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Kate Middleton celebrates ‘amazing’ images submitted to her photographic project in video message

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kate middleton celebrates amazing images submitted to her photographic project in video message

The Duchess of Cambridge has celebrated the ‘amazing’ entries to her photographic project documenting life under lockdown.

Images of sleeping nurses, shielding elderly and chaotic family scenes showing the reality of working from home are featured in the pictures submitted to Kate’s Hold Still initiative.

In a video message to encourage more entries Kate Middleton, 38, said: ‘There have been so many amazing entries to Hold Still over the last few weeks.

‘From families up and down the country showing how they are adapting to life during lockdown, through to some of the most amazing NHS and social care staff who are putting their lives on the line to save the lives of others.

‘But it isn’t too late to take part. So please take a moment to capture what life is like for you, because together I hope that we can build a lasting illustration of just how our country pulled together during the pandemic.

‘I can’t wait to share the final 100 images with you.’  

The Duchess of Cambridge, 38, has shared a video message to encourage people across the UK to participate in the Hold Still photographic project which she launched in collaboration with the National Portrait Gallery

The Duchess of Cambridge, 38, has shared a video message to encourage people across the UK to participate in the Hold Still photographic project which she launched in collaboration with the National Portrait Gallery

The Duchess of Cambridge, 38, has shared a video message to encourage people across the UK to participate in the Hold Still photographic project which she launched in collaboration with the National Portrait Gallery

The images revealed the reality of life for many amid the coronavirus lockdown - including 'band practise at a distance' by Becky Wickes

The images revealed the reality of life for many amid the coronavirus lockdown - including 'band practise at a distance' by Becky Wickes

The images revealed the reality of life for many amid the coronavirus lockdown – including ‘band practise at a distance’ by Becky Wickes

'Sleeping Colleagues Unmasked' by Jane Roe shows two nurses, wearing intensive care branded uniforms, asleep on a sofa after a tiring day working on the frontline

'Sleeping Colleagues Unmasked' by Jane Roe shows two nurses, wearing intensive care branded uniforms, asleep on a sofa after a tiring day working on the frontline

‘Sleeping Colleagues Unmasked’ by Jane Roe shows two nurses, wearing intensive care branded uniforms, asleep on a sofa after a tiring day working on the frontline

Some of the submitted images include one titled Sleeping Colleagues Unmasked by Jane Roe – showing two nurses, wearing intensive care branded uniforms, asleep on a sofa.

Another called Working From Home by Rosangela Borgese features a man with his back to the camera sitting at a computer while in the foreground a toddler lies sprawled on the ground surrounded by toys.

Kate, who spearheaded the campaign, is a patron of the National Portrait Gallery and a keen amateur photographer, aims to capture a snapshot of the UK at this time, with the help of the nation.

The Duchess will personally curate 100 photographs for the Hold Still exhibition. 

In another poignant entry, 'Biba Behind Glass' by Simon Murphy, a girl can be seen with her face behind a pane of glass as she keeps herself safe from the deadly virus

In another poignant entry, 'Biba Behind Glass' by Simon Murphy, a girl can be seen with her face behind a pane of glass as she keeps herself safe from the deadly virus

In another poignant entry, ‘Biba Behind Glass’ by Simon Murphy, a girl can be seen with her face behind a pane of glass as she keeps herself safe from the deadly virus

Hold Still aims to create a collective portrait of lockdown in the UK, capturing the spirit, mood, hopes, fears and feelings of the nation as the coronavirus outbreak continues. Pictured, 'We are the Future' by Daisy Valencia

Hold Still aims to create a collective portrait of lockdown in the UK, capturing the spirit, mood, hopes, fears and feelings of the nation as the coronavirus outbreak continues. Pictured, 'We are the Future' by Daisy Valencia

Hold Still aims to create a collective portrait of lockdown in the UK, capturing the spirit, mood, hopes, fears and feelings of the nation as the coronavirus outbreak continues. Pictured, ‘We are the Future’ by Daisy Valencia

