Connect with us

Latest Stories

Parents of baby left brain damaged after mistakes on NHS maternity ward to get £37million payout 

Published

on

parents of baby left brain damaged after mistakes on nhs maternity ward to get 37million payout

The NHS is to make a £37million payout to the parents of a baby boy who was left severely brain-damaged after mistakes by staff on a maternity ward.

Guy’s and St Thomas’ NHS Foundation Trust has admitted it was at fault in the care of the child.

The amount is thought to be one of the largest payouts in the history of the health service.

Guy¿s and St Thomas¿ NHS Foundation Trust has admitted it was at fault in the care of the child

Guy¿s and St Thomas¿ NHS Foundation Trust has admitted it was at fault in the care of the child

Guy’s and St Thomas’ NHS Foundation Trust has admitted it was at fault in the care of the child

In the maternity negligence case at the High Court the NHS trust conceded that mistakes with the boy’s care left him severely disabled and needing round-the-clock care for the rest of his life.

When the boy, who cannot be named for legal reasons, was born in 2013 midwives did not spot he was in the breech position – meaning feet or buttocks first – before his mother went in to labour.

Once staff on the ward realised what was happening and his heart rate began to drop, his mother was rushed to surgery for an emergency Caesarean section.

But the delays in being born meant he was starved of oxygen for too long and suffered permanent brain damage, leaving him with complex disabilities and needing two carers night and day. 

His family has also been forced to move home to ensure he can be properly cared for.

While the trust admitted liability early on, the legal settlement was only finalised in November last year when the boy had grown enough to allow his long-term needs to be assessed.

In the maternity negligence case at the High Court the NHS trust conceded that mistakes with the boy¿s care left him severely disabled and needing round-the-clock care for the rest of his life

In the maternity negligence case at the High Court the NHS trust conceded that mistakes with the boy¿s care left him severely disabled and needing round-the-clock care for the rest of his life

In the maternity negligence case at the High Court the NHS trust conceded that mistakes with the boy’s care left him severely disabled and needing round-the-clock care for the rest of his life

The boy’s parents told The Independent: ‘Despite the trust obviously being responsible for the incident, which was clear as day and confirmed to us by every single NHS staff [member] that we spoke to on a day-to-day basis, the trust did not admit liability immediately.

‘The consequence is that the extraordinary cost of having a baby with special needs has to be supported by the family until a decision is made on the trust’s liability. 

‘This creates a significant amount of pressure on families on top of the trauma of having a special needs child, produces a different outcome based on the financial condition of the family, and allows trusts to under-compensate some families.’

Suzanne White, head of clinical negligence at Leigh Day, who handled the case, said what had happened to the boy was an ‘absolute tragedy’. 

When the boy, who cannot be named for legal reasons, was born in 2013 midwives did not spot he was in the breech position ¿ meaning feet or buttocks first ¿ before his mother went in to labour

When the boy, who cannot be named for legal reasons, was born in 2013 midwives did not spot he was in the breech position ¿ meaning feet or buttocks first ¿ before his mother went in to labour

When the boy, who cannot be named for legal reasons, was born in 2013 midwives did not spot he was in the breech position – meaning feet or buttocks first – before his mother went in to labour

She added: ‘The sum of compensation paid is one of the largest of its kind and reflects the complex needs which have resulted from the injuries sustained at the time of his birth and the fact that he will require specialist round-the-clock care for the rest of his life.’ 

Campaigners said the boy’s case showed the need for an urgent inquiry in to the state of maternity care across the nation after scandals at other NHS trusts.

Judy Ledger, chief executive of Baby Lifeline, a charity for pregnant women and newborn babies, said: ‘We owe it to mothers, babies, and health professionals to rigorously investigate these recurring themes and address any systemic and wide-ranging issues.’

A spokesman for the trust said: ‘We are very sorry that the care provided to the family during the birth of their child fell short of the high standards we aim to provide to all our patients.’

