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Outrage as cosmetic surgery company sells T-shirts with ‘scars’

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outrage as cosmetic surgery company sells t shirts with scars

A cosmetic surgery company has sparked outrage after it announced it would be selling T-shirts marked with double mastectomy surgical scars.

Plastic surgeon at Cosmetic Surgery Partners in London, Dr Miles Berry, took to social media to unveil the clinic’s new range of T-shirts that would allow those looking to transition from female to male to ‘test the waters’.

However the doctor has since been met with criticism, with those opposed to the clothing range arguing it was ‘grotesque’ and insensitive to breast cancer survivors.

The clinic has since confirmed they have not sold nor will it be selling the T-shirts. 

A surgeon at Cosmetic Surgery Partners in London previously said the clinic would be selling T-shirts that have double-mastectomy surgical scars on them

A surgeon at Cosmetic Surgery Partners in London previously said the clinic would be selling T-shirts that have double-mastectomy surgical scars on them

A surgeon at Cosmetic Surgery Partners in London previously said the clinic would be selling T-shirts that have double-mastectomy surgical scars on them

Surgeon Miles Berry took to social media to unveil the clinic's new range of T-shirts in a post which has now been deleted

Surgeon Miles Berry took to social media to unveil the clinic's new range of T-shirts in a post which has now been deleted

Surgeon Miles Berry took to social media to unveil the clinic’s new range of T-shirts in a post which has now been deleted

Taking to Instagram the aesthetic surgeon, wrote: ‘With lockdown easing and better access to the Post Office, thought it might be time to test the waters.  

‘There are a few each of sizes XS, S, M, L and XL (currently grey only). £20 each (including postage within the UK) with 25% to charity-open to suggestions for the latter. Basket soon to be live on www.cosmeticurgery-partners.co.uk.’

However after being met with criticism by one social media user the doctor went on to explain: ‘Thanks for you comment and I am sorry it has led to you to question our compassion.

‘In fact, it started as a bit of fun that we thought we could provide some additional benefit.

‘Whilst I did research some of the charities, being-cis- felt it might trample on sensitiveness of the trans community if we did not solicit some opinion.’

When contacted by MailOnline a spokesperson for the clinic said: ‘I can confirm the post has now been removed.’

They added: ‘Our clinic has not sold nor will it be selling the T-shirts.’

Following the post, which has since been deleted, social media users criticised the clothing range and suggested it was far from ‘a bit of fun’.

Plastic surgeon Miles Berry said that with lockdown easing and better access to the Post Office it was 'time to test the waters'

Plastic surgeon Miles Berry said that with lockdown easing and better access to the Post Office it was 'time to test the waters'

Plastic surgeon Miles Berry said that with lockdown easing and better access to the Post Office it was ‘time to test the waters’

The doctor later explained that the project started as a 'bit of fun' and was aimed at providing 'additional benefit'. The clinic has since said it had not sold nor would it be selling the T-shirts

The doctor later explained that the project started as a 'bit of fun' and was aimed at providing 'additional benefit'. The clinic has since said it had not sold nor would it be selling the T-shirts

The doctor later explained that the project started as a ‘bit of fun’ and was aimed at providing ‘additional benefit’. The clinic has since said it had not sold nor would it be selling the T-shirts

One user wrote: ‘I was thinking about how breast cancer survivors might feel seeing girls walking round with T-shirts like that.’

While another added: ‘Geezo that is without doubt one of the worst things I’ve saw under the guise of a ‘bit of fun’.

Another person commented: ‘This is grotesque.’

Meanwhile another person wrote: ‘As a woman who has had a double-mastectomy I can say these T-shirts are the obvious missing item in the cancer welcome pack.’

Elsewhere another social media user added: ‘There is so much wrong with this I don’t know where to begin.’ 

A transgender mastectomy, which is also called a masculinising chest surgery, involves the removal of unwanted breast tissue and sees the surgeon reconstruct the chest. 

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Social media users took to Twitter to share their outrage, with one asking how breast cancer patients would feel

Social media users took to Twitter to share their outrage, with one asking how breast cancer patients would feel

Social media users took to Twitter to share their outrage, with one asking how breast cancer patients would feel

In some cases, the areola and nipples are removed and resized before being grafted back onto the body.   

According to the NHS, those who think they may have gender dysphoria are referred to a gender dysphoria clinic (GDC) where a multidisciplinary team of healthcare professionals offer ongoing assessments, treatments, support and advice.

These treatments can include: psychological support, cross-sex hormone therapy and speech and language therapy to help the patient sound more typical of their gender identity.

Some people may decide to have surgery to permanently change their body and will be referred to a surgeon.

Those looking to transition will have to live as their preferred gender identity for at least a year before a referral is made for gender surgery.    

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Trump is expected to defy RBG’s dying wish and nominate replacement in days

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trump is expected to defy rbgs dying wish and nominate replacement in days

President Donald Trump is expected to ignore the dying wish of late Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg and nominate her replacement in the coming days in a rush to hurry through a conservative judge before the election. 

Ginsburg had hoped that Trump would not be the president to select the next Justice, concerned with the direction in which that would take the court.  

Trump’s attempts to hurry through his own pick, the third Supreme Court Justice he would have nominated, has already been met with backlash from his rival, Democratic nominee Joe Biden.

Biden demanded that Trump waits until after the election so the winner can put forward the nomination.

It comes as insiders suggest that some Republican Senators led by Utah’s Mitt Romney will lead a rebellion to scupper Trump’s chances of a rushed process. 

It was the the dying wish of late Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg that Trump not nominate her replacement but he is set to ignore it and nominate in the coming days

It was the the dying wish of late Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg that Trump not nominate her replacement but he is set to ignore it and nominate in the coming days

It was the the dying wish of late Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg that Trump not nominate her replacement but he is set to it and nominate in the coming days

President Donald Trump speaks about the death of Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg Friday. It is rumored he will nominate her replacement in the coming days

President Donald Trump speaks about the death of Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg Friday. It is rumored he will nominate her replacement in the coming days

President Donald Trump speaks about the death of Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg Friday. It is rumored he will nominate her replacement in the coming days

Trump's attempts to hurry through his own pick has already been met with backlash from his rival, Democratic nominee Joe Biden who wishes to wait until after the election

Trump's attempts to hurry through his own pick has already been met with backlash from his rival, Democratic nominee Joe Biden who wishes to wait until after the election

Trump’s attempts to hurry through his own pick has already been met with backlash from his rival, Democratic nominee Joe Biden who wishes to wait until after the election

Trump is expected to whittle down his nomination list from the 20 names he announced last week to one nominee that will then go through the Senate vetting process. 

The decision in the nomination lies solely with the Senate although the Vice President breaks a tie in the event of a 50/50 split.  

Among the current front runners to be announced by Trump in the coming days are U.S. Circuit Judge Amy Coney Barrett, 48, who holds a strong pro-life stance. 

