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Perfume firm Jo Malone apologises to Star Wars actor John Boyega after AXING him from advert

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perfume firm jo malone apologises to star wars actor john boyega after axing him from advert

Perfume company Jo Malone has apologised to the black British star John Boyega for cutting him out of an advert when it was remade for the Chinese market.

The Star Wars actor came up with the idea for the original advert, which shows him enjoying time with his friends and family where he grew up in Peckham, south London.

Mr Boyega, 28, also directed the advert, based around his personal experiences, for the scented candle brand, titled London Gent.

But in China the advert was recast without any black actors.

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33141906 0 image a 55 1600043347095

Jo Malone has apologised to the black British star John Boyega for cutting him out of an advert when it was remade for the Chinese market

Instead it features Chinese actor Liu Hoaran in Mr Boyega’s starring role.

Jo Malone has now apologised to Mr Boyega, saying it was a ‘mistake’ to try and replicate his personal experiences using a different actor.

The company said in a statement: ‘We deeply apologise for what on our end was a mistake in the local execution of the John Boyega campaign.

‘John is a tremendous artist with great personal vision and direction. The concept for the film was based on John’s personal experiences and should not have been replicated.’

The company said that while it ‘immediately took action’ and removed the local version of the campaign, ‘we recognise that this was painful and that offence was caused’.

It added: ‘We respect John, and support our partners and fans globally. We are taking this misstep very seriously and we are working together as a brand to do better moving forward.’

Mr Boyega, who is a global ambassador for Jo Malone, did not know about the recasting of the Chinese advert and only found out about it on Twitter, according to the Hollywood Reporter.

Mr Boyega, 28, also directed the advert, based around his personal experiences, for the scented candle brand, titled London Gent

Mr Boyega, 28, also directed the advert, based around his personal experiences, for the scented candle brand, titled London Gent

Mr Boyega, 28, also directed the advert, based around his personal experiences, for the scented candle brand, titled London Gent

The actor has previously said of the advert: ‘There are several people in this video that have either given me a place to stay in LA while I haven’t had one or just have been consistent in our friendship for years.

‘It’s about breaking free of the concept of ‘going back or returning to your roots’, but more about the roots existing with this new side of my life.’

He has been minimised in Chinese marketing material before. In 2015, the Chinese poster for the new Star Wars film featured a much smaller version of his character Finn compared with the original.

The actor has recently spoken out about the racism he experienced after taking the Star Wars role.

Referring to a social media campaign to boycott the films because of his casting, he said: ‘I’m the only cast member who had their own unique experience of that franchise based on their race… it makes you angry with a process like that.’

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DAN HODGES: Why Dishy Rishi is turning into Ruthless Rishi, the Iron Chancellor

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dan hodges why dishy rishi is turning into ruthless rishi the iron chancellor

Dishy Rishi is about to be put on furlough. ‘People have lost perspective,’ an ally of the Chancellor tells me. 

‘We’ve spent £350billion protecting the economy, but we’ve now reached the point where this isn’t even registering.

‘Someone said to him last week, ‘Why aren’t you doing anything for the theatre?’ We’ve given the theatres £1.6billion. Things are going to have to change.’

As Covid threatens to plunge Britain into a double-dip lockdown, Sunak is only too aware he cannot simply turn off the spending taps. 

But over the past few weeks, he’s become increasingly concerned that the country – and even some of his own colleagues – have started to believe there is an unlimited supply of public cash to be thrown at the coronavirus crisis.

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33385950 8751789 image m 17 1600561990652

As Covid threatens to plunge Britain into a double-dip lockdown, Chancellor Rishi Sunak is only too aware he cannot simply turn off the spending taps

‘We can’t chuck people to the wolves,’ a Minister explains, ‘but everyone is going to have to start to realise that over the medium term this sort of spending can’t continue. It’s not economically sustainable and it’s not politically sustainable.’

So as he prepares for a combined autumn Budget and spending review, Dishy Rishi is set to be replaced by Ruthless Rishi.

