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Police set up traffic stops on major roads into Madrid in travel lockdown

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police set up traffic stops on major roads into madrid in travel lockdown

Police set up controls and stopped cars on major roads into and out of Madrid on Saturday as the city went back into lockdown due to surging coronavirus cases.

Some 4.8 million people are barred from leaving the capital area, while restaurants and bars must shut early and reduce capacity by half.

The new restrictions, which started on Friday evening, are not as strict as the previous lockdown in March, when people were barred from leaving their homes.

A local police officer checks a driver's identification in a traffic checkpoint, to control people's movement in Madrid today

A local police officer checks a driver's identification in a traffic checkpoint, to control people's movement in Madrid today

A local police officer checks a driver’s identification in a traffic checkpoint, to control people’s movement in Madrid today 

Spanish policemen stand guard in a roadblock in the Moncloa district of Madrid, Spain today

Spanish policemen stand guard in a roadblock in the Moncloa district of Madrid, Spain today

Spanish policemen stand guard in a roadblock in the Moncloa district of Madrid, Spain today

Residents in the Spanish capital of Madrid will be barred from leaving the area under the new coronavirus restrictions imposed by the Government. Pictured: A traveller walks through Adolfo Suarez-Madrid Barajas international airport.

Residents in the Spanish capital of Madrid will be barred from leaving the area under the new coronavirus restrictions imposed by the Government. Pictured: A traveller walks through Adolfo Suarez-Madrid Barajas international airport.

Residents in the Spanish capital of Madrid will be barred from leaving the area under the new coronavirus restrictions imposed by the Government. Pictured: A traveller walks through Adolfo Suarez-Madrid Barajas international airport.

However, authorities advised residents not to move around unless absolutely necessary. Travel is banned except for work, school, health or shopping.

‘There are fewer people then we’re used to, shops are empty, bars are empty, there’s a feeling of sadness,’ said Valerio Rojo, director of the Circulo de Bellas Artes cultural organisation.

‘We had reservations but a lot of people have called to cancel them,’ said Macarena Molina, who works in a hostel in central Madrid. ‘Today, we had a reservation through Booking and they cancelled just an hour before saying they were not going to travel because of the restrictions.’

The latest measures ordered by the Socialist-led central government were reluctantly imposed by the conservative-led Madrid government, which said they would cripple the economy.

Health workers from the Madrid Emergency Service (SUMMA) carry out antigen tests for residents in Vallecas, Madrid

Health workers from the Madrid Emergency Service (SUMMA) carry out antigen tests for residents in Vallecas, Madrid

Health workers from the Madrid Emergency Service (SUMMA) carry out antigen tests for residents in Vallecas, Madrid

Police in Madrid stand at check points through the city as the capital enters another lockdown

Police in Madrid stand at check points through the city as the capital enters another lockdown

Police in Madrid stand at check points through the city as the capital enters another lockdown

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33915598 8799353 image a 14 1601663220275

Madrid’s bars and restaurants must close at 11pm instead of 1am, while restaurants, gyms and shops must cut capacity by half. Gatherings of more than six people remain banned.

Near the Plaza Mayor square, usually packed with tourists on a Saturday lunchtime, waiter Luis stood, menu in hand, trying to drum up business.

‘No one is walking past here,’ he said. ‘I don’t know how much longer we are going to keep our jobs.’ 

‘Nothing has changed, it’s just like any other day in the neighbourhood,’ shrugged Martinio Sanchez on a busy street in Madrid. 

‘They should have done this in August and maybe we wouldn’t be where we are right now,’ said this 70-year-old as he walked his dog through the eastern neighbourhood of Ciudad Lineal.

