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Nicola Sturgeon causes holiday chaos for thousands by DEMANDING France is put on quarantine list

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nicola sturgeon causes holiday chaos for thousands by demanding france is put on quarantine list

How can I get home now France has been put on UK quarantine list? 

Travellers trying to return from France on Friday to avoid the quarantine restrictions face paying hundreds of pounds. 

Flights: Air fares are more than six times higher than normal from Paris to London today. The cheapest British Airways tickets are £452. 

Flight booking website Skyscanner suggested there were no direct flights from Biarritz to London.

The cheapest option it offered was to take one flight to Paris, another to Belfast and a third arriving at London Stansted shortly before midnight, at a total cost of £284.

The lowest priced ticket involving just two flights is £579 with Air France, changing in Paris.

Eurostar: Cheapest ticket on train from Paris to London is £210, compared with £165 on Saturday, a rise up almost 30 per cent. 

Ferries: P&O Ferries has limited availability, but one person travelling with a car from Calais to Dover can buy a ticket for £200.

Eurotunnel: The cost of taking a car through the Channel Tunnel on Eurotunnel Le Shuttle services on Friday morning is £260. All trains after midday are fully booked.   

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Nicola Sturgeon has caused chaos for 500,000 British holidaymakers scrambling to get back to the UK today by demanding that France be added to the UK’s quarantine list tomorrow morning instead of Sunday.

A weekend of Bedlam has begun as hundreds of thousands of furious British tourists try to flee France and get home ahead of the new rules on isolating for 14 days, set to come into effect at 4am tomorrow.

Sources claim the Scottish government insisted that the quarantine deadline be brought forward to Saturday morning after UK ministers mooted 4am on Sunday.

Grant Shapps fuelled the chaos last night when he announced the dramatic step, but suggested it would only apply to people who ‘come back from Sunday’. The Department for Transport then clarified the restrictions would come into force tomorrow instead.  

The news also broke hours later than expected, and following signals during the day that France might escape being struck off the list of ‘safe’ countries. 

Travellers rushing to get back to the UK today face paying hundreds of pounds as air fares are now more than six times higher than normal for flights from Paris to London – the cheapest BA tickets being sold for £452.

The cheapest ticket on a Eurostar train from Paris to London is £210, compared with £165 last Saturday, a rise of almost 30 per cent.  

The cost of taking a car through the Channel Tunnel on Eurotunnel Le Shuttle services this morning is £260. All trains after midday are fully booked.

P&O Ferries has limited availability, but one person travelling with a car from Calais to Dover can buy a ticket for £200.

Meanwhile private jet charter company PrivateFly said demand for flights out of countries being removed from the UK’s quarantine-exemption list has trebled since the announcement was made on Thursday night. 

In more bad news for British holidaymakers, Greece could soon be added to the quarantine list, after a spike in its infection rate, with a record 235 cases recorded on August 12. Daily new cases in the country were in the 30s towards the end of July. 

Transport Secretary Grant Shapps insisted the Government had taken ‘a practical approach’ to the new restrictions. However, the move was criticised by France’s secretary of state for European affairs, who said it would lead to ‘reciprocal measures’ across the Channel.

Clement Beaune tweeted: ‘A British decision which we regret and which will lead to reciprocal measures, all in hoping for a return for normal as soon as possible.’  

Tim Alderslade, chief executive of trade body Airlines UK, said: ‘It’s another devastating blow to the travel industry already reeling from the worst crisis in its history.

‘Having the political will to move to a sub-national approach to quarantine, in addition to a testing regime for arriving passengers so that those testing negative can avoid having to self isolate – which other countries like Germany have already implemented – is urgently needed.’ 

As the government’s decision to put France on the quarantine list sparks chaos: 

  • Travellers in southern France face struggle getting back to UK before the 4am Saturday quarantine deadline;
  • Car-carrying Channel Tunnel trains and Eurotunnel Le Shuttle said they are fully booked until tomorrow;  
  • Transport Secretary said estimated 160,000 holidaymakers are expected to look to return to UK from France;
  • Grant Shapps said ‘in all of the things to do with coronavirus, there always has had to be a cut-off’
  • France has vowed to retaliate after it was added to quarantine list and said it ‘regrets the UK’s decision’
  • Nicola Sturgeon ‘stopped holidaymakers from getting an extra 24 HOURS to get back from France’
Passengers arrive at St Pancras International Station from Paris today on Eurostar. Passengers arrive at St Pancras International Station from Paris after it was announced people would have to self isolate after spending time in France

Passengers arrive at St Pancras International Station from Paris today on Eurostar. Passengers arrive at St Pancras International Station from Paris after it was announced people would have to self isolate after spending time in France

Passengers arrive at St Pancras International Station from Paris today on Eurostar. Passengers arrive at St Pancras International Station from Paris after it was announced people would have to self isolate after spending time in France

Transport Secretary Grant Shapps insisted the Government had taken 'a practical approach' to the new restrictions. However, the move was criticised by France's secretary of state for European affairs

Transport Secretary Grant Shapps insisted the Government had taken 'a practical approach' to the new restrictions. However, the move was criticised by France's secretary of state for European affairs

Transport Secretary Grant Shapps insisted the Government had taken ‘a practical approach’ to the new restrictions. However, the move was criticised by France’s secretary of state for European affairs

Pictured: Passengers arrive at St Pancras International Station from Paris today after it was announced Britons returning from France would have to isolate for 14 days from Saturday

Pictured: Passengers arrive at St Pancras International Station from Paris today after it was announced Britons returning from France would have to isolate for 14 days from Saturday

Pictured: Passengers arrive at St Pancras International Station from Paris today after it was announced Britons returning from France would have to isolate for 14 days from Saturday

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31942818 8626527 image a 74 1597398224699

Pictured: A graph showing the countries from which travellers arriving in the UK are currently exempt from the 14-day coronavirus quarantine, and the number of Covid-19 cases per 100,000 people in each country. Speculation is mounting that France could be removed from the list of exempt countries, but there a number of others that have higher or similar figures

Pictured: A graph showing the countries from which travellers arriving in the UK are currently exempt from the 14-day coronavirus quarantine, and the number of Covid-19 cases per 100,000 people in each country. Speculation is mounting that France could be removed from the list of exempt countries, but there a number of others that have higher or similar figures

Pictured: A graph showing the countries from which travellers arriving in the UK are currently exempt from the 14-day coronavirus quarantine, and the number of Covid-19 cases per 100,000 people in each country. Speculation is mounting that France could be removed from the list of exempt countries, but there a number of others that have higher or similar figures

France quarantine Q&A: What are my refund rights and can I claim on my travel insurance? 

