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Moment building collapses in Turkey after 7.0 magnitude earthquake

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moment building collapses in turkey after 7 0 magnitude earthquake

This is the terrifying moment a building collapses in Turkey as the catastrophic 7.0-magnitude earthquake sends people fleeing from their homes on Greek islands – leaving 12 dead and 607 injured.

The air is filled with dust as the seven-story building collapses within moments and some people can be seen trying to protect themselves.

As the building collapses making a rumpling sound, some people’s cries can be heard in the background.  

Turkey and Greece were battered by a 7.0-magnitude earthquake today which killed at least fourteen people, flattened buildings and caused a mini-tsunami which flooded streets in horrifying scenes on the Turkish coast.

Debris was racing down Turkish streets after an apparent sea surge near Izmir where at least six buildings were destroyed and footage showed people climbing over the wreckage of collapsed multi-storey blocks. 

Turkey’s disaster agency said at least twelve people were dead and 607 injured in the earthquake, while two teenagers were killed in Greece when the wall of a building collapsed on the island of Samos.

The mini-tsunami reached Samos too where islanders were told to avoid the coast after some fled their homes because of the quake, which was also felt in Athens and nearby Albania, North Macedonia and Bulgaria.

According to Turkey’s disaster agency, at least 170 aftershocks were recorded, with 21 of them being more than 4 on the Richter scale. 

The shocking moment a building collapses during the earthquake in Izmir

The shocking moment a building collapses during the earthquake in Izmir

The shocking moment a building collapses during the earthquake in Izmir

The air is filled with dust as the seven- story building collapses within moments

The air is filled with dust as the seven- story building collapses within moments

The air is filled with dust as the seven- story building collapses within moments

As the building collapses making a rumpling sound, some people's cries can be heard in the background

As the building collapses making a rumpling sound, some people's cries can be heard in the background

As the building collapses making a rumpling sound, some people’s cries can be heard in the background

A destroyed building in Izmir, Turkey, after the 7.0-magnitude earthquake in the Aegean today which killed at least twelve people and injured 607 others in Turkey, while injuring at least four people in Greece

A destroyed building in Izmir, Turkey, after the 7.0-magnitude earthquake in the Aegean today which killed at least twelve people and injured 607 others in Turkey, while injuring at least four people in Greece

A destroyed building in Izmir, Turkey, after the 7.0-magnitude earthquake in the Aegean today which killed at least twelve people and injured 607 others in Turkey, while injuring at least four people in Greece 

28-year-old Malik Tahirler is being rescued from wreckage by the search and rescue teams in Bornova district

28-year-old Malik Tahirler is being rescued from wreckage by the search and rescue teams in Bornova district

28-year-old Malik Tahirler is being rescued from wreckage by the search and rescue teams in Bornova district

Rescue operations take place on a collapsed building after the earthquake

Rescue operations take place on a collapsed building after the earthquake

Rescue operations take place on a collapsed building after the earthquake

Wounded people are cut free from the wreckage of a toppled building in Izmir, Turkey, after the quake struck

Wounded people are cut free from the wreckage of a toppled building in Izmir, Turkey, after the quake struck

Wounded people are cut free from the wreckage of a toppled building in Izmir, Turkey, after the quake struck

Search and rescue teams continue to look for survivors with dogs in Izmir

Search and rescue teams continue to look for survivors with dogs in Izmir

Search and rescue teams continue to look for survivors with dogs in Izmir

Rescuers search for survivors at a collapsed building after a powerful earthquake struck Turkey's western coast

Rescuers search for survivors at a collapsed building after a powerful earthquake struck Turkey's western coast

Rescuers search for survivors at a collapsed building after a powerful earthquake struck Turkey’s western coast

A man is being carried out of debris of a collapsed building in Izmir

A man is being carried out of debris of a collapsed building in Izmir

A man is being carried out of debris of a collapsed building in Izmir

Rescue operations are in place after the 7.0 magnitude earthquake in the coastal province of Izmir

Rescue operations are in place after the 7.0 magnitude earthquake in the coastal province of Izmir

Rescue operations are in place after the 7.0 magnitude earthquake in the coastal province of Izmir

Debris was floating along streets in high waters after the earthquake in Turkey

Debris was floating along streets in high waters after the earthquake in Turkey

Debris in flooded streets after the earthquake

Debris in flooded streets after the earthquake

Debris was racing down Turkish streets after an apparent sea surge near Izmir amid a ‘mini-tsunami’ in Turkey and Greece which followed the 7.0-magnitude earthquake in the Aegean Sea today 

Rescue workers and local volunteers carry a wounded person on a stretcher after they were found in the debris of a building

Rescue workers and local volunteers carry a wounded person on a stretcher after they were found in the debris of a building

Rescue workers and local volunteers carry a wounded person on a stretcher after they were found in the debris of a building

Search and rescue teams work their way through the rubble of a collapsed building in Izmir, Turkey, after the country was struck by a magnitude 7 earthquake

Search and rescue teams work their way through the rubble of a collapsed building in Izmir, Turkey, after the country was struck by a magnitude 7 earthquake

Search and rescue teams work their way through the rubble of a collapsed building in Izmir, Turkey, after the country was struck by a magnitude 7 earthquake

The rubble of a flattened building is seen from the air as night falls over Izmir, Turkey, after the city was hit by an earthquake

The rubble of a flattened building is seen from the air as night falls over Izmir, Turkey, after the city was hit by an earthquake

The rubble of a flattened building is seen from the air as night falls over Izmir, Turkey, after the city was hit by an earthquake

Heavy lifting machinery is used to sift the rubble of a collapsed building in Izimir, Turkey, after it was hit by an earthquake

Heavy lifting machinery is used to sift the rubble of a collapsed building in Izimir, Turkey, after it was hit by an earthquake

Heavy lifting machinery is used to sift the rubble of a collapsed building in Izimir, Turkey, after it was hit by an earthquake

Dozens of buildings have been reported to be destroyed from the 7.0 magnitude earthquake that rocked Turkey and Greece

Dozens of buildings have been reported to be destroyed from the 7.0 magnitude earthquake that rocked Turkey and Greece

Dozens of buildings have been reported to be destroyed from the 7.0 magnitude earthquake that rocked Turkey and Greece

Rescue teams going through the debris of a collapsed building in Bayrakli district

Rescue teams going through the debris of a collapsed building in Bayrakli district

Rescue teams going through the debris of a collapsed building in Bayrakli district

The quake thats was centred in the Aegean Sea has left dozens of building destroyed

The quake thats was centred in the Aegean Sea has left dozens of building destroyed

 The quake thats was centred in the Aegean Sea has left dozens of building destroyed

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35052736 8897247 image a 7 1604083248971

The European-Mediterranean Seismological Centre said the quake had an epicentre eight miles from of the Greek island of Samos

