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Middle Eastern website says Newcastle is a ‘remote tribal community’ worse than Yemen

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middle eastern website says newcastle is a remote tribal community worse than yemen

A Middle Eastern website has slammed the city of Newcastle and its residents in an article discussing the potential takeover of Newcastle United by Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman.

The opinion article, published on ‘Inside Arabia’ and written by Tom Pollitt, describes Newcastle as a ‘remote, tribal community’ which is worse to live in than war-torn Yemen. 

Mr Pollitt also claims it is ‘illegal not to drink’ in Newcastle and also criticises the dress sense of ‘Geordie lasses’. 

Newcastle has been described as a 'remote, tribal community' where it is 'illegal not to drink' and is a worse place to live in than Yemen by a Middle Eastern website

Newcastle has been described as a 'remote, tribal community' where it is 'illegal not to drink' and is a worse place to live in than Yemen by a Middle Eastern website

Newcastle has been described as a ‘remote, tribal community’ where it is ‘illegal not to drink’ and is a worse place to live in than Yemen by a Middle Eastern website

The article, written in 'Inside Arabia' by Tom Pollitt, states that Newcastle football fans have  'well-documented penchant for violence' and are 'volatile and arrogant on a night out'

The article, written in 'Inside Arabia' by Tom Pollitt, states that Newcastle football fans have  'well-documented penchant for violence' and are 'volatile and arrogant on a night out'

The article, written in ‘Inside Arabia’ by Tom Pollitt, states that Newcastle football fans have  ‘well-documented penchant for violence’ and are ‘volatile and arrogant on a night out’

The author of the piece accuses the people of Newcastle of having a ‘well-documented penchant for violence’ and being ‘volatile and arrogant’ and incomprehensible to outsiders.

The article reads: ‘Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman (MbS) is the de facto ruler of a desert Kingdom where drinking alcohol is officially illegal and, until recently, half of the population were prohibited from driving simply for being women. 

‘It may seem surprising therefore that he has taken interest in the rainy British city of Newcastle, a place where it is unofficially illegal not to drink alcohol.’

Crown Prince bin Salman is looking to claim a majority stake in the north East club and is reportedly preparing a bid worth £300million.

The opinion article was written as an analysis piece for the potential takeover of Newcastle United Football Club by a Saudi prince

The opinion article was written as an analysis piece for the potential takeover of Newcastle United Football Club by a Saudi prince

The opinion article was written as an analysis piece for the potential takeover of Newcastle United Football Club by a Saudi prince

Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman is preparing to conclude a majority takeover of the north east club in a potential £300million move

Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman is preparing to conclude a majority takeover of the north east club in a potential £300million move

Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman is preparing to conclude a majority takeover of the north east club in a potential £300million move

The ‘Inside Arabia’ article continued its comparisons between the Saudi prince’s place of origin and the city where he is looking to make his sporting investment. 

The article claims: ‘At first glance, Newcastle and Saudi Arabia are stark opposites. Newcastle-born women are unlikely to be seen sporting head-to-toe black cloth in the desert sun. 

‘On the contrary, Geordie lasses are renowned for queuing outside night-clubs in sub-zero temperatures, wearing outfits flimsier than MbS’ alibi for the murder of Jamal Khashoggi.

‘In fact, aside from a shared, well-documented penchant for violence, MbS has little in common with Newcastle folk. So, what could he possibly want with them?

‘For a man notorious for his opposition to freedom of speech, it will be refreshing for him to get involved with a city where outsiders cannot understand a word the locals are saying.’

The article also states that outsiders 'do not understand' Geordies say and that the city's women wear outfits flimsier than the Corwn prince's alibi for the murder of Jamal Khashoggi

The article also states that outsiders 'do not understand' Geordies say and that the city's women wear outfits flimsier than the Corwn prince's alibi for the murder of Jamal Khashoggi

The article also states that outsiders ‘do not understand’ Geordies say and that the city’s women wear outfits flimsier than the Corwn prince’s alibi for the murder of Jamal Khashoggi

The article mentions how the CIA refer to the Saudi prince as ‘volatile and arrogant’, which, according to Inside Arabia, ‘makes him sound like a Newcastle fan on a night out.’

Labour MP for Newcastle Central Chi Onwurah reacted angrily to the piece, branding it ‘cheap, shoddy journalism’.