What are my holiday refund rights?

If you have booked a package holiday in France, or any other quarantine country, your tour operator should cancel the holiday. You can then claim a full refund.

Will I get a refund on my flight, ferry or train ticket?

If the airlines continue to operate the route, there is no right although they may offer money back as a goodwill gesture. Ferry operators and Eurostar may offer refunds but most firms will give customers a voucher to rebook at a later date. Eurotunnel says it will give refunds up to 24 hours before travel.

And accommodation?

If a hotel or villa remains open and available, there is no legal right to cancel and get a refund, although some booking websites, such as Airbnb and Booking.com, do offer last-minute cancellation on some listings.

Can I claim on insurance for flights and accommodation?

These are unlikely to be covered if the policy was bought after March 10 when most insurers removed cover for Covid-19-related cancellations.

Can I claim statutory sick pay in quarantine?

No – there is no automatic eligibility to statutory sick pay, unless you meet the required conditions, such as displaying coronavirus symptoms.

What happens if you pass through a country on the quarantine list?

You don’t have to quarantine as long as passengers remain in the car for the whole journey and no one joins them.

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Government sources insisted the delays were down to the latest figures fro France emerging late in the day, and the quarantine changes then needing to be signed off by the devolved institutions.

They said the isolation had to be introduced on a series of countries including France, the Netherlands and Malta after the seven-day count of cases per 100,000 population rose above 20. 

At the daily briefing in Edinburgh today, Ms Sturgeon insisted it had been ‘imperative’ to act as quickly as possible.

‘Where we have a situation where we think a situation in a particular country has deteriorated we cannot hang around before we impose quarantine,’ she said.

‘There is a real imperative to act as quickly as possible.’ 

Ms Sturgeon said people across the UK should ‘think very carefully’ before booking holidays as the rules can change abruptly.

Scottish minister Humza Yousaf added that there was a call with the four UK nations at 9pm, and the changes were announced as soon as possible after that – stressing that they were often reliant on when other countries published new figures. 

Travellers returning to Britain from France today told of their scramble home to avoid having to quarantine. 

Student Yasmine Sellay, 24, from Wimbledon, South London, was among a packed Eurostar train that arrived at St Pancras station from Paris this morning. 

She said: ‘I wanted to get home before the restrictions are enforced. ‘I didn’t know that France had been added to the UK quarantine list until last night and as I don’t want to isolate for a fortnight I came home today. 

‘I’d been in Paris for a month and a half because it’s where I’m originally from and I was visiting family and friends.   

‘When I arrived in France at the end of June, I had to stay in with my relatives for more than a week and couldn’t go out. 

‘I found it really hard to do so I was keen not to have to do the same when I came back to London.  The Eurostar was full so I think many other people had the same idea as me.’  

Engineers Carolina Monteiro, 24, and Douglas Pagani, 29, who live in France, told PA of their relief at arriving in the UK for a 10-day campervan trip to the Lake District and Yorkshire – just before quarantine measures come into effect on Saturday morning.

Speaking outside St Pancras station, Mr Pagani said: ‘We’re very happy to have the correct ticket just in time. At first I was scared looking at all the information to make sure we could enter here, then we saw it was perfect.

‘It was a relief that we could meet our friends here.’

Ms Monteiro added: ‘We have had this trip planned for three or four months, so we’re lucky to be here just in time.’

Travellers in the south of France face a struggle getting back to the UK before the 4am Saturday quarantine deadline. 

Where will be added to the quarantine list next? France vows to retaliate against British travellers as No 10 considers fresh travel restrictions on countries that have 20 coronavirus cases per 100,000 people 

France has vowed to retaliate after it was added to Britain’s quarantine list last night following a surge in coronavirus cases – with more countries set to be added if they cross the threshold of 20 cases per 100,000 people in a week. 

Emmanuel Macron‘s transport minister said France ‘regrets the UK’s decision’ and ‘will apply reciprocal measures’ after people crossing the Channel into Britain were ordered to isolate for 14 days. 

Ministers shut down the ‘travel corridor’ after France suffered a a spike of nearly 14,000 cases in the space of a week including 2,669 new infections announced last night. 

The spike means France has suffered 21.0 cases per 100,000 people in a week, above the threshold of 20 identified by Grant Shapps as the key to Britain’s quarantine rules. 

The Netherlands (24.5 cases per 100,000) and Malta (56.2) have also been hit with Foreign Office travel warnings after crossing the threshold, joining Spain (58.8) and Belgium (29.4) on the quarantine list. 

Switzerland (14.3), Denmark (15.3) and Greece (11.6) are also hovering close to the cut-off point while Portugal (13.5) is still under quarantine rules despite being below the limit. 

Germany (8.6 cases per 100,000) and Italy (5.0) are both below the threshold at the moment but both have seen an alarming uptick in cases in recent weeks which have partly been linked to summer holidays.  

 

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Flight booking website Skyscanner suggested there were no direct flights from Biarritz to London.

The cheapest option it offered was to take one flight to Paris, another to Belfast and a third arriving at London Stansted shortly before midnight, at a total cost of £284.

The lowest priced ticket involving just two flights is £579 with Air France, changing in Paris.

Whichever mode of transport travellers use, they will need to move quickly as many services will be fully booked by Friday afternoon.   

He added that weekly changes to quarantine rules on a national level ‘have proven so disruptive to airlines and passengers’. 

Undeterred passengers at London St Pancras made their way onto the 10.24am Eurostar service to Paris, including lawyer John Strange, 60, from Reading.

He said he was going to the French capital for 10 days and it was possible for him to work from home on his return.

He said: ‘It’s not a disaster for me but it seems for many people it will be, particularly those with young families, it’s going to be catastrophic.

‘I’m sure many will have to cancel their plans and have to accept all that pain and cost that goes with it.’

A traveller who gave her name as Sonata K, a 39-year-old dentist, was due to head to Paris for four nights with her mother – but cancelled her plans after finding out about the quarantine measures at St Pancras on Friday morning.

She said: ‘It’s not worth it to go out and have to self isolate. With my work I can’t do the procedures from home.

‘We were too late to get the news, we’re just finding out here but it’s better than on the train.

‘We’re looking at going to Cardiff and checking trains now, but the weather is changing a bit.’

She added that for £30 they could change their Eurostar tickets to another day and said one hotel had charged them one night’s stay for late cancellation. 

Jack Birkbeck, 23, and George Raybould, 24, were travelling to France to spend five days in the commune of Bantanges, eastern France between Lyon and Dijon to celebrate Jack’s 24th birthday on Saturday with his parents.