Another entry, 'Glass Kisses' by Steph James, shows a shielding elderly lady sending a kiss to her loved one from behind a window

Another entry, 'Glass Kisses' by Steph James, shows a shielding elderly lady sending a kiss to her loved one from behind a window

Another entry, ‘Glass Kisses’ by Steph James, shows a shielding elderly lady sending a kiss to her loved one from behind a window

Life Goes On by Matthew William Hold Still aims to create a collective portrait of lockdown in the UK, capturing the spirit, mood, hopes, fears and feelings of the nation as the coronavirus outbreak continues

Life Goes On by Matthew William Hold Still aims to create a collective portrait of lockdown in the UK, capturing the spirit, mood, hopes, fears and feelings of the nation as the coronavirus outbreak continues

The heartwarming entry ‘Life Goes On’ by Matthew Williams shows a nurse in protective equipment, holding a newborn baby that has just been welcomed into the world

The mother-of-three previously told how she had been ‘struck’ by the many ‘incredible’ images seen already, ‘which have given us an insight into the experiences and stories of people – some desperately sad images showing the human tragedy of this pandemic’.

People from across the UK are invited to submit a photographic portrait which they have taken during these extraordinary times for the community project.

Participants are also encouraged to provide a short written submission to outline the experiences and emotions of those depicted in their photograph.  

Hold Still is completely free, open to all ages and abilities, and will focus on three core themes – ‘Helpers and Heroes’, ‘Your New Normal’ and ‘Acts of Kindness’. 

The idea is to create a unique photographic portrait of the people of our nation in lockdown as we ‘hold still’ for the good of others, and celebrate those who have continued so we can stay safe.

It will reflect resilience and bravery, humour and sadness, creativity and kindness, and human tragedy and hope.

Hold Still will also act as a reminder of the significance of human connection in times of adversity, and that although we were physically apart, as a community and nation, we all faced and rose to the challenge together.

'Working from home' by Roseangela Borgese features a man with his back to the camera sitting at a computer while in the foreground a toddler lies sprawled on the ground surrounded by toys

'Working from home' by Roseangela Borgese features a man with his back to the camera sitting at a computer while in the foreground a toddler lies sprawled on the ground surrounded by toys

‘Working from home’ by Roseangela Borgese features a man with his back to the camera sitting at a computer while in the foreground a toddler lies sprawled on the ground surrounded by toys

A schoolgirl flashes a beautiful smile in a photo titled 'VE celebration during lockdown' by Vanita Bhuva

A schoolgirl flashes a beautiful smile in a photo titled 'VE celebration during lockdown' by Vanita Bhuva

A schoolgirl flashes a beautiful smile in a photo titled ‘VE celebration during lockdown’ by Vanita Bhuva

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SAS Mountain Troop members are barely visible as they patrol in winter camouflage 

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sas mountain troop members are barely visible as they patrol in winter camouflage

This photo shows SAS soldiers patrolling in the snow as they wear their winter camouflage and are barely visible. 

The soldiers are SAS Mountain Troops, who are experts in mountain climbing and arctic warfare and are trained to survive and fight in extreme conditions. 

They can be called on anywhere from the frozen hills in Norway to the mountains in Afghanistan

Their winter camouflage includes face masks and white speckled clothing and equipment, the Daily Star reported

Can you spot the SAS soldiers in this photo? Their winter camouflage includes face masks and white speckled clothing and equipment

Can you spot the SAS soldiers in this photo? Their winter camouflage includes face masks and white speckled clothing and equipment

Can you spot the SAS soldiers in this photo? Their winter camouflage includes face masks and white speckled clothing and equipment 

The outfit makes it possible for them to move almost invisibly through mountains and forests in snowy conditions. 

Members of the Mountain Troops  are among the best climbers in the world and have trained in various climbing schools across Europe and many go on climbing expeditions up some of the world’s highest mountains, including Everest. 

Mountain Troops use a range of equipment in their role, including climbing shoes with sticky rubber soles, climbing harnesses, carabiners for hooking onto climbing rope lines and nuts – metal wedges that fit into cracks, used to secure climbing lines.  

