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Man, 38, faked cancer to stop girlfriend, 50, leaving him

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man 38 faked cancer to stop girlfriend 50 leaving him

A father-of-three council worker, 38, faked cancer by walking with a cane and swallowing 20 vitamin pills a day as his ‘medication’ in a ploy to to stop his girlfriend, 50, from leaving him.

Kevin Bevis lied about being terminally ill to Karen Gregory, even asking her to travel with him to hospital for fake treatment.

The 38-year-old, who worked for Gravesend Borough Council housing department, also convinced Ms Gregory’s friends, who sponsored him in a cancer charity run.

But his deceit came to an end when Ms Gregory went to the police after Bevis became violent and he was jailed for 18 months.

Kevin Bevis, 38, pictured with Karen Gregory, 50. In May 2017, the father-of-three told her he had stomach cancer but the act came to an end in December last year

Kevin Bevis, 38, pictured with Karen Gregory, 50. In May 2017, the father-of-three told her he had stomach cancer but the act came to an end in December last year

Kevin Bevis, 38, pictured with Karen Gregory, 50. In May 2017, the father-of-three told her he had stomach cancer but the act came to an end in December last year

Ms Gregory was put off by his repeated requests to go swinging and was going to end the relationship when Bevis said he had ‘cancer’.

She felt so sorry for him that she eventually slept with other men to please him.

Ms Gregory, from West Malling in Kent, said: ‘I just took his word for it.. He was with me when I lost my auntie to cancer, how can anyone lie about such a thing?

‘It’s hard because people on the outside think ‘how can you be so stupid?’ but he went to such lengths.’

Bevis, from nearby Sittingbourne, would swallow 20 vitamin pills per day as part of the act.

Ms Gregory would drive him to supposed chemotherapy appointments who he would not allow to come in and support him.

She also helped Bevis walk around the garden using a cane because he claimed to be too weak to stand unaided.

He even pretended to collapse in front on the neighbours when his girlfriend was out.

Ms Gregory said: ‘He would say he didn’t want me seeing him like that. I would pick him up and he would come out with bandages and tell me all about the nurses there.

‘He would have the medication, a box of pills, throughout the day.

Bevis even lied to his parents about having the deadly disease to keep up the charade

Bevis even lied to his parents about having the deadly disease to keep up the charade

Bevis even lied to his parents about having the deadly disease to keep up the charade

‘I found out they were just vitamins and supplements. I found a big bag of tablets hidden in the shed when I was clearing out his things.’

The pair initially met through a Facebook group in 2016 and Ms Gregory was attracted to Bevis after seeing pictures of him doing a charity head shave and walk, and said he behaved like a gentleman.

She said: ‘He was really nice. He acted like a gentleman and was old fashioned, it made a change really.’

Three months into their relationship, Ms Gregory wanted to break things off with Bevis due to his ‘sexual urges’ and them being incompatible.

She said: ‘He wanted to do swinging but I’m not into all that, so I thought it would be a problem. But he insisted he would never make me do any of that.’

But in May 2017, he told her he had stomach cancer.

Ms Gregory said: ‘I was speechless. He said “aren’t you going to give me a cuddle?” And then the cancer got worse and worse.’

The mother-of-three had just started spending a lot more time with her teenager daughter and believes Bevis wanted more attention.

Ms Gregory travelled up to Guy’s St Thomas’ Hospital in London under the impression that Bevis could ‘see a consultant’ but again was banned from coming in with him.

To be even more convincing, Bevis purposefully would not eat much at the home they shared together and used the cancer as an excuse not to cook.

The mass manipulator even lied to his parents about having the deadly disease in order to keep up the charade.

Council worker Bevis, above, was handed an 18-month prison sentence and a five-year restraining order to stay away from Ms Gregory at Maidstone Crown Court

Council worker Bevis, above, was handed an 18-month prison sentence and a five-year restraining order to stay away from Ms Gregory at Maidstone Crown Court

Council worker Bevis, above, was handed an 18-month prison sentence and a five-year restraining order to stay away from Ms Gregory at Maidstone Crown Court

Miss Gregory said: ‘I was standing next to him as he broke the news to his mum and dad.

‘If he can lie like that to his parents, you have got to believe it.’

Bevis escalated his lies, first saying that he also had mouth cancer and later a brain tumour and that he would die in two years.

At this point, Ms Gregory had serious misgivings about their relationships but felt unable to leave him and began booking special experiences and nights away to make his last days better.

Her friends even paid for a hot air balloon trip and she started making a memory box full of photos for his mother to keep when Bevis died.

She said: ‘How can you leave someone who is dying? I thought I would try and make it the best I could for him.’

Bevis persistently asked Ms Gregory to have sex with other men as part of his sexual fantasies and, although she did not want to, she eventually relented and had intercourse with three different men.

She said: ‘You do it because you want to make that person happy in their final year, or so I thought. I should never have given in.

‘I did love him but I wasn’t madly in love with him. A friend used to say to me, ‘you don’t love him, you care for him.’

Ms Gregory also helped Bevis, above, walk around the garden using a cane because he claimed to be too weak to stand unaided

Ms Gregory also helped Bevis, above, walk around the garden using a cane because he claimed to be too weak to stand unaided

Ms Gregory also helped Bevis, above, walk around the garden using a cane because he claimed to be too weak to stand unaided

As the lies continued, Ms Gregory stood on the side-lines cheering Bevis on as he completed the Canterbury Half Marathon and Great South Run, raising money for cancer charities.

She had begged Bevis not to take part in the events as she believed he had overcome tremendous pain to do so.

He stopped running three miles before the finish line in Canterbury, telling a fellow runner about his supposed illness.

