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Parents’ unwillingness to impose boundaries ‘spawned a generation of infantilised millennials’

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parents unwillingness to impose boundaries spawned a generation of infantilised millennials

Parents not enforcing boundaries and being unwilling to chastise children has led to a generation of ‘infantilised millennials’, according to a sociology professor.

In his book, Why Borders Matter, Frank Furedi, emeritus professor of sociology at Kent University, says a lack of clear boundaries has created a childlike generation.  

Not chastising children or using moral-based judgements ‘deprives them of a natural process’ of fighting against parental rules and boundaries, says Furedi.

He says children develop by reacting against boundaries given to them by parents and society, and over three or four generations those parameters have weakened.

This has led to millennials in their twenties acting the way they did in their teenage years and refusing to embrace adulthood, he explained in his book.

Millennials were born between 1980 and 1994, so the oldest of the generation are now 40 and the youngest are in their mid-20s. 

In his new book, Why Borders Matter, Frank Furedi, emeritus professor of sociology at Kent University, says a lack of clear boundaries created a childlike generation

In his new book, Why Borders Matter, Frank Furedi, emeritus professor of sociology at Kent University, says a lack of clear boundaries created a childlike generation

In his new book, Why Borders Matter, Frank Furedi, emeritus professor of sociology at Kent University, says a lack of clear boundaries created a childlike generation 

Why Borders Matter goes into the wider issue of a lack of boundaries in modern western society, including between animals and humans.

Furedi argues that an absence of borders has led to a lack of ‘clear guidance’ when it comes to everyday life issues, and deprived children of ‘something to push against’. 

‘Children develop by reacting against those lines, the boundaries that are set, and that is a very creative process to gain self sufficiency and intellectual independence,’ he told The Times.

He said dismantling those boundaries has weakened the process of socialisation that parents use to transmit values to their children. 

‘If what’s happening now is they are kicking against open doors, which is really what is going on, then the whole developmental process becomes compromised,’ he said.

‘This leads to a situation where the transition from childhood to adolescence takes much, much longer than ever before and the transition from adolescence to adulthood also takes much longer.’

Furedi said he once saw a man wearing a T-shirt saying ‘I’m done with adulting’ which he claims is an example of this inability of millennials to embrace adulthood.  

‘Mothers take their 18-year-olds shopping and it’s their daughter that tells them what to wear, not the other way around,’ he told the Times. 

Fathers are out wearing the same clothes as their sons and listening to the same music, he said, adding it leads to an almost ‘conscious effort not to be a father to your child or a mother but to be their best friend’.

“They can make their best friend with their peers. They need somebody that can look up to, somebody that can inspire them. There is this estrangement from adulthood.”

No borders has created a blurred line in today’s culture, he explained, a line that is also less clear between privacy and publicity, rules and freedom.

Part of this comes from the cultural devaluation of the act of judgement – saying this has led to a loss of clarity about moral boundaries. 

This lost sense of borders has encourages a permanent mood of identity crisis and if society is going to be ‘more openminded’ things need to change, he said. 

‘I have long argued the implications of grey areas in society and the insecurity that this brings for individuals. 

He says children develop by reacting against boundaries given to them by parents and society and over three or four generations those walls have been weakened

He says children develop by reacting against boundaries given to them by parents and society and over three or four generations those walls have been weakened

He says children develop by reacting against boundaries given to them by parents and society and over three or four generations those walls have been weakened

‘Without the discipline of boundaries, there is little to guide people as they make their way in the world,’ Furedi explained. 

The professor said the boundary in politics between public and private lives has been blurred as part of this dismantling of borders, fuelling identity politics.

He said this has led to a paradox in society where young people have been raised without facing the judgement of their parents of their actions so in turn they refuse to accept the same judgement in others.

Furedi said ‘safe spaces’, the idea that certain things shouldn’t be discussed for fear of upsetting or triggering people, is an example of them finding borders. 

He says these spaces are just an opportunity for people to ban those with views who clash with their own and is part of identity politics. 

‘The thing about identity politics is that every expression they use is actually a contradiction,’ he said.

‘They talk about diversity — that’s one of the key values of identity politics — but identity politics is totally hostile to a diversity of viewpoints. 

‘So if you argue a different narrative to what they are arguing that is seen as racist, as offensive, as hate.’  

DEFINING THE GENERATIONS: FROM SILENT TO CENTENNIAL

Generations are a group of people who were born around the same time and place – though the exact dates for when each generation starts and another ends are uncertain.