The friends, who both work in retail from Maidstone, Kent, are flying out to Geneva with EasyJet today.

They went to sleep thinking they would not have to quarantine but woke up to the news they would have to self isolate for 14 days.

Despite considering cancelling the trip, they decided to go ahead with it due to the money already spent on the break.

Jack said: ‘I literally woke up at 6am to my mum texting me saying ‘are you still coming?’ as they’ve introduced a quarantine. I went to sleep thinking we were safe.

‘The last case where we are going was on July 27 so they’re going strong for the past few weeks. It’s probably even safer than Maidstone.

‘If we had more time to think about it then maybe we would have cancelled going but we didn’t even have time to change our mind really.

‘I hope the government are doing their best and believe they’ve introduced this now in the best interests of everyone.

‘My boss will probably be angry at me having to isolate. But I’m going to spend quarantine doing work training to make up for it.’

George added: ‘It’s just our luck that the day we go they announce quarantine just hours before we jet off.

‘As bad as it sounds, where we are going is super rural. It’s not exactly the epicentre of the French pandemic. We are not going out and socialising and will be self contained.

‘Of course we’re still going to quarantine when we return home but I like to think the chances of us getting it are very low and if anything, we are more likely to give it to them. That would be the classic British thing to do.

‘I’ve only just come off furlough so I don’t think work will take it too well. I feel bad for my colleagues but theres not much I could have done at such short notice.’

A Heathrow spokesman said: ‘The UK needs a more sustainable long-term plan for the resumption of travel than quarantine roulette.  

Passengers wearing face masks as a precaution against the spread of the novel coronavirus walk along the platform to an escalator after arriving on a Eurostar train from Paris at St Pancras International station in London

Passengers wearing face masks as a precaution against the spread of the novel coronavirus walk along the platform to an escalator after arriving on a Eurostar train from Paris at St Pancras International station in London

Passengers wearing face masks as a precaution against the spread of the novel coronavirus walk along the platform to an escalator after arriving on a Eurostar train from Paris at St Pancras International station in London

Travellers trying to return from France on Friday to avoid the quarantine restrictions face paying hundreds of pounds

Travellers trying to return from France on Friday to avoid the quarantine restrictions face paying hundreds of pounds

Travellers trying to return from France on Friday to avoid the quarantine restrictions face paying hundreds of pounds

Air fares are more than six times higher than normal for flights from Paris to London today, with the cheapest British Airways tickets being sold for £452

Air fares are more than six times higher than normal for flights from Paris to London today, with the cheapest British Airways tickets being sold for £452

Air fares are more than six times higher than normal for flights from Paris to London today, with the cheapest British Airways tickets being sold for £452

How are the UK’s quarantine rules made? 

Decisions are informed by the Joint Biosecurity Centre (JBC) risk assessment, which is informed by a number of factors including:

  • An estimate of the proportion of the population that is currently infectious in each country;
  • Virus incidence rates;
  • Trends in incidence and deaths;
  • Transmission status and international epidemic intelligence;
  • Information on a country’s testing capacity;
  • An assessment of the quality of the data available 
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‘Testing could provide an opportunity to safely reduce the length of quarantine in certain circumstances, protecting both the health and wealth of the nation as we pave a path towards a new normal.

‘As ever, our teams will be on hand to support passengers impacted by the travel restrictions but we urge Government to work with us to trial a solution which could help to provide more certainty.’

Car-carrying Channel Tunnel trains are fully booked until Saturday.

Eurotunnel Le Shuttle said in a statement: ‘Due to the recent Government announcement, our shuttles are now fully booked until tomorrow morning.

‘There is no more ticket availability and we are not selling tickets at check-in.

‘Please do not arrive at the terminal unless you have a ticket valid for travel today.’

Private jet charter company PrivateFly said demand for flights out of countries being removed from the UK’s quarantine-exemption list has trebled since the announcement was made on Thursday night. 

Chief executive Adam Twidell said: ‘Following the changes to the UK’s quarantine list overnight, we’ve received a surge in demand for private jet travel out of affected countries, with three times the average number of enquiries and bookings for flights to the UK from France, the Netherlands and Malta, before 4am on Saturday morning.

Which countries are above the threshold of 20 cases per 100,000 people in a week? 

SPAIN: 58.8

MALTA: 56.2

BELGIUM: 29.4

NETHERLANDS: 24.5

FRANCE: 21.0

SWEDEN: 18.7 (but quarantine is still in place) 

DENMARK: 15.3

SWITZERLAND: 14.3 

PORTUGAL: 13.5 (but quarantine is still in place) 

GREECE: 11.6 

IRELAND: 10.8

AUSTRIA: 10.3 

UK: 9.0

GERMANY: 8.6

ITALY: 5.0 

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Family-of-five cut short holiday in France and drove 12 hours non-stop in desperate bid to beat quarantine deadline

A family-of-five cut short their France holiday and drove 12 hours non-stop in a desperate bid to beat the quarantine deadline.

Eurotunnel and Brittany Ferries have warned people not to turn up at terminals unless they have a booking.

But Julia Burnett, 35, and husband Craig, 36, had already cut short their camping holiday fearing the worst and were just 60 miles from Calais when the announcement was made.

They drove yesterday for 12 hours from the South of France to Calais with their three children Rory, seven, Isabella, five and Finley, one.

They were due to come back next Wednesday but yesterday decided to set off from Biarritz, after reading rumours about a potential quarantine.

The family, from Taunton in Somerset, managed to book onto a ferry less than an hour before the government announcement.

When they were 60 miles from Calais they discovered their gamble had paid off when they saw news of the rule change.

They were in the queue for the ferry crossing feeling ‘tired but relieved’ this morning. 

Julia told the Mirror: ‘We’d been trying to book onto the Channel tunnel but we eventually booked on the ferry instead.

‘Then I checked back on the tunnel website straight after the announcement and I was 5,310th in the queue – it was crazy.

‘Quarantine would have really affected Craig’s work as he runs a dental services business and can’t do it from home.’

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‘We’ve also had a number of inquiries from clients booked to travel to these destinations in the coming weeks to change their travel plans in order to avoid quarantine zones.

‘We can arrange flights at very short notice with the flexibility to change route at the last minute, however availability is limited as the spike in demand coincides with what is already the peak summer season for private leisure travel.’ 

Explaining the quarantine decision on BBC Breakfast this morning, Mr Shapps said: ‘The reality is that in all of the things to do with coronavirus, there always has had to be a cut-off and we’ve seen this throughout, haven’t we, in the way that rules have had to be implemented and, so, ‘if we can do this, why can’t we do that?’, that’s always going to be the case.