Bevis repeatedly assaulted Ms Gregory, each time pinning her down and wrapping his hands around her throat.

The last time he said, ‘I could kill you, I’ve got nothing to live for’, in reference to the supposed cancer.

He later blamed his violence on the steroids he claimed to be taking as part of his treatment.

The act came to an end in December 2019, when Miss Gregory asked the police about her partner’s background under Claire’s Law and encouraged by her daughter.

In a meeting, she told the police he was violent and Bevis was arrested the next day.

He admitted to lying about his illnesses after police looked through his medical records and Ms Gregory was told of the deceit on the phone.

She said: ‘I couldn’t believe it. It was like something you read in a magazine.’

Bevis was handed an 18-month prison sentence and a five-year restraining order to stay away from Ms Gregory at Maidstone Crown Court.

Ghulam Humayun, defending, said Bevis was very sorry for taking an ‘extreme measure’ by claiming cancer because he feared losing his girlfriend.

More than six months since the relationship ended, Miss Gregory still has nightmares about Bevis and says she will probably get counselling.

She believes if she had never gone to the police, Bevis would still be lying to her now.

The courageous mother said she wants people to know how much help was offered to her from the police and witness and victim support after the revelation.

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Emmy Awards: Jimmy Kimmel uses fake audience reactions for his opening monologue

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emmy awards jimmy kimmel uses fake audience reactions for his opening monologue

While there was no live audience in place at the Staples Center in Los Angeles, Jimmy Kimmel threw fans for a surprise with his opening monologue.

When Kimmel, 52, stepped onto the stage, he was greeted by what appeared to be a packed house, though it was revealed later that the audience reactions were not live.

In fact, Kimmel was delivering his monologue in front of an empty arena, with a few celeb cutouts and a surprise appearance by Jason Bateman, as they revealed how the awards show will proceed in the pandemic.

Audience: While there was no live audience in place at the Staples Center in Los Angeles, Jimmy Kimmel threw fans for a surprise with his opening monologue

Audience: While there was no live audience in place at the Staples Center in Los Angeles, Jimmy Kimmel threw fans for a surprise with his opening monologue

Audience: While there was no live audience in place at the Staples Center in Los Angeles, Jimmy Kimmel threw fans for a surprise with his opening monologue

Bateman: In fact, Kimmel was delivering his monologue in front of an empty arena, with a few celeb cutouts and a surprise appearance by Jason Batemen, as they revealed how the awards show will proceed in the pandemic

Bateman: In fact, Kimmel was delivering his monologue in front of an empty arena, with a few celeb cutouts and a surprise appearance by Jason Batemen, as they revealed how the awards show will proceed in the pandemic

Bateman: In fact, Kimmel was delivering his monologue in front of an empty arena, with a few celeb cutouts and a surprise appearance by Jason Batemen, as they revealed how the awards show will proceed in the pandemic

There were several shots of the ‘audience’ in the opening moments, which was presumably from last year’s Emmys ceremony, with Kimmel beginning immediately by addressing the pandemic, stating, ‘Welcome to the Pandemmys!’

He then added that it was great to ‘see people again’ while thanking everyone – and himself – for risking everything to be there.

He then asked why they were having an awards show in the midst of a pandemic, joking, ‘Why is this the year they have to have a host?’

Audience: There were several shots of the 'audience' in the opening moments, which was presumably from last year's Emmys ceremony, with Kimmel beginning immediately by addressing the pandemic, stating, 'Welcome to the Pandemmys!'

Audience: There were several shots of the 'audience' in the opening moments, which was presumably from last year's Emmys ceremony, with Kimmel beginning immediately by addressing the pandemic, stating, 'Welcome to the Pandemmys!'

Audience: There were several shots of the ‘audience’ in the opening moments, which was presumably from last year’s Emmys ceremony, with Kimmel beginning immediately by addressing the pandemic, stating, ‘Welcome to the Pandemmys!’

Kimmel added that it might seem ‘frivolous and unnecessary’ to hold the Emmys this year, though he added it’s frivolous and unnecessary ‘every other year.’  

He admitted that the Emmy ceremony is not ‘important,’ adding it’s not going to ‘stop COVID or put out the fires,’ but it’s fun and ‘we need fun’ right now.

Kimmel added that through it all, television has ‘always been there’ for us,’ and that while this year might be terrible, television has ‘never been better.’

Frivolous: Kimmel added that it might seem 'frivolous and unnecessary' to hold the Emmys this year, though he added it's frivolous and unnecessary 'every other year'

Frivolous: Kimmel added that it might seem 'frivolous and unnecessary' to hold the Emmys this year, though he added it's frivolous and unnecessary 'every other year'

Frivolous: Kimmel added that it might seem ‘frivolous and unnecessary’ to hold the Emmys this year, though he added it’s frivolous and unnecessary ‘every other year’

He also gave Norman Lear a shout-out for being the oldest Emmy winner ever at 98 years of age, which he won at the Creative Arts Emmys last week.

He also made a crack towards upstart Quibi, which he called ‘the dumbest thing to cost $1 billion, while adding that he has to show a Schitt’s Creek graphic on the screen, which he joked was indicative of how network TV is dying.

‘HBO can show us a big blue penis, no problem, I can’t say Schitt’s with a C,’ Kimmel said, but when he made a joke about Watchmen being ‘something that Jerry Falwell Jr. was into,’ they showed an audience reaction shot of Kimmel himself.