They are usually broken into a group that have certain characteristics in common such as growing up with technologies.

But who belongs to what generation and what characteristics are associated with each age range? 

Generation Alpha:

Born 2010 – present day

This is the first generation to be born entirely in the 21st century and the majority are the children of Millennials. They grew up with smartphones and tablets as a major part of their childhood entertainment and will come of age in the 2030s. 

Generation Z, iGen, or Centennials: 

Born 1995 –2010

Those born after 1995 are growing up in a world that has always been associated with technology for them. They are the most connected, educated and sophisticated. Known as the most open minded generation to date. 

Millennials or Generation Y: 

Born 1980 – 1994

Those born in this group have been described as the Peter Pan or Boomerang Generation as they commonly move back to live with their parents. There has also been a delay in getting married or starting a career. They are thought of as lazy, narcissistic, and prone to switch jobs quickly. But they are also open minded and look for more of a work-life balance. 

Generation X: 

Born 1965 – 1979

Known as the ‘middle child’ of generations they are often forgotten. But those in this group are more ethically diverse and better educated than the Baby Boomers. More than 60 per cent went to university, according to thebalancecareers. They are independent, resourceful and self-sufficient. Millennials and Gen Z refer to them as the ‘Karen Generation’ after the stereotype of the complaining middle-aged woman.

Baby Boomers: 

Born 1944 – 1964

The term ‘baby boom’ was coined after the drastic rise in the number of births after the end of the second world war. This generation have a strong work ethic, are self-assured, competitive and goal centred. They often put their career above everything. 

Traditionalists or Silent Generation: 

Born 1944 and before

This group were expected to be seen and not heard growing up. They were the ‘silent generation’. A strong work ethic, tough, and resilient this group saw work as a luxury and are some of the wealthiest members of society.  Loyal employees they respect authority and work long hours. 

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Swiss reject nationalist plan to limit jobs for EU…

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swiss reject nationalist plan to limit jobs for eu

Voters in Switzerland have rejected a plan to limit the number of European Union citizens allowed to live and work in their country. 

The measure was rejected by 61.7 per cent of voters, with 38.3 per cent in favor.

All but four of the country’s 26 cantons, or states, likewise opposed the plan proposed by the Swiss People’s Party, public broadcaster SRF reported.

The measures would have given preferential access to jobs, social protection and benefits to people from Switzerland over those from the 27-nation bloc that surrounds it. 

The government had warned that the measure could further strain the rich Alpine’s country’s deep and lucrative ties to the EU. 

Laura Zimmermann, co-president of opposition movement Operation Libero (centre), together with Valentin Vogt, president of the Swiss Employers' Federation, Renato Perlini, campaign manager of Operation Libero, and Stefan Manser-Egli, Co-President of Operation Libero, from left, are pleased with the result of the vote at the meeting of opponents of the popular initiative 'For moderate immigration' in Bern, Switzerland

Laura Zimmermann, co-president of opposition movement Operation Libero (centre), together with Valentin Vogt, president of the Swiss Employers' Federation, Renato Perlini, campaign manager of Operation Libero, and Stefan Manser-Egli, Co-President of Operation Libero, from left, are pleased with the result of the vote at the meeting of opponents of the popular initiative 'For moderate immigration' in Bern, Switzerland

Laura Zimmermann, co-president of opposition movement Operation Libero (centre), together with Valentin Vogt, president of the Swiss Employers’ Federation, Renato Perlini, campaign manager of Operation Libero, and Stefan Manser-Egli, Co-President of Operation Libero, from left, are pleased with the result of the vote at the meeting of opponents of the popular initiative ‘For moderate immigration’ in Bern, Switzerland

Ms Zimmermann (centre), together with Mr Vogt, Mr Perlini, and Mr Manser-Egli (from left), are pleased with the result of the vote

Ms Zimmermann (centre), together with Mr Vogt, Mr Perlini, and Mr Manser-Egli (from left), are pleased with the result of the vote

Ms Zimmermann (centre), together with Mr Vogt, Mr Perlini, and Mr Manser-Egli (from left), are pleased with the result of the vote

Laura Zimmermann, co-president of Operation Libero, is standing in front of a poster reading 'No. No Switzerland is an island' in Bern, Switzerland

Laura Zimmermann, co-president of Operation Libero, is standing in front of a poster reading 'No. No Switzerland is an island' in Bern, Switzerland

Laura Zimmermann, co-president of Operation Libero, is standing in front of a poster reading ‘No. No Switzerland is an island’ in Bern, Switzerland

It could also have triggered reciprocal disadvantages for millions of Swiss citizens if they want to live or work in the EU.