Lengthy confirmation hearings in the Senate Judiciary Committee normally follow vetting, culminating with a recommendation on whether the nominee should be confirmed and placed onto the court. 

Generally the process from nomination to appointment takes about 70 days although some, such as Brett Kavanaugh, take longer and Ginsburg’s appointment only took 50 days. 

Even this, however, was longer than the 46 days currently remaining before the election meaning the vetting and review for a Trump nominee would have to take place at breakneck speed. 

The long-term direction of the nation’s highest court is at stake as the closely divided court had five justices with conservative bents and four liberals, before Ginsburg’s death. 

If Trump were to choose a conservative judge to replace the liberal Ginsburg, as expected, the court’s conservatives would have more heft with a 6-3 majority.  

The president repeatedly touts his success in already nominating two conservative Supreme Court Justices as one of the biggest achievements of his term but wishes to extend his influence further.

If he loses in November without having secured a third Justice, Biden can appoint a liberal nominee, leaving the conservative-liberal balance at 5-4. 

With other current Justices on the court in their 70s and 80s, without the Trump nominee, a Biden presidency could have further vacancies that could swing the balance of the court completely.   

The Senate is currently controlled by 53 Republicans, while Democrats hold 45 seats. Two independents align with Democrats on most votes.

Among the 53 Republicans are some moderates, including Senators Susan Collins and Lisa Murkowski, who may side with Democrats or oppose a vote before the election.   

Senator Mitt Romney will allegedly lead a pack of GOP rebels

Senator Mitt Romney will allegedly lead a pack of GOP rebels

Senator Mitt Romney will allegedly lead a pack of GOP rebels 

Sen. Lisa Murkowski (R-Alaska) has said she will not vote on a nominee before the election

Sen. Lisa Murkowski (R-Alaska) has said she will not vote on a nominee before the election

Sen. Lisa Murkowski (R-Alaska) has said she will not vote on a nominee before the election

Earlier on Friday shortly before Ginsburg’s death was announced, Senator Murkowski said that if she was presented with a vacancy on the court, she would not vote to confirm a nominee before the election. 

‘I would not vote to confirm a Supreme Court nominee. We are 50 some days away from an election,’ she said, according to Alaska Public. 

She said she made the decision based on the same reasoning that held up the confirmation of former President Barack Obama’s final nominee to the Supreme Court ahead of the 2016 election.  

What happens with the Supreme Court vacancy? 

CAN THE SENATE FILL THE SEAT BEFORE THE ELECTION?

 Yes, but it would require a breakneck pace. Supreme Court nominations have taken around 70 days to move through the Senate, and the last, for Brett Kavanaugh, took longer. 

The election is 46 days away. 

Yet there are no set rules for how long the process should take once President Donald Trump announces his pick, and some nominations have moved more quickly. 

It will come down to politics and votes.

WHAT DOES IT TAKE TO CONFIRM A NOMINEE?

Only a majority. Republicans control the Senate by a 53-47 margin, meaning they could lose up to three votes and still confirm a justice, if Vice President Mike Pence were to break a 50-50 tie.

Supreme Court nominations used to need 60 votes for confirmation if any senator objected, but McConnell changed Senate rules in 2017 to allow the confirmation of justices with 51 votes. 

He did so as Democrats threatened to filibuster Trump´s first nominee, Justice Neil Gorsuch.

WHO ARE THE SENATORS TO WATCH? 

With the slim 53-seat majority in the Senate, the Republicans have few votes to spare. 

Republicans Susan Collins of Maine, Lisa Murkowski of Alaska, Mitt Romney of Utah and others will be among those senators to watch.

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This comment could place Murkowski among a group of rebel GOP senators, potentially led by Mitt Romney, that will abstain from voting or vote with Democrats if a nominee is presented. 

Romney has previously shown his ability to resist Trump and will likely be targeted by Democrats who will remind him of the 18-month delay caused by Republicans in 2016 when they refused to appoint Obama’s nomination ahead of that election

Another Utah senator could also play a prominent role over the next few days although for a different reason. 

Sen. Mike Lee is among Trump’s shortlist for the Supreme Court role, as is his brother, Thomas Lee, who is on the Utah Supreme Court.

Maine’s Collins is another GOP senator who may oppose a Trump nominee due to pressure from voters in her own state. 

She is in a tough race for re-election this year in her home state, which has been trending Democratic.

Ginsburg’s death could have an impact on Collins’ re-election effort and her posture on whether filling the high-court seat should await the outcome of the 2020 presidential race.

Late on Friday, Senate Majority leader Mitch McConnell issued a letter to GOP senators asking them not to reveal whether they will choose to vote before the election and on which candidate.

McConnell has said that he still hopes to complete the nomination process before November. 

It can take several weeks to months between the president’s nomination of a Supreme Court justice and a Senate confirmation vote as the nominee must go through a thorough vetting by the Senate and often makes visits with individual senators to build support for the nomination.  

Yet there are no set rules for how long the process should take once President Donald Trump announces his pick, and some nominations have moved more quickly. It will come down to politics and votes. 

The last Supreme Court opening was filled in October 2018 by Justice Kavanaugh. 

His confirmation faced strong opposition from Senate Democrats and included bitter hearings amid allegations, which he denied, of sexual misconduct decades earlier.

Having being nominated by Trump on July 6, the Senate voted in favor of Kavanaugh joining the court on October 6. 

Trump has already remade the federal bench for a generation and the new vacancy in the highest court gives the president the ability to shape its future for decades to come if he is re-elected in November.

The likely bitter fight ahead was reflected in early statements by Republican and Democratic senators taking partisan sides on whether a Ginsburg replacement should await the election results.

Even though Republicans caused a 14-month Supreme Court vacancy by their refusal to consider an Obama replacement for Scalia in 2016, Republican Senator Rick Scott said on Friday: ‘It would be irresponsible to allow an extended vacancy on the Supreme Court’ this time, as he voiced support of Trump filling Ginsburg’s seat.

Democrats reminded Republicans of that 2016 delay. And Democratic Senator Chris Coons said, ‘Given all the challenges facing our country, this is a moment when we should come together rather than having a rushed confirmation process further divide us.

Since becoming Senate majority leader in 2015, McConnell has focused much of his attention and wielded his power to fill the federal courts with conservative judges nominated by Trump. More than 200 have been installed.

One senior Senate Republican aide said of McConnell, ‘No way he lets a (Supreme Court) seat slip away.’ The aide added that a major question will be whether McConnell, in tandem with Trump, attempts to fill the vacancy before the Nov. 3 election or sometime before Jan. 20, when the next president will be sworn-in.

Trump’s two nominees to the court, Justice Neil Gorsuch, 53, and Justice Brett Kavanaugh, 55, are young appointments meaning that their potential tenure could last for decades.

Mitch McConnell has said he wants the nomination process to happen before the election

Mitch McConnell has said he wants the nomination process to happen before the election

Mitch McConnell has said he wants the nomination process to happen before the election

If possible, the president is expected to pick a third young nominee, increasing the length of his influence on the court. 

