotland

By far his most prominent design was that of the Edinburgh Dome (pictured). Located on George Street, in the heart of the city's New Town district, the building was once the headquarters of Commercial Bank of Scotland

By far his most prominent design was that of the Edinburgh Dome (pictured). Located on George Street, in the heart of the city’s New Town district, the building was once the headquarters of Commercial Bank of Scotland

The current building is a Grade A listed and is home to Caledonian Heritable, a hotel, bars and restaurant group founded by entrepreneur Kevin Doyle.

Alongside Edinburgh Dome, Rhind also designed a number of churches, local government buildings, schools, offices and private residences such as Carlowrie Castle.  

One of his largest schemes was Daniel Stewart’s Hospital in Edinburgh – a hospital for needy boys within the city which was funded by a grant from Mr Stewart as part of his will.

The building is now home to Stewart’s Melville College, which is an independent day and boarding school – whose alumni include popular radio DJ Stuart Henry and watercolour painter Sir William Russell Flint.

One of his largest schemes was Daniel Stewart's Hospital in Edinburgh - a hospital for needy boys within the city which was funded by a grant from Mr Stewart as part of his will. The building is now home to Stewart's Melville College (pictured), which is an independent day and boarding school - whose alumni include popular radio DJ Stuart Henry and watercolour painter Sir William Russell Flint.

One of his largest schemes was Daniel Stewart's Hospital in Edinburgh - a hospital for needy boys within the city which was funded by a grant from Mr Stewart as part of his will. The building is now home to Stewart's Melville College (pictured), which is an independent day and boarding school - whose alumni include popular radio DJ Stuart Henry and watercolour painter Sir William Russell Flint.

One of his largest schemes was Daniel Stewart’s Hospital in Edinburgh – a hospital for needy boys within the city which was funded by a grant from Mr Stewart as part of his will. The building is now home to Stewart’s Melville College (pictured), which is an independent day and boarding school – whose alumni include popular radio DJ Stuart Henry and watercolour painter Sir William Russell Flint.

During his working lift, Rhind was appointed as an architect to the Trustees of Daniel Stewart and to the Life Association of Scotland. 

In 1836, Rhind was elected to the Royal Society of Edinburgh and contributed to the Society for the Promotion of the Fine Arts in Scotland. 

Rhind, an active Freemason who spent most of his working life at 54 Great King Street in Edinburgh, was married twice.

He married Emily Shoubridge who died in 1840, when she was only twenty-eight. He married again in 1845, to Mary Jane Sackville-Pearson and started a second family. He was survived by eight children.

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SNP Westminster leader Ian Blackford apologises for shaming English photographer

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snp westminster leader ian blackford apologises for shaming english photographer

SNP Westminster leader Ian Blackford has been forced to apologise after he accused an English photographer of breaking coronavirus travel rules to take photos in the Highlands – even though he lives there. 

Ollie Taylor took to Twitter on November 22 to post a stunning photo of the Aurora Borealis at Caitness, in the north of Scotland. 

Although the post was widely appreciated, Mr Blackford questioned whether Mr Taylor, an Englishman, had a ‘valid reason’ for posting photos from Scotland. 

He wrote: ‘As you live in the south of England and travel to Scotland is only for permitted reasons I am sure there will be a valid reason as to why you are posting a photo from the north of Scotland last night?’ 

The SNP MP’s comments were a reference to a coronavirus travel ban that came into force last Friday which makes it illegal to cross between the two nations without a valid reason. 

However, Mr Blackford’s attempted shaming of the photographer backfired after it emerged that Mr Taylor had moved to Scotland in September – long before the travel ban came in.

SNP Westminster leader Ian Blackford came under fire for trying to shame an English photographer, appearing to accuse him of breaking a ban stopping travel into Scotland

SNP Westminster leader Ian Blackford came under fire for trying to shame an English photographer, appearing to accuse him of breaking a ban stopping travel into Scotland

SNP Westminster leader Ian Blackford came under fire for trying to shame an English photographer, appearing to accuse him of breaking a ban stopping travel into Scotland

Mr Blackford's attempt at shaming the photographer (pictured) backfired after he realised Mr Taylor is living in the Highlands

Mr Blackford's attempt at shaming the photographer (pictured) backfired after he realised Mr Taylor is living in the Highlands

Mr Blackford’s attempt at shaming the photographer (pictured) backfired after he realised Mr Taylor is living in the Highlands

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36046264 8981857 image a 9 1606223362027

36046266 8981857 image a 10 1606223372225

36046266 8981857 image a 10 1606223372225

The SNP politician deleted the tweet and apologised but was slammed online and labelled a ‘bully’.