Powered by: Daily Mail

Latest Stories

Parents of student,22, who vanished 40-years ago fighting to change death certificate

Published

on

By

parents of student22 who vanished 40 years ago fighting to change death certificate

The elderly parents of a student who vanished nearly 40 years ago say they are ‘living’ to change her death certificate to state that she was murdered. 

Art student Jessie Earl was just 22 when she disappeared from her university home in Eastbourne, East Sussex, in May 1980. 

Nine years later, Jessie’s incomplete skeleton was found in dense scrubland above Beachy Head. Her personal belongings and clothing had been removed – and she was left only with her bra, which had been used to tie up her wrists. 

After her remains were found in 1989, an inquest recorded an open verdict and her parents Valerie, 88, and John, 92, have been fighting to have her her death reclassified ever since.

In an interview with The Sunday Times, Val explained they ‘knew’ it was murder as soon as they saw Jessie’s remains, and that their only wish in life is to change the ruling of their her death.  

Art student Jessie Earl (picture) was just 22 when she disappeared from her university home in Eastbourne, East Sussex, in May 1980

Art student Jessie Earl (picture) was just 22 when she disappeared from her university home in Eastbourne, East Sussex, in May 1980

Art student Jessie Earl (picture) was just 22 when she disappeared from her university home in Eastbourne, East Sussex, in May 1980

After her remains were found in 1989, an inquest recorded an open verdict and her parents Valerie, 88, and John, 92, (pictured) have been fighting to have her her death reclassified

After her remains were found in 1989, an inquest recorded an open verdict and her parents Valerie, 88, and John, 92, (pictured) have been fighting to have her her death reclassified

After her remains were found in 1989, an inquest recorded an open verdict and her parents Valerie, 88, and John, 92, (pictured) have been fighting to have her her death reclassified

‘From the moment I saw the death certificate I thought this is not fair to our daughter, said John, ‘I thought we must get it altered — and that is what we have been living for since’.

Jessie was a student at Eastbourne College of Art and Design, and had been spotted coming home from the doctors by an elderly neighbour the afternoon before she went missing. 

After two weeks the police classified Jessie as a missing person, and her parents would spend every moment they had spare searching for their daughter, distributing flyers and contacting various charities. 

Val told the publication how at one point in the search she stood waiting near the A2, after a psychic said her daughter would be travelling on the road in a blue car. 

Jessie was a student at Eastbourne College of Art and Design, and had been spotted coming home from the doctors by an elderly neighbour the afternoon before she went missing in 1980

Jessie was a student at Eastbourne College of Art and Design, and had been spotted coming home from the doctors by an elderly neighbour the afternoon before she went missing in 1980

Jessie was a student at Eastbourne College of Art and Design, and had been spotted coming home from the doctors by an elderly neighbour the afternoon before she went missing in 1980

After the call to tell them that Jessie’s remains had been found, John and Val knew her death was suspicious, with the ring and watch she wore daily missing from her naked body.   

‘As soon as we saw the bra we knew it was murder’, Val said. 

The family, along with police officer-turned-investigator Mark William-Thomas, have speculated that Jessie could have been a victim of serial killer Peter Tobin. 

John, who now lives in Eltham, south east London, said in January he and his wife aren’t interested in revenge, instead they want to see their daughter’s death recorded as a murder ‘before it is too late.’

‘We are not interested in revenge’,  said John, ‘We just want final justice for our daughter. The important thing is for this to happen in our lifetime. We always hoped we hadn’t seen the last of this.

John, who now lives in Eltham, south east London, said in January he and his wife aren't interested in revenge, instead they want to see their daughter's death recorded as a murder 'before it is too late'

John, who now lives in Eltham, south east London, said in January he and his wife aren't interested in revenge, instead they want to see their daughter's death recorded as a murder 'before it is too late'

John, who now lives in Eltham, south east London, said in January he and his wife aren’t interested in revenge, instead they want to see their daughter’s death recorded as a murder ‘before it is too late’

‘The first 11 years after she disappeared were the worst. They were hard, because we had no idea what had happened to her.

‘We always knew were looking at something suspicious, but the uncertainty is very painful. When she was discovered we were relieved.

‘But this last part has been very painful to get over. We want justice and to have the right verdict.