Shout-out: He also gave Norman Lear a shout-out for being the oldest Emmy winner ever at 98 years of age, which he won at the Creative Arts Emmys last week

Shout-out: He also gave Norman Lear a shout-out for being the oldest Emmy winner ever at 98 years of age, which he won at the Creative Arts Emmys last week

Shout-out: He also gave Norman Lear a shout-out for being the oldest Emmy winner ever at 98 years of age, which he won at the Creative Arts Emmys last week

Dumbest thing: He also made a crack towards upstart Quibi, which he called 'the dumbest thing to cost $1 billion, while adding that he has to show a Schitt's Creek graphic on the screen, which he joked was indicative of how network TV is dying

Dumbest thing: He also made a crack towards upstart Quibi, which he called 'the dumbest thing to cost $1 billion, while adding that he has to show a Schitt's Creek graphic on the screen, which he joked was indicative of how network TV is dying

Dumbest thing: He also made a crack towards upstart Quibi, which he called ‘the dumbest thing to cost $1 billion, while adding that he has to show a Schitt’s Creek graphic on the screen, which he joked was indicative of how network TV is dying

Kimmel said on stage that, ‘How can I be down there? If I’m up here that means no one is in the audience. That would mean that I’m up here all alone.’

The house lights came on and revealed that the arena was in fact empty, with Kimmel joking it was ‘just like prom night.’ 

‘Of course I’m here all alone! Of course we don’t have an audience. This isn’t a MAGA rally, this is the Emmys!’ Kimmel exclaimed.

Alone: Kimmel said on stage that, 'How can I be down there? If I'm up here that means no one is in the audience. That would mean that I'm up here all alone'

Alone: Kimmel said on stage that, 'How can I be down there? If I'm up here that means no one is in the audience. That would mean that I'm up here all alone'

Alone: Kimmel said on stage that, 'How can I be down there? If I'm up here that means no one is in the audience. That would mean that I'm up here all alone'

Alone: Kimmel said on stage that, 'How can I be down there? If I'm up here that means no one is in the audience. That would mean that I'm up here all alone'

Alone: Kimmel said on stage that, ‘How can I be down there? If I’m up here that means no one is in the audience. That would mean that I’m up here all alone’

Like prom night: The house lights came on and revealed that the arena was in fact empty, with Kimmel joking it was 'just like prom night

Like prom night: The house lights came on and revealed that the arena was in fact empty, with Kimmel joking it was 'just like prom night

Like prom night: The house lights came on and revealed that the arena was in fact empty, with Kimmel joking it was ‘just like prom night

He added that the Emmys took a page out of baseball’s playbook, using cardboard cutouts of celebrities, such as Regina King, Hugh Jackman, Meryl Streep and Jason Bateman, though Kimmel noticed something seemed off with Bateman’s cutout.

Kimmel said that he knew it was Bateman, though Bateman shot back, ‘Mind your business, Kimmel, big night for me.’

Kimmel said they have strict safety protocols, with Bateman saying he’s clean and he’s, ‘a big washer-upper’ but Kimmel said they had limits on how many people they can have in the building.’

Big night: Kimmel said that he knew it was Bateman, though Bateman shot back, 'Mind your business, Kimmel, big night for me'

Big night: Kimmel said that he knew it was Bateman, though Bateman shot back, 'Mind your business, Kimmel, big night for me'

Big night: Kimmel said that he knew it was Bateman, though Bateman shot back, ‘Mind your business, Kimmel, big night for me’

Building: Kimmel said they have strict safety protocols, with Bateman saying he's clean and he's, 'a big washer-upper' but Kimmel said they had limits on how many people they can have in the building'

Building: Kimmel said they have strict safety protocols, with Bateman saying he's clean and he's, 'a big washer-upper' but Kimmel said they had limits on how many people they can have in the building'

Building: Kimmel said they have strict safety protocols, with Bateman saying he’s clean and he’s, ‘a big washer-upper’ but Kimmel said they had limits on how many people they can have in the building’

‘No I don’t, OK? I haven’t left the house in six months, don’t send me back there. I want to be here. It’s ritzy. I want to eat shrimp with the cast of The Crown. I want Mario Lopez to ask me about my pants,’ Bateman said.

Kimmel said that he could stay if he promised to laugh at his jokes, but that was the last straw for Bateman as he called a car to pick him up.

Bateman ended his monologue by calling for a standing ovation for him, as footage from previous standing ovations was shown.

Ritzy: 'No I don't, OK? I haven't left the house in six months, don't send me back there. I want to be here. It's ritzy. I want to eat shrimp with the cast of The Crown. I want Mario Lopez to ask me about my pants,' Bateman said

Ritzy: 'No I don't, OK? I haven't left the house in six months, don't send me back there. I want to be here. It's ritzy. I want to eat shrimp with the cast of The Crown. I want Mario Lopez to ask me about my pants,' Bateman said

Ritzy: ‘No I don’t, OK? I haven’t left the house in six months, don’t send me back there. I want to be here. It’s ritzy. I want to eat shrimp with the cast of The Crown. I want Mario Lopez to ask me about my pants,’ Bateman said

Standing O: Bateman ended his monologue by calling for a standing ovation for him, as footage from previous standing ovations was shown

Standing O: Bateman ended his monologue by calling for a standing ovation for him, as footage from previous standing ovations was shown

Standing O: Bateman ended his monologue by calling for a standing ovation for him, as footage from previous standing ovations was shown

Standing O: Bateman ended his monologue by calling for a standing ovation for him, as footage from previous standing ovations was shown

Standing O: Bateman ended his monologue by calling for a standing ovation for him, as footage from previous standing ovations was shown

72nd Primetime Emmy Awards winners

Outstanding Drama Series 

Better Call Saul

The Crown

The Handmaid’s Tale

Killing Eve

The Mandalorian

Ozark

Stranger Things

Succession

 