Flooding on the Greek island of Samos where sea water covered a square after a sea surge came in the wake of the tremor

Flooding on the Greek island of Samos where sea water covered a square after a sea surge came in the wake of the tremor

Flooding on the Greek island of Samos where sea water covered a square after a sea surge came in the wake of the tremor 

A statue of a lion looks over a flooded square with benches and trees surrounded by water at the Greek port of Vathi

A statue of a lion looks over a flooded square with benches and trees surrounded by water at the Greek port of Vathi

A statue of a lion looks over a flooded square with benches and trees surrounded by water at the Greek port of Vathi 

A Greek Orthodox church was damaged in the town of Karlovasi after the island of Samos was hit by today's earthquake

A Greek Orthodox church was damaged in the town of Karlovasi after the island of Samos was hit by today's earthquake

A Greek Orthodox church was damaged in the town of Karlovasi after the island of Samos was hit by today’s earthquake 

Greek firefighters look at a building which was knocked out of shape by the earthquake which hit the island of Samos today

Greek firefighters look at a building which was knocked out of shape by the earthquake which hit the island of Samos today

Greek firefighters look at a building which was knocked out of shape by the earthquake which hit the island of Samos today 

An injured person is surrounded by medical helpers after being cut free from the wreckage in Izmir's Bayrakli disrict today

An injured person is surrounded by medical helpers after being cut free from the wreckage in Izmir's Bayrakli disrict today

An injured person is surrounded by medical helpers after being cut free from the wreckage in Izmir’s Bayrakli disrict today

People surround the claw of an excavator as they search for survivors at a collapsed building in Izmir today

People surround the claw of an excavator as they search for survivors at a collapsed building in Izmir today

People surround the claw of an excavator as they search for survivors at a collapsed building in Izmir today 

People wearing masks look at an injured person being put on a stretcher as victims were taken for medical help in Izmir

People wearing masks look at an injured person being put on a stretcher as victims were taken for medical help in Izmir

People wearing masks look at an injured person being put on a stretcher as victims were taken for medical help in Izmir 

Locals and officials search for survivors at a collapsed building after a strong earthquake struck the Aegean Sea on Friday and was felt in both Greece and Turkey

Locals and officials search for survivors at a collapsed building after a strong earthquake struck the Aegean Sea on Friday and was felt in both Greece and Turkey

Locals and officials search for survivors at a collapsed building after a strong earthquake struck the Aegean Sea on Friday and was felt in both Greece and Turkey

People prepare stretchers as they search for survivors in a building which was totally disfigured by Friday's earthquake

People prepare stretchers as they search for survivors in a building which was totally disfigured by Friday's earthquake

People prepare stretchers as they search for survivors in a building which was totally disfigured by Friday’s earthquake 

A Volkswagen car in the rubble of a collapsed building in Izmir following the earthquake which brought down huge structures

A Volkswagen car in the rubble of a collapsed building in Izmir following the earthquake which brought down huge structures

A Volkswagen car in the rubble of a collapsed building in Izmir following the earthquake which brought down huge structures

People look at the rubble of a building in Izmir after the earthquake struck on Friday

People look at the rubble of a building in Izmir after the earthquake struck on Friday

People look at the rubble of a building in Izmir after the earthquake struck on Friday 

According to Turkey's disaster agency at least 12 people are dead and 607 injured after the catastrophic earthquake

According to Turkey's disaster agency at least 12 people are dead and 607 injured after the catastrophic earthquake

According to Turkey’s disaster agency at least 12 people are dead and 607 injured after the catastrophic earthquake

People look at a building which was knocked precariously off-balance by the earthquake which struck on Friday afternoon

People look at a building which was knocked precariously off-balance by the earthquake which struck on Friday afternoon

People look at a building which was knocked precariously off-balance by the earthquake which struck on Friday afternoon 

The rescue operation begins as people climb over the wreckage of a collapsed building following the powerful earthquake

The rescue operation begins as people climb over the wreckage of a collapsed building following the powerful earthquake

The rescue operation begins as people climb over the wreckage of a collapsed building following the powerful earthquake 

An aerial vivew of a pile of rubble in Turkey with dozens of rescuers and emergency workers on the scene as the light faded

An aerial vivew of a pile of rubble in Turkey with dozens of rescuers and emergency workers on the scene as the light faded

An aerial vivew of a pile of rubble in Turkey with dozens of rescuers and emergency workers on the scene as the light faded 

Emergency responders wearing white helmets scour the rubble today after this building was toppled by the earthquake

Emergency responders wearing white helmets scour the rubble today after this building was toppled by the earthquake

Emergency responders wearing white helmets scour the rubble today after this building was toppled by the earthquake 

Rescue workers and people search for survivors at a collapsed building after a 7.0 magnitude earthquake in Izmir, Turkey

Rescue workers and people search for survivors at a collapsed building after a 7.0 magnitude earthquake in Izmir, Turkey

Rescue workers and people search for survivors at a collapsed building after a 7.0 magnitude earthquake in Izmir, Turkey

Rescue workers and people search for survivors at a collapsed building in Izmir, Turkey

Rescue workers and people search for survivors at a collapsed building in Izmir, Turkey

Rescue workers and people search for survivors at a collapsed building in Izmir, Turkey

Rescue workers sift through the rubble of  building in Izmir, Turkey, after an earthquake that killed at least twelve

Rescue workers sift through the rubble of  building in Izmir, Turkey, after an earthquake that killed at least twelve

Rescue workers sift through the rubble of  building in Izmir, Turkey, after an earthquake that killed at least twelve

Rescue teams searching for survivors in the debris of a building located in Bayrakli area, after the 6.6 quake in Izmir, Turkey

Rescue teams searching for survivors in the debris of a building located in Bayrakli area, after the 6.6 quake in Izmir, Turkey

Rescue teams searching for survivors in the debris of a building located in Bayrakli area, after the 6.6 quake in Izmir, Turkey

Turkey’s Disaster and Emergency Management Presidency said Friday’s earthquake was centred in the Aegean at a depth of 10.3 miles. 

Interior minister Suleyman Soylu said six buildings had collapsed in two parts of Izmir, while mayor Tunc Soyer said nearly 20 buildings had collapsed in the province. 

A small tsunami struck the Seferisar district of Izmir, said Haluk Ozener, director of the Istanbul-based Kandilli Observatory and Earthquake Research Institute. 

Of the twelve confirmed deaths, one person drowned in high waters after the earthquake while the others were thought to have been buried under the wreckage of collapsed buildings. 

Pictures from the Turkish disaster zone showed smoke blowing over the city of Izmir, debris being washed away by high waters, and dazed people trying to make their way through rubble piled high on the streets. 

There were 38 ambulances, two ambulance helicopters and 35 medical rescue teams on the ground in Izmir, where TV footage showed police using chainsaws as they tried to force their way through the rubble. Local media said 70 people had been rescued alive from the debris.  