‘You get over the crying in and things like that in 40 years, now were just want justice – but in our lifetime. We will get the right result.’ 

Following criticism of its handling, Sussex Police reopened the case in 2001 and formally recorded Jessie’s death as murder. A fresh file was sent to the Coroner but no new inquest was organised.

Jessie's parents have previously speculated that their daughter was a victim of convicted serial killer Tobin, who was living in the area at the time

Jessie's parents have previously speculated that their daughter was a victim of convicted serial killer Tobin, who was living in the area at the time

Jessie’s parents have previously speculated that their daughter was a victim of convicted serial killer Tobin, who was living in the area at the time

Earlier this year, the family launched a crowdfunder to get the verdict quashed off the back of Jessie’s death being featured in the second season of the Netflix series ‘The Investigator’.  

Jessie’s parents have previously speculated that their daughter was a victim of convicted serial killer Tobin, who was living in the area at the time.

He is serving life sentences for murdering Polish student Angelika Kluk, Scots schoolgirl Vicky Hamilton and Essex teenager Dinah McNicol.

But Sussex Police have previously ruled Tobin out, telling the BBC last year: ‘We have no evidence implicating Peter Tobin or any other named or known individual in the murder of Jessie Earl’. 

This post first appeared on dailymail.co.uk

Continue Reading

Latest Stories

Employers increasing levels of surveillance in an attempt to recreate office at home

Published

on

By

employers increasing levels of surveillance in an attempt to recreate office at home

As the coronavirus crisis continues, office workers have been advised by Prime Minister Boris Johnson to keep working from home where they can. 

However, this may not mean escaping the office environment entirely, with some employers reportedly using increasing surveillance to try and keep tabs on workers they’re miles away from. 

According to the Observer, several employers have been using online tools to recreate the normal workplace – while others have requested digital methods of monitoring their workers from tech companies. 

Shirking or working? Employers seem increasingly unsure...digital health researcher Dr Claudia Pagliari says managers have 'ramped up' tracking their employees

Shirking or working? Employers seem increasingly unsure...digital health researcher Dr Claudia Pagliari says managers have 'ramped up' tracking their employees

Shirking or working? Employers seem increasingly unsure…digital health researcher Dr Claudia Pagliari says managers have ‘ramped up’ tracking their employees

Dr Claudia Pagliari, a researcher into digital health and society at the University of Edinburgh, told that bosses have ‘ramped up’ their attempts to track their employee’s time, in the same way they might in the real world. 

‘It has really ramped up’, she said, ‘People are home working, and many organisations are beginning to want to track what they’re doing.’

She revealed that employers are keeping track of workers’ time through tools such as Slack and Microsoft Team, which report when an employee is active. 

The publication also spoke with David Heinemeier Hansson, the co-founder of start-up Basecamp, a company providing a platform for remote employees. 

WHAT IS API?  

Application Programming Interface (API) is a software intermediary that allows two applications to communicate with each other. 

When using an app on a mobile phone, the application connects to the Internet and sends data to another server. 

The server retrieves that data, performs the required actions and sends it back to the phone. 

The application then interprets that data and gives the user the information you wanted in a readable way.

APIs can also be used to control access to devices that an application may not have permission to use. 

<!—->Advertisement

He claimed that he’s turned down requests from companies who wish to spy on their employees: ‘We went so far as to say that our API cannot be used for any form of employee surveillance.’   

This news comes after the dramatic reversal of the Government’s recent drive to get people back to workplaces earlier this month.

The new Covid-19 measures implemented last week includes advising all office workers to work from home where they can as soon as possible. 

The official guidance for England now states: ‘Where an employer, in consultation with their employee, judges an employee can carry out their normal duties from home they should do so.’ 

David Heinemeier Hansson, the co-founder of start-up Basecamp, claims that he's turned down requests from companies who wish to spy on their employees

David Heinemeier Hansson, the co-founder of start-up Basecamp, claims that he's turned down requests from companies who wish to spy on their employees

David Heinemeier Hansson, the co-founder of start-up Basecamp, claims that he’s turned down requests from companies who wish to spy on their employees

According to Cabinet Office Minister Michael Gove: ‘We are stressing that if it is safe to work in your workplace, if you are in a Covid-secure workplace, then you should be there if your job requires it. But, if you can work from home you should.’