A man looks at  the arrivals screen at Adolfo Suarez-Madrid Barajas international airport as the city prepares to go into a local lockdown

A man looks at  the arrivals screen at Adolfo Suarez-Madrid Barajas international airport as the city prepares to go into a local lockdown

A man looks at  the arrivals screen at Adolfo Suarez-Madrid Barajas international airport as the city prepares to go into a local lockdown

A team of health workers prepare to take swabs from people in Vallecas, Madrid, as the capital records a rising number of coronavirus cases

A team of health workers prepare to take swabs from people in Vallecas, Madrid, as the capital records a rising number of coronavirus cases

A team of health workers prepare to take swabs from people in Vallecas, Madrid, as the capital records a rising number of coronavirus cases

Under the new restrictions, the city's borders closed to non-essential travel and gatherings will be limited to six people. Pictured: People queue for an antigen test in Vallecas, Madrid

Under the new restrictions, the city's borders closed to non-essential travel and gatherings will be limited to six people. Pictured: People queue for an antigen test in Vallecas, Madrid

Under the new restrictions, the city’s borders closed to non-essential travel and gatherings will be limited to six people. Pictured: People queue for an antigen test in Vallecas, Madrid

Some 4.5 million people are affected by the closure, which came into force at 10:00 pm (2000 GMT) on Friday as the region battles the highest rate in the European Union. 

‘It affects me because because I work outside Madrid and I cannot move around with the freedom I’d like to,’ 45-year-old sales manager Alberto Sanchez told AFPTV, saying the regional government should have acted much earlier.

‘It could have been different if the Madrid region had done its homework and started hiring contact tracers four months ago and following advice from Europe and the government,’ he fumed.

But inside the city, little appeared to have changed with life largely carrying on as normal on a brilliant October morning with a sharp autumnal chill in the area.

‘Everything’s open and you can’t see police anywhere. We can move around Madrid but you can’t go out to the nearby villages or to the mountains,’ says Feliza Sanchez, 78.

‘I don’t know how this is going to change the situation we have at the moment.’

A waiter disinfects a table at a bar terrace in Leganes, Madrid, Spain today

A waiter disinfects a table at a bar terrace in Leganes, Madrid, Spain today

A waiter disinfects a table at a bar terrace in Leganes, Madrid, Spain today 

Sitting on a bar stool nursing a beer and a slice of Spanish omelette, Jorge Alvarez said the restrictions wouldn’t have much impact on his life.

‘In principle, nothing will change. I will continue to live a normal life because you can’t lock yourself up inside your house and not work,’ said Alvarez, a 49-year-old metal worker.

‘Who knows if it will stop the virus spreading? But obviously people in the bar and restaurant industry are going to lose a lot of money,’ he said. 

For those in the bar and restaurant sector, who must reduce their indoor seating capacity by half and close by 11.00pm, the new rules are a huge blow, particularly in a country where people tend to socialise late into the night.

‘It’s going to affect us terribly,’ said Baldomero Cubas, 50, who manages the Cerveceria Santa Ana in the city centre.

‘With this measure many bars will think about closing, because if we were struggling before, now we can only have 60 percent seating capacity outside and 50 percent inside. And on top of that, with closing by 11, we’re looking at a loss rather than breaking even.’

And some fear they simply won’t survive, such as Jorge Luis Ortega Pina, who owns the Degustando tavern, a tiny but popular bar in Ciudad Lineal with counter seating for barely 15 people.

‘I will almost certainly have to close,’ the 50-year-old says, standing behind a gleaming counter. He adds that he has done everything possible to try and create distance between customers.

‘With these restrictions I will be lucky to bring in 1,500 euros ($1,750) a month and we are a family of four. I’ve no idea how I’m going to manage.’

People, he said, had been brought to their knees by the economic devastation caused by pandemic which had left many people struggling to survive, even with financial help from the government.

‘There are going to be riots in the street,’ he warned, saying even the charity sector was struggling with the sheer numbers of people in need.

‘Caritas is overwhelmed, the Red Cross is overwhelmed, everything is just falling apart,’ he said   

With 850 cases per 100,000 people, according to the World Health Organization, the Madrid area has Europe’s worst rate.

Spain had 789,932 coronavirus cases as of Friday, up by 11,325 since Thursday, and there have been 32,086 fatalities. Daily deaths are around their highest levels since early May although far below the late March record of nearly 900.