‘Especially at this time, during the difficult economic situation caused by the corona crisis, good relations with our neighbors and with the EU are important,’ Justice Minister Karin Keller-Sutter said, welcoming the outcome of the vote.

She said Switzerland would continue to pursue a ‘bilateral path’ with the EU, eschewing membership of the bloc while seeking close economic ties with it.

In a nod to the misgivings many Swiss have about the country’s big neighbor, Keller-Sutter acknowledged that ‘freedom of movement doesn’t just have benefits.’

‘The Federal Council only wants as much immigration as necessary,’ she said. ‘That continues to be our goal.’

Roughly 1.4 million EU citizens live in the country of about 8.6 million, while around 500,000 Swiss live in EU countries. 

Marco Chiesa, Swiss People's Party president and State Council, TI, stands in Rothrist, Switzerland for the meeting

Marco Chiesa, Swiss People's Party president and State Council, TI, stands in Rothrist, Switzerland for the meeting

Marco Chiesa, Swiss People’s Party president and State Council, TI, stands in Rothrist, Switzerland for the meeting

Some are dual citizens and wouldn’t have been affected by any restrictions.

In a similar referendum in 2014, the Swiss narrowly voted in favor of limiting EU citizens’ freedom to live and work in Switzerland. 

Lawmakers, however, refused to fully implement that referendum fearing a hefty impact on Swiss society and businesses, prompting the People´s Party to get the issue back on the ballot again this year.

Since the last vote, Switzerland has witnessed the turmoil that Britain’s 2016 referendum to leave the European Union has caused, especially for EU citizens in the UK and Britons living on the continent. 

Britain left the EU in January, but is in a transition period until the end of the year with prospects for a deal on future relations between London and Brussels still uncertain.

Voter Yann Grote in Geneva said he didn’t approve of further limiting freedom of movement.

SSP President and State Councillor Marco Chiesa, TI, on the right, and National Councillor Thomas Matter, BL, speak about the limitation initiative on Sunday, 27 September

SSP President and State Councillor Marco Chiesa, TI, on the right, and National Councillor Thomas Matter, BL, speak about the limitation initiative on Sunday, 27 September

SSP President and State Councillor Marco Chiesa, TI, on the right, and National Councillor Thomas Matter, BL, speak about the limitation initiative on Sunday, 27 September

‘I’m not at all in favor, and even more now, because it´s not a time to isolate Switzerland,’ he said.

Elisabeth Lopes agreed. She said: ‘I’m a daughter of immigrants, so it is a matter that touches me. 

‘If Switzerland had to withdraw or reduce these agreements (with the EU), I think we would be the real losers.’

In Brussels, European Commission President Ursula von der Leyen welcomed the result of the referendum, calling it “a positive signal to continue to consolidate and deepen our relationship.”

She also urged Switzerland to approve a series of agreements negotiated between the country and the EU in 2018, but not yet ratified.

The freedom-of-movement measure was being considered alongside nationwide votes on several other issues.

SRF reported that a majority of voters backed plans for paid paternity leave and for the purchase of up to 6 billion francs (about $6.5 billion) worth of new fighter planes by 2030. 

Voters rejected measures on the right to hunt wolves to keep their population down and on increasing tax breaks for child care.

Turnout was higher than in most recent referendums, almost 60% of voters going to the polls or casting their ballots by mail.

This post first appeared on dailymail.co.uk

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Family of missing British mother, 52, say disappearance has become ‘deeper and darker’

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family of missing british mother 52 say disappearance has become deeper and darker

Family of a British mother who vanished in France a year ago said today ‘The longer this has gone on, the deeper and darker her disappearance has become.’

Police are currently investigating after Karen Milsom, 52, suddenly left the home she shared with electrician husband Steve in the Charente region with some clothes and £5,400 of Euros.

Her car was found three weeks later at nearby Ruffec station by him and their two grown-up children, with no trace of her.

Officers from the French police have searched the family home and septic tank but have still not found out what has happened. They are looking at three possible theories she could have started a new life, killed herself or been murdered.