‘What we have to do is provide clear guidance and, in this case, clear law in order to require people to quarantine.

‘I just want to stress it is very important that people do quarantine. Everybody returning to the UK, no matter where from, doesn’t matter whether you’re in a travel corridor country or a quarantine country, must at this stage fill in a passenger locator form.

‘That is the law and you may well find that people call up to check where you are, and you’ll be breaking the law if you were not quarantining, if that was a requirement for the country you’d come from.’

Mr Shapps said it will not be necessary for people to quarantine on their return to the UK from France if they do so before Saturday at 4am.

The Transport Secretary told BBC Breakfast an estimated 160,000 holidaymakers are expected to look to return to the UK from France.

He added: ‘It’s a practical approach as well which has enabled all fours parts of the United Kingdom – Scotland, Wales, Northern Ireland and England – to implement the same time at 4am where there are no flights in the air at least tomorrow.

‘But, look, I accept your point, you can always argue one way or the other. We have to make a decision on it and we have to do that based on science and medicine, and that’s what we’ve done, we’ve taken the advice and implemented on that basis.’

Asked if he would encourage those returning to the UK if they should self-isolate, even if they fall outside of the official quarantine deadline, Mr Shapps said: ‘That’s not legally required.

‘But what I would say to everybody is look out for the signs, everyone knows what we’re talking about – the persistent cough, the high temperature, the change in taste or smell, so everyone should look out for those signs.

‘But, no, it’s not necessary to quarantine unless you’re coming back after 4am on Saturday and those are the rules.

‘I think the truth of this is, as everyone watching realises, there’s no perfect way to deal with coronavirus.

‘Unless you were going to have a sliding scale that sort of said if you stay another 24 hours the you must quarantine for X amount of time, another 36 hours for Y amount of time, you know, clearly there has to be a cut-off somewhere.’

Mr Shapps added: ‘To be clear, the Joint Biosecurity centre have cleared our approach to this.’

The boss of Channel Tunnel operator has Getlink warned many travellers may not be able to get back to the UK – and told them not to turn up at terminals without a booking as trains are ‘already pretty much fully booked’. 

John Keefe, Getlink’s director of public affairs, told BBC’s Newsnight: ‘We just haven’t got the space to take everybody who might suddenly want to come up to the coast. So what we are saying to people is amend your booking online, make sure there’s space before you travel to the terminal.’ 

After a week of speculation ministers acted on a worsening coronavirus situation across the Channel, ministers ordered travellers returning from the popular destination to isolate for 14 days. 

The move came after Boris Johnson said the UK would be ‘ruthless’ when it came to travel quarantine even with its ‘closest and dearest friends’. 

Mr Keefe said there was ‘some possibility of adding additional trains in the off-peak periods’ but would-be travellers must check online before heading to the terminal.

‘The important thing is that people understand that it’s not going to be easy to get back and they have to be sensible about this and not get themselves into difficulties,’ he said.  

France recorded 2,669 new cases of coronavirus yesterday, up from 2,524 on Wednesday. It is a record figure for the nation since it came out of lockdown.  

The review of the rules saw the Netherlands, Monaco and Malta added to the quarantine list – and Portugal remains on it, along with Spain.

The Turks and Caicos Islands and Aruba in the Caribbean have also lost their places.

 ‘We have got to be absolutely ruthless about this, even with our closest and dearest friends and partners. I think everybody understands that,’ Mr Johnson told reporters as he visited Northern Ireland yesterday. 

Holiday makers arriving back on a ferry at Dover docks this morning after France was added to the UK quarantine list from Saturday

Holiday makers arriving back on a ferry at Dover docks this morning after France was added to the UK quarantine list from Saturday

Holiday makers arriving back on a ferry at Dover docks this morning after France was added to the UK quarantine list from Saturday

Near deserted check in lanes for holiday makers leaving Dover docks after France is added to the UK quarantine list

Near deserted check in lanes for holiday makers leaving Dover docks after France is added to the UK quarantine list

Near deserted check in lanes for holiday makers leaving Dover docks after France is added to the UK quarantine list

Ferries are seen in the Port of Dover, as Britain imposes a 14-day quarantine on arrival from France from Saturday

Ferries are seen in the Port of Dover, as Britain imposes a 14-day quarantine on arrival from France from Saturday

Ferries are seen in the Port of Dover, as Britain imposes a 14-day quarantine on arrival from France from Saturday

Ferries are seen in the Port of Dover, as Britain imposes a 14-day quarantine on arrival from France from Saturday

Ferries are seen in the Port of Dover, as Britain imposes a 14-day quarantine on arrival from France from Saturday

Ferries are seen in the Port of Dover, as Britain imposes a 14-day quarantine on arrival from France from Saturday

The quarantine is set to come in at 4am tomorrow – and with an estimated British 500,000 holidaymakers in France, a weekend of chaos looms as they try to get home

The quarantine is set to come in at 4am tomorrow – and with an estimated British 500,000 holidaymakers in France, a weekend of chaos looms as they try to get home

The quarantine is set to come in at 4am tomorrow – and with an estimated British 500,000 holidaymakers in France, a weekend of chaos looms as they try to get home

British couple drove nine hours through night from Dordogne to Calais to avoid UK quarantine

One British couple drove for nine hours through the night to avoid quarantine.

They had been enjoying a week in their motor home in the Dordogne when the news broke on Thursday night – so they quickly forked out £238 on a ferry from Calais to Dover and hit the road.

The husband and wife, who asked not to be named, left at midnight.

They had been due to come home on Sunday – and they blasted Prime Minister Boris Johnson after arriving in Kent at midday.

The 55-year-old woman, a doctors surgery admin worker from Norfolk, said: ‘We had to do it to avoid quarantine. We just picked up all our stuff, chucked it in the motor home and drove.

‘We’re gutted because we were loving our break over there, but I just couldn’t afford to have to go into quarantine. It wouldn’t be ideal at all.

‘I understand why Boris has done this, but to give us a deadline of 4am on Saturday is nowhere near enough notice.

‘He has to bear in mind that a lot of the people who got the news late last night wouldn’t have been able to just get up and leave like us.

‘Some would’ve been families with young kids who were asleep. Then it’s a real rush to get things ready the next day.’

The mother-of-five added: ‘Boris and the Government really should have thought this through more.’

Marcus Keys, 49, had been on a week-long holiday in Limoges with his two children and wife.

They were due back today – and he was glad to get home.

Housing association development worker Marcus, from Birmingham, said: ‘It’s definitely a relief to avoid the quarantine – we didn’t want to get caught up in that.’

