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Power of the atomic bomb is shown in colourised photos 75 years after 146,000 died in Hiroshima

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power of the atomic bomb is shown in colourised photos 75 years after 146000 died in hiroshima

Saturday marks the 75th anniversary of the end of World War II but for many in Japan August 6 remains a more important date.

On that day in 1945 between 90,000 and 146,000 people died in Hiroshima after the city was hit by an atomic bomb.

The US bomb, ‘Little Boy,’ the first nuclear weapon used in war, was dropped on the city.

A second bomb, ‘Fat Man,’ dropped over Nagasaki three days later, killed another 70,000, prompting Japan’s surrender in the Second World War.

The nuclear attack devastated the city for months after as survivors, known as hibakusha, suffered the effects of radiation and Japan went into a day of remembrance for those fallen last week.

And now specially colourised photos of that terrible day as well as of the weeks proceeding it have emerged to help those alive at the time to remember.

Smoke rises around 20,000 feet above Hiroshima, Japan, after the first atomic bomb was dropped on August 6, 1945. The U.S. bomb, 'Little Boy,' the first nuclear weapon used in war, was dropped on the city, killing between between 90,000 and 146,000 people

Smoke rises around 20,000 feet above Hiroshima, Japan, after the first atomic bomb was dropped on August 6, 1945. The U.S. bomb, 'Little Boy,' the first nuclear weapon used in war, was dropped on the city, killing between between 90,000 and 146,000 people

Smoke rises around 20,000 feet above Hiroshima, Japan, after the first atomic bomb was dropped on August 6, 1945. The U.S. bomb, ‘Little Boy,’ the first nuclear weapon used in war, was dropped on the city, killing between between 90,000 and 146,000 people

Two people walk on a cleared path through the destruction resulting from the August 6 detonation of the first atomic bomb in Hiroshima, on September 8, 1945

Two people walk on a cleared path through the destruction resulting from the August 6 detonation of the first atomic bomb in Hiroshima, on September 8, 1945

Two people walk on a cleared path through the destruction resulting from the August 6 detonation of the first atomic bomb in Hiroshima, on September 8, 1945

A battered religious figure stands witness on a hill above a burn-razed valley at Nagasaki. The 'Fat Man' atomic bomb dropped over Nagasaki, killed 70,000 people prompting Japan's surrender in the Second World War

A battered religious figure stands witness on a hill above a burn-razed valley at Nagasaki. The 'Fat Man' atomic bomb dropped over Nagasaki, killed 70,000 people prompting Japan's surrender in the Second World War

A battered religious figure stands witness on a hill above a burn-razed valley at Nagasaki. The ‘Fat Man’ atomic bomb dropped over Nagasaki, killed 70,000 people prompting Japan’s surrender in the Second World War

Colonel Paul W Tibbets Jr, pilot of the Enola Gay, the plane that dropped the atomic bomb on Hiroshima, Japan, waves from his cockpit before takeoff from Tinian Island in Northern Marianas, August 6, 1945

Colonel Paul W Tibbets Jr, pilot of the Enola Gay, the plane that dropped the atomic bomb on Hiroshima, Japan, waves from his cockpit before takeoff from Tinian Island in Northern Marianas, August 6, 1945

Colonel Paul W Tibbets Jr, pilot of the Enola Gay, the plane that dropped the atomic bomb on Hiroshima, Japan, waves from his cockpit before takeoff from Tinian Island in Northern Marianas, August 6, 1945

Hisashi Takahashi, covering his face with watermelon in the centre, supplied this photo of his family and relatives posing while they eat watermelon around 1932 in Hiroshima, western Japan

Hisashi Takahashi, covering his face with watermelon in the centre, supplied this photo of his family and relatives posing while they eat watermelon around 1932 in Hiroshima, western Japan

Hisashi Takahashi, covering his face with watermelon in the centre, supplied this photo of his family and relatives posing while they eat watermelon around 1932 in Hiroshima, western Japan

When Tokuso Hamai saw the colourised version of a picnic held under cherry tree blossoms sometime before World War II, forgotten memories of family members, most of whom died in the atomic bombing, came pouring out.