 

  

This post first appeared on dailymail.co.uk

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Kate Middleton joins Prince William to view portraits from Hold Still contest at Waterloo Station

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kate middleton joins prince william to view portraits from hold still contest at waterloo station

Kate Middleton appeared effortlessly elegant today as she was joined by Prince William to launch a country-wide display of her lockdown photography exhibition by meeting one of subjects at Waterloo station. 

The Duchess of Cambridge, 38, launched the Hold Still community photography project in May, and invited people of all ages, from across the UK to submit a photographic portrait which they had taken during lockdown.

The mother-of-three received more than 31,000 entries from members of the public in just six weeks and last month unveiled the top 100 images in a digital exhibition. 

Portraits from the exhibition have now gone on show in 80 towns, cities and areas across the UK, bringing the stories of individuals and families during lockdown back to their communities.

The Duke and Duchess visited Waterloo in south London today to view one of the 112 Hold Still community exhibition sites, where they met Sami Massalami Mohammed Elmassalami Ayad, a volunteer at a community Food Hub in Hackney who features in one of the portraits displayed at the site (‘Sami’ by Grey Hutton).   

Kate Middleton, 38, appeared effortlessly elegant today as she was joined by Prince William, 38, to launch her lockdown photography exhibition by meeting one of subjects

Kate Middleton, 38, appeared effortlessly elegant today as she was joined by Prince William, 38, to launch her lockdown photography exhibition by meeting one of subjects

Kate Middleton, 38, appeared effortlessly elegant today as she was joined by Prince William, 38, to launch her lockdown photography exhibition by meeting one of subjects

The Duchess wowed in a crimson coat during the visit to Waterloo station this afternoon to view a portrait from her Hold Still contest

The Duchess wowed in a crimson coat during the visit to Waterloo station this afternoon to view a portrait from her Hold Still contest

The Duchess wowed in a crimson coat during the visit to Waterloo station this afternoon to view a portrait from her Hold Still contest 

The community exhibition has been put together with support from the Co-op and will see the 100 portraits exhibited for a period of four weeks on billboard and outdoor poster sites across the country, including at bus stops, in high streets and outside train stations.

Many of the portraits have also been displayed in the entrants’ hometowns with locations ranging from Belfast, Liverpool and Southampton to Blaenau Ffestiniog (Gwynedd), Oban (Argyll) and Thorpe Audlin (West Yorkshire). 

One of the portraits ‘Melanie, March 2020’, taken by Johannah Churchill, has been recreated as a hand-painted mural in Manchester city centre.

All 100 portraits will also feature in a special exhibition hosted by the National Memorial Arboretum in Staffordshire from 23rd October.    

Feeling peckish sir? Prince William surprised diners in KFC at the London station as he waved to them through the glass window

Feeling peckish sir? Prince William surprised diners in KFC at the London station as he waved to them through the glass window

Feeling peckish sir? Prince William surprised diners in KFC at the London station as he waved to them through the glass window 

Diners at the chicken shop at the busy commuter station appeared stunned to have been given a front row seat to the Duke and Duchess' visit

Diners at the chicken shop at the busy commuter station appeared stunned to have been given a front row seat to the Duke and Duchess' visit

Diners at the chicken shop at the busy commuter station appeared stunned to have been given a front row seat to the Duke and Duchess’ visit 

The Duke and Duchess went on to travel to St. Bartholomew’s Hospital to speak to frontline workers including Joyce Duah, a specialist oncology pharmacist at the hospital, whose photograph ‘All In This Together’ was selected as one of the final portraits, and her two colleagues Amelia Chowdhury and Dipal Samuel who feature in the photograph.

Hold Still, a photography initiative launched by Kate with the National Portrait Gallery, attracted more than 31,000 entries from members of the public in just six weeks.

With the help of a judging panel comprising Nicholas Cullinan, director of the gallery; poet Lemn Sissay; Ruth May, Chief Nursing Officer for England; and photographer Maryam Wahid, the Duchess whittled these down to 100 ‘finalists’ whose work goes on display in a digital exhibition at www.npg.org/holdstill today. 