The Government will continue to provide support. But, as an ally frames it: ‘We’re going to get back to a situation where every pound we spend is going to have to be replaced somewhere else.’

To reassert fiscal prudence, Sunak had been eyeing the ‘triple lock’ on pensions introduced by David Cameron and George Osborne. But I understand Boris Johnson has baulked at unpicking such a totemic policy commitment.

So instead he will be looking for other significant – and politically explosive – savings. First there will be a major squeeze on public-sector pay.

‘It just wouldn’t be right if 16 per cent of the workforce were seeing big pay increases just at the time when everyone else in the economy is having to tighten their belts,’ a Minister explains.

There will also be a freeze on welfare. Ministers have been working on a worst-case scenario of four million unemployed as the existing levels of support for businesses and workers begins to unwind.

Some remain hopeful that a jobs apocalypse on this scale can be averted.

But they believe that whatever final toll Covid wreaks on employment, there is no scope – or public appetite – for an uprating of individual benefits.

And I’m told there’s significant Treasury pushback on Boris’s cherished Operation Moonshot – or Operation Moonf***, as some of the more hard-bitten Treasury civil servants have started branding it.

The Chancellor is said to be supportive of investment on health measures that can get Britain safely back to work.

But he is resisting releasing huge amounts of public money on what could turn out to be nothing more than a bottomless petri dish, until tried and tested technology is available to support the programme.

The Chancellor believes what is needed is an end to Covid-inspired fiscal complacency. Dishy Rishi has been sent home. It's now Ruthless Rishi who's sitting behind the Chancellor's desk

The Chancellor believes what is needed is an end to Covid-inspired fiscal complacency. Dishy Rishi has been sent home. It's now Ruthless Rishi who's sitting behind the Chancellor's desk

The Chancellor believes what is needed is an end to Covid-inspired fiscal complacency. Dishy Rishi has been sent home. It’s now Ruthless Rishi who’s sitting behind the Chancellor’s desk

Over the past few months, Sunak’s growing legion of fans on the Tory backbenches have come to view him as something of a fiscal magician – a swirl of the cape and flourish of the wand, and their constituents’ problems vanish in a puff of smoke.

But even though he is aware there will inevitably be damage to his personal brand, he is said by friends to have decided it’s time to present his colleagues with some harsh economic truths.

‘This Dishy Rishi stuff has got a bit out of hand,’ an ally concedes. ‘We’re facing a serious crisis. And were going to need to introduce a note of reality into all this.’

This chimes in part with the Chancellor’s own personal ideology. As a 15-year-old, he used to do the accounts in his mother’s pharmacy. ‘He’s been balancing the books since he was a teenager,’ says a friend.

He also spent the summer flicking through Nigel Lawson’s memoirs.

‘He tells me he’s a Lawsonian,’ one MP tells me. ‘He’s very hot on fiscal responsibility.’

An example of this is Sunak’s growing alarm at the UK’s debt-to-GDP ratio, which now exceeds 100 per cent.

‘Rishi is very, very worried about how vulnerable this makes us to even small variations in interest rates,’ a Minister reveals. ‘He thinks we’re in a very precarious position.’

But there is also a political calculation behind the Chancellor’s desire to damp down expectations that Britain can painlessly spend its way out of the Covid crisis.

Sunak is one of a growing number of Tory MPs who are becoming worried there is insufficient ‘blue water’ between them and Keir Starmer’s increasingly effective Labour Opposition.

‘There is not enough fiscal demarcation between us and Starmer,’ a Sunak supporter says. ‘We’re Conservatives. We’re going to have to draw a much clearer line between ourselves and Labour on the economy and spending.’

All of which is why Sunak has begun a major charm offensive of Tory backbenchers.

Sunak had been eyeing the 'triple lock' on pensions introduced by David Cameron and George Osborne. But Boris Johnson has baulked at unpicking such a totemic policy commitment

Sunak had been eyeing the 'triple lock' on pensions introduced by David Cameron and George Osborne. But Boris Johnson has baulked at unpicking such a totemic policy commitment

Sunak had been eyeing the ‘triple lock’ on pensions introduced by David Cameron and George Osborne. But Boris Johnson has baulked at unpicking such a totemic policy commitment

Last week saw the growing discontent at Boris’s faltering leadership explode into open revolt over the statement that No 10 was preparing to break international law to kick-start the Brexit negotiations. 

