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Pelosi demands Republicans agree to remove 11 Confederate statues from Capitol Hill

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pelosi demands republicans agree to remove 11 confederate statues from capitol hill

Hours after President Trump said he woudn’t be renaming military bases named for Confederate leaders, House Speaker Nancy Pelosi flaunted her opposition by highlighting her work to get Confederate statues in the U.S. Capitol removed. 

Pelosi sent out a copy of a letter she had addressed to the chairs of the Joint Committee on the Library, which manages the National Statuary Hall collection – the 100 statues contributed by states that are on display in Statuary Hall and other places around the U.S. Capitol complex.  

Each U.S. state gets to contribute two statues and there are currently 11 Confederate figures on display. 

Pelosi called for their removal.  

House Speaker Nancy Pelosi wrote a letter asking that the 11 remaining Confederate statues in Statuary Hall and around the Capitol complex be removed

House Speaker Nancy Pelosi wrote a letter asking that the 11 remaining Confederate statues in Statuary Hall and around the Capitol complex be removed

House Speaker Nancy Pelosi wrote a letter asking that the 11 remaining Confederate statues in Statuary Hall and around the Capitol complex be removed 

Jefferson Davis, the president of the Confederate States of America

Jefferson Davis, the president of the Confederate States of America

Confederate Gen. Robert E. Lee

Confederate Gen. Robert E. Lee

Confederate statues on Capitol Hill include ones of Jefferson Davis (left), which represents Mississippi in the collection and General Robert E. Lee (right), a gift from the commonwealth of Virginia 

JOSEPH WHEELER

JOSEPH WHEELER

URIAH MILTON ROSE

URIAH MILTON ROSE

Commander Joseph Wheelerfor the Confederate Army of Tennessee, left and lawyer Uriah Milton Rose, right

ALEXANDER HAMILTON STEPHENS

ALEXANDER HAMILTON STEPHENS

WADE HAMPTON

WADE HAMPTON

Confederate Vice President Alexander Hamilton Stephens, left, and military officer Wade Hampton

CONFEDERATE STATUES ON CAPITOL HILL AND THE STATES THAT GIFTED THEM

Jefferson Davis – Mississippi 

James Zachariah George – Mississippi 

Wade Hampton – South Carolina 

John E. Kenna – West Virginia  

Gen. Robert E. Lee – Virginia 

Uriah Milton Rose – Arkansas 

Edmund Kirby Smith – Florida  

Alexander Stephens – Georgia 

Zebulon Vance – North Carolina  

Joseph Wheeler – Alabama 

Edward Douglass White – Louisiana  

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Additionally Mississippi has a statue of Confederate James Zachariah George, Alabama has Joseph Wheeler, South Carolina has a statue of Wade Hampton, North Carolina has a statue of Zebulon Vance, West Virginia has John E. Kenna, Louisiana has Edward Douglass White and Arkansas gifted a statue of Uriah Milton Rose, an attorney who sided with the Confederacy. 

The statue of Edmund Kirby Smith, a general in the Confederate Army, was already expected to be replaced.  

Most of the Confederates in the collection are depicted in uniform.  

In her letter to Sen. Roy Blunt, the chair and a Missouri Republican and Rep. Zoe Lofgren, the committee’s vice chair and a California Democrat, Pelosi quoted Stephens’ ‘corner-stone speech’ in which the Confederacy’s vice president said the ‘assumption of the equality of the races’ was something that was made ‘in error.’  

‘Our new government is founded upon exactly the opposite idea; its foundations are laid, its corner-stone rests, upon the great truth that the negro is not equal to the white man; that slavery subordination to the superior race is his natural and normal condition,’ Stephens had said in the speech, Pelosi reminded the lawmakers. 

 She argued that the statues that are on display on Capitol Hill ‘should embody our highest ideals as Americans.’ 

‘Monuments to men who advocated cruelty and barbarism to achieve such a plainly racist end are a grotesque affront to these ideals,’ Pelosi said. ‘Their statues pay homage to hate, not heritage.’ 

‘They must be removed,’ she argued.  

The push to get rid of Confederate symbols has come in the aftermath of the Memorial Day killing of George Floyd, a Minneapolis black man, at the hands of a white police officer. 