Outstanding Comedy Series

Curb Your Enthusiasm

Dead to Me

The Good Place

Insecure

The Kominsky Method

The Marvelous Mrs. Maisel

Schitt’s Creek – WINNER

What We Do in the Shadows

 

Outstanding Limited Series

Little Fires Everywhere

Mrs. America

Unbelievable

Unorthodox

Watchmen – WINNER

 

Lead Actor, Drama Series

Jason Bateman, Ozark

Sterling K. Brown, This Is Us

Steve Carell, The Morning Show

Brian Cox, Succession

Billy Porter, Pose

Jeremy Strong, Succession

 

Lead Actress, Drama Series

Jennifer Aniston, The Morning Show

Olivia Colman, The Crown

Jodie Comer, Killing Eve

Laura Linney, Ozark

Sandra Oh, Killing Eve

Zendaya, Euphoria

 

Lead Actor, Comedy Series

Anthony Anderson, Black-ish

Don Cheadle, Black Monday

Ted Danson, The Good Place

Michael Douglas, The Kominsky Method

Eugene Levy, Schitt’s Creek – WINNER

Ramy Youssef, Ramy

 

Lead Actress, Comedy Series

Christina Applegate, Dead to Me

Rachel Brosnahan, The Marvelous Mrs. Maisel

Linda Cardellini, Dead to Me

Catherine O’Hara, Schitt’s Creek – WINNER

Issa Rae, Insecure

Tracee Ellis Ross, Black-ish

 

Lead Actor, Limited Series or Movie

Jeremy Irons, Watchmen

Hugh Jackman, Bad Education

Paul Mescal, Normal People

Jeremy Pope, Hollywood

Mark Ruffalo, I Know This Much Is True – WINNER

 

Lead Actress, Limited Series or Movie

Cate Blanchett, Mrs. America

Shira Haas, Unorthodox

Regina King, Watchmen – WINNER

Octavia Spencer, Self Made: Inspired by the Life of Madam C.J. Walker

Kerry Washington, Little Fires Everywhere 

 

Supporting Actor, Drama Series

Nicholas Braun, Succession

Billy Crudup, The Morning Show

Kieran Culkin, Succession

Mark Duplass, The Morning Show

Giancarlo Esposito, Better Call Saul

Matthew Macfadyen, Succession

Bradley Whitford, The Handmaid’s Tale

Jeffrey Wright, Westworld

 

Supporting Actress, Drama Series

Helena Bonham Carter, The Crown

Laura Dern, Big Little Lies

Julia Garner, Ozark

Thandie Newton, Westworld

Fiona Shaw, Killing Eve

Sarah Snook, Succession

Meryl Streep, Big Little Lies

Samira Wiley, The Handmaid’s Tale

 

Supporting Actor, Comedy Series

Mahershala Ali, Ramy

Alan Arkin, The Kominsky Method

Andre Braugher, Brooklyn Nine-Nine

Sterling K. Brown, The Marvelous Mrs. Maisel

William Jackson Harper, The Good Place

Daniel Levy, Schitt’s Creek – WINNER

Tony Shalhoub, The Marvelous Mrs. Maisel

Kenan Thompson, Saturday Night Live

 

Supporting Actress, Comedy Series

Alex Borstein, The Marvelous Mrs. Maisel

D’Arcy Carden, The Good Place

Betty Gilpin, Glow

Marin Hinkle, The Marvelous Mrs. Maisel

Kate McKinnon, Saturday Night Live

Annie Murphy, Schitt’s Creek – WINNER

Yvonne Orji, Insecure

Cecily Strong, Saturday Night Live

 

TV Movie

American Son

Bad Education

Dolly Parton’s Heartstrings: These Old Bones

El Camino: A Breaking Bad Movie

Unbreakable Kimmy Schmidt: Kimmy vs. the Reverend   

 

Supporting Actress, Limited Series or Movie 

Uzo Aduba, Mrs. America – WINNER

Toni Collette, Unbelievable

Margo Martindale, Mrs. America

Jean Smart, Watchmen

Holland Taylor, Hollywood

Tracey Ullman, Mrs. America

 

Supporting Actor, Limited Series or Movie

Yahya Abdul-Mateen II, Watchmen – WINNER

Jovan Adepo, Watchmen

Tituss Burgess, Unbreakable Kimmy Schmidt: Kimmy vs. the Reverend

Louis Gossett Jr., Watchmen

Dylan McDermott, Hollywood

Jim Parsons, Hollywood

 

Variety Talk Series

The Daily Show With Trevor Noah

Full Frontal With Samantha Bee

Jimmy Kimmel Live!

The Late Show With Stephen Colbert

Last Week Tonight with John Oliver – WINNER

 

Reality Competition Program

The Masked Singer

Nailed It!

RuPaul’s Drag Race

Top Chef

The Voice

 

Variety Sketch Series

A Black Lady Sketch Show

Drunk History

Saturday Night Live  

Reality Host 

Bobby Berk, Karamo Brown, Tan France, Antoni Porowski and Jonathan Van Ness, Queer Eye

Nicole Byer, Nailed It!