‘In colourised photos, people come to life,’ said Hamai, now 86. ‘I often played near [the picnic site], and sometimes I would do some naughty things and get scolded by my father.’

The power of a colourised photo to reignite lost memories was eye-opening for Anju Niwata, a student who gave Hamai the picture as a present three years ago.

Niwata, 18, said she hopes it will bring attention to her project with a Tokyo University professor to painstakingly colourise photos using artificial intelligence 

Their research seeks to spark lost memories for the rapidly ageing generation who experienced the war.

In this US Navy's black and white photo digitally colourised and published by Anju Niwata and Hidenori Watanave, USS Franklin is provided assistance by the USS Santa Fe after the aircraft carrier had been hit and set afire by a single Japanese dive bomber, during the Okinawa invasion, on March 19, 1945

In this US Navy's black and white photo digitally colourised and published by Anju Niwata and Hidenori Watanave, USS Franklin is provided assistance by the USS Santa Fe after the aircraft carrier had been hit and set afire by a single Japanese dive bomber, during the Okinawa invasion, on March 19, 1945

In this US Navy’s black and white photo digitally colourised and published by Anju Niwata and Hidenori Watanave, USS Franklin is provided assistance by the USS Santa Fe after the aircraft carrier had been hit and set afire by a single Japanese dive bomber, during the Okinawa invasion, on March 19, 1945

US Army and Coast Guardsmen stand at attention as the American flag is raised over Akashima, Japan on April 2, 1945, the little island, only a few miles from Okinawa

US Army and Coast Guardsmen stand at attention as the American flag is raised over Akashima, Japan on April 2, 1945, the little island, only a few miles from Okinawa

US Army and Coast Guardsmen stand at attention as the American flag is raised over Akashima, Japan on April 2, 1945, the little island, only a few miles from Okinawa

The first of 20 Japanese emerges from an Iwo Jima cave with his hands in the air on April 5, 1945. The group had been hiding for several days

The first of 20 Japanese emerges from an Iwo Jima cave with his hands in the air on April 5, 1945. The group had been hiding for several days

The first of 20 Japanese emerges from an Iwo Jima cave with his hands in the air on April 5, 1945. The group had been hiding for several days

‘Seeing Niwata share the colourised pictures with Hamai, and then watching him recall his old memories one after another, made it feel like the ice around his frozen memories was melting away,’ said Hidenori Watanave, the professor who taught Niwata how to colourise monochrome pictures using AI.

Niwata and Watanave call their photo colourisation project ‘Rebooting Memories,’ and they published a book last month of the colourised versions of about 350 monochrome pictures taken before, during and after the war.

Watanave and Niwata use three different types of AI photo colouring software. The AI is useful in identifying the accurate colours of natural things, such as the sea, the sky and human skin, but it cannot accurately colourise human-made objects like roofs and clothes, Watanave said.

So Niwata and Watanave painstakingly finish the AI-colourised photos by hand to get more accurate colours based on the photo owners’ memories and advice from experts. 

Japanese Emperor Hirohito (right), meets General Douglas MacArthur (left) at the US Embassy in Tokyo on September 27, 1945. General of the Army Douglas MacArthur was an American five-star general and Field Marshal of the Philippine Army. He was Chief of Staff of the United States Army during the 1930s and played a prominent role in the Pacific theater

Japanese Emperor Hirohito (right), meets General Douglas MacArthur (left) at the US Embassy in Tokyo on September 27, 1945. General of the Army Douglas MacArthur was an American five-star general and Field Marshal of the Philippine Army. He was Chief of Staff of the United States Army during the 1930s and played a prominent role in the Pacific theater