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‘Here’s hoping there are no delays’: British family tells MailOnline how they plan on getting to UK

Natalie Mills wrote to MailOnline: ‘We are a family currently in the Cote d’Azur. 

‘Our scheduled flight is at 10pm tonight – we are desperately hoping there are no delays!

‘We decided to come away as we’ve stayed in a fairly remote villa and so we felt pretty safe. We would not have travelled if we had booked a hotel.

‘My father in law is 86 and my father 71, so we’ve not done anything touristy really – just enjoyed the villa, and staring at a different four walls has been a treat in itself!

‘It will be hugely frustrating if we miss the deadline as we’ve made a point of staying safe.’

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Passengers returning from France scrambled to book earlier Eurostar trains, forking out hundreds of pounds extra and cutting their holidays short to avoid having to quarantine under new UK travel rules.

Carriages arriving at London St Pancras today were packed, with passengers unable to socially distance as most chairs were taken in the rush to return home.

Panicked Brits filled the platform at London St Pancras station this morning, wearing face masks and pulling their suitcases through the crowds in the mad rush to get home.

Vikesh Patel, 27, paid over the odds to change his Eurostar ticket to return home today after only arriving in Paris last night to visit his girlfriend.

The interdealer broker, from Essex, was devastated when he received a call from his boss advising him to return home to escape quarantine rules.

He said: ‘I arrived in Paris at 6pm last night to see my girlfriend who lives there. I was meant to come home on Monday.

‘It is the absolute worst thing that could have happened. I am not going to see her now for so long.

‘I could have not gone, but getting there at 6pm and then being told to come home by 4am Saturday is awful.

‘The train was so overbooked and people were trying to space themselves out.

‘I’ve taken the Eurostar a few times and at the moment you are not meant to sit next to another person.

‘But I think people were sitting in each other’s seats. I sat next to someone, but I had no choice and others stood for the whole two hours.

‘I heard the news at 10.30pm last night and tried to ignore it, but I got a text from my boss saying you’d better come home.

‘I woke up at 7.30am and there was only one train left for today. I paid an extra £110 on top of my original tickets.

‘I also had to pay for a flight home just in case I got stuck there.

‘I’ve not been working from home this whole time so the quarantine would affect me.

‘I don’t know when we’ll next see each other, I guess we will have to find a country it is safe for both of us to go to.’

Teachers Dilip Chakraborti, 39, and Camille Brignolle, 41, from north London, also changed their tickets at the last minute to avoid being in quarantine when schools reopen.

The pair only had 24 hours in Paris where they arrived yesterday to visit Camille’s family, and were angered to discover through Twitter of the imminent new travel restrictions.

Camille, a secondary school teacher, said: ‘We were due back on Tuesday and we only arrived yesterday, so we spent literally 24 hours in Paris.

‘We went to visit my dad. He lives just outside of Paris and I haven’t seen him since Christmas.

‘It was tricky trying to change our ticket to avoid the quarantine. Initially a ticket popped up this afternoon but it went away.

‘It was supposed to be an exchange, but we had to pay an extra £224 on top of our original tickets between the two of us.

‘Having just 24 hours with my dad is not great.

‘I am annoyed at the fact the announcement was at 11pm of an evening on Twitter.

‘I am not impressed with the government with the way they have dealt with it and the manner of it.

‘Why not tell us during the day? Why tell us at 11pm on Twitter.’

She added: ‘Because I am a teacher, I wanted to make sure I would not have any problems so we waited for a few weeks before booking to wait and see what was going on with the restrictions.’

Dilip, a primary school teacher, said: ‘We rebooked and got an earlier train today.

‘So we will have to wait and see if we can get any money back.

‘If we had stayed, it would have been touch and go for me having to quarantine before the schools open at the beginning of September.

‘But Camille’s school opens a week early so we have to come back.’ 

Visitors wearing protective face masks queue to enter the Louvre Pyramid in Paris yesterday, hours before the quarantine announcement

Visitors wearing protective face masks queue to enter the Louvre Pyramid in Paris yesterday, hours before the quarantine announcement

Visitors wearing protective face masks queue to enter the Louvre Pyramid in Paris yesterday, hours before the quarantine announcement

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Nicola Sturgeon ‘stopped holidaymakers from getting an extra 24 HOURS to get back from France’: Scottish First Minister ‘insisted the cut-off should be 4am TOMORROW instead of Sunday’ sparking desperate stampede of Britons to get home 

British holidaymakers voiced fury at the timing of the France quarantine move today amid claims Nicola Sturgeon demanded the cut-off was brought forward.

The new rules on isolating for 14 days will take effect for anyone who arrives in the UK from 4am tomorrow, sparking a desperate stamped to get home by thousands of British holidaymakers.

But sources said the Scottish government insisted that the deadline was earlier after UK ministers initially mooted 4am on Sunday.

Mr Shapps fuelled the chaos last night when he announced the dramatic step, but suggested it would only apply to people who ‘come back from Sunday’.

The Department for Transport then clarified that in fact the restrictions come into force from 4am tomorrow.

The news also broke hours later than expected, and following signals during the day that France might escape being struck off the list of ‘safe’ countries.

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‘We will be looking at the data a bit later on this afternoon – looking exactly where France and other countries are getting to.

‘We can’t be remotely complacent about our own situation. 

‘Everybody understands that in a pandemic you don’t allow our population to be reinfected or the disease to come back in.

‘That is why the quarantine measures are very important and we have to apply them in very sftrict way.’

Speculation has been mounting about quarantine exemptions being scrapped as infections rise across much of Europe. 

Hundreds of thousands of Britons are either on holiday in France or planning to go there, but yesterday it recorded more than 2,500 cases – a record since lockdown was eased.

The country appears to be perilously close to the yardstick of 20 cases per 100,000 population in a seven-day period. 

But ministers are believed to be prepared to hold off on restrictions when changes are announced, with the situation kept under close observation. 

The quarantine list already includes Spain and Portugal. Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland are not believed to have signed off on the adjustments yet. 

Travellers are expected to be given around 30 hours notice of any changes coming into force, so they can make new arrangements if required.  

The Netherlands (23.1 per 100,000), Gibraltar (35.6), Monaco (38.2), Malta (46.7), San Marino (53.0), the Faroe Islands (198.5), Turks and Caicos (278.9) and Aruba (547.9) all have higher rates of new cases per 100,000 than France.

Those on the list with a slightly lower rate than France are Denmark (15.3 per 100,000), Iceland (14.7), the Czech Republic (14.0), Switzerland (13.3) and Poland (12.7). 