‘I don’t mind dying in the ditch over Brexit,’ one exasperated MP tells me, ‘but I do expect No 10 to at least dig me the ditch before the bullets start flying.’

Rishi Sunak is going to spend the next few weeks rolling up his sleeves, and digging in with his colleagues.

He knows that hard times are coming. That the crushing burden of Covid-19 on the UK economy can no longer be resisted by one-off loans and eye-catching restaurant discounts. And that when economic gravity finally reasserts itself, there will be a political backlash.

Some of his opponents think there is no place for him to hide.

‘We don’t think we’ll be fighting Boris at the next Election,’ one of Keir Starmer’s aides told me a few weeks ago, ‘but I’m not sure we’re going to be facing Rishi either. He’s very popular now, but let’s see how popular he is when the furlough scheme is taken away.’

But it isn’t popularity the Chancellor craves at the moment. He believes what is needed is an end to Covid-inspired fiscal complacency.

Dishy Rishi has been sent home. It’s now Ruthless Rishi who’s sitting behind the Chancellor’s desk.

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Senior Tories plot ‘Parliamentary lock’ to subject Covid emergency measures to a vote by MPs

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senior tories plot parliamentary lock to subject covid emergency measures to a vote by mps

Senior Tories are planning a parliamentary lock to prevent Boris Johnson having the final say on new lockdown measures, according to The Sunday Telegraph

Altrincham and Sale West MP Sir Graham Brady is planning to table an amendment that would force ministers to put any new measures to a vote first.

MPs will vote next week on reauthorising the government’s use of such emergency powers under the Coronavirus Act 2020.

Sir Graham Brady (centre) is looking to force a vote by MPs on emergency coronavirus measures amid concerns that restrictions on the public's freedom are being imposed without parliamentary scrutiny. Senior Tory MPs are said to be angry that they are not able to debate new measures, such as the Rule of Six and £1000 fines for flouting self-isolation, which takes effect next week. Brady said there was 'no justification for ministers ruling by emergency powers without reference to normal democratic processes' now parliament is in session (file photo).

Sir Graham Brady (centre) is looking to force a vote by MPs on emergency coronavirus measures amid concerns that restrictions on the public's freedom are being imposed without parliamentary scrutiny. Senior Tory MPs are said to be angry that they are not able to debate new measures, such as the Rule of Six and £1000 fines for flouting self-isolation, which takes effect next week. Brady said there was 'no justification for ministers ruling by emergency powers without reference to normal democratic processes' now parliament is in session (file photo).

Sir Graham Brady (centre) is looking to force a vote by MPs on emergency coronavirus measures amid concerns that restrictions on the public’s freedom are being imposed without parliamentary scrutiny. Senior Tory MPs are said to be angry that they are not able to debate new measures, such as the Rule of Six and £1000 fines for flouting self-isolation, which takes effect next week. Brady said there was ‘no justification for ministers ruling by emergency powers without reference to normal democratic processes’ now parliament is in session (file photo).

A Downing Street spokesman told The Telegraph: ‘It’s absolutely vital that MPs are engaged in this process as these decisions will have a huge impact on them and their constituents and we will continue to discuss these plans with all MPs.’

But some senior Tory MPs are angry about new restrictions on the public’s freedom, such as the Rule of Six, being introduced without a debate in the Commons.

Drinkers are seen out on the town in Nottingham on Saturday. Fears of a second wave of coronavirus have prompted Boris Johnson to institute harsh new rules to limit the virus' spread. But some in his party are displeased with changes that they feel unfairly restrict the freedom of their constituents.

Drinkers are seen out on the town in Nottingham on Saturday. Fears of a second wave of coronavirus have prompted Boris Johnson to institute harsh new rules to limit the virus' spread. But some in his party are displeased with changes that they feel unfairly restrict the freedom of their constituents.

