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Long Covid could become a bigger public health issue than excess deaths, academic warns

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long covid could become a bigger public health issue than excess deaths academic warns

So-called ‘Long Covid’ – which causes victims to suffer symptoms months after falling ill with the virus – could be a bigger public health problem than excess deaths, an academic has warned.

It comes as a new report by King’s College London revealed that around 10 per cent of coronavirus patients who took part in its survey showed Long Covid symptoms such as breathlessness and chronic fatigue for a month after infection.

As many as two per cent were still experiencing such symptoms after three months.

In a report from Tony Blair Institute of Global Change, Tim Spector, Professor of Genetic Epidemiology at King’s College London, warns Long Covid could become a bigger public health issue than excess deaths due to Covid-19.

The professor has pointed the statistics showing that Long Covid is most prevelant in women in their 40s, while deaths due to coronavirus are most among the elderly.

The report calls on the government to raise awareness of the issue.

The authors of the paper, titled Long Covid: Reviewing the Science and Assessing the Risk, say they believe awareness campaigns ‘would help drive compliance with containment measures such as the use of masks’.

So-called 'Long Covid' - which causes victims to suffer symptoms months after falling ill with the virus - could be a bigger public health problem than excess deaths, an academic has warned. Pictured: Library image of a woman wearing a mask

So-called 'Long Covid' - which causes victims to suffer symptoms months after falling ill with the virus - could be a bigger public health problem than excess deaths, an academic has warned. Pictured: Library image of a woman wearing a mask

So-called ‘Long Covid’ – which causes victims to suffer symptoms months after falling ill with the virus – could be a bigger public health problem than excess deaths, an academic has warned. Pictured: Library image of a woman wearing a mask

In the report’s foreword, Professor Spector said that in the first few months of the pandemic, little attention was paid to the infected population who were not sick enough to go to hospital, who made up 99 per cent of cases.

He said it turned out that Covid-19 was not just a bad flu, but in many people it behaved more like an autoimmune disease, affecting multiple systems in the body.

Prof Spector said the app launched in March by his group at King’s College London and the health-science company ZOE to capture the wider range of symptoms people were experiencing received data from more than 4 million people.

Tim Spector, Professor of Genetic Epidemiology at King's College London, says around 10 per cent of coronavirus patients who took part in a college survey showed Long Covid symptoms

Tim Spector, Professor of Genetic Epidemiology at King's College London, says around 10 per cent of coronavirus patients who took part in a college survey showed Long Covid symptoms

Tim Spector, Professor of Genetic Epidemiology at King’s College London, says around 10 per cent of coronavirus patients who took part in a college survey showed Long Covid symptoms

Researchers learned that ‘a great many people didn’t get better after two weeks as expected’, Prof Spector said, adding: ‘We kept following them and found out that a significant number still had problems after months.

‘This is the other side of Covid: the long-haulers that could turn out to be a bigger public-health problem than excess deaths from Covid-19, which mainly affect the susceptible elderly.’

The report said the King’s College study indicates around 10 per cent of those taking part in the survey had symptoms of long Covid for a month, with between 1.5 per cent and 2 per cent still experiencing such symptoms after three months.

The authors said these appear to be the most reliable statistics on which to base a rough estimate of the scale of long Covid in the population, adding that while there is no clear evidence about prevalence in asymptomatic cases, it is likely

to be lower than these percentages.

The report said long Covid seems rare in those under 18 and over 65, with higher prevalence among those of working age.

The median age of those affected is 45 and it affects women more than men.

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33982178 8804953 image a 75 1601857061200

‘As Professor Spector says, long Covid is likely a bigger issue than excess deaths as a result of Covid, but, crucially, the risk must be considered alongside the economic impact and other health impacts linked to Covid restrictions,’ the paper concluded.

Among their recommendations, the authors suggest further studies, awareness campaigns and mass testing to help with diagnosis.

Daniel Sleat, co-author of the report, said: ‘While long Covid poses a significant risk, it must be assessed alongside the wider impacts of Covid restrictions, both in economic and health terms, as governments determine their next steps on containment measures to avoid a full lockdown.’

This post first appeared on dailymail.co.uk

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Albania’s Crown Prince Leka II and Crown Princess Elia announce the birth of their first child

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albanias crown prince leka ii and crown princess elia announce the birth of their first child

Albania’s Crown Prince Leka II and Crown Princess Elia have announced the birth of their first child, a baby girl named Geraldine.

The couple, who were married in 2016 in the European nation’s second ever royal wedding and the first since the end of communism, welcomed their daughter on Thursday at the Queen Geraldine Maternity Hospital in Tirana.