The current front runner is U.S. Circuit Judge Amy Coney Barrett, 48, a devout Catholic and pro-lifer, who will cause major concerns for liberals that her anti-abortion stance will lead to the removal of the Roe v Wade ruling that legalized abortion across the nation. 

Other members of the current court are also in their 70s and 80s, potentially meaning the next president could have the chance to fill yet another vacancy.

Through other members of the court are in their 70s and 80s.

Regardless of party, presidents tend to look for the same characteristics in potential Supreme Court picks.

Stellar legal credentials are a must. And they tend to be old enough to have a distinguished legal career but young enough to serve for decades. That generally means nominees are in their late 40s or 50s.

More recently, nominees have also previously clerked for a Supreme Court justice, an early mark of legal smarts. Five of the current justices previously clerked at the Supreme Court.

Who will Trump pick to replace Ruth Bader Ginsburg? The 20 names on President’s Supreme Court shortlist including frontrunner Judge Amy Coney Barrett and senators Ted Cruz and Tom Cotton – who has promised to overturn Roe v Wade

The death of Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg aged 87 on Friday has potentially presented President Donald Trump with the opportunity to appoint a further conservative judge to the court, pushing it further to the right. 

Earlier in September, after it was revealed that Bader Ginsburg was undergoing treatment for cancer, Trump added 20 names to a shortlist of candidates he pledged to choose from if he had future vacancies to fill.  

The list includes a variety of conservative judges who have ruled in Trump’s favor, as well as three sitting GOP senators who have backed Trump’s agenda while defending him during impeachment. 

According to ABC, the current frontrunner is U.S. Circuit Judge Amy Coney Barrett, 48, a devout Catholic and pro-lifer. 

She was already a finalist for the nomination in 2018 which eventually went to Brett Kavanaugh.  

Barrett has previously written that Supreme Court precedents are not sacrosanct. 

Frontrunner U.S. Circuit Judge Amy Coney Barrett, 48, a devout Catholic and pro-lifer

Frontrunner U.S. Circuit Judge Amy Coney Barrett, 48, a devout Catholic and pro-lifer

Frontrunner U.S. Circuit Judge Amy Coney Barrett, 48, a devout Catholic and pro-lifer 

Liberals have taken these comments as a threat to the 1973 Roe v. Wade decision legalizing abortion nationwide. 

Barrett wrote that she agrees ‘with those who say that a justice’s duty is to the Constitution, and that it is thus more legitimate for her to enforce her best understanding of the Constitution rather than a precedent she thinks clearly in conflict with it’.

She is a former member of the Notre Dame’s ‘Faculty for Life’ and in 2015 signed a letter to the Catholic Church affirming the ‘teachings of the Church as truth.’ 

Among those teachings were the ‘value of human life from conception to natural death’ and marriage-family values ‘founded on the indissoluble commitment of a man and a woman’

Her deep Catholic faith was cited by Democrats as a large disadvantage, however, during her 2017 confirmation hearing for a seat on the U.S. Court of Appeals for the 7th Circuit.  

‘If you’re asking whether I take my faith seriously and I’m a faithful Catholic, I am,’ Barrett responded during that hearing, ‘although I would stress that my personal church affiliation or my religious belief would not bear in the discharge of my duties as a judge.’ 

Senator Ted Cruz is among those named by President Trump on his shortlist

Senator Ted Cruz is among those named by President Trump on his shortlist

Senator Ted Cruz is among those named by President Trump on his shortlist 

Senator Tom Cotton suggested overturning Roe v Wade in appointed

Senator Tom Cotton suggested overturning Roe v Wade in appointed

Senator Tom Cotton suggested overturning Roe v Wade in appointed 

Among the others on Trump’s list are Senator Ted Cruz, Trump’s closest competition for the Republican nomination in 2016; Senator Tom Cotton of Arkansas, who immediately tweeted he would get rid of Roe v Wade if confirmed; and Department of Justice official Stephen Engel, who drafted memo justifying denying cooperation with House investigations. 

And also in the running are Christopher Landau, the current ambassador to Mexico; Republican Senator and Trump loyalist Josh Hawley; and Kentucky Attorney General Daniel Cameron, among others.

Trump’s list includes several controversial choices, compiled of six women and fourteen men.  

During a campaign speech in Bemidji, Minnesota on Friday night, delivered while unaware of Bader Ginsburg’s death, Trump declared that Senator Cruz would be the appointment he would make if given the opportunity.  

He stated that ‘one of the things we have done that is so good with the Supreme Court, we have two Supreme Court justices. We will have at the end of my term approximately 300 federal judges’.

He later called Bader Ginsburg an ‘amazing woman’ having learned of her death. 

Steven A. Engel

Steven A. Engel

U.S. Ambassador to Mexico - Christopher Landau

U.S. Ambassador to Mexico - Christopher Landau

Steven A. Engel and U.S. Ambassador to Mexico – Christopher Landau

Senator Josh Hawley, R-Mo., asks a question during the Senate Judiciary Committee hearing

Senator Josh Hawley, R-Mo., asks a question during the Senate Judiciary Committee hearing

Senator Josh Hawley, R-Mo., asks a question during the Senate Judiciary Committee hearing

Despite Cruz being named by Trump on Friday, he has spoken about he does not want to sit on the court. 

During an interview with Fox News on Sunday he was asked whether he wanted the job, to which he replied: ‘I don’t. It is deeply honoring, it’s humbling to be included in the list … but it’s not the desire of my heart. I want to be in the political fight.’

He was repeating a statement from 2016 in which he also said that the high court is ‘not the desire of my heart’, despite him writing a book about it that is set to be published on October 6. 

James Ho is another Texas choice on the list, currently a judge on the 5th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals and former Texas solicitor general.

One controversial potential choice is Senator Cotton, who immediately tweeted about overturning Roe v Wade if confirmed. 

‘The Supreme Court could use some more justices who understand the difference between applying the law and making the law, which the Court does when it invents a right to an abortion, infringes on religious freedom, and erodes the Second Amendment,’ he wrote. 

He added in another tweet: ‘It’s time for Roe v. Wade to go,’ in reference to the landmark abortion rights ruling.’ 

On Friday night, however, he tweeted his condolences over Bader Ginsburg’s death. 

‘I extend my condolences to the family of Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg for their loss. She dedicated her life to public service, and now she is at peace,’ he wrote.