Speaking in a video about the exhibition, Kate said: ‘I felt really strongly that I wanted to try and create a portrait of the nation, that captures the fears and the hopes and the feelings of the nation at this really extraordinary time. As a record, I suppose, for the years to come.

The Duke and Duchess visited Waterloo station this afternoon to see one of the images submitted to Kate's Hold Still photography project during lockdown

The Duke and Duchess visited Waterloo station this afternoon to see one of the images submitted to Kate's Hold Still photography project during lockdown

The Duke and Duchess visited Waterloo station this afternoon to see one of the images submitted to Kate’s Hold Still photography project during lockdown 

The couple went on to meet with Sami Massalami Mohammed Elmassalami Ayad, a volunteer at a community Food Hub in Hackney who features in one of the portraits displayed at the site

The couple went on to meet with Sami Massalami Mohammed Elmassalami Ayad, a volunteer at a community Food Hub in Hackney who features in one of the portraits displayed at the site

The couple went on to meet with Sami Massalami Mohammed Elmassalami Ayad, a volunteer at a community Food Hub in Hackney who features in one of the portraits displayed at the site 

Kate opted to wear a bold red coat for the occasion, and could be seen discussing one of the winning photographs on display in London with Prince William

Kate opted to wear a bold red coat for the occasion, and could be seen discussing one of the winning photographs on display in London with Prince William

Kate opted to wear a bold red coat for the occasion, and could be seen discussing one of the winning photographs on display in London with Prince William 

‘The thing that I think has struck me going through all of these images is how difficult and diverse everyone’s experience of Covid 19 has been.

‘No one story is the same, everyone’s is unique. It’s like a huge rollercoaster of emotions, but I suppose that’s what everyone has experienced.

‘It’s a reflection of what everyone’s been through at this time.’

As the exhibition went live in September, the Queen paid tribute to the resilience of the British public during the pandemic and praised those who had submitted a portrait.

She said: ‘It was with great pleasure that I had the opportunity to look through a number of the portraits that made the final 100 images for the Hold Still photography project. 

‘The Duchess of Cambridge and I were inspired to see how the photographs have captured the resilience of the British people at such a challenging time, whether that is through celebrating frontline workers, recognising community spirit or showing the efforts of individuals supporting those in need. 

‘The Duchess of Cambridge and I send our best wishes and congratulations to all those who submitted a portrait to the project.’

The Duchess could be seen stepping out of a car on the way to Waterloo wearing a pretty floral face covering before she removed the mask

The Duchess could be seen stepping out of a car on the way to Waterloo wearing a pretty floral face covering before she removed the mask

The Duchess could be seen stepping out of a car on the way to Waterloo wearing a pretty floral face covering before she removed the mask 

Other works included are This is What Broken Looks Like by Ceri Hayles, Glass Kisses by Steph James and Forever Holding Hands by Hayley Evans.

The Queen has said she was ‘inspired’ by the results of a photographic lockdown project led by the Duchess of Cambridge.

Kate and a panel of judges selected 100 images from more than 31,000 entries for the Hold Still digital exhibition, which launched with the National Portrait Gallery in May.

People of all ages across the UK were invited to submit a photo which they had taken during lockdown, and in the six weeks that the project was open 31,598 images were submitted. 

Among the images shared with the Queen were The Look Of Lockdown by Carlotta Cutrupi, which evokes feelings of isolation, and Everyday Hero – Richard by Arnhel de Serra, which celebrates the work of a Royal Mail worker. 

Hold Still focuses on three themes – helpers and heroes, your new normal and acts of kindness – with the final 100 tackling subjects including family life in lockdown, the work of healthcare staff and the Black Lives Matter movement.

One entry shows a woman during an anti-racism protest holding a banner which reads, ‘Be on the right side of history’ while another sees Captain Sir Tom Moore give a thumbs up to the camera.

The Hold Still initiative aimed to capture and document ‘the spirit, the mood, the hopes, the fears and the feelings of the nation’ as the UK dealt with the coronavirus outbreak.