Turkish media said the earthquake was felt across the regions of Aegean and Marmara, where Istanbul is located. However, Istanbul’s governor said there were no reports of damage. 

Soylu said there were no reports of casualties from six other provinces where the earthquake was felt but added there were small cracks in some buildings. 

Ilke Cide, a doctoral student who was in Izmir’s Guzelbahce region during the earthquake, said he went inland after waters rose after the earthquake. ‘I am very used to earthquakes… so I didn’t take it very seriously at first but this time it was really scary,’ he said, adding the earthquake had lasted for at least 25 to30 seconds. 

Turkish president Recep Tayyip Erdogan said that ‘with all the means of our state, we stand by our citizens affected by the earthquake’. ‘We have taken action to start the necessary work in the region with all our relevant institutions and ministers,’ he said. 

Greece’s prime minister Kyriakos Mitsotakis later spoke to Erdogan to offer condolences for the victims in Turkey, saying that ‘whatever our differences, these are the times when our people need to stand together’.

France, which has been locked in an angry row with Turkey in recent weeks, also offered its ‘full solidarity’ with both Turkey and Greece. 

Tensions between Ankara and Paris had reached a peak last weekend when President Erdogan questioned the mental health of his French counterpart Emmanuel Macron. 

An injured woman is carried on a stretcher through a crowd of people at the scene of the disaster in the Bayrakli district

An injured woman is carried on a stretcher through a crowd of people at the scene of the disaster in the Bayrakli district

An injured woman is carried on a stretcher through a crowd of people at the scene of the disaster in the Bayrakli district 

A man puts a mask over his face by the side of an emergency vehicle in the Bayrakli district during search and rescue works

A man puts a mask over his face by the side of an emergency vehicle in the Bayrakli district during search and rescue works

A man puts a mask over his face by the side of an emergency vehicle in the Bayrakli district during search and rescue works

A huge crowd of locals and emergency officials search the debris of one of the collapsed buildings in Izmir today

A huge crowd of locals and emergency officials search the debris of one of the collapsed buildings in Izmir today

A huge crowd of locals and emergency officials search the debris of one of the collapsed buildings in Izmir today 

People look at the collapsed facade of a building in Izmir today with emergency services responding to Friday's disaster

People look at the collapsed facade of a building in Izmir today with emergency services responding to Friday's disaster

People look at the collapsed facade of a building in Izmir today with emergency services responding to Friday’s disaster 

The rubble of a building is heaped on the ground after it collapsed during the Aegean earthquake on Friday

The rubble of a building is heaped on the ground after it collapsed during the Aegean earthquake on Friday

The rubble of a building is heaped on the ground after it collapsed during the Aegean earthquake on Friday 

Seawater floods a shop at the port town of Vathy following a mini-tsunami caused by the earthquake on the island of Samo

Seawater floods a shop at the port town of Vathy following a mini-tsunami caused by the earthquake on the island of Samo

Seawater floods a shop at the port town of Vathy following a mini-tsunami caused by the earthquake on the island of Samo

A car is barely above water while a chair is partly submerged in a road in Vathi today after high waters brought by the quake

A car is barely above water while a chair is partly submerged in a road in Vathi today after high waters brought by the quake

A car is barely above water while a chair is partly submerged in a road in Vathi today after high waters brought by the quake 

People walk past a damaged house on the Greek island of Samos where at least two people were killed in Friday's earthquake

People walk past a damaged house on the Greek island of Samos where at least two people were killed in Friday's earthquake

People walk past a damaged house on the Greek island of Samos where at least two people were killed in Friday’s earthquake

Cars are covered in dirt at a quake-damaged site in Izmir shortly after the 7.0-magnitude pummelled Greece and Turkey

Cars are covered in dirt at a quake-damaged site in Izmir shortly after the 7.0-magnitude pummelled Greece and Turkey

Cars are covered in dirt at a quake-damaged site in Izmir shortly after the 7.0-magnitude pummelled Greece and Turkey

Buildings overlook a mountain of rubble while a car's bonnet is covered in grime following the earthquake in Izmir

Buildings overlook a mountain of rubble while a car's bonnet is covered in grime following the earthquake in Izmir

Buildings overlook a mountain of rubble while a car’s bonnet is covered in grime following the earthquake in Izmir  

A woman holds her head as she looks at the ruins in Izmir while an excavator begins the clean-up operation in the Turkish city

A woman holds her head as she looks at the ruins in Izmir while an excavator begins the clean-up operation in the Turkish city

A woman holds her head as she looks at the ruins in Izmir while an excavator begins the clean-up operation in the Turkish city

Search and rescue works underway in Izmir today with Turkish flags hanging from two nearby windows in the coastal city

Search and rescue works underway in Izmir today with Turkish flags hanging from two nearby windows in the coastal city

Search and rescue works underway in Izmir today with Turkish flags hanging from two nearby windows in the coastal city 

A car is submerged on Turkey's Aegean Sea coastline today after the mini-tsunami which followed the huge earthquake

A car is submerged on Turkey's Aegean Sea coastline today after the mini-tsunami which followed the huge earthquake

A car is submerged on Turkey’s Aegean Sea coastline today after the mini-tsunami which followed the huge earthquake 

People stand on the flooded promenade of the port town of Vathy following the earthquake in Greece

People stand on the flooded promenade of the port town of Vathy following the earthquake in Greece

People stand on the flooded promenade of the port town of Vathy following the earthquake in Greece 

Boats anchored to the coast are seen damaged after the earthquake caused an apparent sea surge and resulted in flooding

Boats anchored to the coast are seen damaged after the earthquake caused an apparent sea surge and resulted in flooding

Boats anchored to the coast are seen damaged after the earthquake caused an apparent sea surge and resulted in flooding 

A group of women wearing masks look at phones as they stand outside their homes following the earthquake in Turkey

A group of women wearing masks look at phones as they stand outside their homes following the earthquake in Turkey

A group of women wearing masks look at phones as they stand outside their homes following the earthquake in Turkey 

A massive search and rescue operation underway in Izmir after the 7.0-magnitude quake barrelled into Turkey and Greece

A massive search and rescue operation underway in Izmir after the 7.0-magnitude quake barrelled into Turkey and Greece

A massive search and rescue operation underway in Izmir after the 7.0-magnitude quake barrelled into Turkey and Greece

Boats were carried out from a harbour in Turkey

Boats were carried out from a harbour in Turkey

Debris floating in flooded streets

Debris floating in flooded streets

Boats were carried out from a harbour in Turkey (left) where debris was also seen floating along flooded streets (right)

Smoke over the city of Izmir which appeared to have taken the heaviest damage of the earthquake on the Turkish side

Smoke over the city of Izmir which appeared to have taken the heaviest damage of the earthquake on the Turkish side