EDWARD DOUGLASS WHITE

EDWARD DOUGLASS WHITE

JOHN E. KENNA

JOHN E. KENNA

Edward Douglass White, left, and John E. Kenna, right 

Zebulon Baird Vance, a Confederate military officer in the American Civil War, the 37th and 43rd Governor of North Carolina

Zebulon Baird Vance, a Confederate military officer in the American Civil War, the 37th and 43rd Governor of North Carolina

Zebulon Baird Vance, a Confederate military officer in the American Civil War, the 37th and 43rd Governor of North Carolina

JAMES ZACHARIAH GEORGE

JAMES ZACHARIAH GEORGE

EDMUND KIRBY SMITH

EDMUND KIRBY SMITH

James Zachariah George, left,  and Edmund Kirby Smith, right

Among the statues is Confederate Gen. Robert E. Lee, a gift from Virginia, Confederate president Jefferson David, a gift from Mississippi, Confederate vice presieent Alexander Stephens, a gift from Georgia. 

The ‘Black Lives Matter’ protests that followed have put renewed attention on issues like the Capitol Hill statues, flying the Confederate flag at certain events and renaming 10 U.S. Army bases, which currently are named after Confederate leaders. 

On Wednesday, President Trump articulated that the U.S. bases would not be renamed under his watch.  

Democrats had previously tried to get the Statuary Hall collection statues removed on the heels of the August 2017 protests in Charlottesville that pit KKK members, neo-Nazis and white supremacists against counter-protesters, one of whom was killed. 

Republicans, at the time, responded by saying that the statue selections are up to each state.    

Upon seeing the letter, Lofgren said she agreed with Pelosi that the Joint Committee and the Architect of the Capitol ‘should expediently remove these symbols of cruelty and bigotry from the halls of the Capitol.’ 

‘The Capitol building belongs to the American people and cannot serve as a place of honor for the hatred and racism that tears at the fabric of our nation, the very poison that these statues embody,’ Lofgren said.   

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ITV drama Des hit with Ofcom complaints from viewers disturbed by details of Dennis Nilsen’s murders

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itv drama des hit with ofcom complaints from viewers disturbed by details of dennis nilsens murders

ITV drama Des depicts the true story of British serial killer Dennis Nilsen and his murderous atrocities committed against men and boys between 1978 and 1983.

The broadcast regulators, Ofcom, have reportedly received seven complaints from viewers who were  left horrified by the disturbing details of his crimes in the three-part series, reports the Sun.

The TV drama documents Dennis – played by David Tenant – during his arrest and subsequent trial for the brutal murders of 15 young men, and launched to critical acclaim on Monday.

New show: ITV drama Des depicts the true story of British serial killer Dennis Nilsen and his murderous atrocities committed against men and boys between 1978 and 1983

New show: ITV drama Des depicts the true story of British serial killer Dennis Nilsen and his murderous atrocities committed against men and boys between 1978 and 1983

New show: ITV drama Des depicts the true story of British serial killer Dennis Nilsen and his murderous atrocities committed against men and boys between 1978 and 1983

Des has given ITV it’s biggest drama launch of the year after an average of 5.4 million viewers tuned in to watch. 

The first episode peaked at 5.9 million, however some fans were deterred by the chilling revelations of his crimes which included necrophilia and dismemberment, and they felt it warranted a complaint to Ofcom.

Other viewers took to Twitter to share their reaction as they became engrossed in the dark yet gripping storytelling of Dennis which unfolded on the small screen. 

Horrified: The broadcast regulators, Ofcom, have reportedly received seven complaints from viewers left horrified by the disturbing nature of the three part series

Horrified: The broadcast regulators, Ofcom, have reportedly received seven complaints from viewers left horrified by the disturbing nature of the three part series

Horrified: The broadcast regulators, Ofcom, have reportedly received seven complaints from viewers left horrified by the disturbing nature of the three part series

One viewer penned: ‘Oh it’s time to scare myself silly again Face screaming in fearwatching @itv #Des I’m hoping @TwiningsUK Sleeping symbol is going to help this evening #scared #itv #itvdes #tea #twinings #sleep.’

DCI Jay is in charge of the investigation into Dennis and is played by Ashes to Ashes actor, Daniel Mays. A viewer tweeted to the 42-year old actor and said: ‘@DanielMays9 Just watched Des, scared to go to sleep now!’