Japanese Emperor Hirohito (right), meets General Douglas MacArthur (left) at the US Embassy in Tokyo on September 27, 1945. General of the Army Douglas MacArthur was an American five-star general and Field Marshal of the Philippine Army. He was Chief of Staff of the United States Army during the 1930s and played a prominent role in the Pacific theater

Hiroshima resident Hisashi Takahashi and his parents, grandmother and younger brother pose for a photograph in a flower bed of dandelions in 1935

Hiroshima resident Hisashi Takahashi and his parents, grandmother and younger brother pose for a photograph in a flower bed of dandelions in 1935

Hiroshima resident Hisashi Takahashi and his parents, grandmother and younger brother pose for a photograph in a flower bed of dandelions in 1935

They also look through historical documents and archives that show what the colours should look like. Some photos take a few months to finish.

For Watanave, Twitter has become a powerful platform to pursue the colourisation project.

When he posted a picture of the Hiroshima atomic bomb mushroom cloud that the Al software had colorized as white, a film director suggested that it should be more orange.

Watanave checked the testimonies of those who saw the mushroom cloud and also researched the components of the atomic bomb to see if it could actually make an orangish colour.

After he confirmed that it could, Watanave added orange to the picture.

While the accuracy of the colour is important, Niwata and Watanave said the most vital thing is that the colourised photos match the memories of the photo owners.

This photo combination shows digital colourisation process by Anju Niwata and Hidenori Watanave (left) and original black and white image that Hiroshima resident Hisashi Takahashi and his parents

This photo combination shows digital colourisation process by Anju Niwata and Hidenori Watanave (left) and original black and white image that Hiroshima resident Hisashi Takahashi and his parents

This photo combination shows digital colourisation process by Anju Niwata and Hidenori Watanave (left) and original black and white image that Hiroshima resident Hisashi Takahashi and his parents

Time, however, is running out; the average age of the atomic bomb survivors is about 83.

There are often moments of wonder when the elderly see the revitalised photos.

When Niwata showed the colourised version of a family photograph to a war survivor who had dementia, for example, he remembered the type of flowers in the photograph; just a few weeks later, he was unable to speak.

Niwata said that publishing the colourisation book during the coronavirus outbreak has made her think about the pandemic’s link to the war.

‘Our everyday lives have been stolen away by the coronavirus in a flash, which I think resembles what happened in the war. That’s why I feel like now is an opportunity for people to imagine (wartime life) as their own experience,’ she said.

Watanave hopes that using new technology will help younger Japanese feel more of an attachment to those who lived through the war.

‘People are forgetting wartime memories. We need to revitalize those old memories by using the latest method of expression and delivering it to the hearts of many people,’ he said. 

‘By the time we mark the 80th or 85th anniversary, we need to come up with a new way of expressing (wartime memories).’

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Norman Baker says Netflix wouldn’t offer Harry and Meghan a deal because of ‘interesting views’

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norman baker says netflix wouldnt offer harry and meghan a deal because of interesting views

Prince Harry should be stripped of his royal title because he is currently ‘exploiting’ it for his personal financial gain, former Lib Dem MP Norman has claimed. 

Mr Baker, 63, author of What The Royal Family Don’t Want You To Know, argued the Duke of Sussex, 36, should be made to live as a private individual, after a Tatler survey found two thirds of Britons think he and Meghan, 39, should be stripped of their HRH titles. 

Mr Baker argued Harry should not be allowed to keep his HRH title because he is no longer representing the British royal family overseas and is cashing in on his pedigree.

The Duke and Duchess of Sussex drew criticism last week after they commented publicly on the US elections and urged people to register to vote. 

Speaking on Good Morning Britain today, Mr Baker said: ‘Harry clearly is exploiting the Buckingham palace connection, if he wants to run away and do Netflix documentaries, that’s fine, do it as a private individual.