They can be called on anywhere from the frozen hills in Norway (pictured, file photo) to the mountains in Afghanistan

They can be called on anywhere from the frozen hills in Norway (pictured, file photo) to the mountains in Afghanistan

They can be called on anywhere from the frozen hills in Norway (pictured, file photo) to the mountains in Afghanistan

Their skills have been required throughout history until recently where their training in high-altitude warfare was used in the mountain ranges of Afghanistan. 

They were used during the 1982 Falklands conflict and during the cold war, they were used in Norway to guard Nato’s northern flanks against an expected Soviet push. 

Mountain Troopers are highly skilled in long distance skiing, scaling sheer cliffs and rock faces as well as arctic survival techniques.  

Their skills allow them to reach areas considered inaccessible by others and to attack from unexpected directions.  

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Woman, 39, was kept prisoner by jealous ex-boyfriend who smashed her face into bathroom door

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woman 39 was kept prisoner by jealous ex boyfriend who smashed her face into bathroom door

A domestic abuse survivor speaks about the abuse she suffered at the hands of her violent ex-boyfriend after he is jailed for five years. 

Katrina Pidden, 39, thought she was going to die after Mitchell Liversedge, 25, attacked her in their home in Daventry, Northamptonshire.

During one attack, Katrina was dragged across the floor by her feet while Liversedge pulled the bathroom door from its hinges and hit Katrina over the head with it.

Katrina Pidden, 39, (pictured) thought she was going to die after she was violently attacked by her ex boyfriend

Katrina Pidden, 39, (pictured) thought she was going to die after she was violently attacked by her ex boyfriend

Katrina Pidden, 39, (pictured) thought she was going to die after she was violently attacked by her ex boyfriend  

In September last year, a neighbour in witnessed Liversedge dragging a bloodied Katrina across the garden by her finger and called the police.

He held her prisoner for hours, locked her out of the house in the rain and shoved her during the year of abuse in their home.

Liversedge was jailed in March for five years for four counts of Actual Bodily Harm (ABH), one charge of false imprisonment and one count of damaging property.

He was also sentenced for threatening to destroy or damage property, and one charge of engaging in controlling or coercive behaviour in an intimate relationship. 

Speaking for the first time since the ordeal, Katrina said: ‘I’d split up with him and he turned up at my house and started getting out of control.

Mitchell Liversedge, 25, (pictured) attacked his ex girlfriend in their home in Daventry, Northamptonshire, and has been sentenced to five years in prison

Mitchell Liversedge, 25, (pictured) attacked his ex girlfriend in their home in Daventry, Northamptonshire, and has been sentenced to five years in prison

Mitchell Liversedge, 25, (pictured) attacked his ex girlfriend in their home in Daventry, Northamptonshire, and has been sentenced to five years in prison 

During one attack, Katrina was dragged across the floor by her feet while Liversedge pulled the bathroom door from its hinges and hit Katrina over the head with it (pictured)

During one attack, Katrina was dragged across the floor by her feet while Liversedge pulled the bathroom door from its hinges and hit Katrina over the head with it (pictured)

During one attack, Katrina was dragged across the floor by her feet while Liversedge pulled the bathroom door from its hinges and hit Katrina over the head with it (pictured) 

‘I could feel it when something was going to happen. He threw a drink over me so I took myself into the garden to get away from him.

‘He came flying outside, attacked me, hitting me over the head with the kitchen chair.

‘He dragged me down the garden by my finger and my finger ended up so swollen that my ring had to be cut off.

‘I only had a nightie on so my skin was getting scraped on the path.

‘I thought he was going to kill me. I was screaming so my neighbour came out and called the police.’

Katrina, who has since stopped working as a retail assistant, met Liversedge on a night out in 2019 and immediately became a couple. 

Katrina said the first four months of their relationship were perfect, but Liversedge, a block paver from Daventry, then became possessive.