But this may not be bad news to all, with a July survey revealing one in three office workers want to continue working from home after the coronavirus threat is over. 

The study from the Centre for Economics and Business Research (CEBR) found that 32 per cent of people are expecting to at least partially work from home even after the lockdown has ended. 

The research further indicated that between 25 per cent and 30 per cent of employees will be working from home on any one day in 2021. 

This post first appeared on dailymail.co.uk

Continue Reading

Latest Stories

Crying toddler found wandering the streets of Hull alone – as passer-by spots him and calls police

Published

on

By

crying toddler found wandering the streets of hull alone as passer by spots him and calls police

A sobbing toddler, thought to be about two years old, was found wandering alone in the streets of Hull.

The little boy was spotted looking lost and confused by two passers-by on a road in Spring Bank in Hull, East Yorkshire on Saturday afternoon.

The men phoned the police who were filmed arriving on the scene in a Facebook video that has been viewed almost 20,000 times.  

Passers-by called the police when they found a little boy all alone looking lost and confused on a road in Spring Bank in Hull, East Yorkshire on Saturday afternoon

Passers-by called the police when they found a little boy all alone looking lost and confused on a road in Spring Bank in Hull, East Yorkshire on Saturday afternoon

Passers-by called the police when they found a little boy all alone looking lost and confused on a road in Spring Bank in Hull, East Yorkshire on Saturday afternoon

Footage shows the missing boy, who is wearing a red coat and green shorts, waiting with two men and a child as the police arrive.

The men explain the situation while the little boy stands beside the adults with a terrified look on his face. 

One policeman tries to talk to the boy, saying: ‘Hello love. You alright? It’s okay, talk to us.’ 

The other policeman bends down to the boy’s height and reaches for his hand, coaxing him to come to him, saying: ‘We’ll find mummy, come on.’ 

Video footage shows the police arriving on the scene as one policeman tries to talk to the boy, bending down to his level saying: 'We'll find mummy, come on'

Video footage shows the police arriving on the scene as one policeman tries to talk to the boy, bending down to his level saying: 'We'll find mummy, come on'

Video footage shows the police arriving on the scene as one policeman tries to talk to the boy, bending down to his level saying: ‘We’ll find mummy, come on’

The terrified boy continues to sob as he is held in the policeman's arms as the men try to figure out his name and where he lives

The terrified boy continues to sob as he is held in the policeman's arms as the men try to figure out his name and where he lives

The terrified boy continues to sob as he is held in the policeman’s arms as the men try to figure out his name and where he lives

He picks the toddler up in his arms as the little boys begins to sob.

‘Where’s your house?’ he asks him. ‘Where’s mummy?’, but the boy just continues to cry.

The four men discuss the situation, with the policemen wondering why they can’t see any distressed parents out looking for him.

When the boy calms down they ask him again where he lives and his name but he only shakes his head. 

Eventually, the two police officers take the boy to their police van and it has been confirmed that the little boy has been safely reunited with his family

Eventually, the two police officers take the boy to their police van and it has been confirmed that the little boy has been safely reunited with his family

Eventually, the two police officers take the boy to their police van and it has been confirmed that the little boy has been safely reunited with his family

Eventually, the two police officers take the boy to their police van promising the boy some chocolate and thanking the kind strangers for looking after him. 

Humberside Police confirmed to The Sun that the boy has now been safely returned to his family.

It is unclear how the toddler ended up wandering the street by himself.

People commenting on the video expressed their relief that the boy had been found by the right people with one person writing: ‘Thank goodness you helped him it could have been so much worse.’

Another wrote: ‘Ah bless him. His parents will be frantic. Glad it was someone nice who spotted him before he was in any danger. Hope he’s home and safe.’

This post first appeared on dailymail.co.uk

Continue Reading

Trending

Copyright © 2020 DiazHub.