She tweeted: ‘They say -“Our vision is to build bridges of understanding between Arabs and Americans to promote peace and tolerance.” – obviously by stereotyping & insulting everyone else.

‘Dear @saeb_sakkijha, CEO of @Inside Arabia by so grossly insulting & patronising #Geordies, people living in the region & #NUFC fans you undermine both your reputation & the interests of the causes you serve.’

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Rihanna’s father Ronald Fenty says Barbados should have removed Queen as head of state in 1966

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rihannas father ronald fenty says barbados should have removed queen as head of state in 1966

The father of singer Rihanna has said that Barbados should have removed the Queen as a head of state as the country reveals it will become a republic.

Ronald Fenty, 66, said the Queen should have been removed as head of state ‘when we declared independence in 1966’.

He told The Times that he can see ‘British people being hurt by the decision’ but that Barbados will ‘still be part of the Commonwealth’.   

Barbados has announced its intention to remove the Queen as its head of state and become a republic by November, 2021.  

Ronald Fenty, 66, said the Queen should have been removed as head of state 'when we declared independence in 1966'

Ronald Fenty, 66, said the Queen should have been removed as head of state 'when we declared independence in 1966'

Ronald Fenty, 66, said the Queen should have been removed as head of state ‘when we declared independence in 1966’

The decision to replace the Queen as head of state is dividing the conservative nation

The decision to replace the Queen as head of state is dividing the conservative nation

The decision to replace the Queen as head of state is dividing the conservative nation 

It was the Queen’s representative, governor-general Dame Sandra Mason, 71, who announced on Wednesday that ‘the time has come to fully leave our colonial past behind’. 

She added that ‘Barbadians want a Barbadian head of state’.       

Prime Minister Mia Mottley wrote a speech quoting the Caribbean island nation’s first premier Errol Barrow’s warning against ‘loitering on colonial premises’.

Ms Mottley came to power two years ago with a programme that included a ‘reassessment’ of relations with the United Kingdom.  

The decision to replace the Queen as head of state follows the decriminalisation of cannabis and the removal of Bridgetown’s statue of Horatio Nelson in dividing this conservative nation. 

Buckingham Palace has said Barbados’ intention to remove the Queen as head of state and become a republic is a ‘matter’ for the Caribbean nation.  

The Queen pictured with Governor-General of Barbados Dame Sandra Mason at Windsor Castle in 2018

The Queen pictured with Governor-General of Barbados Dame Sandra Mason at Windsor Castle in 2018

The Queen pictured with Governor-General of Barbados Dame Sandra Mason at Windsor Castle in 2018

The Queen inspects a guard of honour upon arrival in Barbados in 1977

The Queen inspects a guard of honour upon arrival in Barbados in 1977

The Queen inspects a guard of honour upon arrival in Barbados in 1977 

Prince Charles attends a wreath laying ceremony in Bridgetown in March 2019

Prince Charles attends a wreath laying ceremony in Bridgetown in March 2019

Prince Charles attends a wreath laying ceremony in Bridgetown in March 2019 

Reading the speech, Governor-General Dame Sandra Mason said: ‘The time has come to fully leave our colonial past behind. Barbadians want a Barbadian Head of State. 

‘This is the ultimate statement of confidence in who we are and what we are capable of achieving.

‘Hence, Barbados will take the next logical step toward full sovereignty and become a Republic by the time we celebrate our 55th Anniversary of Independence.’

Asked to comment on the Commonwealth country’s plans a palace spokesman said: ‘This is a matter for the government and people of Barbados.’

Downing Street said it was a ‘decision for Barbados and the Government there’ but that Britain would continue to ‘enjoy a partnership’ with the Caribbean island nation as members of the Commonwealth.

Queen Elizabeth ll smiles with a young girl in Barbados on November 1, 1977

Queen Elizabeth ll smiles with a young girl in Barbados on November 1, 1977

Queen Elizabeth II on a walkabout during a visit to Bridgetown, Barbados, during her Silver Jubilee tour of the Caribbean

Queen Elizabeth II on a walkabout during a visit to Bridgetown, Barbados, during her Silver Jubilee tour of the Caribbean

Left, Queen Elizabeth ll smiles with a young girl in Barbados on November 1, 1977. Right, Queen Elizabeth II on a walkabout during a visit to Bridgetown

A Number 10 spokesman said: ‘We obviously have a shared history and remain united with Barbados in terms of history, culture and language, and we will continue to have and enjoy a partnership with them as members of the Commonwealth.’