Katrina said: ‘He started becoming jealous and I wasn’t allowed any male friends. 

‘The first time he got violent, he tried to hit me with an iron and threw a cup at me.

‘He said it would never happen again but he started pushing me around, throwing me into things then it turned into slaps and then punches and kicks.

Katrina met Liversedge on a night out in 2019 and immediately became a couple, saying the first four months were 'perfect' before he became possessive

Katrina met Liversedge on a night out in 2019 and immediately became a couple, saying the first four months were 'perfect' before he became possessive

Katrina met Liversedge on a night out in 2019 and immediately became a couple, saying the first four months were ‘perfect’ before he became possessive 

Katrina was forced to move towns out of fear Liversedge will go looking for her when he's released from prison

Katrina was forced to move towns out of fear Liversedge will go looking for her when he's released from prison

Katrina was forced to move towns out of fear Liversedge will go looking for her when he’s released from prison

‘I finished it so many times but he was so controlling. He would wait outside my house and bang on my door at 2am.

‘I went on a night out once, I was wearing a skirt and tights and I’d ripped my tights with my nails pulling them up so he thought I’d been cheating.

‘He called me a dirty slag, dragged me outside and left me in the rain curled up in a ball in the garden.

‘Then he came outside and started speaking to me like it was my fault. He said ‘look at the state of you’ then took me back inside and pushed me over.

‘I tried to run down the road and he came after me, dragged me back and kept me there all night, beating me for about 40 minutes at a time.

During one attaack, Liversedge kept Katrina in the house and beat her for about 40 minutes at a time

During one attaack, Liversedge kept Katrina in the house and beat her for about 40 minutes at a time

During one attaack, Liversedge kept Katrina in the house and beat her for about 40 minutes at a time

‘He took my keys, my phone and I was hiding in random rooms around the house. I was locked in all night.’

Katrina was forced to move towns out of fear Liversedge will go looking for her when he’s released from prison.

The victim is seeing a therapist to help with her depression, anxiety and PTSD and she’s speaking out to encourage victims of domestic abuse to seek help.

She said: ‘It’s over one year on and I’m still suffering.

‘It’s the emotional and mental abuse. You get told it’s your fault and that you’re worthless. 

The victim is seeing a therapist to help with her depression, anxiety and PTSD and she's speaking out to encourage victims of domestic abuse to seek help

The victim is seeing a therapist to help with her depression, anxiety and PTSD and she's speaking out to encourage victims of domestic abuse to seek help

The victim is seeing a therapist to help with her depression, anxiety and PTSD and she’s speaking out to encourage victims of domestic abuse to seek help

Katrina doesn't want other woman to suffer like she has and is urging women to 'seek help' if they are in a similar situation

Katrina doesn't want other woman to suffer like she has and is urging women to 'seek help' if they are in a similar situation

Katrina doesn’t want other woman to suffer like she has and is urging women to ‘seek help’ if they are in a similar situation 

‘I had to move out of the town I’d lived in my whole life to a place where I don’t know anyone because he’s the most vengeful person I know and I’m scared.

‘I barely go out of my house but I don’t want other women to suffer like I did.

‘I have a false tooth now and every time I take it out it’s a reminder of what happened and I have scars all over my body that I have to look at every day.

‘I just want to tell anyone in a similar situation to please seek help and don’t be ashamed.

‘It isn’t your fault and you won’t be judged.

‘Just get out, no matter how many times they say they’ll change and get help, they won’t and things will just get worse.’

Katrina said: 'He said it would never happen again but he started pushing me around, throwing me into things then it turned into slaps and then punches and kicks'

Katrina said: 'He said it would never happen again but he started pushing me around, throwing me into things then it turned into slaps and then punches and kicks'

Katrina said: ‘He said it would never happen again but he started pushing me around, throwing me into things then it turned into slaps and then punches and kicks’ 

The thug knocked Katrina's tooth out and she said: 'I have a false tooth now and every time I take it out it's a reminder of what happened'

The thug knocked Katrina's tooth out and she said: 'I have a false tooth now and every time I take it out it's a reminder of what happened'

The thug knocked Katrina’s tooth out and she said: ‘I have a false tooth now and every time I take it out it’s a reminder of what happened’ 

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Revellers in Leeds hit the town to make the most of final weekend of freedom

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revellers in leeds hit the town to make the most of final weekend of freedom

Revellers in Leeds hit the pubs and bars to make the most of their final weekend of freedom before possible new coronavirus restrictions in the city. 