He is also facing accusations of fuelling anti-English sentiment. 

To make matter worse for Mr Blackford, Campbell Deane, the head of media law at BKF solicitors, Glasgow, said he could still face legal action despite his apology.

Mr Deane said: ‘He is clearly questioning Mr Taylor’s actions with an innuendo of wrongdoing.

‘One only needs to consider the public opprobrium aimed at Dominic Cummings to see how much the public can be offended by breaching the Covid rules.

Britons who cross the Scottish border face a £60 fine

Are all people banned from leaving or entering Scotland from 6pm on Friday? 

Yes, apart from a small number of exemptions. Nicola Sturgeon’s legislation demands that any person living in Scotland must not enter England, Wales, Northern Ireland and the Republic of Ireland from tonight.

The First Minister has also made it illegal for people living in those countries to enter Scotland.

Anyone breaching the rules will be fined £60, she says. 

There are some exemptions including leaving Scotland to take a driving test, feeding an animal, donating blood or for some work, education and health reasons.

Will police be setting up road blocks? 

No road blocks will be set up and police say they will not be patrolling the border looking for people breaking the law.

Instead they will enforce the new law if they come across transgressors in the ‘course of duty’. 

Police Scotland Assistant Chief Constable Alan Speirs says they want people to ‘do the right thing’.

He added: ‘We will use enforcement as a last resort where there is a clear breach of the legislation.

‘The chief constable has said publicly on numerous occasions that we will not be routinely stopping vehicles or setting up road blocks, and that will not change as a result of travel restrictions now being in law.

‘However, officers may in the course of their duties come across people who are travelling from one local authority area to another. In areas where travel restrictions apply, officers will continue to use the common sense, discretion and excellent judgement that they have applied since the crisis began.’

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‘The tweet would be capable of being defamatory in law notwithstanding Mr Blackford’s entirely appropriate apology.’

Last night Mr Taylor said he had moved from Dorset to Halkirk, Caithness, on October 23 – before the Scottish tier system was introduced. 

Mr Taylor, 40, added: ‘I would expect him to message me first and ask me. Does he think I’ve just driven up?

‘I think that’s unprofessional, that’s damaging.’

Mr Taylor said he is currently working on two books – one of which is a collection of night photography shots in Scotland.

Scottish Conservative leader Douglas Ross said: ‘Ian Blackford’s comments were ill-judged and needlessly inflammatory.

‘I hope he reflects on the potential harm these tweets can cause.’

Willie Rennie, leader of the Scottish Liberal Democrats, said: ‘Ian Blackford has form for his remarks about people from England who happen to be in Scotland.

‘This behaviour could only add to the problems of anti-English sentiment in Scotland. ‘

In his apology, Mr Blackford wrote: ‘It was wrong to query an individual on Twitter and I apologise to @OllieTPhoto for my earlier post, which I have deleted.’ 

The furore comes after Mr Blackford’s fellow MP Margaret Ferrier was suspended from the SNP after she travelled to London before getting the results of a Covid-19 test and came home on a train after being told she was positive. 

Crossing the Scottish border was made illegal from the end of last this week under sweeping new Covid restrictions which critics have described as ‘deeply flawed’.

As of 6pm on Friday, entering or leaving Scotland without a reasonable excuse was banned and anyone caught doing so may now be slapped with a £60 fine.

People living within Level Three or Level Four lockdown areas – which includes vast swathes of central Scotland – are also not permitted to leave their area. 

Furthermore, a list of bizarre exceptions have been put in place which would allow the travel rules to be breached.

Scots can leave the country – or their locked down area – to feed an animal, donate blood or take a driving test.

Exemptions to the travel ban also apply for more common essential travel reasons, including for health, work or for school.

It also emerged that people who are banned from travelling to an airport because of the rules are unlikely to receive compensation if their flight goes ahead.  