Judges on the panel included England’s chief nursing officer Ruth May, director of the National Portrait Gallery Nicholas Cullinan, writer and poet Lemn Sissay and photographer Maryam Wahid. 

Kate previously said she had been ‘so overwhelmed by the public’s response to Hold Still, the quality of the images has been extraordinary, and the poignancy and the stories behind the images have been equally as moving as well’.

The panel assessed the images on the emotions and experiences they convey, rather than on their photographic quality or technical expertise. 

This post first appeared on dailymail.co.uk

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The Million Pound Cube viewers left cringing as brothers erupt into furious row

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the million pound cube viewers left cringing as brothers erupt into furious row

Viewers were left feeling ‘uncomfortable’ and switching off after two brothers furiously argued on The Million Pound Cube – and it even saw host Phillip Schofield rush to an ad break. 

The highly-anticipated ITV game show returned to our screens last night for the first time in five years – apart from celebrity specials – and saw siblings Adam and John complete the tasks together in the hopes of reaching the top price.

Despite the brothers, from Cheshire, saying they were ‘really, really close’, soon tense disagreements broke out between the pair as they each blamed one another for losing the challenges.

‘That was your side, your side bro,’ roared Adam during a round where contestants were asked to place all the balls on the ground inside a cylinder, before Phillip rushed to an ad break. 

Viewers were appalled at Adam for blaming his older brother every time they lost a task, with one admitting: ‘Couldn’t bear to carry on watching #TheMillionPoundCube with those two brothers.’

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Viewers were left feeling 'uncomfortable' and 'switching off' after two brothers (pictured) furiously argued on The Million Pound Cube - and it even saw host Phillip Schofield rush to an ad break

Viewers were left feeling 'uncomfortable' and 'switching off' after two brothers (pictured) furiously argued on The Million Pound Cube - and it even saw host Phillip Schofield rush to an ad break

Pictured, one of the two brothers

Pictured, one of the two brothers

Viewers were left feeling ‘uncomfortable’ and switching off after two brothers (pictured) furiously argued on The Million Pound Cube – and it even saw host Phillip Schofield rush to an ad break

The highly-anticipated ITV game show returned to our screens last night for the first time in five years - apart from celebrity specials - and saw siblings Adam and John complete the tasks together in the hopes of reaching the top price. Pictured, Phillip Schofield

The highly-anticipated ITV game show returned to our screens last night for the first time in five years - apart from celebrity specials - and saw siblings Adam and John complete the tasks together in the hopes of reaching the top price. Pictured, Phillip Schofield

The highly-anticipated ITV game show returned to our screens last night for the first time in five years – apart from celebrity specials – and saw siblings Adam and John complete the tasks together in the hopes of reaching the top price. Pictured, Phillip Schofield

Older brother John, who owns a flooring business, said he was good at ‘catching, throwing and accuracy’, while student Adam said he was more ‘nimble and agile’, as well as a ‘tiny bit shorter and a tiny bit more fit’.

At the start of the programme, host Phillip asked: ‘But you’re close brothers?’, with John replying: ‘Really really close, like every single day close.’ 

But awkwardly, the brothers ended up bickering before Phillip jumped in and told viewers they would be back after the break.

After a tense task, trying to grab all the red balls and place them in a glass cylinder, Adam and John argued over whose fault it was that they lost.

‘That was your side, your side bro!’ said Adam, before John replied: ‘I picked up six and put them in, we had time for that one.’ 

Despite the brothers (pictured), from Cheshire, saying they were ‘really, really close’, soon tense disagreements broke out between the pair as they each blamed one another for losing the challenges

Despite the brothers (pictured), from Cheshire, saying they were ‘really, really close’, soon tense disagreements broke out between the pair as they each blamed one another for losing the challenges

Despite the brothers (pictured), from Cheshire, saying they were ‘really, really close’, soon tense disagreements broke out between the pair as they each blamed one another for losing the challenges

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34610326 8858667 image a 1 1603190209283

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34610330 8858667 image a 17 1603188043362

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34610332 8858667 image a 2 1603190209286

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34610328 8858667 image a 19 1603188058394

Viewers (above) were appalled at Adam for blaming his older brother every time they lost a task, with one admitting: 'Couldn't bear to carry on watching #TheMillionPoundCube with those two brothers.'