WHO’S WHO ON TRUMP’S SUPREME COURT SHORTLIST

REPUBLICAN SENATORS

Ted Cruz, Texas. 49

Josh Hawley, Missouri. 40

Tom Cotton, Arkansas. 43

JUDGES 

Bridget Bade, U.S. Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit. 54

Stuart Kyle Duncan, U.S. Court of Appeals for the Fifth Circuit. 48

James Ho, U.S. Court of Appeals for the Fifth Circuit, 47

Gregory Katsas, U.S. Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit. 56

Barbara Lagoa, U.S. Court of Appeals for the Eleventh Circuit. 52

Carlos Muñiz, Supreme Court of Florida. 51

Martha Pacold, U.S. District Court for the Northern District of Illinois. 41

Peter Phipps, U.S. Court of Appeals for the Third Circuit. 47

Sarah Pitlyk, U.S. District Court for the Eastern District of Missouri. 43

Allison Jones Rushing, U.S. Court of Appeals for the Fourth Circuit. 38

Lawrence VanDyke, U.S. Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit. 47

CURRENT AND FORMER REPUBLICAN OFFICIALS 

Daniel Cameron, Kentucky Attorney General. 34

Paul Clement, partner with Kirkland & Ellis, former solicitor general. 54

Steven Engel, assistant attorney general for the Justice Department’s Office of Legal Counsel. 46

Noel Francisco, former U.S. solicitor general. 51

Christopher Landau, U.S. ambassador to Mexico. 56

Kate Todd, deputy White House counsel. 45

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Tributes pour in for Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg from Hillary Clinton and President George Bush

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tributes pour in for justice ruth bader ginsburg from hillary clinton and president george bush

Donald Trump apparently learned of the death of Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg from reporters, after leaving a rally in Minnesota. 

The president told reporters that he didn’t know Ginsburg had died when a reporter asked him for comment before he boarded a plane after the rally Friday evening.  

‘She just died? Wow. I didn’t know that, you’re telling me now for the first time,’ he said. 

‘She led an amazing life. She was an amazing woman.’ 

Ginsburg died aged 87 after a battle with metastatic pancreas cancer at her D.C .home.

Tributes have poured in from across the political spectrum for the veteran judged, with Joe Biden said she ‘stood for all of us’.  

Former presidents including Bill Clinton, George Bush and Jimmy Carter and politicians including Hillary Clinton, Bernie Sanders and New York Governor Andrew Cuomo voiced their tributes. 

The White House lowered its flags to half staff and social media users pointed out that in Jewish tradition, a person who dies on Rosh Hashanah – which started tonight – is regarded as a person of great righteousness.  

The president claimed he was unaware of her death after the rally finished, despite a supporter shouting out that Ginsburg had died during his rally

The president claimed he was unaware of her death after the rally finished, despite a supporter shouting out that Ginsburg had died during his rally

The president claimed he was unaware of her death after the rally finished, despite a supporter shouting out that Ginsburg had died during his rally

Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg (pictured 2009) died aged 87 after a battle with metastatic pancreas cancer, the Supreme Court has announced

Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg (pictured 2009) died aged 87 after a battle with metastatic pancreas cancer, the Supreme Court has announced

Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg (pictured 2009) died aged 87 after a battle with metastatic pancreas cancer, the Supreme Court has announced

Trump was on stage when the Justice’s death was announced and carried on with his campaign rally apparently unaware of the news. 

However while on stage – and moments after the Supreme Court announced her death – he reeled off his list of potential Supreme Court nominees for if and when a seat became available.  

A supporter in the crowd shouted out that Ginsburg had died during his rally.

Meanwhile the White House flag was lowered to half staff and his Chief of Staff Mark Meadows tweeted a tribute to the ‘trailblazer’ and ‘dedicated public servant’. 

When asked about her death by reporters, Trump said: ‘She just died? Wow. I didn’t know that, you’re telling me now for the first time.’

He then paused and held his hands in the air before paying tribute to Ginsburg – who he had a fraught relationship with since he moved in to the White House.

‘She led an amazing life. What else can you say? She was an amazing woman whether you agreed [with her] or not. She was an amazing who led an amazing life.

While Trump seemed oblivious to the news, his Democrat rival Joe Biden paid his respects to the legal pioneer and champion of equal rights. Biden called 'not only a giant in the legal profession but a beloved figure' who 'stood for all of us' in an interview on CNN

While Trump seemed oblivious to the news, his Democrat rival Joe Biden paid his respects to the legal pioneer and champion of equal rights. Biden called 'not only a giant in the legal profession but a beloved figure' who 'stood for all of us' in an interview on CNN

While Trump seemed oblivious to the news, his Democrat rival Joe Biden paid his respects to the legal pioneer and champion of equal rights. Biden called ‘not only a giant in the legal profession but a beloved figure’ who ‘stood for all of us’ in an interview on CNN

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‘I’m actually sad to hear that. I’m sad to hear that,’ he said, before he turned and walked toward his jet. 

Soon after he tweeted a statement saying the ‘nation mourns the loss of a titan of the law’ and calling her a ‘fighter to the end.’

There was no mention of the next steps in appointing a successor.  

There was no love lost between Trump and Ginsburg even before Trump entered the White House in 2016. 

Ginsburg’s staunch criticism of the president earned her the nickname the Notorious RBG and made her a heroine among the left.

She branded him a ‘faker’ and said she could’t imagine what would happen if he became president.

Ginsburg, only the second woman to serve as a Supreme Court Justice, died Friday evening aged 87 after a battle with metastatic pancreas cancer, the Supreme Court announced. 

The judge, who served for 27 years on the highest court of the land, passed away surrounded by her family at her home in Washington D.C. following complications after she has battled the disease on and off since 2009.     

While Trump seemed oblivious to the news, his Democrat rival Joe Biden paid his respects to the legal pioneer and champion of equal rights.  

Biden tweeted: ‘Ruth Bader Ginsburg stood for all of us. She was an American hero, a giant of legal doctrine, and a relentless voice in the pursuit of that highest American ideal: Equal Justice Under Law. May her memory be a blessing to all people who cherish our Constitution and its promise.’

The presidential candidate insisted a new justice should not be chosen until after the election in November and said this was the process followed in 2016. 

‘There is no doubt – let me be clear – that the voters should pick the president and the president should pick the justice for the Senate to consider,’ he said in an interview to CNN.

‘This was the position that the Republican Senate took in 2016 when there were almost 10 months to go.’   

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Tributes poured in from Democrats including Hillary Clinton, New York Governor Andrew Cuomo and Washington Governor Jay Inslee

Tributes poured in from Democrats including Hillary Clinton, New York Governor Andrew Cuomo and Washington Governor Jay Inslee

Tributes poured in from Democrats including Hillary Clinton, New York Governor Andrew Cuomo and Washington Governor Jay Inslee

Chief Justice John Roberts led the tributes to his colleague Friday describing her as a ‘champion of justice’.

‘Our nation has lost a justice of historic stature,’ Roberts said in a statement. 

‘We at the Supreme Court have lost a cherished colleague. Today we mourn but with confidence that future generations will remember Ruth Bader Ginsburg as we knew her — a tireless and resolute champion of justice.’  

Hillary Clinton tweeted that Ginsburg, a staunch advocate for women’s rights, paved the way for other women. 

‘Justice Ginsburg paved the way for so many women, including me. There will never be another like her. Thank you RBG,’ Clinton wrote. 

Bernie Sanders called her passing a ‘tremendous loss’ to America. 