The country gained its independence from Britain in 1966, though the Queen remains its constitutional monarch.

In 1998, a Barbados constitutional review commission recommended republican status, and in 2015 Prime Minister Freundel Stuart said ‘we have to move from a monarchical system to a republican form of government in the very near future’.

Most Caribbean countries have kept formal links with the monarchy after achieving independence.

Barbados would join Trinidad and Tobago, Dominica and Guyana if it proceeds with its plan to become a republic.

The Queen and Prince Philip driving through Barbados waving to the crowds in February 1966

The Queen and Prince Philip driving through Barbados waving to the crowds in February 1966

The Queen and Prince Philip driving through Barbados waving to the crowds in February 1966 

Jamaica has also flagged such a transition, with Prime Minister Andrew Holness saying it is a priority of his government, but has yet to achieve it.

Barbados took another step towards independence from the UK in 2003 when it replaced the London-based Judicial Committee of the Privy Council with the Caribbean Court of Justice, located in Trinidad and Tobago’s Port of Spain, as its final appeals court.

Former Prime Minister Owen Arthur promoted the idea of a referendum on becoming a republic in 2005, however the vote was called off due to concerns raised by the Electoral and Boundaries Commission.

Barbados: The country’s colonial history 

The Sugar Revolution, the introduction of sugar cane from Dutch Brazil, in the 1640s was highly lucrative but came at great social cost

The Sugar Revolution, the introduction of sugar cane from Dutch Brazil, in the 1640s was highly lucrative but came at great social cost

The Sugar Revolution, the introduction of sugar cane from Dutch Brazil, in the 1640s was highly lucrative but came at great social cost 

Barbados was one of the oldest English settlements in the West Indies, being surpassed only by Saint Kitts. 

The countries’ historical ties date back to the 17th century and involve settlement, post-colonialism and modern bilateral relations. 

Since Barbados gained its independence in 1966, the nations have continued to share ties through the Commonwealth, with the Queen as Monarch. 

The Barbadian Parliament is the third oldest in the entire Commonwealth and the island continues to practice the Westminster style of government.

Many of the historic Anglican churches and plantation houses across the island show the influence of English architecture. 

In 1627, 80 Englishmen aboard the William and John landed on the Caribbean island and founded Jamestown (close to today’s Holetown), in the name of King James I.

The early settlers struggled to develop a profitable export crop and faced difficulties in maintaining supplies from Europe.

However, the Sugar Revolution, the introduction of sugar cane from Dutch Brazil, in the 1640s was highly lucrative and over the next decade more than two thirds of English emigres to the Americas went to Barbados. 

But while this shift to sugar yielded huge profits, it came at a great social cost. Thousands of West African slaves were shipped across the Atlantic to work the plantations and workers suffered from low wages and minimal social services. 

It is estimated that between 1627 to 1807, some 387,000 Africans were shipped to the island against their will and the country shifted from having a majority white population to a majority black population. 

On 28th August 1833, the British Government passed the Slavery Abolition Act, and slaves across the British empire were granted emancipation. 

Barbados remained a British colony until internal autonomy was granted in 1961. 

The country became fully independent on November 30, 1966, during a time when the country’s economy was expanding and diversifying. 

Since then, the Barbadian Parliament has remained a constitutional monarchy and parliamentary democracy, which is modeled on the British Westminster system of government. 

In 2008, British exports to Barbados stood at £38 million, making it Britain’s fourth-largest export market in the region.  

In recent years a growing number of British nationals have been relocating to Barbados to live, with polls showing that British nationals make up 75–85 per cent of the Barbados second home market.

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Prime Minister Boris Johnson

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Prime Minister Boris Johnson and Labour leader Sir Keir Starmer have arrived at Westminster Abbey in London for the annual Sunday service marking the 80th anniversary of the Battle of Britain.

Mr Johnson, along with Chief of the Air Staff, Air Chief Marshal Mike Wigston, will give a reading at the venue’s first major service since March. 