All the above have now overtaken Portugal’s rate of 12.4 new cases per 100,000 people in the last seven days, but despite this, Portugal remains on the list of countries from which all arrivals to the UK, including those returning from holiday, must quarantine for two weeks.

Downing Street reminded potential holidaymakers this week that ‘there is no risk free way of travelling overseas’ with Boris Johnson adding that he ‘would not hesitate’ to bring in travel restrictions for other countries. 

The latest data on coronavirus cases on foreign soil is being analysed by the Government’s Joint Biosecurity Centre (JCB), which reports to Health Secretary Matt Hancock. 

Britons in France and other countries could be forced to make a dash home or risk being forced to quarantine on their return to the UK, should the government decide to remove more countries from the list.    

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Pictured: Estelle Blanc aged 37

Pictured: Estelle Blanc aged 37

Pictured: Dylan Jones

Pictured: Dylan Jones

Passengers arrive at St Pancras International Station from Paris. Last night it was announced that people would have to self isolate after spending time in France, to help stop the spread of Covid 19 (pictured: Estelle Blanc, left, Dylan Jones, right)

Bertie Lawrence, 33, and Elske Koelman, 29, project managers within international development, have already had relatives cancel attendance of their wedding following the new rules

Bertie Lawrence, 33, and Elske Koelman, 29, project managers within international development, have already had relatives cancel attendance of their wedding following the new rules

Bertie Lawrence, 33, and Elske Koelman, 29, project managers within international development, have already had relatives cancel attendance of their wedding following the new rules

Robert Lawrence, 65, from Islington, retired broadcast worker. He was catching the 11am Eurostar today on an interrail to visit friends in the Netherlands and Germany

Robert Lawrence, 65, from Islington, retired broadcast worker. He was catching the 11am Eurostar today on an interrail to visit friends in the Netherlands and Germany

Robert Lawrence, 65, from Islington, retired broadcast worker. He was catching the 11am Eurostar today on an interrail to visit friends in the Netherlands and Germany

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UK Ministers are believed to be planning new measures for a swathe of countries amid a surge in European coronavirus cases

UK Ministers are believed to be planning new measures for a swathe of countries amid a surge in European coronavirus cases

UK Ministers are believed to be planning new measures for a swathe of countries amid a surge in European coronavirus cases

Woman tells how their French holiday is cut short so her children can get back to school 

Emmeline Owens, 45, from Battersea, was staying in Antibes in the south of France with her husband and two children, eight and 11 years old.

She said that quarantining was ‘not really’ an option for them as they wanted their children to be able to return to school shortly.

‘They haven’t had much of an education in the last six months,’ she told the PA news agency. ‘If we can get in today they will be able to return to school when they’re due to go back in a couple of weeks, so, yes, it (quarantine) wasn’t much of an option.’ 

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On Tuesday, the UK updated its travel ‘green list’, but did not take Portugal off the quarantine list, in a blow to the country’s economy that benefits greatly from tourism from the UK.

The UK Government was warned that cases in Portugal had not fallen fast enough to be able to safely add the country to the ‘green list’.  

On Monday, France reported the first significant rise in the number of coronavirus patients in hospital since the lockdown was lifted, although it fell again on Tuesday before rising two days on the bounce. 

Earlier this week France‘s prime minister told his citizens to ‘pull themselves together’ amid a fresh surge in coronavirus cases. 

Jean Castex said the public was becoming careless and raised the spectre of a second lockdown after a rise of more than 10,000 cases in the last week. 

‘If we don’t act collectively, we expose ourselves to the heightened risk that the rebound in the epidemic becomes hard to control,’ Castex said on a visit to an intensive care ward in the South of France. 

Some parts of France have tightened their mask rules despite the summer heatwave, with police now set to ramp up checks on face coverings – while neighbouring Belgium yesterday made masks compulsory in all public spaces including outdoors.

France's prime minister Jean Castex (pictured at a hospital in Montpellier this week) has told his citizens to 'pull themselves together' amid a fresh surge in coronavirus cases in France

France's prime minister Jean Castex (pictured at a hospital in Montpellier this week) has told his citizens to 'pull themselves together' amid a fresh surge in coronavirus cases in France

France’s prime minister Jean Castex (pictured at a hospital in Montpellier this week) has told his citizens to ‘pull themselves together’ amid a fresh surge in coronavirus cases in France

Travel chiefs: This is a devastating blow to the industry 

ByTom Payne Transport Correspondent For The Daily Mail

The bombshell decision to reimpose quarantine on France is a ‘devastating blow’ to Britain’s crippled travel sector, industry leaders said last night.

Airlines and tour operators have suffered colossal losses during the pandemic as a result of plummeting passenger numbers and sweeping global travel restrictions.

A long-awaited announcement on travel corridors brought some respite in mid-July – but a steady yet sharp rise in coronavirus cases on the continent has brought hopes of a revived travel season to a sudden end.

Travel bosses last night said the decision to reimpose quarantine on France – weeks after Spain, Belgium, Andorra and the Bahamas were also kicked off the ‘safe’ country list – effectively signals the death knell for foreign holidays for the rest of the year.

But ministers are believed to be prepared to hold off on restrictions when changes are announced, with the situation kept under close observation

But ministers are believed to be prepared to hold off on restrictions when changes are announced, with the situation kept under close observation

But ministers are believed to be prepared to hold off on restrictions when changes are announced, with the situation kept under close observation

It also spells misery for millions of Britons with ruined trips, who now face a battle to claim refunds from airlines which may refuse to give them their money back.

Most holidaymakers are unlikely to be covered on travel insurance as the majority of policies bought after March 10 carry no cover for Covid 19-related cancellations.

Travel bosses last night criticised the Government’s inaction on airport testing – seen by many as a viable alternative to blanket quarantine measures – and blasted ministers’ ‘chaotic approach’ for throwing the industry into chaos and uncertainty.

One senior industry figure told the Daily Mail: ‘It has been chaos at every turn. The latest announcement on France is a watershed moment and a dark day for our industry. We are in uncharted waters. It is hard to see where we go from this.’

Gloria Guevara, president of the World Travel and Tourism Council, said the ‘worst fears’of the industry were coming true, and estimated three million UK jobs could be lost due to the ongoing uncertainty.

Tim Alderslade of trade body Airlines UK added: ‘It’s another devastating blow to the travel industry already reeling from the worst crisis in its history.

‘Having the political will to move to a sub-national approach to quarantine, in addition to a testing regime for arriving passengers so that those testing negative can avoid having to self-isolate – which other countries like Germany have already implemented – is urgently needed.’