‘Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg was one of the great justices in modern American history and her passing is a tremendous loss to our country,’ he tweeted. 

‘She will be remembered as an extraordinary champion of justice and equal rights.’

Barack Obama penned a Medium blog commemorating the strides Ginsburg made for gender equality and saying he ‘admired her greatly’. 

‘Sixty years ago, Ruth Bader Ginsburg applied to be a Supreme Court clerk. She’d studied at two of our finest law schools and had ringing recommendations,’ he wrote.

‘But because she was a woman, she was rejected. Ten years later, she sent her first brief to the Supreme Court — which led it to strike down a state law based on gender discrimination for the first time. 

‘And then, for nearly three decades, as the second woman ever to sit on the highest court in the land, she was a warrior for gender equality — someone who believed that equal justice under law only had meaning if it applied to every single American.’

Obama went on to write that Trump must not appoint a new justice until after the election because the Republicans refused to allow Obama to do the same thing back in 2016.  

‘Four and a half years ago, when Republicans refused to hold a hearing or an up-or-down vote on Merrick Garland, they invented the principle that the Senate shouldn’t fill an open seat on the Supreme Court before a new president was sworn in,’ he wrote. 

‘A basic principle of the law — and of everyday fairness — is that we apply rules with consistency, and not based on what’s convenient or advantageous in the moment… As votes are already being cast in this election, Republican Senators are now called to apply that standard.’

Obama planned to appoint Merrick Garland to the court after Justice Antonin Scalia died in February 2016.

Republicans refused to hold hearings or vote on a replacement until after a new president took office with Mitch McConnell saying: ‘the American people should have a voice in the selection of their next Supreme Court Justice. Therefore, this vacancy should not be filled until we have a new president.’ 

The seat was not filled and two weeks after taking office Trump appointed his own choice Neil Gorsuch to the court instead.  

Former president George Bush also paid tribute to Ginsburg in a statement Friday. 

‘Laura and I join our fellow Americans in mourning the loss of Ruth Bader Ginsburg. She dedicated many of her 87 remarkable years to the pursuit of justice and equality, and she inspired more than one generation of women and girls,’ he said. 

‘Justice Ginsburg loved our country and the law. Laura and I are fortunate to have known this smart and humorous trailblazer, and we send our condolences to the Ginsburg family’.  

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33361118 8749539 Tributes poured in from political leaders including former presi a 53 1600475806275

33361118 8749539 Tributes poured in from political leaders including former presi a 53 1600475806275

 

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Former presidents Barack Obama, George Bush, Bill Clinton and Jimmy Carter also paid tribute to the legal pioneer Friday

Former presidents Barack Obama, George Bush, Bill Clinton and Jimmy Carter also paid tribute to the legal pioneer Friday

Former presidents Barack Obama, George Bush, Bill Clinton and Jimmy Carter also paid tribute to the legal pioneer Friday

Former president Jimmy Carter also paid tribute to the ‘powerful legal mind and a staunch advocate for gender equality’.

‘Rosalynn and I are saddened by the passing of Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg. A powerful legal mind and a staunch advocate for gender equality, she has been a beacon of justice during her long and remarkable career,’ he said in a statement.

‘I was proud to have appointed her to the U.S. Court of Appeals in 1980. We join countless Americans in mourning the loss of a truly great woman.

‘We will keep her family in our thoughts and prayers during this difficult time.’ 

Bill Clinton, who appointed Ginsburg to the Supreme Court during his White house tenure, also tweeted calling her ‘one of the most extraordinary Justices’.

‘We have lost one of the most extraordinary Justices ever to serve on the Supreme Court,’ he wrote.

‘Ruth Bader Ginsburg’s life and landmark opinions moved us closer to a more perfect union. And her powerful dissents reminded us that we walk away from our Constitution’s promise at our peril.’ 

New York Governor Andrew Cuomo spoke of the state’s heartbreak over the loss over one of its own.

‘NY’s heart breaks with the passing of Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg,’ the Democrat tweeted.

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‘During her extraordinary career, this Brooklyn native broke barriers & the letters RBG took on new meaning—as battle cry & inspiration. Her legal mind & dedication to justice leave an indelible mark on America.’

Washington Governor Jay Inslee, also a Democrat, described her as an ‘American hero’ and demanded that her ‘dying wish’ to not be replaced on the bench until after the election be respected.

He tweeted: ‘We have lost an American hero and a giant of justice. 

‘May we honor Justice Ginsburg’s legacy by fighting for the civil rights of all Americans and respect her dying wish that she ‘will not be replaced until a new president is installed.”

His words were echoed by Senator Cory Booker who urged the nation to carry on ‘her legacy of fairness and equality’.

‘Ruth Bader Ginsburg was a true giant, an American hero and a warrior for justice,’ Booker tweeted.

‘Our country mourns her loss deeply—we must honor her by carrying on her legacy of fairness and equality.’ 

Flags over the Capitol were flown at half staff in Ginsburg's honor

Flags over the Capitol were flown at half staff in Ginsburg's honor

Ginsburg died aged 87 after a battle with metastatic pancreas cancer at her D.C .home

Ginsburg died aged 87 after a battle with metastatic pancreas cancer at her D.C .home

Flags over the Capitol were flown at half staff in Ginsburg’s honor after she died aged 87 following a cancer battle 

House Speaker Nancy Pelosi said flags over the Capitol would be flown at half staff in Ginsburg’s honor.

‘Tonight, the flags are flying at half staff over the Capitol to honor the patriotism of Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg,’ she tweeted.

‘Every woman and girl, and therefore every family, in America has benefitted from her brilliance.’

Elizabeth Warren remembered her ‘friend’ for her ‘wit, her tenaciousness, and her skill as a jurist’.

Meanwhile Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez called her a ‘giant in the history of our nation’ and called on Americans to ‘fight’.

Tributes also poured in from those on the other side of the political spectrum.  

Senator Lindsey Graham tweeted that he was filled with ‘great sadness’ at the news and that despite their ‘many differences’ he ‘appreciate[d] her service to our nation’.

‘It was with great sadness that I learned of the passing of Justice Ginsburg. Justice Ginsburg was a trailblazer who possessed tremendous passion for her causes. She served with honor and distinction as a member of the Supreme Court,’ he wrote. 

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Tributes also poured in from those on the other side of the political spectrum

Tributes also poured in from those on the other side of the political spectrum

Tributes also poured in from those on the other side of the political spectrum

‘While I had many differences with her on legal philosophy, I appreciate her service to our nation. My thoughts and prayers are with her family and friends. May she Rest In Peace.’ 

President Trump is yet to tweet about her passing however estranged niece Mary Trump urged Americans to continue her ‘fight for our country’.

‘Take a moment. Breathe. And then we fight for our country the way she always did for us. Or we will lose everything,’ she wrote on Twitter. 

Ginsburg’s death gives Trump the opportunity to name her successor at a critical time just six weeks before the nation heads to the polls. 