Smoke over the city of Izmir which appeared to have taken the heaviest damage of the earthquake on the Turkish side 

Damaged buildings in Turkey where the earthquake destroyed at least six buildings

Damaged buildings in Turkey where the earthquake destroyed at least six buildings

Damaged buildings in Turkey where the earthquake destroyed at least six buildings

Damaged buildings in Turkey where the earthquake destroyed at least six buildings

Damaged buildings in Turkey where the earthquake destroyed at least six buildings

Search and rescue works at a building in Izmir

Search and rescue works at a building in Izmir

People anxiously wait for news near a destroyed building in Izmir

People anxiously wait for news near a destroyed building in Izmir

People anxiously wait for news as crews search through the rubble of a destroyed building in Izmir for survivors

Damaged buildings are seen after a magnitude 6.6 quake shook Turkey's Aegean Sea coast, in Seferihisar district of Izmir

Damaged buildings are seen after a magnitude 6.6 quake shook Turkey's Aegean Sea coast, in Seferihisar district of Izmir

Damaged buildings are seen after a magnitude 6.6 quake shook Turkey’s Aegean Sea coast, in Seferihisar district of Izmir

Search and rescue works are being conducted at debris of a building in Bayrakli district, Izmir

Search and rescue works are being conducted at debris of a building in Bayrakli district, Izmir

Search and rescue works are being conducted at debris of a building in Bayrakli district, Izmir

The European-Mediterranean Seismological Centre said the quake had an epicentre eight miles from Samos, where the island’s 45,000 people were urged to stay away from coastal areas. 

Greece’s top seismologist Eftyhmis Lekkas told Greek media: ‘It was a very big earthquake, it’s difficult to have a bigger one.’

A tsunami warning was issued, with residents of the Samos area told to stay away from the coast while water rose above the dock in the main harbour of Samos and flooded the street. 

Media reports said the the two victims, the first to be reported in Greece, were aged 15 and 17, and were walking home from school in the port of Vathy when disaster struck.

‘Two unconscious youngsters were pulled from the rubble of a collapsed wall and taken to hospital for identification,’ the fire service said. The Greek authorities said another seven people have been injured in the quake, which caused the walls of several old buildings to crumble.  

People rushed into the streets on Samos and other islands following the tremor, which Greek officials put at magnitude 6.6 and the US Geological Survey at 7.0. 

‘We have never experienced anything like it,’ said one local official. ‘People are panicking.’ Police said there was damage to some old buildings on the island.  

Both countries reported aftershocks. 

Greece and Turkey are both situated in one of the world’s most active earthquake zones. In 1999, a 7.4 magnitude earthquake struck Turkey’s northwest, killing more than 17,000 people, including 1,000 in Istanbul.

Another quake in 2011 in the southeastern province of Van resulted in more than 600 deaths. In Greece, the last deadly quake killed two people on the island of Kos, near Samos, in July 2017. 

A person receives treatment after feeling faint following the earthquake on Turkey's Aegean Sea cost today

A person receives treatment after feeling faint following the earthquake on Turkey's Aegean Sea cost today

A person receives treatment after feeling faint following the earthquake on Turkey’s Aegean Sea cost today 

Boats were damaged after the earthquake which had its epicentre in the Aegean Sea struck the coast of Turkey

Boats were damaged after the earthquake which had its epicentre in the Aegean Sea struck the coast of Turkey

Boats were damaged after the earthquake which had its epicentre in the Aegean Sea struck the coast of Turkey 

People stand outside their homes in Izmir today following the earthquake that left people trapped under rubble

People stand outside their homes in Izmir today following the earthquake that left people trapped under rubble

People stand outside their homes in Izmir today following the earthquake that left people trapped under rubble 

The sun shines over a heap of rubble as people begin the clean-up operation in Izmir on Friday afternoon

The sun shines over a heap of rubble as people begin the clean-up operation in Izmir on Friday afternoon

The sun shines over a heap of rubble as people begin the clean-up operation in Izmir on Friday afternoon 

Cars are damaged and covered in muck at the port of Vathy in Greece where the mini-tsunami reached the Aegean island

Cars are damaged and covered in muck at the port of Vathy in Greece where the mini-tsunami reached the Aegean island

Cars are damaged and covered in muck at the port of Vathy in Greece where the mini-tsunami reached the Aegean island 

Cars are together piled after an earthquake at the port of Vathi on the eastern Aegean island of Samos, Greece

Cars are together piled after an earthquake at the port of Vathi on the eastern Aegean island of Samos, Greece

Cars are together piled after an earthquake at the port of Vathi on the eastern Aegean island of Samos, Greece

Seawater covers a square after an earthquake at the port of Vathi on the eastern Aegean island of Samos, Greece

Seawater covers a square after an earthquake at the port of Vathi on the eastern Aegean island of Samos, Greece

Seawater covers a square after an earthquake at the port of Vathi on the eastern Aegean island of Samos, Greece

Seawater covers a road after an earthquake at the port of Vathi on the eastern Aegean island of Samos, Greece

Seawater covers a road after an earthquake at the port of Vathi on the eastern Aegean island of Samos, Greece

Seawater covers a road after an earthquake at the port of Vathi on the eastern Aegean island of Samos, Greece

According to Turkey's disaster agency, at least 170 aftershocks were recorded after the quake

According to Turkey's disaster agency, at least 170 aftershocks were recorded after the quake

According to Turkey’s disaster agency, at least 170 aftershocks were recorded after the quake

This post first appeared on dailymail.co.uk

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Police design new uniform hijab hoping that it will attract more Muslim women to join up

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police design new uniform hijab hoping that it will attract more muslim women to join up

A police officer who helped design a new hijab because the one provided was uncomfortable and unsafe said she hopes it will inspire other Muslim women to join the force.

Pc Uzma Amireddy, a positive action coordinator, said the hijab given to her by North Yorkshire Police was uncomfortable, did not look good and was potentially unsafe in hostile situations.

She said: ‘If you want to attract people from diverse backgrounds they have to feel and look good in their uniform and something like that certainly will put people off joining.

Pc Uzma Amireddy, pictured right, designed a new hijab to form part of her North Yorkshire Police uniform which she hopes will allow more Muslim women to join the force

Pc Uzma Amireddy, pictured right, designed a new hijab to form part of her North Yorkshire Police uniform which she hopes will allow more Muslim women to join the force

Pc Uzma Amireddy, pictured right, designed a new hijab to form part of her North Yorkshire Police uniform which she hopes will allow more Muslim women to join the force

Pc Amireddy, pictured, is North Yorkshire Police's positive action coordinator

Pc Amireddy, pictured, is North Yorkshire Police's positive action coordinator

Pc Amireddy, pictured, is North Yorkshire Police’s positive action coordinator 

‘That’s why I took it on myself.’