Marshal of the Royal Air Force Lord Stirrup representing the Prince of Wales and U.S. ambassador to Britain, Woody Johnson, are also among those attending.

Prime Minister Boris Johnson

Prime Minister Boris Johnson

Labour leader Sir Keir Starmer and his wife Victoria

Labour leader Sir Keir Starmer and his wife Victoria

Prime Minister Boris Johnson, left, and Labour leader Sir Keir Starmer, right, have arrived at Westminster Abbey in London for the annual Sunday service marking the 80th anniversary of the Battle of Britain

Chairs for around 79 invited guests, who are all wearing masks, have been placed at the transepts of the church close to the altar.

Each chair has been spaced two metres apart to allow social distancing, with protective plastic screens separating the north and south transepts.

The annual Sunday service usually attracts around 2,000 people to the London landmark as the UK commemorates the first battle in history fought entirely in the air during the Second World War.

However, this Sunday’s event will see attendance significantly reduced and social-distancing measures in place – with the abbey vowing the service will be ‘reduced in stature but not in spirit’.

A spokesperson said: ‘The Abbey is a very large church, it usually holds 2,200, so the guests will be easily spaced out to conform with social distancing.’

Woody Johnson, U.S. ambassador to Britain arrives at Westminster Abbey ahead of the "Service of Thanksgiving and Rededication to mark the 80th anniversary of the Battle of Britain", today

Woody Johnson, U.S. ambassador to Britain arrives at Westminster Abbey ahead of the "Service of Thanksgiving and Rededication to mark the 80th anniversary of the Battle of Britain", today

Woody Johnson, U.S. ambassador to Britain arrives at Westminster Abbey ahead of the ‘Service of Thanksgiving and Rededication to mark the 80th anniversary of the Battle of Britain’, today

A member of the armed forces at a service to mark the 80th anniversary of the Battle of Britain at Westminster Abbey on Sunday

A member of the armed forces at a service to mark the 80th anniversary of the Battle of Britain at Westminster Abbey on Sunday

A member of the armed forces at a service to mark the 80th anniversary of the Battle of Britain at Westminster Abbey on Sunday

It is the first major service to take place at Westminster Abbey since the Commonwealth Day service held earlier this year on March 9, two weeks before the UK went into lockdown in response to the pandemic.

The 11am service led by Dr David Hoyle – the Dean of Westminster Abbey, includes an act of remembrance, during which the Battle of Britain Roll of Honour bearing the names of 1,497 pilots and aircrew killed or mortally wounded in the battle will be borne through the church.

This will be followed by a procession of flags, readings, prayers and music – with a flypast over Westminster Abbey planned at the end of the service.

The Battle of Britain was a major air campaign fought in the skies over the UK in 1940, and although the battle took place between July and October, September 15 saw the British Royal Air Force (RAF) gain a decisive victory over the Luftwaffe in what was Nazi Germany’s largest daylight attack.

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Girl, 14, dies after being hit by a car as two men, aged 18 and 19, are arrested

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girl 14 dies after being hit by a car as two men aged 18 and 19 are arrested

A 14-year-old girl has died after being hit by a car in Merseyside on Saturday night. 

Merseyside Police said two men, aged 18 and 19, were arrested on suspicion of causing death by dangerous driving after the crash in St Helens. 

Officers were called to a report of a collision involving a car and a pedestrian on Blackbrook Road around 9.50pm. 

A 14-year-old girl has died after being hit by a car in Merseyside on Saturday night and two men, aged 18 and 19, were arrested on suspicion of causing death by dangerous driving

A 14-year-old girl has died after being hit by a car in Merseyside on Saturday night and two men, aged 18 and 19, were arrested on suspicion of causing death by dangerous driving

A 14-year-old girl has died after being hit by a car in Merseyside on Saturday night and two men, aged 18 and 19, were arrested on suspicion of causing death by dangerous driving

A force spokesman said: ‘Emergency services attended and the pedestrian, a 14-year-old girl, was taken to hospital where she sadly died. 

‘Her family have been informed and are being supported at this time.’  

Officers urged anyone who witnessed the incident or had any information, CCTV or dashcam footage to contact police on 101 quoting ref 20000569277, call the Roads Policing Unit on 0151 777 5747 or contact Crimestoppers, anonymously, on 0800 555 111.

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