Barbara Corcoran, Mark Cuban, Lori Greiner, Daymond John, Robert Herjavec and Kevin O’Leary, Shark Tank

Padma Lakshmi, and Tom Colicchio, Top Chef

Amy Poehler and Nick Offerman, Making It

RuPaul, Drag Race

 

Structured Reality Program

Antiques Roadshow

Love Is Blind

Queer Eye

Shark Tank

A Very Brady Renovation

 

Unstructured Reality Program

Amy Schumer Learns To Cook: Lunch Break And Pasta Night

Cheer

Kevin Hart: Don’t F**k This Up

RuPaul’s Drag Race: Untucked

We’re Here

 

Guest Actress, Comedy

Angela Bassett, A Black Lady Sketch Show

Bette Midler, The Politician

Maya Rudolph, The Good Place

Maya Rudolph, Saturday Night Live

Wanda Sykes, The Marvelous Mrs. Maisel

Phoebe Waller-Bridge, Saturday Night Live

 

Guest Actor, Comedy

Brad Pitt, Saturday Night Live

Adam Driver, Saturday Night Live

Luke Kirby, The Marvelous Mrs. Maisel

Eddie Murphy, Saturday Night Live

Dev Patel, Modern Love

Fred Willard, Modern Family

 

Guest Actress, Drama

Alexis Bledel, The Handmaid’s Tale

Laverne Cox, Orange Is The New Black

Cherry Jones, Succession

Phylicia Rashad, This Is Us

Cicely Tyson, How To Get Away With Murder

Harriet Walter, Succession

 

Guest Actor, Drama

Jason Bateman, The Outsider

Ron Cephas Jones, This Is Us

James Cromwell, Succession

Giancarlo Esposito, The Mandalorian

Andrew Scott, Black Mirror

Martin Short, The Morning Show

 

Documentary or Nonfiction Series

American Masters

Hillary

McMillion$

The Last Dance

Tiger King: Murder, Mayhem And Madness

 

Documentary or Nonfiction Special

The Apollo

Beastie Boys Story

Becoming

The Great Hack

Laurel Canyon: A Place In Time

 

Animated Program

Big Mouth

Bob’s Burgers

BoJack Horseman

Rick And Morty

The Simpsons

 

Writing for a Comedy Series

Dan Levy, Schitt’s Creek (Happy Ending) – WINNER

Sam Johnson and Chris Marcil, What We Do In The Shadows (Collaboration)

Tony McNamara, The Great (The Great)

Stefani Robinson, What We Do In The Shadows (On The Run)

Michael Schur, The Good Place (Whenever You’re Ready)

Paul Simms, What We Do In The Shadows (Ghosts)

David West Read, Schitt’s Creek (The Presidential Suite)

 

Writing for a Drama Series

Jesse Armstrong, Succession (This Is Not for Tears)

Miki Johnson, Ozark (Fire Pink)

Peter Morgan, The Crown (Aberfan)

Chris Mundy, Ozark (All In)

Thomas Schnauz, Better Call Saul (Bad Choice Road)

John Shiban, Ozark (Boss Fight)

Gordon Smith, Better Call Saul (Bagman)

 

Writing for a Limited Series, Movie or Drama Special

Tanya Barfield, Mrs. America (Shirley)

Susannah Grant, Michael Chabon and Ayelet Waldman, Unbelievable (Episode 1)

Damon Lindelof and Cord Jefferson, Watchmen (This Extraordinary Being)- WINNER

Sally Rooney and Alice Birch, Normal People (Episode 3)

 

Writing for a Drama Series

Jesse Armstrong, Succession (This Is Not for Tears)

Miki Johnson, Ozark (Fire Pink)

Peter Morgan, The Crown (Aberfan)

Chris Mundy, Ozark (All In)

Thomas Schnauz, Better Call Saul (Bad Choice Road)

John Shiban, Ozark (Boss Fight)

Gordon Smith, Better Call Saul (Bagman)

 

Writing for a Limited Series, Movie or Drama Special

Tanya Barfield, Mrs. America (Shirley)

Susannah Grant, Michael Chabon and Ayelet Waldman, Unbelievable (Episode 1)

Damon Lindelof and Cord Jefferson, Watchmen (This Extraordinary Being)

Sally Rooney and Alice Birch, Normal People (Episode 3)

Ben Semanoff, Ozark (Su Casa Es Mi Casa)

 

Directing for a Limited Series

Lenny Abrahamson, Normal People (Episode 5)

Steph Green, Watchmen (Little Fear Of Lightning)

Nicole Kassell, Watchmen (It’s Summer And We’re Running Out Of Ice)

Maria Schrader, Unorthodox – WINNER

Lynn Shelton, Little Fires Everywhere (Find A Way)

Stephen Williams, Watchmen (This Extraordinary Being)

 

Directing for a Variety Series

Dime Davis, A Black Lady Sketch Show, (Born At Night, But Not Last Night)

Jim Hoskinson, The Late Show With Stephen Colbert (Live Show; Chris Christie; Nathaniel Rateliff)

Linda Mendoza, Tiffany Haddish Presents: They Ready (Flame Monroe)

David Paul Meyer, “The Daily Show With Trevor Noah” (Dr. Fauci Answers Trevor’s Questions About Coronavirus)

Paul Pennolino and Christopher Werner, Last Week Tonight With John Oliver (Episode 629)

Don Roy King, Saturday Night Live (Host: Eddie Murphy)

 

 

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DOMINIC LAWSON: Yes, these Covid-19 curbs seem arbitrary, but they may just SAVE the economy

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dominic lawson yes these covid 19 curbs seem arbitrary but they may just save the economy

At the risk of startling readers, I can reveal that the Government does have a Covid strategy. That strategy is to ensure as little disruption to businesses and schools as possible, and to make our social lives take the entire strain of new measures to limit the spread of infection.

This can lead to apparently bizarre consequences, illustrated by a letter that appeared in the Financial Times from a reader called Barrie Bain in East Sussex. In full, it read: ‘If I understand the UK Government‘s rule of six correctly, it is illegal for seven children to feed ducks, but legal for 30 men to shoot ducks.’

Well, yes. But the fact is that game shooting is big business in parts of the rural economy, with a long tail of jobs dependent on it. Feeding birds in the park? Not so much. Sorry, children — but you can still gather en masse with your mates at school.