They named their daughter Geraldine – a meaningful tribute to the little one’s paternal great-grandmother, Queen Geraldine, who died on October 22, 2002, 18 years to the day before her namesake’s birth.

‘Her Royal Highness and her child are both doing well,’ the royal court said in a statement announcing the birth, adding that they were ‘delighted’ with the news. 

Albania's Crown Prince Leka II and Crown Princess Elia (pictured in Madrid in 2016) have announced the birth of their first child, a baby girl named Geraldine

Albania's Crown Prince Leka II and Crown Princess Elia (pictured in Madrid in 2016) have announced the birth of their first child, a baby girl named Geraldine

Albania’s Crown Prince Leka II and Crown Princess Elia (pictured in Madrid in 2016) have announced the birth of their first child, a baby girl named Geraldine

'Her Royal Highness and her child are both doing well,' the royal court said in a statement announcing the birth (above), adding that they were 'delighted' with the news

'Her Royal Highness and her child are both doing well,' the royal court said in a statement announcing the birth (above), adding that they were 'delighted' with the news

‘Her Royal Highness and her child are both doing well,’ the royal court said in a statement announcing the birth (above), adding that they were ‘delighted’ with the news

Queen Geraldine was married to King Zog I, who was the first monarch of Albania after it gained independence from the Ottoman Empire but fled his homeland in 1939 when Italy’s fascists occupied the Balkan state. 

Despite the monarch having been dissolved, Zog’s son King Leka remained head of the House of Zogu and claimant to the throne until his death in 2011 and was succeeded by his only son, Leka II.

WHO IS IN ALBANIA’S ROYAL FAMILY?  

Zog I was proclaimed King of the Albanians in 1928 and forced into exile in 1939.

Zog and his wife Geraldine had one son, Leka, who was declared king upon his father’s death in 1961.

Leka and his wife Susan Cullen-Ward had one son, Leka, who assumed the throne in Albanian monarchists’ eyes after Leka I’s death in 2011.

Leka II is married to singer and actress Elia Zaharia.

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The Crown Prince, who attended Royal Military College Sandhurst and has worked as an adviser to Albania’s president, succeeded his father as head of the House of Zogu, and titular King of the Albanians.

As Leka II currently does not have any sons, his current heir presumptive is Skënder Zogu, his first cousin once removed. 

Leka II married Elia Zaharia in a lavish ceremony in 2016, with around 20 royal families from across the world in attendance including Prince Michael of Kent -the first cousin of Queen Elizabeth II.

Princess Léa of Belgium and Queen Sofía of Spain were also present at the opulent ceremony in Albanian capital Tirana, where the couple now live.  

Leka II and Elia, who were engaged in Paris in 2010, now preside over the Queen Geraldine Foundation. 

The prince has also worked as an adviser within the Albanian Ministry of Foreign Affairs, Ministry of Interior and the Albanian Presidents Office, while the princess works at the Albanian National Theater.

Albania’s royal family was expelled from the country in 1939 after it was invaded by Italian fascists. 

The couple were married in 2016 (pictured) in the European nation's second ever royal wedding and the first since the end of communism

The couple were married in 2016 (pictured) in the European nation's second ever royal wedding and the first since the end of communism

The couple were married in 2016 (pictured) in the European nation’s second ever royal wedding and the first since the end of communism

After World War II, when the Communists took over the country, King Zog and his family were considered traitors and stripped from power completely and removed from history books.

Following their exile, the Albanian royal family spent time in Greece and Turkey before settling in England, where they briefly resided at The Ritz in London.

King Zog and his family then moved to Egypt before the monarch spent the remainder of his life in France.

This post first appeared on dailymail.co.uk

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Salford missing boy: Police search for 15-year-old who ‘may be in a distressed state’

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salford missing boy police search for 15 year old who may be in a distressed state

Police have launched a desperate search for a 15-year-old boy who ‘may be in a distressed state’.

Mckenzi Platt-Barnes went missing from his home in Eccles, Salford, between 6am and 7.45am yesterday.

He was last seen wearing black Nike jogging bottoms, a black Next coat and possibly had ‘scruffy looking’ trainers on, according to Greater Manchester police.