Ruth Bader Ginsburg in her engagement photo taken in December 1953 

Ruth Bader Ginsburg in her engagement photo taken in December 1953 

Ruth Bader Ginsburg in her engagement photo taken in December 1953 

The president has already appointed two members of the Supreme Court, Justices Neil M. Gorsuch and Brett M. Kavanaugh, in a move that pushes the court increasingly right wing.

The replacement of Ginsburg, a Democrat and women’s rights champion, by another Republican will leave the court Democrats outnumbered, with six Republicans to their three.

A debate is expected to ensue over whether Trump should nominate her successor or leave the seat vacant until after the outcome of the election. 

Senator Chuck Schumer tweeted Friday after the news broke of Ginsburg’s death that the position should not be filled until the White House race was over.

‘The American people should have a voice in the selection of their next Supreme Court Justice,’ he tweeted.

‘Therefore, this vacancy should not be filled until we have a new president.’

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell issued a statement saying the Senate and nation mourns for Ginsburg alongside a statement where he said Trump’s nominee would be voted for by the Senate. 

‘The Senate and the nation mourn the passing of Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg and the conclusion of her extraordinary American life,’ he tweeted. 

Ginsburg was appointed to the Supreme Court by President Clinton in 1993 and has served more than 27 years. 

She leaves behind her two children Jane Carol Ginsburg and James Steven Ginsburg, four grandchildren Paul Spera, Clara Spera, Miranda Ginsburg and Abigail Ginsburg, two step-grandchildren Harjinder Bedi and Satinder Bedi, and one great-grandchild Lucrezia Spera. 

Her husband Martin David Ginsburg died in 2010. 

Ginsburg was born in Brooklyn, New York, on March 15 1933.    

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Secret diary of the Queen’s first confidante Alathea Fitzalan Howard

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secret diary of the queens first confidante alathea fitzalan howard
Alathea Fitzalan Howard ecame a close friend of Princess Elizabeth and her sister Margaret, visiting them often at Windsor Castle, and enjoying parties, balls, picnics and celebrations with the Royal Family and other members of the Court

Alathea Fitzalan Howard ecame a close friend of Princess Elizabeth and her sister Margaret, visiting them often at Windsor Castle, and enjoying parties, balls, picnics and celebrations with the Royal Family and other members of the Court

Alathea Fitzalan Howard ecame a close friend of Princess Elizabeth and her sister Margaret, visiting them often at Windsor Castle, and enjoying parties, balls, picnics and celebrations with the Royal Family and other members of the Court

Alathea Fitzalan Howard was sent to live with her grandfather, Viscount Fitzalan of Derwent, at Cumberland lodge in Windsor Great Park during World War II after her parents separated. 

There she became a close friend of Princess Elizabeth and her sister Margaret, visiting them often at Windsor Castle, and enjoying parties, balls, picnics and celebrations with the Royal Family and other members of the Court. 

1940 

Sunday, January 21 

LiLibet [Princess Elizabeth, aged 13 and living with her family at Royal Lodge in Windsor] rang up to ask me to skate. She, [Princess] Margaret and the King picked me up in the car and we drove to the lake. Queen came down and watched. Played hockey with about six other people — policemen and chauffeurs etc from Royal Lodge. Great fun. Lilibet is so much nicer by herself than at Guides. 

Wednesday March 20 

[At] Royal Lodge we all dragged an old garden cart down to the rubbish heap below the vicarage and filled it with old iron etc and dragged it back to the garden (the detective helping)! then we played charades indoors. Margaret’s rather silly but she’s very sweet. Lilibet’s stopped wearing socks. Crawfie [governess Marion Crawford] kissed me goodbye! Heavenly day. 

Monday, May 6 

The princesses came to tea today. Nasty damp day but we went out and played in the garden till about six, then came in and did two charades, which were great fun. Friday, may 10 Hitler invaded Holland and Belgium at 3am! 

Tuesday, May 14 

The princesses have moved to Windsor [Castle] for greater safety. Somehow it does feel lonely to know they’re not next door.  

Friday, June 7 

Lilibet and Margaret and Crawfie met me at the door and we walked down to the guardroom for tea with some officers. enormous tea — cakes galore, ices, cherries, with which we had competitions. once Lilibet and I looked at each other and nearly laughed. Lilibet and Margaret for the first time (that I’ve seen) weren’t dressed alike. 

Monday, June 17 

Heard that France has given in, so now we are left to face Germany alone. Naturally if we are beaten we must all hope for death as our only release. 

Tuesday, July 2 

I went to the York Hall for a rehearsal of the concert on Saturday. Lilibet will tap dance in ‘An Apple For the teacher’ (she’s the teacher). Margaret is in it too. they both play the piano on the stage and then Margaret is the Dormouse in the Mad Hatter’s tea Party. it’s very good, but everyone I’ve met says it’s making them much too cheap. they really shouldn’t do it. they ought to get up little plays of their own with their friends but not dance with all the evacuees like this. 

Saturday, July 13 

Crawfie was in a bad mood. I think she’s rather cross because I borrowed her purse last week for the programme money and now can’t remember what i have done with it. the princesses were rather cross too, because Lilibet played the piano badly and the curtain fell on Margaret’s head!

Thursday, August 15 

We all drew outside. Afterwards, i tidied as usual in Lilibet’s room and she told me her silk stockings cost eight and six. typical! 

Sunday, August 25 

I went to bed about ten and was in the middle of praying when three terrible explosions shook my windows. We all went down to the cellar amid more bombs and guns. 

Tuesday, August 27 

Biked to the Castle with hiking things. We were divided into two [Guides] groups with Lilibet and me in charge. We made a fire and cooked sausages on sticks. 

Monday, September 23 

Biked to the Castle for tea. We all listened to the King’s speech on the wireless in the nursery and knitted. 

Tuesday, October 1 

At nine o’clock [a] time bomb went off [nearby]. I lay in speechless horror watching my walls rock violently from side to side. i know that people in the future will read about this war and look upon it in horror as comparable only to the French or Russian Revolutions and they will pity the generation whose youth was wasted by it. 

Princess Elizabeth (pictured left) reads to her sister Princess Margaret and Jane the corgi by a window in Windsor Castle. Princess Elizabeth is the future Queen Elizabeth II of England.

Princess Elizabeth (pictured left) reads to her sister Princess Margaret and Jane the corgi by a window in Windsor Castle. Princess Elizabeth is the future Queen Elizabeth II of England.

Princess Elizabeth (pictured left) reads to her sister Princess Margaret and Jane the corgi by a window in Windsor Castle. Princess Elizabeth is the future Queen Elizabeth II of England.