Royal experts have clashed over whether Prince Harry and Meghan Markle, pictured the Commonwealth Day Service, should have their titles removed

Royal experts have clashed over whether Prince Harry and Meghan Markle, pictured the Commonwealth Day Service, should have their titles removed

Royal experts have clashed over whether Prince Harry and Meghan Markle, pictured the Commonwealth Day Service, should have their titles removed

Former MP and author of What The Royal Family Don't Want You To Know Norman Baker, 63, (pictured) appeared on GMB this morning to discuss the issue

Former MP and author of What The Royal Family Don't Want You To Know Norman Baker, 63, (pictured) appeared on GMB this morning to discuss the issue

Former MP and author of What The Royal Family Don’t Want You To Know Norman Baker, 63, (pictured) appeared on GMB this morning to discuss the issue 

‘HRH means he’s representing Britain abroad, but he’s not. He’s divorced himself from the royal family in practical terms, but not titular terms.

He continued: ‘If he keep his HRH title he is still eligible for public support from the taxpayer.

‘For example, we’re paying up to a million to pay for security personnel to wander around Frogmore cottage, we’ll pay for his travel when he comes back to the UK.

He added: ‘Harry clearly is exploiting the Buckingham palace connection, if he wants to run away and do Netflix documentaries, that’s fine, do it as a private individual.’ 

However royal expert Ingrid Seward, editor of Majesty magazine, argued it makes no difference whether Harry had a royal title or not because he is a ‘prince by blood’ and will capitalise on his royal connections with or without the official HRH title. 

She said: ‘The title was a gift of the queen on their wedding day, to one of her favourite grandchildren and to his future wife. 

Royal commentator Ingrid Seward, 72, also appeared and argued that taking away their titles will achieve nothing as Harry is a 'prince by blood'

Royal commentator Ingrid Seward, 72, also appeared and argued that taking away their titles will achieve nothing as Harry is a 'prince by blood'

Royal commentator Ingrid Seward, 72, also appeared and argued that taking away their titles will achieve nothing as Harry is a ‘prince by blood’

Norman, from Lewes in East Sussex, believes Harry is 'exploiting' his royal connections, and that he and Meghan weren't offered their 'huge deal' for their 'interesting views'

Norman, from Lewes in East Sussex, believes Harry is 'exploiting' his royal connections, and that he and Meghan weren't offered their 'huge deal' for their 'interesting views'

Norman, from Lewes in East Sussex, believes Harry is ‘exploiting’ his royal connections, and that he and Meghan weren’t offered their ‘huge deal’ for their ‘interesting views’

‘It’s really something it would be very churlish, I feel, to say they can’t have anymore, everyone knows them as Harry and Megan. 

‘Yes I agree they’re trading off their connections, but that’s who they are, Harry is a prince of the blood and you can’t take that away from him.’ 

Viewers were divided over the issue, with some believing they should not keep their title. 

One raged: ‘If they truly wanted to live in privacy as they say, then they wouldn’t be preaching their cr*p constantly, however these attention seeking numpty’s never really wanted anonymity ” especially her” so leave them do it without the privilege of any royal title’ 

Another agreed: ‘Well…. yeah? You can’t be a member of the royals, sworn to impartiality and make a damn political ad????’ 

However others disagreed, with one writing: ‘It makes no difference if Harry has a title or not, the fact is he is Royal, people are interested in them.’ 

Another said: ‘Don’t slate Harry and Meghan slate Netflix for leaching of them. Good luck them’. 

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Viewers were divided over the issue, with some believing they should not keep their title, while others felt it won't make much of a difference

Viewers were divided over the issue, with some believing they should not keep their title, while others felt it won't make much of a difference

Viewers were divided over the issue, with some believing they should not keep their title, while others felt it won’t make much of a difference 

This post first appeared on dailymail.co.uk

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Uber can KEEP its London licence after court ruling

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uber can keep its london licence after court ruling

Uber has kept its licence to operate in London following a court ruling today despite a magistrate criticising ‘historical failings’ by the ride-hailing service.

Deputy chief magistrate Tan Ikram allowed its appeal against Transport for London’s refusal to renew its operating licence after it was removed due to safety concerns.