Another viewer added: ‘I can attest that reading Dennis Nilsen’s Wikipedia page before turning in doesn’t make for a great night’s sleep. #Des.’

MailOnline have reached out to Ofcom for further comment.     

Too much: An average 5.4 million viewers tuned in to watch Des however some fans were deterred by the chilling details of his crimes which included necrophilia and dismemberment

Too much: An average 5.4 million viewers tuned in to watch Des however some fans were deterred by the chilling details of his crimes which included necrophilia and dismemberment

Too much: An average 5.4 million viewers tuned in to watch Des however some fans were deterred by the chilling details of his crimes which included necrophilia and dismemberment

Dennis, who died at the age of 74 in 2018 at HMP Full Sutton, 34 years into his life sentence, is believed to have killed as many as 15 gay men, most of them homeless, at his homes in north London suburbs Cricklewood and Muswell Hill.

During his killing spree, Dennis would befriend his subjects in pubs and bars in London before luring them into his flat, where he would murder them and sit with their corpses before dismembering them.

His crimes were discovered when a drain outside his home on Cranley Gardens, Muswell Hill, became blocked by human remains that he had tried to flush away.  

Dennis was jailed for life with a recommendation he serve a minimum of 25 years in 1983, on six counts of murder and two of attempted murder. The sentence was later upgraded to a whole-life tariff.   

Shocking: Dennis (pictured) who died at the age of 74 in 2018 at HMP Full Sutton, 34 years into his life sentence, is believed to have killed as many as 15 gay men at his homes in north London

Shocking: Dennis (pictured) who died at the age of 74 in 2018 at HMP Full Sutton, 34 years into his life sentence, is believed to have killed as many as 15 gay men at his homes in north London

Shocking: Dennis (pictured) who died at the age of 74 in 2018 at HMP Full Sutton, 34 years into his life sentence, is believed to have killed as many as 15 gay men at his homes in north London

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Covid gridlock ‘puts 999 patients in peril’

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covid gridlock puts 999 patients in peril

Road closures brought in during the pandemic are causing gridlock and leading to life-threatening delays for the emergency services, campaigners claim.

Councils are using emergency coronavirus cash to rush through the ‘green’ measures, an audit of local road schemes suggests.

Under the projects brought in to aid social distancing and encourage walking and cycling, portions of road are being turned over to pedestrians and bikes – and in some cases, closed off altogether.

Blocked by bollards: Ambulance in Ealing, west London. Road closures brought in during the pandemic are causing gridlock and leading to life-threatening delays for the emergency services, campaigners claim

Blocked by bollards: Ambulance in Ealing, west London. Road closures brought in during the pandemic are causing gridlock and leading to life-threatening delays for the emergency services, campaigners claim

Blocked by bollards: Ambulance in Ealing, west London. Road closures brought in during the pandemic are causing gridlock and leading to life-threatening delays for the emergency services, campaigners claim

The Mail carried out a snapshot survey of 30 local authorities and found all have introduced schemes that have an impact on traffic in the past four months.

Analysis of data from satnav makers TomTom also reveals rush-hour congestion was worse than normal in 19 of 25 towns and cities on Thursday morning. 

The rash of new restrictions has also led to life-threatening delays in reaching heart attack and stroke patients, according to the College of Paramedics.

In May, councils were handed £250million for ‘green’ schemes to promote social distancing and to encourage walking and cycling in the wake of lockdown.

Supporters say the measures have cut air pollution, led to a rise in physical activity and attracted strong local support.

But campaigners claim draconian measures are being rushed through, bringing chaos to the roads at a time when many are shunning public transport in favour of their cars over Covid fears.

Department for Transport figures show traffic volumes were at 97 per cent of normal levels on Monday, September 13, compared with 36 per cent for trains.

Chaos: Traffic chokes a road in King’s Cross, London, as bollards mark a new cycle lane

Chaos: Traffic chokes a road in King’s Cross, London, as bollards mark a new cycle lane

Chaos: Traffic chokes a road in King’s Cross, London, as bollards mark a new cycle lane

In a letter seen by the Mail, the AA has warned Transport Secretary Grant Shapps the combination of high traffic levels and anti-car schemes has made congestion and pollution worse in some areas.