Saturday, November 9

[Alathea was staying at the castle for the weekend.] I played a French game with L and M and Monty [French governess Mrs Montaudon-Smith], then we all had lunch with the K and Q and household. then L and M, Crawfie and I went out in the rain and messed about till the Queen joined us, when we gave some scarves to some soldiers, then unblocked a stream. M pushed me into some barbed wire, tearing my good stocking! us three had tea with the K and Q and afterwards played [card game] Racing Demon with the Queen. At seven L and i went to our baths. L and i had supper in our night things in the nursery. At about eight, L and I and Bobo [nursery maid Margaret MacDonald] walked down to their shelter, miles away. L and M sleep on two bunks on top of each other (M on top) and Mrs Knight [nanny] on a bed in the same room. I was put in an adjoining room. M made us laugh a lot. The K and Q looked in on me to say good night. 

Sunday, November 10 

Came up from the shelter at a quarter to eight and dressed. Lunch 1.15. Two Eton boys came, the Spencer boy [later Earl Spencer, father of Princess Diana] and another. L and I had to make conversation to [sic] them! Afterwards L, M and I went for a long walk in the Home Park with the K and Q and ran into the Archbishop of Canterbury. tea with them and cards with the Q again after. She was very chatty to me. I simply love her. bath then supper. Marched down to the shelter again complete with apples, clocks, books, etc! I left the door open to talk and I went into [the princesses’] room twice to get something and they came into mine when an emergency [light] came on in my room. M made me die with laughter by asking me if I thought L and her and myself were pretty! We went to sleep after the news, about 9.15, as we bring the wireless down. 

Monday, November 11 

We Got up soon after 7.30 and went upstairs through miles of icy cold corridors and staircases. Lovely cheerful nursery breakfast. In that Castle, with its gilded rooms and red corridors, there is an atmosphere of happy family life that I myself have never known. 

Sunday, November 17 

I do want more than anything in the world to be a lady-in-waiting when i grow up, but I should like always to be Lilibet’s friend whatever happens. 

Tuesday, December 3 

Lilibet’s hair is worse now that it is curled than before, I think, because she’s got it in little flat curls close to her head all round the back, very tight in front. 

Tuesday, December 21 

Lilibet did shortbread [at Guides], and I did bread pudding. Lilibet actually likes washing-up and does more of it than the rest of us put together! I much prefer needlework, which L hates! 

Alathea Fitzalan Howard documents her life after was sent to live with her grandfather, Viscount Fitzalan of Derwent, at Cumberland lodge in Windsor Great Park during World War II

Alathea Fitzalan Howard documents her life after was sent to live with her grandfather, Viscount Fitzalan of Derwent, at Cumberland lodge in Windsor Great Park during World War II

Alathea Fitzalan Howard documents her life after was sent to live with her grandfather, Viscount Fitzalan of Derwent, at Cumberland lodge in Windsor Great Park during World War II

1941 

Thursday, March 6 

Lilibet, M and i set off for the Red Drawing Room, where we were joined by three Grenadier officers. then all the RAF officers filed by, shaking hands with L. Lilibet finds making conversation very difficult, like me, but she did very well, as she had to stand by herself for over an hour talking to each one in turn. She insisted on bringing the dogs in because she said they were the greatest save to the conversation when it dropped!

Sunday, March 9 

L turned her hair under and asked me if i liked it and I said no. We played cards till lunch, then went outside. We laughed a great deal and had great fun spitting over a bridge into a stream, trying to hit leaves as they floated by! Crawfie is such fun; I don’t think Monty would approve of spitting! Didn’t get back till 4.30 and we got very giggly and silly at the end because we were so exhausted! Crawfie and I were walking slowly arm-in-arm down the steep slope from the terrace and L pushed us and we hurtled down and collapsed into a bush and laughed so much we couldn’t get up. 

Saturday, March 15 AnnabeL [daughter of Sir Cecil Newman] thinks Lilibet has an enormous chest! It is a great pity as it’ll be awful one day. 

Saturday, March 22 

We had dressed crab that the King and Queen had brought back live from Plymouth. Ate chocolates with the Queen afterwards, then we went out with Crawfie before tea with the K and Q. He asked me if I was ‘hair conscious’ too, as Lilibet is always fiddling about with her hair now. So i said, ‘Yes!’ the Queen asked me if i powdered my face. She is so sweet and kind and without being beautiful she has such irresistible charm one could not help loving her. She has won my unswerving adoration — oh, if only I had a mother like that. 

Thursday, April 3 Last lesson for this term [Alathea was sharing weekly drawing lessons with the princesses at Windsor Castle]. Afterwards, we played cards till tea. they said something about Philip, so I said, ‘Who’s Philip?’ Lilibet [aged 14] said, ‘He’s called Prince Philip of Greece’ and then they both burst out laughing. I asked why, knowing quite well! Margaret [ten] said, ‘We can’t tell you,’ but L said, ‘Yes, we can. Can you keep a secret?’ then she said that P was her ‘boy’. Monty asked me if i had one, and in the end, I told them it was Robert Cecil [guardsman at Windsor, and future Marquess of Salisbury], which amused L. M said she was so glad I had a ‘beau’! We all laughed terribly. I must say Lilibet is far more grown-up than I was two years ago. When I left, she said, ‘We part today the wiser for two secrets,’ and I biked home feeling very proud at being let into such a great secret, which I shall never betray. 

Wednesday, April 9 

Biked to Forest Gate and met the princesses [and three other friends]. We drove to a lovely part of the forest, where we stopped and went for a walk, picking primroses. Had tea on rugs, which we spread out under the trees. Lit a fire to warm ourselves by. I was very surprised that the princesses came by themselves without [nanny] Mrs Knight — I think it must have been about the first time; of course, they had a detective. Packed up and set off in the cars to look for the German plane shot down in the forest last night. took some time finding it, but when we did, it was well worth it. It was a huge thing, completely smashed, and we picked up bits as souvenirs. 

Tuesday, April 15 

Hugh Euston [Grenadier guardsman at Windsor Castle — also earl of Euston and descendant of Charles ii and his mistress Barbara Villiers] came to dinner and we had great fun. 

Monday, April 28 

Letter from Lilibet [who had turned 15 a week before] — very nice, quite long. it was signed ‘with love from Elizabeth’. I’m wondering whether one oughtn’t to begin calling her Princess now she’s older. 

Monday, may 5 

Letter from Sonia [daughter of eminent radiologist Dr Harold Graham Hodgson] saying she’s been to tea with the princesses and they talked about young men. L told her that she adored Hugh Euston, so S said that I did, too, so they laughed and laughed! L [also] told her that she had a beau but didn’t say who. 

Saturday, may 17 Walked to Royal Lodge and was met by the princesses. Said, ‘How do you do,’ to the K and Q who were sitting on a bench in the garden and soon after the K drove us back to Castle in his own open sports car, which was an exciting experience! The Q gave me her silk scarf to put over my head. If only she knew how much I adored her! 

Saturday, May 24 

Dancing [lesson]. Had biscuits and orange juice in nursery with the princesses. After tea the Q, the princesses and I played Racing Demon in her sitting room. I would gladly die for that family if there were a Revolution. 