Sources close to the investigation revealed there was ‘a considerable amount of funds’ in Mrs Milsom’s bank account, but has not made any withdrawals since.

Last night Mrs Milsom’s brother Jon Ward told MailOnline: ‘Something has happened to my sister.

‘The longer this has gone the deeper and darker her disappearance has become.

‘There are a lot of uneasy elements in this, we didn’t learn Karen was missing until more than two months later – this was from my dad.

‘We are aware that Karen had been unhappy about the state of her marriage for some time. She had told friends she was unhappy.’

Steve and Karen Milsom pictured in France just weeks before she vanished without a trace

Steve and Karen Milsom pictured in France just weeks before she vanished without a trace

Steve and Karen Milsom pictured in France just weeks before she vanished without a trace

Mother-of-two Karen Milsom, 52, left her home in the Charente region in August last year

Mother-of-two Karen Milsom, 52, left her home in the Charente region in August last year

Mother-of-two Karen Milsom, 52, left her home in the Charente region in August last year

The family car was found at Ruffec Station 25 miles away three weeks later after a tip-off

The family car was found at Ruffec Station 25 miles away three weeks later after a tip-off

The family car was found at Ruffec Station 25 miles away three weeks later after a tip-off

33569808 8767457 image a 35 1600946061815

33569808 8767457 image a 35 1600946061815

Mrs Milsom, who was born in Bristol, had been a carer for an elderly British women before she disappeared after they moved to France 15 years ago.

Mr Ward said: ‘I have such an emotional attachment to all this I don’t want to put two and two together and get 22

‘At the end of the day we hope and pray she is safe and well. If she sees this we just want to ask her “please Karen get in touch”.

‘We don’t care what she’s doing or what she’s up to we just need to know she is safe and well and then we will give her space.

‘If she doesn’t pick up the phone and say she’s safe then we will think and continue worry she is in trouble.

‘There has been no communication from her and there were no clues in the car when her husband and two sons recovered it from the train station.

Mrs Milsom and her family had moved to the Charente region 15 years ago to live

Mrs Milsom and her family had moved to the Charente region 15 years ago to live

Mrs Milsom and her family had moved to the Charente region 15 years ago to live

‘The boys think one day she will just come back and walk through the door when she’s ready.’

Her husband told the Guardian she suddenly left after an outburst and thought she would come back after she took their car, but said she texted him to say the vehicle was at nearby Ruffec station. It had a bag of men’s clothes inside.

He added: ‘She had been fishing for an argument. She was in one of her moods.

‘She said no one cared about her. She would fly off the handle and then a couple of hours later she would apologise.

‘I was gobsmacked when she left. She said she would be in contact as and when she wanted to.

‘Three weeks later, I got a text off her to say that the car was at Ruffec station. 

‘She left of her own accord. I really don’t know what could have happened. I don’t think she’d have taken her life. I had two phone calls from withheld numbers. I spoke to her and it was a strange conversation.’

Maybe she was craving a more exciting life. I’m hoping she’s going to show her face, but at the moment I’m in limbo.”

Mr Milsom said he reported her missing to the police three weeks later after it became clear she was not coming home. 

She vanished in August and the Gendarmerie has made appeals for witnesses as it investigated what has happened.

One of her friends Claire McDermott received a text from her in September last year and she believed she had been bored with her life in France.

Ms McDermott said: ‘She felt she had nothing to look forward to.’

The message said she would be back in December to explain, but she has not been seen again.

Another friend Sue Jones added: ‘She was a very bubbly person, very caring and empathetic.

‘But I knew she wasn’t very happy.’

She said that Milsom’s mother had killed herself when her daughter was a teenager.

She said: ‘I find it hard to believe that she would do that to her children.’

Milsom is one of more than 800 missing people on the files of the Lucie Blackman Trust.

It said in an appeal: ‘Karen has not been seen nor heard from since around 20th August 2019.

She has been living in France for 15 years and has kept in regular touch with her family.

‘Therefore this disappearance, from her home in Charente, France, is completely out of character and there are serious concerns for her.’

This post first appeared on dailymail.co.uk

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NHS hospitals warn test and trace system is NOT ready for the enormous demands of winter

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nhs hospitals warn test and trace system is not ready for the enormous demands of winter

The body which represents NHS hospital trusts says the test and trace systems in England isn’t ready for the enormous demands of winter.