After she took the issue to her chief officer – Pc Arfan Rahouf, who is the force’s operational lead for faith and belief, got involved in the development.

With input from Pc Amireddy, he set about finding a hijab that would be suitable.

They sourced one from a local supplier and suggested some alterations to help make it more suitable for use by officers – for example, the head and neck are detachable, meaning if someone were to grab and pull it, it will not pull around the neck.

Pc Rahouf said: ‘It looks professional, it looks smart, it’s safe, she feels beautiful in in it, she feels comfortable, she feels valued by the organisation because they’ve provided it and it’s just something that represents her faith.’

On Monday, Pc Amireddy wore the hijab on the streets for the first time.

She said: ‘When I went out on the streets of North Yorkshire – and I know it’s only one shift and I don’t know what the future holds – but it went really well and I think people saw past the hijab – which I wanted.

‘Because I don’t want to be in the spotlight, I don’t want to be singled out. I want people to see me as a human being and a person doing the job that they love to do.

Pc Amireddy, pictured, said people in North Yorkshire are able to see past her hijab so it does not make it more difficult for her to do her job

Pc Amireddy, pictured, said people in North Yorkshire are able to see past her hijab so it does not make it more difficult for her to do her job

Pc Amireddy, pictured, said people in North Yorkshire are able to see past her hijab so it does not make it more difficult for her to do her job

‘And they saw me as a police officer on the doorstep, not as somebody from a Muslim background and that’s what I wanted.’

Now the pair are hoping the hijab might be taken up by forces more widely.

Pc Rahouf said: ‘We’ve been invited to have conversations nationally to see if this can be incorporated as a standard hijab with police forces across the country.’

For Pc Amireddy, she believes she has already seen the potential power the hijab could have.

She said: ‘A friend of mine was in the pipeline of joining the police force and when I told her and she’d seen the hijab and she tried it on, she said ‘you know what, I’m really happy with this’.

‘So for me, that was my proudest moment – that I’ve made a Muslim female happy with joining the police force.

‘She doesn’t have to face those obstacles and barriers that I had to.’

North Yorkshire Police commended the two officers, saying they had ‘worked really hard’ to ‘make this important change happen’.

A spokesperson said: ‘It’s really important for North Yorkshire Police to make sure that the uniform for each and every police officer is fit for purpose.

‘Inclusion and diversity is a key agenda for the police service. We need to be more representative of the communities we serve, in order for us to be an inclusive workforce and deliver a better service to all of our communities.’

This post first appeared on dailymail.co.uk

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Blood found on Louise Smith’s uncle’s trainers one billion times more likely to have come from her

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blood found on louise smiths uncles trainers one billion times more likely to have come from her

The blood stains found on the trainers of Louise Smith’s uncle were ‘one billion times’ more likely to have come from the teenager than from someone else, a court heard today.

Louise vanished in Havant, Hampshire, at 12.49pm on May 8, having been ‘lured’ one and a half miles away to the murder scene at Havant Thicket by Shane Mays, a court heard.

Mays, 30, is accused of the ‘brutal’ murder of the teenager whose body was found in thick woodland two weeks after she went missing on VE day. 

Today, Edward Dowlman, a forensic scientist, explained that the blood stains found on Mays’ Adidas trainers were ‘one billion times’ more likely to have come from Louise than someone else.

He also said that there were two confirmed blood stains on the outside of the left shoe and another smaller one inside the opening. 

Louise Smith's uncle Shane Mays, 30, (right with his wife, Chazlynn Jayne Mays ) is accused of the 'brutal' murder of the teenager

Louise Smith's uncle Shane Mays, 30, (right with his wife, Chazlynn Jayne Mays ) is accused of the 'brutal' murder of the teenager

Louise Smith’s uncle Shane Mays, 30, (right with his wife, Chazlynn Jayne Mays ) is accused of the ‘brutal’ murder of the teenager

Today forensic scientist Edward Dowlman explained that the blood stains found on Mays' Adidas trainers were 'one billion times' more likely to have come from Louise than someone else

Today forensic scientist Edward Dowlman explained that the blood stains found on Mays' Adidas trainers were 'one billion times' more likely to have come from Louise than someone else

Today forensic scientist Edward Dowlman explained that the blood stains found on Mays’ Adidas trainers were ‘one billion times’ more likely to have come from Louise than someone else

The scientist said there were two confirmed blood stains on the outside of the left shoe and another smaller one inside the opening

The scientist said there were two confirmed blood stains on the outside of the left shoe and another smaller one inside the opening

The scientist said there were two confirmed blood stains on the outside of the left shoe and another smaller one inside the opening

One of the white Adidas shoes worn by Mays with green stripes had three spots of blood on the outside and another smaller one inside the opening.

The court saw the shoe itself and were also shown pictures of the right shoe which had even smaller specks of blood on it.

There was a ‘minor profile’ of Mays’ DNA inside the shoes which was consistent with it being his, the court heard.

Mr Dowlman said: ‘We found two dark brown stains which we confirmed is blood staining.

‘There was another in the opening of the shoe, again confirmed as blood staining.

‘It has been calculated it is at least one billion times more likely [the blood] originated from Louise Smith rather than another unrelated individual.

‘[We can see] Spots of blood. Small circular stains from blood usually mean that they were airborne before landing on an item.’

He added that no blood had been found on the shoes of Mays wife, Chazlynn Jayne (CJ) Mays. 

Aspiring veterinary nurse Louise – who only started living with Mays and his wife CJ a few weeks before – was found with her skull smashed on May 21.

Her body had been ‘terribly’ defiled, and burned in what has been described as a ‘cruel and brutal’ murder. 

Today Mays’ barrister outlined to a jury a possible version of events leading up to the tragic death of the aspiring veterinary student. 

They heard the ‘extremely vulnerable’ teenager went to the woods with the 30-year-old where they argued before he punched her and beat her while she lay defenceless on the ground.         

Louise vanished in Havant, Hampshire, at 12.49pm on May 8, sparking a huge two-week search for her

Louise vanished in Havant, Hampshire, at 12.49pm on May 8, sparking a huge two-week search for her

Louise vanished in Havant, Hampshire, at 12.49pm on May 8, sparking a huge two-week search for her

Cross examining Mr Dowlman, defence counsel Andrew Langdon QC asked him if the following version of events could explain Louise’s blood being found on Mays’ shoes.   

Mr Langdon said: ‘Mays walked with Louise to the woods. There was an argument, she picked up a stick, she hit him, he took the stick from her and punched her. Punched her many times.

‘At first she was standing then he punched her many times while she on the ground. Then he walked away.’

Mr Langdon asked the scientist whether that was the scenario he had been asked to consider and he confirmed it was.

He said in his opinion that version of events could account for the blood stains found on Mays’ shoes and also DNA found on a stick which had been ‘pushed’ inside the teenager’s body.