Viewers (above) were appalled at Adam for blaming his older brother every time they lost a task, with one admitting: 'Couldn't bear to carry on watching #TheMillionPoundCube with those two brothers.'

Viewers (above) were appalled at Adam for blaming his older brother every time they lost a task, with one admitting: ‘Couldn’t bear to carry on watching #TheMillionPoundCube with those two brothers.’

Phillip joked to the camera: ‘This is what happens when you put brothers in the cube…  We will be back after the break.’ 

Some viewers were left feeling uncomfortable by the siblings’ display, while others saw the funny side and guessed they’d be disagreeing more backstage.    

‘Sore loser younger brother needlessly humiliating his sibling on #TheMillionPoundCube is my cue to go shower!’ said one viewer.

Another quipped: ‘These two brothers really want to swear at each other, it’s so funny.’

‘Brothers squabbling in front of an audience is it good TV or cringe?,’ a third unimpressed viewer questioned.

'That was your side, your side bro,' roared Adam during a round where contestants were asked to place all the balls on the ground inside a cylinder, before Phillip rushed to an ad break. Pictured, the brothers together

'That was your side, your side bro,' roared Adam during a round where contestants were asked to place all the balls on the ground inside a cylinder, before Phillip rushed to an ad break. Pictured, the brothers together

‘That was your side, your side bro,’ roared Adam during a round where contestants were asked to place all the balls on the ground inside a cylinder, before Phillip rushed to an ad break. Pictured, the brothers together

Older brother John, who owns a flooring business, said he was good at 'catching, throwing and accuracy', while student Adam (pictured during the task) said he was more 'nimble and agile', as well as a 'tiny bit shorter and a tiny bit more fit'

Older brother John, who owns a flooring business, said he was good at 'catching, throwing and accuracy', while student Adam (pictured during the task) said he was more 'nimble and agile', as well as a 'tiny bit shorter and a tiny bit more fit'

Older brother John, who owns a flooring business, said he was good at ‘catching, throwing and accuracy’, while student Adam (pictured during the task) said he was more ‘nimble and agile’, as well as a ‘tiny bit shorter and a tiny bit more fit’

After five years away, the show launched on Saturday with a one-off celebrity special featuring comedian Mo Gilligan along with fellow comedian Jason Manford each completing tasks for their chosen charities. 

Each contestant must complete seven challenges with just nine lives to get them through with each game a step closer to winning the ultimate £1million prize. 

For the first time the five-episode series saw two-person challenges in the four-metre squared container from pairs in the same household. 

A TV insider told The Sun: ‘The last time The Cube aired was in 2015, so there was no way ITV would bring it back without making some radical changes to refresh the show. 

They added: ‘But the simple format at the heart of the show remains largely unchanged — it’s still about contestants desperately trying to keep their cool.’ 

This post first appeared on dailymail.co.uk

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Is this the tallest boy in the world? Chinese pupil, 14, is already SEVEN FOOT THREE 

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is this the tallest boy in the world chinese pupil 14 is already seven foot three

Towering nearly two feet over his classmates, 14-year-old Ren Keyu from China has always stood out from the crowd.

The ninth-grade pupil, nicknamed Xiaoyu, already measures about seven feet three inches (2.21 metres) in height and is still growing.

The boy has applied to be the tallest male teenager in the world with the Guinness World Records – a title previously held by an American teen who was seven feet and one inch (2.159 metres) tall when he was 16.

Xiaoyu, a ninth-grade pupil from south-western China, is seen on his 14th birthday on Sunday

Xiaoyu, a ninth-grade pupil from south-western China, is seen on his 14th birthday on Sunday

Xiaoyu, a ninth-grade pupil from south-western China, is seen on his 14th birthday on Sunday

The above picture shows the boy with his classmates in 2018 when he was already six feet nine

The above picture shows the boy with his classmates in 2018 when he was already six feet nine

The above picture shows the boy with his classmates in 2018 when he was already six feet nine 

Apparently, Xiaoyu’s massive stature is not the result of any medical condition.