The Government is now introducing what some describe as ‘draconian measures’ to ensure the public observes self-isolation rules (when quarantine is required): fines of up to £10,000 are to be imposed on the most heinous offenders, apparently.

At the risk of startling readers, I can reveal that the Government does have a Covid strategy. That strategy is to ensure as little disruption to businesses and schools as possible, and to make our social lives take the entire strain of new measures to limit the spread of infection (file image of Prime Minister Boris Johnson)

At the risk of startling readers, I can reveal that the Government does have a Covid strategy. That strategy is to ensure as little disruption to businesses and schools as possible, and to make our social lives take the entire strain of new measures to limit the spread of infection (file image of Prime Minister Boris Johnson)

At the risk of startling readers, I can reveal that the Government does have a Covid strategy. That strategy is to ensure as little disruption to businesses and schools as possible, and to make our social lives take the entire strain of new measures to limit the spread of infection (file image of Prime Minister Boris Johnson)

Confusion

But if you look at the Government’s website on rules mandating self-isolation for those returning from trips to nations with high infection rates, you will find that the list of ‘exceptions’ covering various jobs goes on for paragraph after paragraph.

For example, you don’t have to self-isolate if you have ‘specialist or technical skills to ensure the continued production, supply, manufacture, storage or preservation of goods’. Or if you are a lorry driver with an international licence. Or if you are a postal worker ‘involved in the transport of mail into and out of the UK’. I think that covers my local postie, since he often delivers mail to me from overseas.

The other day, I was startled to be told by someone who works in a hospital that although the country from which he’d just returned was now on the quarantine list, he would go straight back to work ‘because registered health and care workers are exempt’. That can’t be right, I spluttered: you will be dealing with some of those most vulnerable to infection.

In fact, he wasn’t right: on July 31, those workers lost their rights of exemption from the self-isolation requirement when returning from countries with high rates of infection. But the fact that he thought he was exempt shows the level of confusion which now exists.

Obviously, this is not the same as someone who’s actually been found to have Covid-19 going out and about rather than self-isolating — and it is these selfish sorts that the government’s new jumbo fines are designed to deter.

Yesterday, on The Andrew Marr Show, the Health Secretary, Matt Hancock (pictured), said unhesitatingly that he would report a neighbour who was breaking the rule of six

Yesterday, on The Andrew Marr Show, the Health Secretary, Matt Hancock (pictured), said unhesitatingly that he would report a neighbour who was breaking the rule of six

Yesterday, on The Andrew Marr Show, the Health Secretary, Matt Hancock (pictured), said unhesitatingly that he would report a neighbour who was breaking the rule of six

Understandably, the hospitality industry is imploring the Government not to introduce any sort of 'second lockdown'. But voluntary decisions by consumers will also cause them pain if soaring infection rates are followed by a surge in hospitalisations

Understandably, the hospitality industry is imploring the Government not to introduce any sort of 'second lockdown'. But voluntary decisions by consumers will also cause them pain if soaring infection rates are followed by a surge in hospitalisations

Understandably, the hospitality industry is imploring the Government not to introduce any sort of ‘second lockdown’. But voluntary decisions by consumers will also cause them pain if soaring infection rates are followed by a surge in hospitalisations

Also, presumably, those who don’t observe the ‘rule of six’. But when such breaches occur in the home, how will they be detected? This is where we come to the vexed issue of ‘dobbing in’.

Yesterday, on The Andrew Marr Show, the Health Secretary, Matt Hancock, said unhesitatingly that he would report a neighbour who was breaking this rule.

But his boss, the Prime Minister, said last week that he was against a ‘sneak culture’ and would inform only if ‘some huge kind of Animal House party was taking place’. I doubt his Downing Street next door neighbour, Rishi Sunak (a teetotaller), would get up to that sort of thing.

And the police don’t seem keen to be bothered by us about neighbours who are breaking the rules. 

Ken Marsh, chairman of the Metropolitan Police Federation, complained: ‘Say you get called by a householder to say there are 12 people in her neighbour’s garden, what is our power of entry? There isn’t one. If you then go upstairs in her house to have a look to check if the claims are correct, the people have most likely gone back indoors. All it is doing is creating animosity between the police and the public.’

The truth is that these rules — designed to stop the rate of coronavirus infection climbing to the levels now seen in France and Spain — will fundamentally rest on individual decisions, not enforcement.

This was also true of the lockdown and what preceded it. If people are worried about infection, they will react accordingly: thus the restaurant trade had collapsed even before the Government imposed lockdown on March 23. They were facing ruin, and were actually rescued by the furlough scheme and the suspension of business rates.

The Prime Minister, said last week that he was against a 'sneak culture' and would inform only if 'some huge kind of Animal House party was taking place'. I doubt his Downing Street next door neighbour, Rishi Sunak (a teetotaller), would get up to that sort of thing

The Prime Minister, said last week that he was against a 'sneak culture' and would inform only if 'some huge kind of Animal House party was taking place'. I doubt his Downing Street next door neighbour, Rishi Sunak (a teetotaller), would get up to that sort of thing

The Prime Minister, said last week that he was against a ‘sneak culture’ and would inform only if ‘some huge kind of Animal House party was taking place’. I doubt his Downing Street next door neighbour, Rishi Sunak (a teetotaller), would get up to that sort of thing

Creative

Understandably, the hospitality industry is imploring the Government not to introduce any sort of ‘second lockdown’. But voluntary decisions by consumers will also cause them pain if soaring infection rates are followed by a surge in hospitalisations (and we have no idea if they will be).