However, he said there could be other explanations.        

Mr Dowlman concluded that a mixture of DNA on the stick involved in the attack was ‘highly likely to be from’ Louise Smith and Shane Mays and there was a ‘far less likely’ chance some also came from CJ Mays.

The court also heard that after Mays was re-arrested for murder following the discovery of the teenager’s body he denied any involvement in her death before refusing to answer any more questions.

Detective Constable Julie Way, read out a police transcript from an interview with Shane Mays after he was arrested at a Holiday Inn on May 27.

Police officers at the area of woodland in Havant, Hampshire, during their investigation in May

Police officers at the area of woodland in Havant, Hampshire, during their investigation in May

Police officers at the area of woodland in Havant, Hampshire, during their investigation in May

In a pre-prepared statement, given to detectives, Mays said: ‘I have been arrested on suspicion of murder and I strongly deny this allegation. I have had no involvement at all in the murder of Louise Smith. That is all I wish to say at present.’

Previously the court heard from Home Office pathologist Dr Basil Purdue who said that there were signs of ‘catastrophic injuries, severe blood loss and potentially a copious inhalation of blood’ possibly caused by a ‘log’ or large branch on Louise’s body.

The jurors in the case were also told they will be visiting the site where the teenagers’ body was found on Monday morning to see how ‘remote’ the location was.

Mays denies murder but admits manslaughter. He also claims he did not defile or set fire to Louise.

The trial continues.    

This post first appeared on dailymail.co.uk

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AstraZeneca will likely run a NEW global coronavirus vaccine trial, CEO says

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astrazeneca will likely run a new global coronavirus vaccine trial ceo says

AstraZeneca will likely to run an additional global trial to assess the efficacy of its COVID-19 vaccine, according to the company’s Chief Executive Pascal Soriot, Bloomberg News reported on Thursday.

It comes after the firm came under fire because the most promising arm of its original trial happened by accident when a portion of participants were given a half dose in their first vaccine injections, followed by a second full dose.  

Instead of adding the trial arm to an ongoing U.S. process, a new trial would be run to evaluate a lower dosage that performed better than a full amount in AstraZeneca’s studies, the report said.

The accidental trial arm is thought to have helped boost the potential efficacy of they shot to 90 per cent, while it blocked just 70 per cent of infections on average across all branches of the trial. 

AstraZeneca is facing tricky questions about its success rate that some experts say could hinder its chances of getting speedy U.S. and EU regulatory approval.

Several scientists have raised doubts about the robustness of results after the mistake led to a higher efficacy. 

Running an entirely new trial could delay the approval of the Oxford University-designed vaccine, which some including the World Health Organization (WHO) deemed the most promising of the competing COVID-19 jabs. 

AstraZeneca will likely run an entirely new trial to test the use of a half dose for the first injection of its coronavirus vaccine is most effective after the accidental regimen appeared to boost the efficacy of the shot in its original trial

AstraZeneca will likely run an entirely new trial to test the use of a half dose for the first injection of its coronavirus vaccine is most effective after the accidental regimen appeared to boost the efficacy of the shot in its original trial

AstraZeneca will likely run an entirely new trial to test the use of a half dose for the first injection of its coronavirus vaccine is most effective after the accidental regimen appeared to boost the efficacy of the shot in its original trial 

Chief scientist for the company, Mene Pangalos, initially defended the results, saying the shot worked ‘whichever way you cut the data.’ 

The CEO later contradicted his head scientist and said the firm will likely run a whole new trial to test whether the regimen given a half-strength first dose is really the most effective. 

‘Now that we’ve found what looks like a better efficacy we have to validate this, so we need to do an additional study,’ Soriot said, according to Bloomberg. 

The 90 per cent figure is being challenged by experts because of the small number of people it was tested on – only 2,300 volunteers were given under 55 were given the smaller dose and none of them were over-55, the most high-risk age group.

In the Moderna and Pfizer vaccine trials – which are about 95 per cent effective – dosing regimens were tested on 10,000 volunteers and four in 10 were over 55.

Mene Pangalos, AstraZeneca’s executive vice president for research, batted away criticisms this morning, claiming ‘the mistake is actually irrelevant.’

He added: ‘Whichever way you cut the data – even if you only believe the full-dose, full-dose data… We still have efficacy that meets the thresholds for approval with a vaccine that’s over 60 per cent effective.

Mene Pangalos, AstraZeneca's vice president for research, defended Oxford's Covid-19 vaccine amid mounting criticism

Mene Pangalos, AstraZeneca's vice president for research, defended Oxford's Covid-19 vaccine amid mounting criticism

Mene Pangalos, AstraZeneca’s vice president for research, defended Oxford’s Covid-19 vaccine amid mounting criticism

‘I’m not going to pretend it’s not an interesting result, because it is – but I definitely don’t understand it and I don’t think any of us do.’

Pfizer’s former president of global research, John LaMattina, has also raised the prospect that the vaccine may not be approved for emergency-use in the US.

He tweeted it was it was ‘hard to believe’ that regulators would give the green light to a vaccine ‘whose optimal dose has only been given to 2,300 people’.

The World Health Organization set a target of 50 per cent effectiveness for a Covid-19 jab, a threshold Oxford surpassed after its jab was 60 per cent effective in people receiving two full doses. 

But despite this it is facing mounting criticism from scientists.

Hilda Bastian, an accomplished scientist turned writer who blogs for the British Medical Journal (BMJ), claimed yesterday data from the Oxford trials had been ‘patched together’ and excludes results from the groups most vulnerable to Covid.

Others have warned they ‘still don’t have all the information that is needed’ and that, based on current data, the jab may be rejected for emergency approval by US regulators. 

Oxford’s candidate is seen as a potential silver bullet because it costs a fraction of the price of rivals made by Pfizer and Moderna and does not need to be stored in expensive fridges. 

Dr Pangalos said yesterday there was a theoretical rationale for why a lower dose followed by a higher dose could work, reports the Wall Street Journal.

The Oxford vaccine is a genetically engineered common cold virus that used to infect chimpanzees. It has been modified to make it weak so it does not cause illness in people and loaded up with the gene for the coronavirus spike protein, which Covid-19 uses to invade human cells

The Oxford vaccine is a genetically engineered common cold virus that used to infect chimpanzees. It has been modified to make it weak so it does not cause illness in people and loaded up with the gene for the coronavirus spike protein, which Covid-19 uses to invade human cells

The Oxford vaccine is a genetically engineered common cold virus that used to infect chimpanzees. It has been modified to make it weak so it does not cause illness in people and loaded up with the gene for the coronavirus spike protein, which Covid-19 uses to invade human cells

‘I’m not going to hand wave with the immunologists,’ he said.

‘(But) until I see some data that gives me some science behind it, I’m going to say “I don’t know”.’