NHS Providers is calling for testing capacity to be quadrupled within three months, a dramatic improvement on turnaround times and a clear plan for regular testing of health workers, according to the BBC.

Chris Hopson, chief executive of NHS Providers, said: ‘If NHS Test and Trace is under pressure now, it’s likely to face even greater pressures this winter.

‘We’ll all, understandably, want the reassurance of a test if we have a cold, flu or a bug with coronavirus-like symptoms.

‘NHS Test and Trace therefore has a major task on its hand to expand capacity, expand the number of testing sites, expand the number of tests being processed for the next day, and expand its ability to deal with local outbreaks.

‘Whilst there are top level plans in place to do this, we need more detail and the NHS trusts that we represent want to know what contribution they will need to make.’

He told BBC Breakfast that going into winter, the country would need ‘probably four times as many tests as we’ve currently got’. 

Yesterday health secretary Matt Hancock hailed the Government’s test and trace app a success, claiming more than 10 million people had already downloaded it since Thursday.

But the app has been plagued with problems since it launched with the latest fiasco seeing up to 70,000 users blocked from logging their test results.

The app relies on Bluetooth to determine if someone has been within two metres of an infectious person for 15 minutes, but other Bluetooth devices can interfere with the signal, generating a ‘false positive’. 

Matt Hancock has hailed the app a success as he says 10 million people have downloaded it

Matt Hancock has hailed the app a success as he says 10 million people have downloaded it

The app has been plagued by problems since it launched on Thursday

The app has been plagued by problems since it launched on Thursday

Matt Hancock’s new coronavirus tracing app, which the health secretary has hailed as a huge success, has been hit by multiple flaws and bugs this weekend which have left users confused

Police to start coronavirus HOME checks: Officers will launch drive to enforce self-isolation rules this week with spot visits to people’s houses and £10,000 fines 

Police will carry out spot checks and act on tip-offs to enforce strict new Covid-19 self-isolation rules from today.

People ordered to quarantine after they or a contact test positive for the virus face a knock on the door from officers to check they are not leaving their home.

From today, people across England are required by law to quarantine for ten days if they test positive for Covid-19 or are contacted by NHS Test and Trace.

Those who do not self-isolate – or employers who force staff to turn up to work – will be hit with fines of up to £10,000.

The police will be used to ‘check compliance’ with the rules and will investigate claims by informers that a person who should be in quarantine is flouting the requirement. 

Officers will ‘investigate and prosecute high-profile and egregious cases of non-compliance’, and ‘act on instances where third parties have identified others who have tested positive, but are not self-isolating’.

The rules state that if someone receives a positive test result, they are required by law to self-isolate for ten days after they first displayed symptoms, or ten days after the date of the test if they did not have symptoms.

Other members of their household must self-isolate for 14 days after the onset of symptoms, or after the date of the positive test.

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To compound the problems, it has also transpired that the app doesn’t work on millions of older smartphones.

It also requires a code to register a completed test but it is only given if the test returns as positive. 

Those with a negative test are only able to register their result if they booked directly through the app – a bug the Government says has been fixed over the weekend.

But users continue to report flaws with the system which users say are confusing.

Maddie, from London, told BBC Radio 4: ‘I had a notification on my phone saying ‘possible Covid exposure’ so obviously as soon as I saw that I clicked it and it took me straight into the app.

‘So I was clicking all the different sections in the app and nothing was coming up with any kind of alert that I’d been exposed to Covid.

‘It was just really confusing and then I didn’t really know what to do.’

Maddie added that because it seemed like an ‘error’ she went about her day as usual.

David Bonsall, senior researcher at Oxford University and a government adviser on the app said: ‘There are notifications that are pushed to the phone from the core bit of software that’s provided by Google.

‘So the contact tracing function of the app is working in the background and there’s some notifications that are just telling you that the app is working.

‘To be absolutely clear, any notification to isolate will be absolutely crystal clear within the app.

‘If you don’t have something within the app telling you to do something then you don’t need to worry.’ 

The Health Secretary said on social media it was an ‘absolutely fantastic’ response so far, and urged more people to download it. 

It comes as NHS Test and Trace whistle-blowers told BBC Panorama that they were bored and frustrated and that the system for tracing people who’ve tested positive for coronavirus and their contacts does not appear to be working.

Healthcare professional and NHS Test and Trace whistle-blower Alex Lee says that she only spoke to one person with coronavirus during her four months with the system, after it went live. 