This can be seen by looking at Sweden, where there was no government-mandated lockdown. Its GDP fell by 8.6 per cent in the second quarter, a sharper drop than that experienced by its neighbours Denmark (7.4 per cent down) and Finland (3.2 per cent down), even though those nations did impose lockdowns.

Swedes, on the ‘advice’ of their government, have been working from home as much as we have, with the CEO of the Stockholm Business Region telling a British newspaper last week: ‘Most major company buildings are still closed.’

Admittedly, the Swedish authorities have been more creative than ours in deterring young people from too much ‘mingling’. At one point, council workers in the city of Lund covered the park most favoured by its thousands of students with vast mounds of stinking chicken manure. That seemed to do the trick.

It’s sad that socialising is to be constrained by rules which seem so arbitrary (why six, exactly?). But if this form of contagion containment does not prevent the economy from continuing its strong recovery, then it’s endurable.

Ken Marsh (pictured), chairman of the Metropolitan Police Federation, complained: ‘Say you get called by a householder to say there are 12 people in her neighbour’s garden, what is our power of entry? There isn’t one. If you then go upstairs in her house to have a look to check if the claims are correct, the people have most likely gone back indoors. All it is doing is creating animosity between the police and the public’

Ken Marsh (pictured), chairman of the Metropolitan Police Federation, complained: ‘Say you get called by a householder to say there are 12 people in her neighbour’s garden, what is our power of entry? There isn’t one. If you then go upstairs in her house to have a look to check if the claims are correct, the people have most likely gone back indoors. All it is doing is creating animosity between the police and the public’

Ken Marsh (pictured), chairman of the Metropolitan Police Federation, complained: ‘Say you get called by a householder to say there are 12 people in her neighbour’s garden, what is our power of entry? There isn’t one. If you then go upstairs in her house to have a look to check if the claims are correct, the people have most likely gone back indoors. All it is doing is creating animosity between the police and the public’

‘Des’ and an exhibit to kill your appetite 

Serial killers, especially when their murdering involves bizarre sexual practices, hold a peculiar fascination for the British (and probably not just us). So no wonder the recreation of Dennis Nilsen by actor David Tennant has attracted such attention.

I didn’t watch any of ITV’s three-part drama, Des. But then, having actually seen the oven and utensils with which Nilsen — a former cook in the British Army — boiled down various parts of his victims, I’ve had enough of all that ghoulishness. 

To explain: many years ago, I was invited by the Metropolitan Police to visit what it then called the Black Museum in New Scotland Yard. This — now renamed the Crime Museum — encompassed a collection of items connected to some of the most notorious killers ever brought to justice by the Met.

It is not open to the public but occasional tours are given to people professionally involved in the justice system, and I tagged along with a group of criminal barristers.

Serial killers, especially when their murdering involves bizarre sexual practices, hold a peculiar fascination for the British (and probably not just us). So no wonder the recreation of Dennis Nilsen by actor David Tennant (pictured) has attracted such attention

Serial killers, especially when their murdering involves bizarre sexual practices, hold a peculiar fascination for the British (and probably not just us). So no wonder the recreation of Dennis Nilsen by actor David Tennant (pictured) has attracted such attention

Serial killers, especially when their murdering involves bizarre sexual practices, hold a peculiar fascination for the British (and probably not just us). So no wonder the recreation of Dennis Nilsen by actor David Tennant (pictured) has attracted such attention

At the end of the tour of the windowless and gloomy room which housed these sinister exhibits, we came to its pièce de résistance: yes, the cooker and pots taken from Dennis Nilsen’s North London kitchen.

Our guide drew our attention to a small glass container sitting on top of the oven.

It appeared to have some congealed brownish substance in it. He then asked: ‘Would any of you like to suggest what is in this glass?’

One of the barristers, a woman who had been staring with great intensity at this grotesque criminological relic, replied, hesitatingly. ‘It’s . . .er . . . stock . . . isn’t it?’

‘Yes, madam,’ said the copper, in tones of practised relish. ‘Stock. Human stock.’

Later, I wondered if it was exactly respectful to the victims to display this essence of their boiled-down bodies. At the time, I was just glad to get out and into the open air.

I didn’t watch any of ITV’s three-part drama, Des. But then, having actually seen the oven and utensils with which Nilsen — a former cook in the British Army — boiled down various parts of his victims, I’ve had enough of all that ghoulishness

I didn’t watch any of ITV’s three-part drama, Des. But then, having actually seen the oven and utensils with which Nilsen — a former cook in the British Army — boiled down various parts of his victims, I’ve had enough of all that ghoulishness

I didn’t watch any of ITV’s three-part drama, Des. But then, having actually seen the oven and utensils with which Nilsen — a former cook in the British Army — boiled down various parts of his victims, I’ve had enough of all that ghoulishness

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Model, 26, who lost eight stone to be crowned Miss GB says NOT ‘fat-shaming’ to call people ‘obese’

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model 26 who lost eight stone to be crowned miss gb says not fat shaming to call people obese

A model who lost eight stone to be crowned Miss GB has said it’s not ‘fat-shaming’ to call the overweight obese and criticised people for being ‘way too easily offended.’

Jen Atkin used to weigh in at 18 stone before she decided to heed messages such as ‘burn those calories.’

But the 26-year-old has revealed her horror that the very language which spurred her on was being advised against by the British Psychological Society which argued that we ought to say that someone is ‘living with obesity,’ rather than that they are obese.

Ms Atkin said that ‘hiding terms’ such as ‘burn off last night’s pizza’ would only exacerbate Britain’s fat crisis – almost two thirds of UK adults are obese.