Students and young people dressed to impress as they hit the town on Saturday night and enjoyed themselves in the bustling city centre.

Two women could be seen with their hands in the air as a musician sang in the streets, while another man gave his friend a piggyback on their way to the pub.

Police were a visible presence and could be seen chatting to punters and patrolling the area as queues formed up at bars and pubs in Leeds.

In Newcastle punters still headed out to town to have a good time, but the streets dramatically emptied at the 10pm curfew as the curfew was enforced. 

It comes amid a rising number of infections in Leeds prompted warnings the it may soon head in the same direction as other parts of West Yorkshire with additional coronavirus restrictions, including a 10pm pub curfew.

Leeds recorded its highest ever daily increase of Covid-19 cases on Friday, with the city confirming a further 117 infections. The largest rise ahead of this figure was reported on April 22, when 109 cases were detected. 

Two friends arriving in Leeds city centre last night and getting ready to go out to one of the many bars in the centre

Two friends arriving in Leeds city centre last night and getting ready to go out to one of the many bars in the centre

Two friends arriving in Leeds city centre last night and getting ready to go out to one of the many bars in the centre

A group of friends head into Leeds on Saturday night. One friend is helpfully giving his pal a piggyback on the way in

A group of friends head into Leeds on Saturday night. One friend is helpfully giving his pal a piggyback on the way in

A group of friends head into Leeds on Saturday night. One friend is helpfully giving his pal a piggyback on the way in

Three women head into the city centre in Leeds. It comes amid a rising number of infections in the city prompted warnings the it may soon head in the same direction as other parts of West Yorkshire with additional coronavirus restrictions

Three women head into the city centre in Leeds. It comes amid a rising number of infections in the city prompted warnings the it may soon head in the same direction as other parts of West Yorkshire with additional coronavirus restrictions

Three women head into the city centre in Leeds. It comes amid a rising number of infections in the city prompted warnings the it may soon head in the same direction as other parts of West Yorkshire with additional coronavirus restrictions

Three friends head out on Saturday night in Leeds. It might be the last weekend revellers can stay out late before a curfew is imposed

Three friends head out on Saturday night in Leeds. It might be the last weekend revellers can stay out late before a curfew is imposed

Three friends head out on Saturday night in Leeds. It might be the last weekend revellers can stay out late before a curfew is imposed

A group of friends hit the town in Newcastle on Saturday. The evening was cut short, as a curfew is currently in place at 10pm

A group of friends hit the town in Newcastle on Saturday. The evening was cut short, as a curfew is currently in place at 10pm

A group of friends hit the town in Newcastle on Saturday. The evening was cut short, as a curfew is currently in place at 10pm

A group of friends laugh and joke in Newcastle on Saturday night. Two of the women are holding up cardboard cut outs of One Direction

A group of friends laugh and joke in Newcastle on Saturday night. Two of the women are holding up cardboard cut outs of One Direction

A group of friends laugh and joke in Newcastle on Saturday night. Two of the women are holding up cardboard cut outs of One Direction

Tough new restrictions to control the spread of coronavirus were announced for the North East of England last night, ahead of further rules which were unveiled yesterday across parts of the North West, Midlands and West Yorkshire.  

The latest measures, which include a 10pm curfew on pubs and bars, affect Newcastle, Gateshead, Sunderland, Northumberland, South Tyneside, North Tyneside and County Durham from last night. 

Similar lockdown measures will then come into force in Lancashire, Merseyside, Warrington, Halton, Wolverhampton, Oadby & Wigston, and parts of Bradford, Kirklees and Calderdale from Tuesday.