Mckenzi Platt-Barnes went missing from his home in Eccles, Salford, between 6am and 7.45am yesterday morning

Mckenzi Platt-Barnes went missing from his home in Eccles, Salford, between 6am and 7.45am yesterday morning

Mckenzi Platt-Barnes went missing from his home in Eccles, Salford, between 6am and 7.45am yesterday morning

He was last seen wearing black Nike jogging bottoms, a black Next coat and possibly had 'scruffy looking' trainers on, according to Greater Manchester police

He was last seen wearing black Nike jogging bottoms, a black Next coat and possibly had 'scruffy looking' trainers on, according to Greater Manchester police

He was last seen wearing black Nike jogging bottoms, a black Next coat and possibly had ‘scruffy looking’ trainers on, according to Greater Manchester police

The force tweeted a picture of the schoolboy and said: ‘He is a white male, slim build, about 1.65m tall with brown eyes and short, dark hair.’ 

Police are becoming ‘increasingly concerned for him’ and want to make sure he is safe and well.

They are asking anyone with information about where he is to get in touch.

This post first appeared on dailymail.co.uk

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Greggs battles it out with Waitrose to supply British Airways’ in-flight meals

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greggs battles it out with waitrose to supply british airways in flight meals

Greggs is in a battle with Waitrose to supply British Airways‘ in-flight meals after the airline axed its deal with Marks & Spencer.

Sources said the airline will not move to free food on short flights in a bid to distance itself from less exclusive carriers.

But it is expected to turn to Waitrose or Greggs as it searches for another ‘great British brand’ to replace M&S.

Greggs is in a battle with Waitrose to supply British Airways' in-flight meals after the airline axed its deal with Marks & Spencer (file photo)

Greggs is in a battle with Waitrose to supply British Airways' in-flight meals after the airline axed its deal with Marks & Spencer (file photo)

Greggs is in a battle with Waitrose to supply British Airways’ in-flight meals after the airline axed its deal with Marks & Spencer (file photo)

Sources said the airline will not move to free food on short flights in a bid to distance itself from less exclusive carriers (file photo)

Sources said the airline will not move to free food on short flights in a bid to distance itself from less exclusive carriers (file photo)

Sources said the airline will not move to free food on short flights in a bid to distance itself from less exclusive carriers (file photo)

A source told the Sun: ‘BA pushed the boat out to get M&S on board, so it’s a big surprise to see them jettison the firm. And possibly a big risk.’

The firm started selling M&S food in 2016 after passengers slammed its in-flight meals.

It also axed free food in economy class on shorter journeys, opting to flog salads and sandwiches instead.

Alex Cruz, who stepped down as BA chief earlier this month, claimed the move ‘set a new standard in short-haul catering’.

A BA spokesman said: ‘We’re off on a new flight path.

‘We look forward to announcing our exciting new buy-on-board proposition with a great British brand that customers have told us they love.’

BA is expected to turn to Waitrose or Greggs as it searches for another 'great British brand' to replace M&S (file photo)

BA is expected to turn to Waitrose or Greggs as it searches for another 'great British brand' to replace M&S (file photo)

BA is expected to turn to Waitrose or Greggs as it searches for another ‘great British brand’ to replace M&S (file photo)

Meanwhile BA parent company IAG slashed flights by 70 per cent compared to last year after losing £1.2billion in three months. 

The group expects its flight capacity from October to December to be no more than 30 per cent – down from previous guidance – of what it was over the same period in 2019.

IAG said the reduction is due to recent bookings being lower than expected due to ‘additional measures implemented by many European governments in response to a second wave of Covid-19 infections’.

These include an increase in local lockdowns and the extension of quarantine requirements for travellers visiting a rising number of countries.

A source said: 'BA pushed the boat out to get M&S on board, so it's a big surprise to see them jettison the firm. And possibly a big risk'

A source said: 'BA pushed the boat out to get M&S on board, so it's a big surprise to see them jettison the firm. And possibly a big risk'

A source said: ‘BA pushed the boat out to get M&S on board, so it’s a big surprise to see them jettison the firm. And possibly a big risk’

It comes as initiatives to reduce quarantine periods and boost customer confidence to book and travel – such as pre-departure testing and air corridors – have ‘not been adopted by governments as quickly as anticipated’, IAG said.

The group ‘no longer expects to breakeven in terms of net cash flows from operating activities’ between October and December.

Announcing its preliminary financial results for July-September, total revenue declined by 83 per cent year on year to £1.1billion.

The loss before exceptional items of £1.2billion between July and September is compared with a £1.3billion profit during the same period last year.

Flight capacity was down 78.6 per cent over the quarter, with passenger demand decreasing by 88.0 per cent.

The average number of seats filled on flights was 48.9 per cent, down 38.8 percentage points.

This post first appeared on dailymail.co.uk

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