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Orphaned daughters pay tribute to parents killed in Manchester bombing

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orphaned daughters pay tribute to parents killed in manchester bombing

The orphaned daughters of a Polish couple who were killed in the Manchester Arena terror attack have paid tribute to their parents at the public inquiry into the attack.

Marcin, 42, and Angelika Klis, 39, had been waiting in the venue’s foyer to pick up their daughters following an Ariana Grande concert in May 2017 when they were caught in the explosion which killed 22 and injured 119.

In a statement to the inquiry, their daughters Aleksandra, then aged 20, and Patrycja, then 14, described how the pain following the death of their ‘amazing parents’ was ‘so hard to explain’. 

Details of the couple’s life and death were given during the commemorative phase of the public inquiry, where family members of each of the 22 murdered in the attack give tributes including statements, videos and photographs of their loved ones. 

Marcin, 42, and Angelika Klisn (pictured together moments before they were killed), 39, had been waiting in the foyer of the Manchester Arena when they were killed on May 2017

Marcin, 42, and Angelika Klisn (pictured together moments before they were killed), 39, had been waiting in the foyer of the Manchester Arena when they were killed on May 2017

Marcin, 42, and Angelika Klisn (pictured together moments before they were killed), 39, had been waiting in the foyer of the Manchester Arena when they were killed on May 2017

The hearing in Manchester was told the parents were born in Slowno, a small town in northern Poland and grew up in another town, Darlowo nearby.

They had married in Poland in 1996 and divorced ten years later but only remained apart for a short time and though they did not remarry, were very much still in love, the hearing was told.

The daughters’ statement read: ‘I don’t know an awful lot about their growing up and education. I’m not sure how my parents met but they met in the early 1990s and fell in love.’ 

‘We think of our parents all the time, they are never out of our thoughts,’ the sisters added.   

In 2004, their father Marcin, a postman in Poland, moved to the UK, working initially for Tesco and latterly as a taxi driver after all the family moved to York in 2007.

Meanwhile their mother Angelika, who had studied economics in Poland, initially worked as a cleaner then as a shop worker for Tesco until she was killed. 

They would go back to Poland once a year and also enjoyed family holidays in Rome and Egypt.

In their statement the daughters said: ‘Every few weeks they would plan a family day because spending time with us made them both happy. We enjoyed every minute of time we spend together.

‘Mum and dad’s love was incredibly strong, they were so in love as if teenagers without a care in the world.

‘Most of all they were happy. They were soulmates and did not want to be without each other.

‘Mum and dad were amazing parents and kind people.

‘Losing our mum and dad and the pain and loss we feel is so hard to explain.

Aleksandra Klis (pictured), from York, who was 20 at the time of her parents death, and her sister Patrycja, then 14, paid tribute to their parents at the public inquiry into the attack

Aleksandra Klis (pictured), from York, who was 20 at the time of her parents death, and her sister Patrycja, then 14, paid tribute to their parents at the public inquiry into the attack

Aleksandra Klis (pictured), from York, who was 20 at the time of her parents death, and her sister Patrycja, then 14, paid tribute to their parents at the public inquiry into the attack

Suicide bomber Salman Abedi (pictured entering a lift to the Manchester Arena) detonated his large Karrimor rucksack which contained the explosive on the day of the attack

Suicide bomber Salman Abedi (pictured entering a lift to the Manchester Arena) detonated his large Karrimor rucksack which contained the explosive on the day of the attack

Suicide bomber Salman Abedi (pictured entering a lift to the Manchester Arena) detonated his large Karrimor rucksack which contained the explosive on the day of the attack

‘We are completely devastated by what has happened and our lives have been completely turned upside down.’

The final picture of the couple taken on the evening of the bombing as they waited for the concert to finish was also shown during the inquiry.        

Following their parents death, the daughters received an outpouring of support, with Donna Kellaway, a neighbour of the family’s home in York, setting up a GoFundMe page for the girls.

On the page Ms Kellaway wrote: ‘Alex and Patrycia tragically lost both parents in the Manchester attacks. There are no words to describe what they must be going through.

‘I know money will do nothing to ease their pain, but I hope the community can raise something for these girls that will help them financially at this terrible time.’   

During the terror attack, suicide bomber Salman Abedi waited an hour in the City Room, the foyer outside the venue, before detonating his large Karrimor rucksack which contained the explosive at 10.31pm.

His body, which was recovered in four parts, was identified by his DNA and finger prints which were on the police database after he was arrested for shop lifting in 2012. 

The forensic investigators recovered 1,675 nyloc nuts, 156 flanged nuts, 663 plain nuts and 11 fragments from the deceased, survivors, and crime scene. 