Jen Atkin, 26, (pictured) from Ulceby, who was able to shed eight stone in a two-year period after overhauling her lifestyle, has been crowned Miss Great Britain

Jen Atkin, 26, (pictured) from Ulceby, who was able to shed eight stone in a two-year period after overhauling her lifestyle, has been crowned Miss Great Britain

Jen Atkin, 26, (pictured) from Ulceby, who was able to shed eight stone in a two-year period after overhauling her lifestyle, has been crowned Miss Great Britain 

Jen (pictured before) saw her weight escalate to 17st on a diet of takeaways, before developing a regime of healthy eating and regular gym work outs

Jen (pictured before) saw her weight escalate to 17st on a diet of takeaways, before developing a regime of healthy eating and regular gym work outs

Jen (pictured before) saw her weight escalate to 17st on a diet of takeaways, before developing a regime of healthy eating and regular gym work outs

The 26-year-old (pictured) previously won Miss Scunthorpe and achieved runner-up in Miss England, 2018

The 26-year-old (pictured) previously won Miss Scunthorpe and achieved runner-up in Miss England, 2018

The 26-year-old (pictured) previously won Miss Scunthorpe and achieved runner-up in Miss England, 2018

The model from Grimsby told the BBC: ‘I think it’s going to encourage people to eat more calories and not keep track of what they’re eating and therefore end up overweight or obese. It’s just avoiding the issue completely.

‘Trust me. I have been fat shamed in the past and this is not fat shaming.’ She added. ‘Calories are in food and we need calories to survive … we need to educate people on healthy living.’

But Belinda Barnett of the Anorexia and Bulimia Care charity disagreed and said that terms such as ‘burn those calories’ are ‘triggering’ to those with eating disorders.

‘Language like “burn those calories” suggests that we have to do some type of compensation for the calories we eat and I think that can feed into feelings of guilt and shame around eating,’ she said.

Ms Atkin, an aviation administrator, has been keen to promote a healthy lifestyle after her remarkable weight loss, which came over a two-year period and also included regular visits to the gym.

Jen (pictured before) briefly retired from competing in pageants after getting married

Jen (pictured before) briefly retired from competing in pageants after getting married

Jen (pictured after) decided to give the longest-running pageant in the UK another shot, after her name was put forward

Jen (pictured after) decided to give the longest-running pageant in the UK another shot, after her name was put forward

Jen decided to give the longest-running pageant in the UK another shot, after her name was put forward, pictured: before left and right in 2019

Jen (pictured before) who is also a country singer, said she felt 'incredible' to have been crowned the 75th Miss Great Britain

Jen (pictured before) who is also a country singer, said she felt 'incredible' to have been crowned the 75th Miss Great Britain

Jen (pictured before) who is also a country singer, said she felt ‘incredible’ to have been crowned the 75th Miss Great Britain

Jen (pictured) maintains her weight loss by eating protein rich foods and snacking on fruit, in addition to exercising five days a week

Jen (pictured) maintains her weight loss by eating protein rich foods and snacking on fruit, in addition to exercising five days a week

Jen (pictured) maintains her weight loss by eating protein rich foods and snacking on fruit, in addition to exercising five days a week 

Jen (pictured) was inspired to overhaul her lifestyle after the breakdown of her first serious relationship, fearing that she wouldn't meet someone else

Jen (pictured) was inspired to overhaul her lifestyle after the breakdown of her first serious relationship, fearing that she wouldn't meet someone else

Jen (pictured) was inspired to overhaul her lifestyle after the breakdown of her first serious relationship, fearing that she wouldn’t meet someone else

After her weight loss, Ms Atkin was named Miss Scunthorpe before going on to compete for the title of Miss England in 2018, where she finished as first runner-up. 

She then briefly retired from competing in pageants after getting married but decided to give it one more shot after having her name put forward to represent Great Britain.

She was named the 75th Miss Great Britain in March following a whirlwind couple of years. 

The 26-year-old was originally inspired to lose weight after the breakdown of her first serious relationship, fearing that she wouldn’t meet someone else.

Jen (pictured) was selected as Miss Great Britain, with judges on the panel including Miss Great Britain 2018/19 Kobi-Jean Cole and pageant historian Sally-Ann Fawcett

Jen (pictured) was selected as Miss Great Britain, with judges on the panel including Miss Great Britain 2018/19 Kobi-Jean Cole and pageant historian Sally-Ann Fawcett

Jen (pictured) was selected as Miss Great Britain, with judges on the panel including Miss Great Britain 2018/19 Kobi-Jean Cole and pageant historian Sally-Ann Fawcett

The aviation administrator (pictured before) competed for the title of Miss Great Britain at the Athena in Leicester, which attracted over 400 guests

The aviation administrator (pictured before) competed for the title of Miss Great Britain at the Athena in Leicester, which attracted over 400 guests

The aviation administrator (pictured before) competed for the title of Miss Great Britain at the Athena in Leicester, which attracted over 400 guests

Jen (pictured after) who wore a size UK 22 at her heaviest, followed exercise workouts from YouTube in addition to eating healthy foods

Jen (pictured after) who wore a size UK 22 at her heaviest, followed exercise workouts from YouTube in addition to eating healthy foods

Jen (pictured after) who wore a size UK 22 at her heaviest, followed exercise workouts from YouTube in addition to eating healthy foods

Struggling to fit into her clothes, Ms Atkin began walking regularly and spending hours in the gym.

As she embraced the single life, while her friends were busy with their own relationships and children, she would spend time studying food packaging to make healthier choices.  

She is also a country singer and released her first single in 2018 through the record label MHMG, reaching number two in the ReverbNation national charts.

Her twin brother, Sam Atkin, is an international athlete who competed for Great Britain at last year’s European Indoor Championships over the 3,000m distance.

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