He said this would ‘provide carriers and customers with additional certainty around the ability to operate this autumn and winter’.

Karen Dee of the Airport Operators Association said: ‘Our airports are facing pressures that were unimaginable six months ago and it is essential that the Government work with the industry to introduce regional travel corridors to low-risk areas and agree a package of financial measures that support our airports who have already lost over £2billion since the start of the pandemic.

‘We have consistently called for support including relief from business rates and an extension to employment support beyond October and it is long overdue that the Government provides the same level of support to aviation that it has provided to other sectors.’

Rory Boland of consumer group Which? said: ‘It’s understandable that the Government wants to restrict travel to these countries at this time, but the burden of this decision disproportionally falls on holidaymakers – thousands of whom are likely to be left significantly out of pocket because their airline will refuse to refund them.

‘Unlike tour operators, airlines now routinely ignore Foreign and Commonwealth Office travel warnings and refuse refunds because, they argue, the flight is still operating. Some major airlines, like Ryanair, won’t even allow customers to rebook without charging a hefty fee.

‘The Government wants us to act responsibly and not travel to countries with an FCO warning, but it needs to make it clear to airlines that they too need to act responsibly and not ignore government travel advice in an effort to pocket customer cash.’ 

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Parents of student,22, who vanished 40-years ago fighting to change death certificate

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parents of student22 who vanished 40 years ago fighting to change death certificate

The elderly parents of a student who vanished nearly 40 years ago say they are ‘living’ to change her death certificate to state that she was murdered. 

Art student Jessie Earl was just 22 when she disappeared from her university home in Eastbourne, East Sussex, in May 1980. 

Nine years later, Jessie’s incomplete skeleton was found in dense scrubland above Beachy Head. Her personal belongings and clothing had been removed – and she was left only with her bra, which had been used to tie up her wrists. 

After her remains were found in 1989, an inquest recorded an open verdict and her parents Valerie, 88, and John, 92, have been fighting to have her her death reclassified ever since.

In an interview with The Sunday Times, Val explained they ‘knew’ it was murder as soon as they saw Jessie’s remains, and that their only wish in life is to change the ruling of their her death.  

Art student Jessie Earl (picture) was just 22 when she disappeared from her university home in Eastbourne, East Sussex, in May 1980

Art student Jessie Earl (picture) was just 22 when she disappeared from her university home in Eastbourne, East Sussex, in May 1980

Art student Jessie Earl (picture) was just 22 when she disappeared from her university home in Eastbourne, East Sussex, in May 1980

After her remains were found in 1989, an inquest recorded an open verdict and her parents Valerie, 88, and John, 92, (pictured) have been fighting to have her her death reclassified

After her remains were found in 1989, an inquest recorded an open verdict and her parents Valerie, 88, and John, 92, (pictured) have been fighting to have her her death reclassified

After her remains were found in 1989, an inquest recorded an open verdict and her parents Valerie, 88, and John, 92, (pictured) have been fighting to have her her death reclassified

‘From the moment I saw the death certificate I thought this is not fair to our daughter, said John, ‘I thought we must get it altered — and that is what we have been living for since’.

Jessie was a student at Eastbourne College of Art and Design, and had been spotted coming home from the doctors by an elderly neighbour the afternoon before she went missing. 

After two weeks the police classified Jessie as a missing person, and her parents would spend every moment they had spare searching for their daughter, distributing flyers and contacting various charities. 

Val told the publication how at one point in the search she stood waiting near the A2, after a psychic said her daughter would be travelling on the road in a blue car. 

Jessie was a student at Eastbourne College of Art and Design, and had been spotted coming home from the doctors by an elderly neighbour the afternoon before she went missing in 1980

Jessie was a student at Eastbourne College of Art and Design, and had been spotted coming home from the doctors by an elderly neighbour the afternoon before she went missing in 1980

Jessie was a student at Eastbourne College of Art and Design, and had been spotted coming home from the doctors by an elderly neighbour the afternoon before she went missing in 1980

After the call to tell them that Jessie’s remains had been found, John and Val knew her death was suspicious, with the ring and watch she wore daily missing from her naked body.   

‘As soon as we saw the bra we knew it was murder’, Val said. 

The family, along with police officer-turned-investigator Mark William-Thomas, have speculated that Jessie could have been a victim of serial killer Peter Tobin. 

John, who now lives in Eltham, south east London, said in January he and his wife aren’t interested in revenge, instead they want to see their daughter’s death recorded as a murder ‘before it is too late.’

‘We are not interested in revenge’,  said John, ‘We just want final justice for our daughter. The important thing is for this to happen in our lifetime. We always hoped we hadn’t seen the last of this.

John, who now lives in Eltham, south east London, said in January he and his wife aren't interested in revenge, instead they want to see their daughter's death recorded as a murder 'before it is too late'

John, who now lives in Eltham, south east London, said in January he and his wife aren't interested in revenge, instead they want to see their daughter's death recorded as a murder 'before it is too late'

John, who now lives in Eltham, south east London, said in January he and his wife aren’t interested in revenge, instead they want to see their daughter’s death recorded as a murder ‘before it is too late’

‘The first 11 years after she disappeared were the worst. They were hard, because we had no idea what had happened to her.

‘We always knew were looking at something suspicious, but the uncertainty is very painful. When she was discovered we were relieved.

‘But this last part has been very painful to get over. We want justice and to have the right verdict.

‘You get over the crying in and things like that in 40 years, now were just want justice – but in our lifetime. We will get the right result.’ 

Following criticism of its handling, Sussex Police reopened the case in 2001 and formally recorded Jessie’s death as murder. A fresh file was sent to the Coroner but no new inquest was organised.

Jessie's parents have previously speculated that their daughter was a victim of convicted serial killer Tobin, who was living in the area at the time

Jessie's parents have previously speculated that their daughter was a victim of convicted serial killer Tobin, who was living in the area at the time

Jessie’s parents have previously speculated that their daughter was a victim of convicted serial killer Tobin, who was living in the area at the time

Earlier this year, the family launched a crowdfunder to get the verdict quashed off the back of Jessie’s death being featured in the second season of the Netflix series ‘The Investigator’.  

Jessie’s parents have previously speculated that their daughter was a victim of convicted serial killer Tobin, who was living in the area at the time.

He is serving life sentences for murdering Polish student Angelika Kluk, Scots schoolgirl Vicky Hamilton and Essex teenager Dinah McNicol.

But Sussex Police have previously ruled Tobin out, telling the BBC last year: ‘We have no evidence implicating Peter Tobin or any other named or known individual in the murder of Jessie Earl’. 