Drinkers are seen out on the town in Nottingham on Saturday. Fears of a second wave of coronavirus have prompted Boris Johnson to institute harsh new rules to limit the virus’ spread. But some in his party are displeased with changes that they feel unfairly restrict the freedom of their constituents.

Fines of up to £1000 for breaching self-isolation were also approved without parliamentary scrutiny.

Sir Brady, who is chairman of the 1922 Committee of Tory backbenchers, said that parliament has been sitting since April.

‘There is now no justification for ministers ruling by emergency powers without reference to normal democratic processes.’ 
 

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Parliamentary staff write poems about their privilege after Black Lives Matter protests

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parliamentary staff write poems about their privilege after black lives matter protests

Parliamentary staff have been urged to admit their ‘privilege’ through an online platform that has been set up in the wake of the Black Lives Matter protests.

Officials have reportedly been issued with an ‘inclusivity toolkit’ by senior figures which encourages white workers to acknowledge their ‘internalised racism’.

The digital wall was set up by Parliament’s diversity group Parli-REACH for staff to profess their privilege, write poetry and give their ‘support’ for Black, Asian and Minority Ethnic (BAME) colleagues, according to the Telegraph.

Parliamentary staff have reportedly been urged to admit their 'privilege' on a new digital wall set up by Parliament's diversity group Parli-REACH

Parliamentary staff have reportedly been urged to admit their 'privilege' on a new digital wall set up by Parliament's diversity group Parli-REACH

Parliamentary staff have reportedly been urged to admit their ‘privilege’ on a new digital wall set up by Parliament’s diversity group Parli-REACH

After the Edward Colston statue was toppled in Bristol in June (above), parliamentary staff were given advice on expressing support for Black Lives Matter protests

After the Edward Colston statue was toppled in Bristol in June (above), parliamentary staff were given advice on expressing support for Black Lives Matter protests

After the Edward Colston statue was toppled in Bristol in June (above), parliamentary staff were given advice on expressing support for Black Lives Matter protests

This comes soon after staff were given advice on how to support Black Lives Matter protests, such as ‘attending protests and social media use’, after Edward Colston’s statue was pulled down in Bristol in June.

Messages posted on the digital ‘solidarity and support’ wall include one woman saying: ‘As a white woman I acknowledge my privilege and continue to educate myself.’

One person posted on the platform arguing that staff could no longer watch American comedy series Brooklyn Nine-Nine, which stars Andy Samberg, because it sold a ‘cosy lie’ about policing.

And another wrote that ‘as a white man I am conscious of the privilege I have’, the Telegraph reported.

One person said that staff could no longer watch American comedy series Brooklyn Nine-Nine, which stars Andy Samberg, because it sold a 'cosy lie' about policing

One person said that staff could no longer watch American comedy series Brooklyn Nine-Nine, which stars Andy Samberg, because it sold a 'cosy lie' about policing

One person said that staff could no longer watch American comedy series Brooklyn Nine-Nine, which stars Andy Samberg, because it sold a ‘cosy lie’ about policing

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33384126 8751573 image a 2 1600557018480

House of Commons staff leaders have reportedly promised that the death of George Floyd would be a ‘catalyst for change’ in Parliament

But the admissions have been described as ‘divisive’ by some MPs, who are calling for a review of public institutions.

Tory MPs Danny Kruger and Miram Caters told the Telegraph that a ‘woke consensus’ has ‘taken hold’ of ‘parts of Whitehall’, warning the party not to ‘pander’ to its supporters with policy.

Documents obtained by the Telegraph reportedly show the House of Commons staff leaders promising that George Floyd’s death in May would be a ‘catalyst for change’ in Parliament.

It was also revealed that new unconscious bias training and more online resources have been given out to staff, including the new digital wall.  

A Minneapolis police officer knelt on the neck of George Floyd, 46, for nearly nine minutes and his death has led to global protests against racism, colonialism and police brutality.

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