Professor Sarah Gilbert, part of the team behind Oxford’s vaccine, said on Monday the smaller earlier dose may ‘prime the immune system’ to produce a stronger response when it is hit with a bigger dose of the vaccine.

‘It may be because that better mimics what happens in a real infection,’ she said. ‘It could be that giving a small vaccine to start with and following up with a big amount that could be the better way to kick the immune system into action.’ 

In a piece for Wired, Ms Bastian said the critical flaw was that a dosing error led to a huge boost in the success rate – experts accidentally gave some volunteers one-and-a-half doses of the jab rather than two full doses that people are meant to get. 

The trials were also never designed to test this hypothesis, which leaves the door open to subconscious biases creeping into the study methods or data, making the study less rigorous.

She wrote: ‘This week’s ‘promising’ results are nothing like the others that we’ve been hearing about in November [the studies the results are based on were less rigorous] — and the claims that have been drawn from them are based on very shaky science.

‘The problems start with the fact that Monday’s announcement did not present results from a single, large-scale, Phase 3 clinical trial, as was the case for earlier bulletins about the BNT-Pfizer and Moderna vaccines…

‘I have a tiny sense of pride’: Volunteer in Oxford’s coronavirus vaccine trial hails ‘promising’ results 

A volunteer in Oxford University’s coronavirus vaccine trial has revealed she felt a ‘tiny sense of pride’ at taking part in research that could finally beat the virus. 

Sarah Hurst, 47, from South Oxfordshire, said it was a ‘great feeling’ after hearing on Monday that the vaccine could trigger an immune response in up to 90 per cent of those who receive the jab.

Jack Somers, 35, from London, who also took part, said he was ‘very happy’ and felt like his vaccine team had ‘just won’. 

Sarah Hurst, 47, from Goring-on-Thames, who took part in the trials of the vaccine, said she had a 'tiny sense of pride' in helping to prove the jab worked

Sarah Hurst, 47, from Goring-on-Thames, who took part in the trials of the vaccine, said she had a 'tiny sense of pride' in helping to prove the jab worked

Sarah Hurst, 47, from Goring-on-Thames, who took part in the trials of the vaccine, said she had a ‘tiny sense of pride’ in helping to prove the jab worked

The pair, who both work as journalists, received two shots of either the experimental or placebo vaccine. Mr Somers said he suffered side-effects of a pain in his shoulder and slightly raised temperature, but Ms Somers said she didn’t experience any. 

Ms Hurst, who works as a journalist, said: ‘It’s really the developers and everyone who’s done all the work, all the medical students who are constantly all day meeting the vaccine participants and testing them and being on the front line.

‘But it’s good, it’s a great feeling to help to make a vaccine.’

Jack Somers, 35, from London , who also took part, said he was 'very happy' and felt like his vaccine team had 'just won'

Jack Somers, 35, from London , who also took part, said he was 'very happy' and felt like his vaccine team had 'just won'

Jack Somers, 35, from London , who also took part, said he was ‘very happy’ and felt like his vaccine team had ‘just won’ 

Explaining why she signed up, she said: ‘I live near where it’s being done and they were looking for people in the Thames Valley. As soon as I saw that I wanted to get involved to help research a vaccine.’

She underwent health checks and blood tests before receiving her two shots, and filled in a diary to notify researchers of her movements over the course of the study, as well as any symptoms.

‘You have to treat it as if you were in the placebo group anyway, you wouldn’t go out and randomly expose yourself because you don’t know,’ she said.

Despite suffering no side effects, this doesn’t mean she received the placebo. The trial used the meningitis vaccine as a control, which scientists argued would elicit a similar response to the Covid-19 jab. 

She said Monday’s results were ‘promising’ and noted ‘the fact it doesn’t need to be chilled at a very low temperature and is cheaper than the other vaccines will help in making it easier to distribute’.

‘You have to treat it as if you were in the placebo group anyway, you wouldn’t go out and randomly expose yourself because you don’t know,’ she said. 

‘People have only been vaccinated for a few months so I would still want to know: what are going to be the results after a year? Is it going to be effective after a year?

‘That’s something you really just have to wait for.’

Mr Somers said he found it hard to believe how quickly scientists had developed the vaccine. 

‘I can’t help but take my hat off to the scientists,’ said the freelance journalist from south-west London.

‘I remember six months ago sitting in a hospital watching a safety video, with Professor Matthew Snape at Oxford University talking in quite careful, deliberate, cautious terms about how this vaccine might work or it might not work.

‘Now it seems amazing that we’re here six months later and that jab is very effective at stopping coronavirus.

‘It’s not where I thought we’d be six months ago, it’s not even where I thought we’d be a month ago, but it’s testament to the work of so many people, so many extraordinary people.’ 

Volunteers receive no information about how the trial is going so have been following the progress in the media along with everybody else.

And Mr Sommers said that, while he had been very pleased to read about positive results from other vaccines such as that developed by Pfizer, there was a special feeling about this one. 

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‘The fact that they may have had to combine data from two trials in order to get a strong enough result raises the first red flag…. As far as we know, some of this analysis could hinge on data from just a few sick people.’

She said this means the findings could be a coincidence, or they could be ‘biased by other factors’.  

The former president for global research at Covid-19 vaccine competitor Pfizere, John LaMattina, has warned based on the current data Oxford’s jab is unlikely to be approved for emergency-use in the US. 

He tweeted it was it was ‘hard to believe’ that regulators would give the green light to a vaccine ‘whose optimal dose has only been given to 2,300 people’.

Professor Natalie Bean, a bio-statistician at the University of Florida, told the Financial Times they still ‘don’t have all the information we need to tell whether these results are reliable’.

‘We certainly don’t have enough information in the public domain to decide whether this half dose is really working,’ she added. 

An investment analyst at SVB Leerink, Geoffrey Porges, told the FT the jab was likely to be rejected because the company had ‘tried to embellish their results’ by highlighting its effectiveness in a ‘relatively small subset of subjects in the study’.

Adding pressure to Oxford’s vaccine, a virologist at the Icahn School of Medicine in New York, Florian Krammer, told the New York Times: ‘The only thing that you can really say right now is that the vaccine seems to work.’

And added: ‘It’s just hard to say how well it works compared to others.’ 

But Professor Ian Jones, a virologist at the University of Reading, told MailOnline: ‘We need to keep the positives in mind, that the vaccine is safe and can provide protection. 

‘It is also a fact that in order to see protection, a Phase 3 trial has to be done in an area of current infection and if the level of infection changes, there may be a need to add additional sites.’

He did concede, however, that ‘the issue of the dose is confusing’. 

He added: ‘That 90 per cent protection was observed in the subset that received the supposed lower dose is really good but I think that would equate to only about 15 people in the 3,000 that received it which may be too low to convince regulators of efficiency, especially if it is not quite clear what the key difference is between it and the higher dose. All this should be much clearer when the full data are published.’ 