This post first appeared on dailymail.co.uk

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Employers increasing levels of surveillance in an attempt to recreate office at home

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employers increasing levels of surveillance in an attempt to recreate office at home

As the coronavirus crisis continues, office workers have been advised by Prime Minister Boris Johnson to keep working from home where they can. 

However, this may not mean escaping the office environment entirely, with some employers reportedly using increasing surveillance to try and keep tabs on workers they’re miles away from. 

According to the Observer, several employers have been using online tools to recreate the normal workplace – while others have requested digital methods of monitoring their workers from tech companies. 

Shirking or working? Employers seem increasingly unsure...digital health researcher Dr Claudia Pagliari says managers have 'ramped up' tracking their employees

Shirking or working? Employers seem increasingly unsure...digital health researcher Dr Claudia Pagliari says managers have 'ramped up' tracking their employees

Shirking or working? Employers seem increasingly unsure…digital health researcher Dr Claudia Pagliari says managers have ‘ramped up’ tracking their employees

Dr Claudia Pagliari, a researcher into digital health and society at the University of Edinburgh, told that bosses have ‘ramped up’ their attempts to track their employee’s time, in the same way they might in the real world. 

‘It has really ramped up’, she said, ‘People are home working, and many organisations are beginning to want to track what they’re doing.’

She revealed that employers are keeping track of workers’ time through tools such as Slack and Microsoft Team, which report when an employee is active. 

The publication also spoke with David Heinemeier Hansson, the co-founder of start-up Basecamp, a company providing a platform for remote employees. 

WHAT IS API?  

Application Programming Interface (API) is a software intermediary that allows two applications to communicate with each other. 

When using an app on a mobile phone, the application connects to the Internet and sends data to another server. 

The server retrieves that data, performs the required actions and sends it back to the phone. 

The application then interprets that data and gives the user the information you wanted in a readable way.

APIs can also be used to control access to devices that an application may not have permission to use. 

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He claimed that he’s turned down requests from companies who wish to spy on their employees: ‘We went so far as to say that our API cannot be used for any form of employee surveillance.’   

This news comes after the dramatic reversal of the Government’s recent drive to get people back to workplaces earlier this month.

The new Covid-19 measures implemented last week includes advising all office workers to work from home where they can as soon as possible. 

The official guidance for England now states: ‘Where an employer, in consultation with their employee, judges an employee can carry out their normal duties from home they should do so.’ 

David Heinemeier Hansson, the co-founder of start-up Basecamp, claims that he's turned down requests from companies who wish to spy on their employees

David Heinemeier Hansson, the co-founder of start-up Basecamp, claims that he's turned down requests from companies who wish to spy on their employees

David Heinemeier Hansson, the co-founder of start-up Basecamp, claims that he’s turned down requests from companies who wish to spy on their employees

According to Cabinet Office Minister Michael Gove: ‘We are stressing that if it is safe to work in your workplace, if you are in a Covid-secure workplace, then you should be there if your job requires it. But, if you can work from home you should.’

But this may not be bad news to all, with a July survey revealing one in three office workers want to continue working from home after the coronavirus threat is over. 

The study from the Centre for Economics and Business Research (CEBR) found that 32 per cent of people are expecting to at least partially work from home even after the lockdown has ended. 

The research further indicated that between 25 per cent and 30 per cent of employees will be working from home on any one day in 2021. 

This post first appeared on dailymail.co.uk

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Crying toddler found wandering the streets of Hull alone – as passer-by spots him and calls police

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crying toddler found wandering the streets of hull alone as passer by spots him and calls police

A sobbing toddler, thought to be about two years old, was found wandering alone in the streets of Hull.

The little boy was spotted looking lost and confused by two passers-by on a road in Spring Bank in Hull, East Yorkshire on Saturday afternoon.

The men phoned the police who were filmed arriving on the scene in a Facebook video that has been viewed almost 20,000 times.  

Passers-by called the police when they found a little boy all alone looking lost and confused on a road in Spring Bank in Hull, East Yorkshire on Saturday afternoon

Passers-by called the police when they found a little boy all alone looking lost and confused on a road in Spring Bank in Hull, East Yorkshire on Saturday afternoon

Passers-by called the police when they found a little boy all alone looking lost and confused on a road in Spring Bank in Hull, East Yorkshire on Saturday afternoon

Footage shows the missing boy, who is wearing a red coat and green shorts, waiting with two men and a child as the police arrive.

The men explain the situation while the little boy stands beside the adults with a terrified look on his face. 

One policeman tries to talk to the boy, saying: ‘Hello love. You alright? It’s okay, talk to us.’ 

The other policeman bends down to the boy’s height and reaches for his hand, coaxing him to come to him, saying: ‘We’ll find mummy, come on.’ 

Video footage shows the police arriving on the scene as one policeman tries to talk to the boy, bending down to his level saying: 'We'll find mummy, come on'

Video footage shows the police arriving on the scene as one policeman tries to talk to the boy, bending down to his level saying: 'We'll find mummy, come on'

Video footage shows the police arriving on the scene as one policeman tries to talk to the boy, bending down to his level saying: ‘We’ll find mummy, come on’

The terrified boy continues to sob as he is held in the policeman's arms as the men try to figure out his name and where he lives

The terrified boy continues to sob as he is held in the policeman's arms as the men try to figure out his name and where he lives

The terrified boy continues to sob as he is held in the policeman’s arms as the men try to figure out his name and where he lives

He picks the toddler up in his arms as the little boys begins to sob.

‘Where’s your house?’ he asks him. ‘Where’s mummy?’, but the boy just continues to cry.

The four men discuss the situation, with the policemen wondering why they can’t see any distressed parents out looking for him.

When the boy calms down they ask him again where he lives and his name but he only shakes his head. 

Eventually, the two police officers take the boy to their police van and it has been confirmed that the little boy has been safely reunited with his family

Eventually, the two police officers take the boy to their police van and it has been confirmed that the little boy has been safely reunited with his family

Eventually, the two police officers take the boy to their police van and it has been confirmed that the little boy has been safely reunited with his family

Eventually, the two police officers take the boy to their police van promising the boy some chocolate and thanking the kind strangers for looking after him. 

Humberside Police confirmed to The Sun that the boy has now been safely returned to his family.

It is unclear how the toddler ended up wandering the street by himself.

People commenting on the video expressed their relief that the boy had been found by the right people with one person writing: ‘Thank goodness you helped him it could have been so much worse.’

Another wrote: ‘Ah bless him. His parents will be frantic. Glad it was someone nice who spotted him before he was in any danger. Hope he’s home and safe.’

This post first appeared on dailymail.co.uk

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