Thursday, May 29 

Biked to drawing, which we had under the [Castle] terrace. M and I found it hard to stop talking! Monty asked me, ‘Admirez-vous Lord Euston?’ and I said, ‘oui.’ She said she thought so by the way I talked to him on Saturday! We all laughed terribly and M asked if he was my beau, knowing quite well he is!!! She’s very old for her age in those ways — indeed in most ways. 

Saturday, June 7 

After [dancing] class i changed in M’s room as she always bags me but L says i’m to go to hers next time! At lunch, i hoped Hugh e would sit next to me but he was put between the Q and Lilibet. M caught my eye and laughed! After lunch we went out with the K and Q. the K played golf, so we strayed off and presently it poured with rain and we rushed for the tunnel and had to remain there about half an hour as we had thin shoes and no coats. the Q was sweet and very chatty to me and we all sang. M asked me if I liked her, as she said she wasn’t sure!! How could one not like her? She’s inherited all her mother’s charm, more than L. 

Thursday, June 12 

BiKed to the Castle. I said I loved coming to tea. Margaret laughed and said, ‘She adores us,’ and made one of her enchanting faces!!! 

Friday, July 4 [Alathea had been invited to spend the weekend at the castle] At 4pm, Lilibet and I watched their new chameleon on the syringa [lilac] tree, then she and I and Crawfie walked down to Frogmore, where we punted on the lake. Rolled our stockings down to prevent tearing them. After tea we lay on the grass and talked and laughed. We had supper in our dressing gowns in nursery at eight, then L and I sat in her room and read and talked till bed. 

Saturday, July 5 

Breakfast in nursery. Messed about afterwards while Lilibet did lessons, then changed into my blue chiffon for dancing. At lunch, I sat next to Hugh e. [At] 4, we came in and got ready to go to Adelaide Cottage [home of Sir Jackie Philipps, commander of the Castle Company] with the officers. We had tea with the Philipps and three of the officers and after we played the usual games. 

Sunday, July 6 

After breakfast we sat about and also went for a little walk with Crawfie. L said nothing about me staying till Monday, so much against my secret hopes I had to resign myself to leaving this evening; L is funny in some ways — v. matter of fact and uncurious and above all untemperamental. but one can’t have everything. [After] church, we fed the chameleon and then to Frogmore with Crawfie and Monty pulling Margaret, who’d just got up, in a basket on wheels. Got into punt, and then found a nice place to eat our picnic lunch. Great fun — we drank ginger beer out of bottles! We lay out on a rug and talked and read. We had great fun getting back, what with Crawfie’s hat and two dogs falling into the water! 

Wednesday, July 23 

Arrived [at the castle for a dance] and was miserable at first because everyone had long white gloves [and] I should have liked to have worn them. We all filed through into the Red Drawing Room, shaking hands with the K and Q and the princesses. there were nearly 200 there. the Q danced all the ‘funny dances’ and looked lovely in a full frock of white tulle, covered with silver sequins and the princesses wore dresses rather the same as the Q, also from Hartnell, in white lacy stuff embroidered with pale blue marguerites, and they had flowers in their hair and at their waist. No Eton boys, for which I was glad, as we then only had the dashing young ‘cavaliers’ [officers]! I was terrified I wasn’t going to dance with Hugh e but then I met him at the buffet and he said, with that great charm of his, ‘oh, Alathea, I’ve been looking for you all the evening, we must have a dance!’ it wasn’t true but still!! He asked me how many times I danced with him and said she was rather hurt because he only had the first one with her because he was asked to and then not again. We said goodbye about 3.15[am] — P Margaret [aged ten] stayed up till the very end. 

Thursday, July 31 

Lilibet said she had something to show me and when I went into her room to tidy, she took a letter out of a drawer for me to read — it was to Colonel Legh from Hugh E thanking for the dance — she said she’d stolen it and was going to keep it! He’s got nice writing. S

Sunday, August 17 

Mummy and I went for a walk and began talking about Daddy, and she said she didn’t think she could go on living with him after the war. I listened with dry eyes and a heavy heart — somehow I wasn’t surprised. their temperaments differ too widely. but this has affected me deeply. I only wish that tradition demanded they should remain together and make the best they could of the wreck of their own unhappiness. 

Thursday, August 21 

Mummy and I had a conversation about me — she said i’m old fashioned in the ‘old-maidish’ way, which is awful (underlined). I went to bed in tears — life seemed to me so, so hopeless. 

Saturday, August 23 

Went to bed early tonight. oh, how I longed for Hugh to come to me — but this night and the next and many more, I must spend alone, until one day when that greatest desire of every girl will be satisfied. 

Friday, August 29 

Ming-Ming [her younger sister’s nanny, real name Miss Smith] suggested I should do a little mending for myself and I lost my temper and getting a needle I made long scratches on my arm till I drew blood — it relieved my feelings but still I could find no outlet for my pent-up, angry soul. 

Saturday, October 11 

Had tea with Libby Hardinge [daughter of Sir Alexander Hardinge, private secretary to George Vi). two sweet little boys were there — how I long to have a child of my own. I should love it to be Hugh’s too. L told me that he has left the Castle — my heart sank. I shall lose sight of him and he’s sure to marry someone else and meanwhile I’ve got nobody! Lilibet will be sad he’s gone too. 

Extracted from the Windsor diaries: A childhood With the Princesses by Alathea Fitzalan Howard, edited by Isabella Naylor Leyland, to be published by Hodder & Stoughton on October 8, £25. © Isabella Naylor Leyland 2020 to order a copy for £21.25 go to www.mailshop.co.uk/books or call 020 3308 9193. Free UK delivery on orders over £15. Offer price valid until 10/10/2020.

How her treasured diaries came to light 

Alathea came into my life in 1975, when I met my husband, Philip. She was his aunt, and I liked her immediately: she was composed, generous, forthright and loved to laugh. When she died in 2001 she left me her diaries, of which there are 64 and in her words ‘not one day’s exception from 1940!’ A year earlier, she had written: ‘My diaries must be preserved and published.’ Alathea Alys Gwendolen Mary Fitzalan Howard, born in 1923, was the elder daughter of Viscount Fitzalan of Derwent, and of Joyce Langdale, who later became Countess Fitzwilliam. Her mother had little interest in children and at the beginning of the war Alathea was sent to live with her rather staid grandfather and maiden aunt Magdalen. Hers was a lonely childhood and the diaries were her greatest friend. She wrote down all her hopes, fears and frustrations and could tell her diary what no one else knew: a perfect confidant. Her only other solace was the friendship she had with Princesses Elizabeth and Margaret. In adulthood the Queen kept up their friendship, and occasionally they would lunch together. In 2001 she was diagnosed with an advanced brain tumour. During a spell in hospital she received two bunches of flowers and I couldn’t resist looking at the cards to find out who had sent them. One was from Jools Holland, the other the Queen. Alathea died at our home, in what had always been her room, on March 5, 2001.

 Isabella Naylor Leyland

 

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