The app relies on Bluetooth to determine if someone has been within two metres of an infectious person for 15 minutes, but other Bluetooth devices can interfere with the signal

The app relies on Bluetooth to determine if someone has been within two metres of an infectious person for 15 minutes, but other Bluetooth devices can interfere with the signal

The app relies on Bluetooth to determine if someone has been within two metres of an infectious person for 15 minutes, but other Bluetooth devices can interfere with the signal

Another whistle-blower, Tobin Stonelake, employed to call the close contacts of positive cases, told Panorama he had made no successful contact tracing calls during the 10 weeks he was working for the service: ‘It’s demoralising and it doesn’t make you feel good about what’s going on with Covid-19.’

Alex Lee, who worked for the BBC four years ago, and is also the on-screen reporter for tonight’s film BBC Panorama: ‘Test and Trace Exposed’, says: ‘I’m pretty ashamed to say to people, this is what I’m doing, because the whole point of me setting out to do this was to make a turnaround, to make a contribution.

‘I feel like I’ve achieved a big fat zero.’

She was hired as a clinical contact caseworker to call people who’d tested positive, tell them to self-isolate and obtain the details of their close contacts.

She filmed herself on a mobile phone to show how little work she had to do. She can be seen on her computer, wearing a telephone headset ready to call cases and clicking a button labelled ‘start tracing’ signalling that she is available.

Whistle-blower, Tobin Stonelake, employed to call close contacts of positive cases, told Panorama he made no successful contact tracing calls during the 10 weeks he worked there

Whistle-blower, Tobin Stonelake, employed to call close contacts of positive cases, told Panorama he made no successful contact tracing calls during the 10 weeks he worked there

Whistle-blower, Tobin Stonelake, employed to call close contacts of positive cases, told Panorama he made no successful contact tracing calls during the 10 weeks he worked there

Alex Lee, who worked for the BBC four years ago, told the Panorama special on test and trace that she was 'pretty ashamed' of what she was doing when she worked for test and trace

Alex Lee, who worked for the BBC four years ago, told the Panorama special on test and trace that she was 'pretty ashamed' of what she was doing when she worked for test and trace

Alex Lee, who worked for the BBC four years ago, told the Panorama special on test and trace that she was ‘pretty ashamed’ of what she was doing when she worked for test and trace

She also records computer glitches and system errors that either prevented her from logging on or following up some cases.

When reporting issues to team leaders, she was told that they were widespread, affecting others too.

Latest Government figures show that just over one in five people who’ve tested positive for coronavirus aren’t being reached by NHS Test and Trace, the system for England that went live last May.

It includes health protection teams who continue to trace cases and their contacts in complex settings like hospitals and care homes.

Panorama also filmed with Leicester City Council. Officials there believe that England’s first local lockdown which followed a spike in infections, could have been avoided had local authorities been plugged into the national system earlier.

Sir Peter Soulsby, the Labour Mayor of Leicester said: ‘If they had been feeding through to us where the positive tests were coming from…We could have intervened at a much, much earlier stage.

The mayor of Leicester Sir Peter Soulsby

The mayor of Leicester Sir Peter Soulsby

The mayor of Leicester Sir Peter Soulsby

‘And there [would have] been no question whatsoever of having to take any special measures, lockdown or other in Leicester.’

The details of people who have tested positive are now shared with local authorities, but only when NHS Test and Trace has been unable to contact them first.

Panorama filmed teams in Leicester cross referencing information they received from Test and Trace, with their own databases to help improve the likelihood of tracing a positive case and persuading them to self-isolate.

A spokesperson for the Department of Health and Social Care said: ‘NHS Test and Trace is one of the largest testing and contact tracing systems in the world.

‘The service is working hard to break chains of transmission, with almost half a million people who may otherwise have unknowingly spreading coronavirus contacted and told to isolate.

‘We’re working with Directors of Public Health and have more than doubled the size of local health protection teams to increase local contact tracing and stop outbreaks.

‘We are also providing tests at an unprecedented scale – over 225,000 a day on average over the last week – and expanding capacity further to provide 500,000 tests a day by the end of October.’

The DHSC also told Panorama any technical issues which emerged with the establishment of the new service have been resolved quickly and it says whilst it keeps staffing levels under constant review, it is right to have capacity in the system as the infection rate and thus call handler requirement can increase at an exponential rate on short timescales.

This post first appeared on dailymail.co.uk

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