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Devout Christian Mike Pence’s daughter married in a ‘self-uniting style ceremony’

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devout christian mike pences daughter married in a self uniting style ceremony

Vice President Mike Pence‘s daughter Audrey has married in a ‘self-uniting style’ ceremony to a man who survived a plane crash that tragically killed his father. 

Audrey Pence, 26, tied the knot to Daniel Tomanelli, 25, on the steps outside the Moultrie Courthouse in Washington on November 1 with 12 guests present. 

The youngest child of the Vice President and Second Lady, Karen Pence, shared a black-and-white picture of the newlyweds to her Instagram as they shared a kiss.

Audrey Pence, 26, tied the knot to Daniel Tomanelli, 25, on the steps outside the Moultrie Courthouse in Washington on November 1 with 12 guests present. Pictured: Vice President Mike Pence with wife Karen Pence and their daughter Audrey in January

Audrey Pence, 26, tied the knot to Daniel Tomanelli, 25, on the steps outside the Moultrie Courthouse in Washington on November 1 with 12 guests present. Pictured: Vice President Mike Pence with wife Karen Pence and their daughter Audrey in January

Audrey Pence, 26, tied the knot to Daniel Tomanelli, 25, on the steps outside the Moultrie Courthouse in Washington on November 1 with 12 guests present. Pictured: Vice President Mike Pence with wife Karen Pence and their daughter Audrey in January 

She penned: ‘Thank you to these two beautiful families for joyfully coming alongside us when we decided to throw together a courthouse ceremony in 10 days. We are truly blessed.’ 

The couple were joined by Audrey’s sister Charlotte Pence Bond, 27, sister-in-law Sarah Pence, the groom’s mother Eve Tomanelli, Nick Tomanelli and Hope Tomanelli. 

She first met Daniel, a policy adviser in the office of the deputy assistant secretary of the Air Force at the Pentagon, in July 2015 during a study abroad program in the Balkans run through Northeastern University, Boston.  

Audrey, an associate at Covington & Burling, described how she was at ‘ease’ with Daniel from the start and felt like they had been ‘best friends for years’, according to The New York Times.  

Audrey first met Daniel, a policy adviser in the office of the deputy assistant secretary of the Air Force at the Pentagon, in July 2015

Audrey first met Daniel, a policy adviser in the office of the deputy assistant secretary of the Air Force at the Pentagon, in July 2015

Audrey first met Daniel, a policy adviser in the office of the deputy assistant secretary of the Air Force at the Pentagon, in July 2015

The international affairs graduates got engaged in February 2019 in Cape Cod, Massachusetts, and were set to say their vows in Kauai, Hawaii, in front of 80 guests in May, until coronavirus halted their plans. 

The couple had a self-uniting ceremony where there is no third party to officiate the wedding. The non-denominational style is also known as a ‘Quaker marriage’. 

Pence led the exchange of vows and Audrey told how the couple plan to have a larger ceremony in Hawaii next year. 

The H. Carl Moultrie Courthouse in Washington is named after the former Chief Judge H. Carl Moultrie. He was appointed in June 1978 and remained in the position until he died in April 1986. 

The seven-storey limestone courthouse was built in 1976 and houses the Superior Court of the District of Columbia. 

Audrey, an associate at Covington & Burling in Washington, described how she was at 'ease' with Daniel from the start

Audrey, an associate at Covington & Burling in Washington, described how she was at 'ease' with Daniel from the start

Audrey, an associate at Covington & Burling in Washington, described how she was at ‘ease’ with Daniel from the start 

In April 2017 Daniel (pictured) was involved in a plane crash with his father Dr Joseph Tomanelli, 56, who died in the tragic accident

In April 2017 Daniel (pictured) was involved in a plane crash with his father Dr Joseph Tomanelli, 56, who died in the tragic accident

In April 2017 Daniel (pictured) was involved in a plane crash with his father Dr Joseph Tomanelli, 56, who died in the tragic accident

In April 2017 Daniel was involved in a plane crash with his father Dr Joseph Tomanelli, 56, who died in the tragic accident. 

The father and son were piloting the plane together while Dr Tomanelli practised takeoffs and landings at the Meriden Markham Municipal Airport in Meriden, Connecticut, according to My Record Journal

The plane veered into a fence and caught fire. Daniel was pulled from the plane and was treated in hospital for his injuries. Dr Tomanelli, who had a medical career spanning 27 years, died. 

This post first appeared on dailymail.co.uk

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