The boy from the south-western province of Sichuan says his parents took him to hospital for examination when he was young, and doctors found that his extraordinary height was not caused by any disease.

He believes that his size is influenced by his parents and grandparents, all of whom are taller than six feet.

Xiaoyu is measured by workers of the Guinness World Records on his birthday on October 18

Xiaoyu is measured by workers of the Guinness World Records on his birthday on October 18

Xiaoyu attends a measuring session held by the Guinness World Records on his 14th birthday

A certification officer (far left) observes Xiaoyu's measuring session at a hospital in Leshan city

A certification officer (far left) observes Xiaoyu's measuring session at a hospital in Leshan city

A certification officer (far left) observes Xiaoyu’s measuring session at a hospital in Leshan city

Born on October 18, 2006, Xiaoyu realised he was much bigger than his peers after he started the nursery.

He tells Chinese website Red Star News that he stood about five feet three inches – the average height of a 13-year-old boy in China – when he was just three. As a result, he was often mistaken for a primary school pupil at the nursery by strangers. 

When he was 11, his height was six feet nine inches (2.06 metres).

In his current middle school, teachers have to get his desk, chair and uniform tailor-made to fit his rapidly growing body.

He also has difficulties using public transport or visiting amusement parks due to height restriction.

‘At first, I cared a lot about how other people think of me,’ Xiaoyu admitted to Red Star News while talking about his trouble.

‘But my teacher taught me to lead my own path and let others gossip.’

The towering boy is pictured studying by his tailor-made desk at his middle school in 2018

The towering boy is pictured studying by his tailor-made desk at his middle school in 2018

The towering boy is pictured studying by his tailor-made desk at his middle school in 2018

Despite still studying in the middle school, Xiaoyu is only five centimetres (two inches) or so shorter than Tacko Fall, the tallest NBA player in the 2019-20 season. 

His classmates call him ‘little Yao Ming’, after the former NBA all-star from China who is seven feet and six inches (2.29 metres) in height.

But Xiaoyu confesses that he is not interested in playing basketball or other sports because he finds it hard to move around.

He suffers from flat fleet and chondromas – very rare, benign tumours made of cartilage. He has undergone four operations because of the conditions, it is reported.

'At first, I cared a lot about how other people think of me,' Xiaoyu told a local reporter while talking about his trouble. 'But my teacher taught me to lead my own path and let others gossip'

'At first, I cared a lot about how other people think of me,' Xiaoyu told a local reporter while talking about his trouble. 'But my teacher taught me to lead my own path and let others gossip'

‘At first, I cared a lot about how other people think of me,’ Xiaoyu told a local reporter while talking about his trouble. ‘But my teacher taught me to lead my own path and let others gossip’

The Guinness World Records is set to announced if Xiaoyu sets the new record next month

The Guinness World Records is set to announced if Xiaoyu sets the new record next month

The Guinness World Records is set to announced if Xiaoyu sets the new record next month

On his 14th birthday on Sunday, Xiaoyu attended a measuring session held by the Guinness World Records in his hometown of Leshan to be officially recognised as the tallest teenage boy in the world.

A certification officer from the organisation said that the record is intended for males between the age of 13 and 18.

The officer and her colleagues measured Xiaoyu’s height while he was standing. They also took down his length while he was lying down, his arm span and the size of his hands.

The Guinness World Records is reviewing Xiaoyu’s application and determining his precise height. The results are expected to be announced next month.

The title of the tallest living teenage male and female in the world are both vacant at present because the former record-holders are now older than 18.

Kevin Bradford from the United States was the world’s tallest male teenager. Born on October 27, 1998, he measured seven feet and one inch (2.159 metres) on April 30, 2015.

The tallest teenage female was Rumeysa Gelgi, who was born in Turkey on January 1, 1997. She stood just over seven feet (2.136 metres) in  height on March 19, 2014.

This post first appeared on dailymail.co.uk

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