It was previously revealed that the Arena bomber who had been studying for a degree in business and management at Salford University, had used his student loan to fund the terrorist attack with the help of his brother.

Pictured: Ambulances and police arriving to Manchester Arena following the explosion

Pictured: Ambulances and police arriving to Manchester Arena following the explosion

Pictured: Ambulances and police arriving to Manchester Arena following the explosion 

In 2019, Aleksandra Klis urged Britain not to let Isis bride Shamima Begum return, during an interview on ITV’s This Morning.  

She said: ‘I think she’s comparing two things that shouldn’t ever be compared. She’s saying that there are fighters in IS that are getting killed.

‘Those people go there knowing what to expect. People who went to the Manchester Arena, they went there to take their kids to a concert.

‘She’s out of order, comparing those two things… She’s made her bed. I think she should remain where she is. I don’t think she’s being honest.

‘The only reason that she wants to come back is because she couldn’t stay where she was. What is the point in coming back if you enjoy it so much there?’

The public inquiry into the circumstances of the attack is expected to last into spring next year.

The hearing continues.     

The 22 victims of the Manchester Arena bombing in May 2017 

  • Elaine McIver, 43: the off-duty police officer died in the attack, which injured her husband and children;
  • Saffie Rose Roussos, 8: the youngest victim was separated from her mother and sister in the seconds after the blast;
  • Sorrell Leczkowski, 14: schoolgirl died in the bomb blast, while her mother, Samantha and grandmother Pauline were badly hurt;
  • Eilidh MacLeod, 14: confirmed dead having been missing since being caught up in the blast with her friend Laura MacIntyre;
  • Nell Jones, 14: farmer’s daughter travelled to the pop concert with her best friend for her 14th birthday;
  • Olivia Campbell-Hardy, 15: her family searched desperately for her for nearly 48 hours and went on TV to plead for news;
  • Megan Hurley, 15: the Liverpool schoolgirl was with her brother who suffered serious injuries in the blast;
  • Georgina Callander, 18: met Ariana Grande backstage at a previous gig and died in hospital with her mother at her bedside;
  • Chloe Rutherford, 17, and Liam Curry, 19: couple from South Shields ‘wanted to be together forever and now they are’, their family said;
  • Courtney Boyle, 19, and Philip Tron, 32: criminology student and her stepfather were confirmed dead following a Facebook appeal;
  • John Atkinson, 26: pop fan from Radcliffe, Greater Manchester, was in a local dance group and was leaving the gig when the blast happened;
  • Martyn Hett, 29: public relations manager from Stockport, who was due to start a two-month ‘holiday of a lifetime’ to the US two days later;
  • Kelly Brewster, 32: civil servant from Sheffield who died trying to shield her 11-year-old niece from the bombing;
  • Marcin Klis, 42, and Angelika Klis, 39: both killed as they waited for their daughters who both survived the blast;
  • Michelle Kiss, 45: mother-of-three from Clitheroe, Lancashire, went to the Ariana Grande concert with her daughter;
  • Alison Lowe, 44, and friend Lisa Lees, 43: both killed when they arrived to pick up their teenage daughters who were not hurt;
  • Wendy Fawell, 50: mother from Leeds was killed by the blast while picking up her children at the Arena with a friend;
  • Jane Taylor, 50: mother-of-three from Blackpool was killed as she waited to collect a friend’s daughter from the concert
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Sri Lanka sends back 21 containers of ‘recycling’ to UK because it was full of rotting MEDICAL WASTE

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sri lanka sends back 21 containers of recycling to uk because it was full of rotting medical waste

Sri Lanka has shipped 21 containers full of ‘recycling’ back to the UK because it was full of rotting medical waste.

The Sri Lankan government said container-loads of waste were brought into the island in violation of international laws governing the shipping of hazardous material.

Previous illegally imported containers had included rags, bandages and body parts from mortuaries, according to officials.

The 21 containers (pictured) were holding up to 260 tonnes of rubbish were brought into the island in violation of international laws governing the shipping of hazardous material

The 21 containers (pictured) were holding up to 260 tonnes of rubbish were brought into the island in violation of international laws governing the shipping of hazardous material

The 21 containers (pictured) were holding up to 260 tonnes of rubbish were brought into the island in violation of international laws governing the shipping of hazardous material

The type of hospital waste was not revealed, but they departed Sri Lanka on Saturday according to customs.

The 21 containers were holding up to 260 tonnes of rubbish and had first arrived by ship in the capital Colombo’s main port between September 2017 and March 2018. 

The containers were meant to carry used mattresses, carpets and rugs, but had also contained hospital waste, officials said.

Customs spokesman Sunil Jayaratne said: ‘The shipper had agreed to take back these 21 containers.

‘We are working to secure compensation from those responsible for getting the containers into the country.’