Oxford University acknowledged yesterday it mistakenly administered a half-dose and full-dose regime to some participants in the study.

They added: ‘The methods for measuring the concentration are now established and we can ensure that all batches of vaccine are now equivalent.’ 

Oxford’s trials found that the jab has a nine in ten chance of working when administered as a half dose first and then a full dose a month later. 

But efficacy drops to mere 62 per cent when someone is given two full doses a month apart.

Oxford has also claimed that its vaccine has an average efficacy of 70 per cent, based on the 62 and 90 per cent figures, which would put the Covid jab on par with good flu vaccines.

But there have been doubts about the reliability of the 70 per cent figure because it has been crudely calculated based on the two regimens, rather than everyone in the trials of all ages. 

And because so far Oxford and AstraZeneca – the British pharmaceutical firm which owns the rights to the jab – have only revealed the percentages in a press release, it is not clear how they arrived at those figures. 

It means the analysis that could seal whether or not the jab is administered to millions of people globally could be based on data from a handful of people – which, again, leaves the door open for other factors to bias in the study.

For example, it has since been revealed that the people who received the reduced dose included no-one over the age of 55 – who are most vulnerable to falling seriously ill or dying from Covid, according to Ms Bastian.

That was not the case for the normal dosed group, raising questions about whether the demographic – rather than dosing – difference is the true driver behind the boosted efficacy. 

The Oxford-AstraZeneca study appears to include few participants over the age of 55, even though the vaccine is being targeted at elderly people. 

Wired reports that people in that demographic were not originally eligible to join the Brazilian trial at all – compared Pfizer’s trial, where 41 per cent were over 55. 

Another flaw, according to Ms Bastian, came from the simple fact the results have been combined from two separate trials in the UK and Brazil, as opposed to one single large-scale study like Pfizer and Moderna’s vaccines. 

Oxford originally planned to conduct a single trial in the UK when it launched its phase three study in May, but coronavirus began to fizzle out over summer which meant not enough volunteers were getting infected naturally. 

A month later a second phase three trial was started in Brazil where transmission had begun to spike. 

But the consequence of splitting the trial in half was that researchers could not control variables as tightly as they could in one single trial done by the same team.

There wasn’t a standardised dosing regimen across both trials and control groups in the studies were not given the same fake vaccine to compare to the Covid jab.

Participants in Brazil were given a saline injection as a placebo, whereas the British arm of the study were given a vaccine for meningitis – which creates an unfair comparison. 

According to emergency-use vaccine guidance issues by Britain’s medical regulator, the MHRA, and the FDA in the US, jabs can be approved if they demonstrate safety and efficacy through a single Phase 3 clinical study. 

Although early results from Oxford’s clinical trials were published on Monday, the study is not completed.

Hilda Bastian, an accomplished scientist turned writer who blogs for the British Medical Journal (BMJ), claims data from the Oxford trials has been 'patched together'

Hilda Bastian, an accomplished scientist turned writer who blogs for the British Medical Journal (BMJ), claims data from the Oxford trials has been 'patched together'

Hilda Bastian, an accomplished scientist turned writer who blogs for the British Medical Journal (BMJ), claims data from the Oxford trials has been ‘patched together’

Oxford has started a 30,000-person phase 3 trial in the US to get more accurate and precise data about its vaccine – but the jab could be approved and rolled out within weeks before those results arrive.

Oxford researchers said they intend to publish the full results of the trial in a medical journal in the coming weeks and will then submit an application to the drugs regulator, the MHRA, for a licence to use the vaccine on members of the public.

This process could then take days or weeks for the MHRA to decide whether the jab is good enough to use before it can start to be given out – this is currently expected to be completed in December.

The vaccine uses a harmless adenovirus to deliver genetic material that tricks the human body into producing proteins known as antigens that are normally found on the coronavirus’s surface, helping the immune system develop an arsenal against infection.

Britain has ordered 100 million doses, with almost 20 million due by Christmas. 

The vaccine is expected to cost just £2 per dose and can be stored cheaply in a normal fridge, unlike other jabs made by Pfizer and Moderna that showed similarly promising results last week but need to be kept in ultra-cold temperatures using expensive equipment. 

It’s also a fraction of the price, with Pfizer’s costing around £15 per dose and Moderna’s priced at about £26 a shot. 

HOW DO THE OXFORD, MODERNA AND PFIZER/BIONTECH VACCINES COMPARE? 

Moderna and Pfizer/BioNTech have both released interim results of the final stage clinical trials of their vaccines, with both suggesting they are extremely effective. 

Oxford University has published the findings from its second phase, which show the jab provokes an immune response and is safe to use – it is not yet clear how well it protects against coronavirus in the real world.

Here’s how they compare: 

MODERNA (US)

PFIZER (US) & BIONTECH (DE)

OXFORD UNIVERSITY (UK)

How it works: 

mRNA vaccine – Genetic material from coronavirus is injected to trick immune system into making ‘spike’ proteins and learning how to attack them.

mRNA vaccine – both Moderna’s and Pfizer and BioNTech’s vaccines work in the same way.

Recombinant viral vector vaccine – a harmless cold virus taken from chimpanzees was edited to produce the ‘spike’ proteins and look like the coronavirus.

How well does it work?

94.5% effective (90 positive in placebo group, 5 positive in vaccine group) .

95% effective (160 positive in placebo group, 8 positive in vaccine group).

62% – 90% effective, depending on dosing.

How much does it cost?

Moderna confirmed it will charge countries placing smaller orders, such as the UK’s five million doses, between £24 and £28 per dose. US has secured 100million doses for $1.525billion (£1.16bn), suggesting it will cost $15.25 (£11.57) per dose.

The US will pay $1.95bn (£1.48bn) for the first 100m doses, a cost of $19.50 (£14.80) per dose.

Expected to cost £2.23 per dose. The UK’s full 100m dose supply could amount to just £223million.

Can we get hold of it?

UK has ordered five million doses which will become available from March 2021. Moderna will produce 20m doses this year, expected to stay in the US. 

UK has already ordered 40million doses, of which 10million could be available in 2020. First vaccinations expected in December.

UK has already ordered 100million doses and is expected to be first in line to get it once approved.

What side effects does it cause? 

Moderna said the vaccine is ‘generally safe and well tolerated’. Most side effects were mild or moderate but included pain, fatigue and headache, which were ‘generally’ short-lived. 

Pfizer and BioNTech did not produce a breakdown of side effects but said the Data Monitoring Committee ‘has not reported any serious safety concerns’.

Oxford said there have been no serious safety concerns. Mild side effects have been relatively common in small trials, with many participants reporting that their arm hurt after the jab and they later suffered a headache, exhaustion or muscle pain. More data is being collected.

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