Residents in these areas are banned from socialising in homes or gardens with people outside their household or ‘bubble’ and food and drink venues are restricted to table service only. Restaurants, bars and pubs will have to close between 10pm and 5am. 

It comes as Mr Hancock today admitted that a new national crackdown is on the cards as he warned infections are ‘accelerating across the country’ and more people will die due to the pandemic.

A group of people in Leeds city centre sing along as a musician plays a song on Saturday night

A group of people in Leeds city centre sing along as a musician plays a song on Saturday night

A group of people in Leeds city centre sing along as a musician plays a song on Saturday night

Police officers talk to a member of the public in Leeds city centre on Saturday. A number of pubs and bars were busy

Police officers talk to a member of the public in Leeds city centre on Saturday. A number of pubs and bars were busy

Police officers talk to a member of the public in Leeds city centre on Saturday. A number of pubs and bars were busy

A group of friends hug in Newcastle city centre on Saturday night. The city is currently under a 10pm curfew

A group of friends hug in Newcastle city centre on Saturday night. The city is currently under a 10pm curfew

A group of friends hug in Newcastle city centre on Saturday night. The city is currently under a 10pm curfew

Police officers talk to a musician on Saturday night in Leeds city centre, while some other partygoers stand nearby

Police officers talk to a musician on Saturday night in Leeds city centre, while some other partygoers stand nearby

Police officers talk to a musician on Saturday night in Leeds city centre, while some other partygoers stand nearby

The Health Secretary pleaded with the public to ‘come together to tackle this virus’ as ministers consider imposing draconian restrictions for a fortnight in a ‘circuit break’ to stop the spread.

The move could come as soon as next week, with pubs, restaurants and hotels across Britain facing being shut to prevent ‘significant’ casualties.

Last week Health Secretary Matt Hancock said a national lockdown was the ‘last line of defence’. But he warned that it was a ‘big moment for the country’ with cases now doubling every eight days, and unless the ‘Rule of Six’ restrictions worked more would have to be done.

‘The virus is clearly accelerating across the country,’ he told Sky News. ‘We have got to take the necessary action to keep people safe. We will do what it takes to keep people safe.’   

Around 12million people across the UK are now in areas of intervention, including parts of Greater Manchester, Leicester and Scotland. But neither Middlesbrough and Hartlepool in the North East, two other authorities officially named as a hotspot by Public Health England last week.

A group of friends hug in Newcastle city centre on Saturday night. The city currently has a curfew

A group of friends hug in Newcastle city centre on Saturday night. The city currently has a curfew

A group of friends hug in Newcastle city centre on Saturday night. The city currently has a curfew 

Increasing numbers of infections in London and Leeds have also prompted warnings the cities may soon head in the same direction as the North East with additional restrictions.

It comes as London mayor Sadiq Khan is reportedly pressing for new coronavirus restrictions for the capital on Monday, including a 10pm pub curfew. 

Mayoral sources said the city was catching up with disease hotspots in the North West and North East of England, which have been placed under new controls.

While data from only a few days ago suggested London was two weeks behind those areas, the latest modelling seen by Mr Khan was said to show the gap had closed to two or three days.

The mayor is now urging ministers to extend the latest regional restrictions – including ordering bars and restaurants to close at 10pm – to cover the capital as well. 

A mayoral source told HuffPost: ‘It’s clear that cases in London are only moving in one direction, we are now just days behind hotspots in the North West and North East. We can’t afford more delay.

‘Introducing new measures now will help slow the spread of the virus and potentially prevent the need for a fuller lockdown like we saw in March, which could seriously damage the economy once again.’ 

He is also said to be looking at the possibility of asking those who are able to work from home to do so.

Such a move would be in sharp contrast to the Government, which has until recently been urging people to get back to their offices following the easing of lockdown restrictions. 

It comes as people in England who refuse an order to self-isolate will face fines of up to £10,000, the Government has warned amid deepening concern at the sharp upsurge in coronavirus infections.

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