Another 242 containers from Britain remain abandoned at the same port and at a free trade zone outside the capital.

The illegal waste first arrived by ship in the capital Colombo's main port (pictured) between September 2017 and March 2018

The illegal waste first arrived by ship in the capital Colombo's main port (pictured) between September 2017 and March 2018

The illegal waste first arrived by ship in the capital Colombo’s main port (pictured) between September 2017 and March 2018

The government said they were carrying illegal garbage in violation of international law and also arrived between 2017 and 2018.  

The government is currently engaged in legal action against the shipper to have the 242 containers removed from the country.

A Sri Lankan investigation last year into nearly 3,000 tonnes of illegally imported hazardous waste found the importer had reshipped about 180 tonnes to India and Dubai.

In the past two years several Asian countries have turned back container-loads of waste from foreign shores.

This post first appeared on dailymail.co.uk

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Wedding venue is fined £10,000 for hosting a 120-person reception

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wedding venue is fined 10000 for hosting a 120 person reception

An events venue has been fined £10,000 after police found 120 revellers at a wedding party. 

Police were called to the venue at 4.45pm on Friday following reports of a wedding reception taking place at Stafford Park in Telford, Shropshire. 

The scenes came nearly a week after the Prime Minister set out a raft of measures designed to clampdown on the coronavirus, including slashing the number allowed to gather at nuptials to 15.    

Chief Supt Paul Moxley, of West Mercia Police, said: ‘The majority of our communities are adhering to the new COVID legislation and laws and are acting very responsibly.

The events venue in Stafford Park in Telford, Shropshire, has been fined £10,000 after police found 120 revellers celebrating at a wedding reception. (Stock image)

The events venue in Stafford Park in Telford, Shropshire, has been fined £10,000 after police found 120 revellers celebrating at a wedding reception. (Stock image)

The events venue in Stafford Park in Telford, Shropshire, has been fined £10,000 after police found 120 revellers celebrating at a wedding reception. (Stock image)

‘It is therefore unacceptable that a minority of people are continuing to disregard the rules and as a consequence a £10,000 fine was given to the organisation hosting the wedding party in Telford today.

‘It is believed that around 120 people were attending the event in Stafford Park, all of whom left the venue when we attended and spoke to them.

‘Therefore no fixed penalty notices were given to the guests.

‘We are taking a robust enforcement approach towards those who choose to intentionally break the law and in order to help suppress the virus and protect everyone, where people are clearly breaching the regulations they will be given a fine.’

Last Thursday police shut down Adelina’s Bar and Kitchen in Swansea after dozens of guests were found crammed inside the venue for a wedding reception. 

A spokeswoman for South Wales Police said: ‘South Wales Police responded to a report of a gathering at the Adelina’s Bar and Kitchen at approximately 7.10pm on Thursday.

‘Upon arrival officers found large number of people in attendance at a private function.

‘The function was shut down and all attendees ordered to leave.

West Mercia Police said the venue was fined £10,000 for breaching the coronavirus restrictions

West Mercia Police said the venue was fined £10,000 for breaching the coronavirus restrictions

West Mercia Police said the venue was fined £10,000 for breaching the coronavirus restrictions

It comes early a week after the Prime Minister set out a raft of measures designed to clampdown on the coronavirus. (Stock image)

It comes early a week after the Prime Minister set out a raft of measures designed to clampdown on the coronavirus. (Stock image)

It comes early a week after the Prime Minister set out a raft of measures designed to clampdown on the coronavirus. (Stock image)

‘Further enforcement action by South Wales Police and Swansea Council is currently being considered.’    

A spokesperson for Adelina’s Bar and Kitchen told The Sun they had only taken a booking for 25 people for the wedding reception .

They claimed to be unaware of bookings taken in other parts of the restaurant for the same party. 

In August, police also shut down a wedding reception at Waheed’s Buffet and Banqueting Hall in Blackburn after more than 100 people gathered to celebrate a local lockdown-breaching wedding reception.   

This post first appeared on dailymail.co.uk

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Parents of student,22, who vanished 40-years ago fighting to change death certificate

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parents of student22 who vanished 40 years ago fighting to change death certificate

The elderly parents of a student who vanished nearly 40 years ago say they are ‘living’ to change her death certificate to state that she was murdered. 

Art student Jessie Earl was just 22 when she disappeared from her university home in Eastbourne, East Sussex, in May 1980. 

Nine years later, Jessie’s incomplete skeleton was found in dense scrubland above Beachy Head. Her personal belongings and clothing had been removed – and she was left only with her bra, which had been used to tie up her wrists. 

After her remains were found in 1989, an inquest recorded an open verdict and her parents Valerie, 88, and John, 92, have been fighting to have her her death reclassified ever since.