The motoring organisation’s president Edmund King has asked the minister to rethink the schemes so local people and emergency services are properly consulted.

In his letter, he wrote: ‘Some schemes are regrettably adding to congestion and poorer air quality rather than improving them.

‘As you know, governments at all levels succeed best when they engage residents and include them in both the thought and decision-making process.

‘Unfortunately, the lack of consultation is leading to growing levels of dissatisfaction and frustration across many road users, including some emergency services.’

Richard Webber, of the College of Paramedics, said certain schemes had caused ambulance delays.

He told the Mail: ‘Some streets are now almost impossible to get through. This really matters with heart attack and stroke patients. For every minute you delay treatment for a cardiac arrest, there is a 10 per cent drop in survivability. Crews have been given keys to bollards. But the process of unlocking them is time-consuming.

Covid blitz on drivers

Bristol: Council has pedestrianised parts of city and suspended parking. Bristol Bridge has been closed to private vehicles.

Bath: Motorists are banned from using key city roads from 10am to 6pm.

West London: Several roads have been closed in Ealing to give people more room to socially distance.

Bolton: Seven roads shut in the city centre to aid social distancing.

Colchester: High street closed to cars. 

Ludlow, Shropshire: High street closed to traffic between 10am and 3pm.

Wigan: Pedestrian zone times extended so they run from 9am to 5pm. 

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‘As for cycle lanes, some have been extended and separated from the road by hard bollards. This means that ambulances are forced to sit in traffic.’

The London Ambulance Service said the changes all had the potential to delay their response – although they admitted that, even though the schemes had caused problems, they have still managed to hit all response time targets.

Howard Cox, of pressure group FairFuelUK, said: ‘Clueless local authorities, conspiring with and funded by central government, are aimlessly clogging up the heart of our cities, and screwing the world’s already highest taxed drivers with yet more “pay to pollute” congestion and ultra-low emission taxes.’

A Department for Transport spokesman said: ‘We expect local authorities to engage constructively with residents to make sure any changes they make are the right ones for everyone and must accommodate emergency services.

‘Evidence shows these schemes are significantly cutting rat-running traffic, improving air quality and reducing noise pollution, and increasing walking and cycling. Where they do this, they have attracted strong public support.’

The Mail’s survey of local authorities uncovered the introduction of schemes from the widening of pavements and cycle lanes to full closures of town centres to cars.

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Theresa May photo portrait finally goes on No.10 staircase

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theresa may photo portrait finally goes on no 10 staircase

For years, Margaret Thatcher’s portrait has been the only one of a woman to adorn the famous yellow staircase at 10 Downing Street.

But yesterday, it was finally joined by a photo of Theresa May, the country’s second woman prime minister.

Portraits of former prime ministers line the staircase chronologically, so Mrs May is positioned next to her predecessor David Cameron.

For years, Margaret Thatcher’s portrait has been the only one of a woman to adorn the famous yellow staircase at 10 Downing Street. But yesterday, it was finally joined by a photo of Theresa May, the country’s second woman prime minister

For years, Margaret Thatcher’s portrait has been the only one of a woman to adorn the famous yellow staircase at 10 Downing Street. But yesterday, it was finally joined by a photo of Theresa May, the country’s second woman prime minister

For years, Margaret Thatcher’s portrait has been the only one of a woman to adorn the famous yellow staircase at 10 Downing Street. But yesterday, it was finally joined by a photo of Theresa May, the country’s second woman prime minister

Portraits of former prime ministers line the staircase chronologically, so Mrs May is positioned next to her predecessor David Cameron. Once a PM is out of office, his or her photo is added to the No.10 wall

Portraits of former prime ministers line the staircase chronologically, so Mrs May is positioned next to her predecessor David Cameron. Once a PM is out of office, his or her photo is added to the No.10 wall

Portraits of former prime ministers line the staircase chronologically, so Mrs May is positioned next to her predecessor David Cameron. Once a PM is out of office, his or her photo is added to the No.10 wall

Once a prime minister is out of office, his or her photo is added to the wall, then all the other pictures are shuffled down the staircase. 

Art historian Simon Schama once said in a documentary on Downing Street: ‘Where you might have in other great houses of state, even in the White House, huge portraits, larger than life size, here [in the UK] we have modest engravings and photographs of the ghosts of Downing Street.’

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