He declared that it was a ‘fit and proper’ company to operate minicabs in the capital, following a four-day hearing at Westminster Magistrates’ Court earlier this month.

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Uber had been allowed to continue operating in London until the appeal was completed (file)

Mr Ikram said today: ‘Despite their historical failings, I find them, now, to be a fit and proper person to hold a London PHV (private hire vehicle) operator’s licence.

‘I do, however, wish to hear from the advocates on conditions and on my determination as to the length of a licence.’

TfL had rejected Uber’s application for a new London licence in November 2019, due to ‘several breaches that placed passengers and their safety at risk’.

It found a change to Uber’s systems had allowed unauthorised people to upload their photos to legitimate driver accounts, enabling them to pick up passengers.

London black cab taxis block Whitehall during a huge protest against Uber in February 2016

London black cab taxis block Whitehall during a huge protest against Uber in February 2016

London black cab taxis block Whitehall during a huge protest against Uber in February 2016

Uber, which is based in San Francisco, California, had been allowed to continue operating in London until the appeal process was completed.

The company was previously granted a short-term licence by a judge in 2018, following TfL’s decision not to renew its licence in September 2017.

Uber argued that it since assuaged concerns over insurance verification and driver identification since TfL refused to grant it a new licence last year. 

The company claims that more than 3.5million Londoners ‘regularly’ use its app, but there is now increasing competition from rivals such as Free Now, Ola and Bolt. 

This post first appeared on dailymail.co.uk

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The Singapore Grip viewers say ‘weird’ father and daughter relationship in drama is ‘creepy’

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the singapore grip viewers say weird father and daughter relationship in drama is creepy

Viewers of The Singapore Grip have confessed the ‘weird’ father and daughter relationship in ITV’s WWII drama is ‘disturbing’ – after blasting the ‘loathsome’ characters and wooden acting.

The third episode of the programme, which aired last night, saw audiences at home criticise the manipulative partnership between Walter Blackett (played by David Morrissey) and his daughter Joan (Georgia Blizzard). 

They were seen scheming to try to secure the allegiance of Matthew Webb (Luke Treadaway) the son of a powerful aristocrat, through marriage to Joan – but viewers said the characters appeared irredeemable and ‘weird’.

Based on the 1978 novel by JG Farrell, which drew on real events, The Singapore Grip is initially the story of rich Brits living lives of excess in the Crown colony in the early 1940s.

But the invasion of the island by Japan in 1942, one of the key events of the Second World War, throws their lives into turmoil.

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The third episode of The Singapore Grip, which aired last night, saw audiences at home criticise the manipulative partnership between Walter Blackett (played by David Morrissey) and his daughter Joan (above) (Georgia Blizzard)

The third episode of The Singapore Grip, which aired last night, saw audiences at home criticise the manipulative partnership between Walter Blackett (played by David Morrissey) and his daughter Joan (above) (Georgia Blizzard)

The third episode of The Singapore Grip, which aired last night, saw audiences at home criticise the manipulative partnership between Walter Blackett (played by David Morrissey) and his daughter Joan (above) (Georgia Blizzard)

They were seen scheming to try to secure the allegiance of Matthew Webb (Luke Treadaway) the son of a powerful aristocrat, through marriage to Joan - but viewers said the characters appeared irredeemable and 'weird'. Pictured, Walter Blackett

They were seen scheming to try to secure the allegiance of Matthew Webb (Luke Treadaway) the son of a powerful aristocrat, through marriage to Joan - but viewers said the characters appeared irredeemable and 'weird'. Pictured, Walter Blackett

They were seen scheming to try to secure the allegiance of Matthew Webb (Luke Treadaway) the son of a powerful aristocrat, through marriage to Joan – but viewers said the characters appeared irredeemable and ‘weird’. Pictured, Walter Blackett

One viewer wrote: ‘That is one very odd and disturbing father and daughter relationship, made me feel icky.’