In an interview with The Sunday Times, Val explained they ‘knew’ it was murder as soon as they saw Jessie’s remains, and that their only wish in life is to change the ruling of their her death.  

Art student Jessie Earl (picture) was just 22 when she disappeared from her university home in Eastbourne, East Sussex, in May 1980

Art student Jessie Earl (picture) was just 22 when she disappeared from her university home in Eastbourne, East Sussex, in May 1980

Art student Jessie Earl (picture) was just 22 when she disappeared from her university home in Eastbourne, East Sussex, in May 1980

After her remains were found in 1989, an inquest recorded an open verdict and her parents Valerie, 88, and John, 92, (pictured) have been fighting to have her her death reclassified

After her remains were found in 1989, an inquest recorded an open verdict and her parents Valerie, 88, and John, 92, (pictured) have been fighting to have her her death reclassified

After her remains were found in 1989, an inquest recorded an open verdict and her parents Valerie, 88, and John, 92, (pictured) have been fighting to have her her death reclassified

‘From the moment I saw the death certificate I thought this is not fair to our daughter, said John, ‘I thought we must get it altered — and that is what we have been living for since’.

Jessie was a student at Eastbourne College of Art and Design, and had been spotted coming home from the doctors by an elderly neighbour the afternoon before she went missing. 

After two weeks the police classified Jessie as a missing person, and her parents would spend every moment they had spare searching for their daughter, distributing flyers and contacting various charities. 

Val told the publication how at one point in the search she stood waiting near the A2, after a psychic said her daughter would be travelling on the road in a blue car. 

Jessie was a student at Eastbourne College of Art and Design, and had been spotted coming home from the doctors by an elderly neighbour the afternoon before she went missing in 1980

Jessie was a student at Eastbourne College of Art and Design, and had been spotted coming home from the doctors by an elderly neighbour the afternoon before she went missing in 1980

Jessie was a student at Eastbourne College of Art and Design, and had been spotted coming home from the doctors by an elderly neighbour the afternoon before she went missing in 1980

After the call to tell them that Jessie’s remains had been found, John and Val knew her death was suspicious, with the ring and watch she wore daily missing from her naked body.   

‘As soon as we saw the bra we knew it was murder’, Val said. 

The family, along with police officer-turned-investigator Mark William-Thomas, have speculated that Jessie could have been a victim of serial killer Peter Tobin. 

John, who now lives in Eltham, south east London, said in January he and his wife aren’t interested in revenge, instead they want to see their daughter’s death recorded as a murder ‘before it is too late.’

‘We are not interested in revenge’,  said John, ‘We just want final justice for our daughter. The important thing is for this to happen in our lifetime. We always hoped we hadn’t seen the last of this.

John, who now lives in Eltham, south east London, said in January he and his wife aren't interested in revenge, instead they want to see their daughter's death recorded as a murder 'before it is too late'

John, who now lives in Eltham, south east London, said in January he and his wife aren't interested in revenge, instead they want to see their daughter's death recorded as a murder 'before it is too late'

John, who now lives in Eltham, south east London, said in January he and his wife aren’t interested in revenge, instead they want to see their daughter’s death recorded as a murder ‘before it is too late’

‘The first 11 years after she disappeared were the worst. They were hard, because we had no idea what had happened to her.

‘We always knew were looking at something suspicious, but the uncertainty is very painful. When she was discovered we were relieved.

‘But this last part has been very painful to get over. We want justice and to have the right verdict.

‘You get over the crying in and things like that in 40 years, now were just want justice – but in our lifetime. We will get the right result.’ 

Following criticism of its handling, Sussex Police reopened the case in 2001 and formally recorded Jessie’s death as murder. A fresh file was sent to the Coroner but no new inquest was organised.

Jessie's parents have previously speculated that their daughter was a victim of convicted serial killer Tobin, who was living in the area at the time

Jessie's parents have previously speculated that their daughter was a victim of convicted serial killer Tobin, who was living in the area at the time

Jessie’s parents have previously speculated that their daughter was a victim of convicted serial killer Tobin, who was living in the area at the time

Earlier this year, the family launched a crowdfunder to get the verdict quashed off the back of Jessie’s death being featured in the second season of the Netflix series ‘The Investigator’.  

Jessie’s parents have previously speculated that their daughter was a victim of convicted serial killer Tobin, who was living in the area at the time.

He is serving life sentences for murdering Polish student Angelika Kluk, Scots schoolgirl Vicky Hamilton and Essex teenager Dinah McNicol.

But Sussex Police have previously ruled Tobin out, telling the BBC last year: ‘We have no evidence implicating Peter Tobin or any other named or known individual in the murder of Jessie Earl’. 

This post first appeared on dailymail.co.uk

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