Another said: ‘Such a weird father and daughter’, before a viewer added: ‘What a terrible family’.

A third added: ‘Father and daughter are as bad as each other in The Singapore Grip.’

A fourth said: ‘We are not really being encouraged to like the loathsome members of the Singers set, are we?’, referring to the Blackett family.

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Reaction: It is the scheming and close relationship shared by Walter and Joan which left some viewers (above) weirded out

Reaction: It is the scheming and close relationship shared by Walter and Joan which left some viewers (above) weirded out

Reaction: It is the scheming and close relationship shared by Walter and Joan which left some viewers (above) weirded out

In the third episode, Matthew has fallen ill with fever and is being cared for by his guest Vera Chiang (played by Elizabeth Tan) – with the pair sharing some romantic chemistry.

But rubber merchant Walter Blackett has his sights set on Matthew and his fortune – having worked closely with his father Mr Webb, a powerful aristocrat played by Game of Throne’s Charles Dance, who died in the first episode.

He encourages his scheming daughter Joan, who has been trying to court Matthew and catch his attention in the last two shows, to convince the aristocrat’s son to marry her.

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Unimpressed viewers also slammed the 'wooden' acting in the programme and suggested it was 'boring' to watch

Unimpressed viewers also slammed the 'wooden' acting in the programme and suggested it was 'boring' to watch

Unimpressed viewers also slammed the ‘wooden’ acting in the programme and suggested it was ‘boring’ to watch

Rubber merchant Walter Blackett (pictured) has his sights set on Matthew and his fortune - having worked closely with his father Mr Webb, a powerful aristocrat played by Game of Throne¿s Charles Dance, who died in the first episode

Rubber merchant Walter Blackett (pictured) has his sights set on Matthew and his fortune - having worked closely with his father Mr Webb, a powerful aristocrat played by Game of Throne¿s Charles Dance, who died in the first episode

Rubber merchant Walter Blackett (pictured) has his sights set on Matthew and his fortune – having worked closely with his father Mr Webb, a powerful aristocrat played by Game of Throne’s Charles Dance, who died in the first episode

But Joan confesses that she doesn’t feel like Matthew is ‘seeing her’, to which her father comforts her with a caress of her cheek, adding that he has a ‘feeling’ it’ll work out.

It was this scheming and close relationship shared by the two of them which left some viewers creeped out.

Meanwhile, the criticism comes after viewers panned the acting in the second, with some saying the ‘awful’ script had left the actors with ‘nothing to work with’.

Walter encourages his scheming daughter Joan (pictured), who has been trying to court Matthew and catch his attention in the last two shows, to convince the aristocrat's son to marry her

Walter encourages his scheming daughter Joan (pictured), who has been trying to court Matthew and catch his attention in the last two shows, to convince the aristocrat's son to marry her

Walter encourages his scheming daughter Joan (pictured), who has been trying to court Matthew and catch his attention in the last two shows, to convince the aristocrat’s son to marry her

In the second episode of the drama, much of the focus is on the team running military operations. They dismissed the approach of the Japanese before being left cowering under the table when the threat materialised. Pictured, Luke Treadaway as Matthew Webb

In the second episode of the drama, much of the focus is on the team running military operations. They dismissed the approach of the Japanese before being left cowering under the table when the threat materialised. Pictured, Luke Treadaway as Matthew Webb

 In the second episode of the drama, much of the focus is on the team running military operations. They dismissed the approach of the Japanese before being left cowering under the table when the threat materialised. Pictured, Luke Treadaway as Matthew Webb

‘Is this supposed to be a comedy because the acting and script are very OTT?!’ one person wrote. ‘Not sure what to make of it. #singaporegrip’  

Another added: ‘I was looking forward to the Singapore Grip, but am finding it quite boring…very disappointing.’ 

In the second episode of the drama, much of the focus is on the team running military operations. They dismissed the approach of the Japanese before being left cowering under the table when the threat materialised.

This post first appeared on dailymail.co.uk

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