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President Trump says two other Arab countries may soon recognise Israel

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president trump says two other arab countries may soon recognise israel

Donald Trump has insisted that two more Arab states are ready to join Bahrain and the UAE in recognising Israel. 

Trump said that the US is ‘very down the road with about five different countries’, and that two of them ‘are ready to try’.

‘You’re going to have a whole level of peace in the Middle East without blood all over the sand,’ he said on Wednesday, a day after hosting the leaders of Israel, Bahrain and the UAE in Washington to sign the pact.

Donald Trump has insisted that negotiations are ongoing with five Arab states to sign a peace deal with Israel, and that two of them are 'ready to try'

Donald Trump has insisted that negotiations are ongoing with five Arab states to sign a peace deal with Israel, and that two of them are 'ready to try'

Donald Trump has insisted that negotiations are ongoing with five Arab states to sign a peace deal with Israel, and that two of them are ‘ready to try’

‘I think Saudi Arabia ultimately will come in too. This is my feeling … it’s not based on knowledge other than a couple of conversations I had with the king,’ he added, according to Israel National News.

Those in advanced talks with the US over Israeli relations are though to include Oman, Sudan and Morocco.

Two other Arab states – Egypt and Jordan – have long-established ties with Israel.

The pact signed Wednesday normalises diplomatic relations between Israel, Bahrain and the UAE, and establishes economic ties.

The deal breaks with years of consensus among Arab countries that a pact recognising a Palestinian state is a necessary precursor to any accord with Israel.

It comes after Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu (left), Bahrain Foreign Minister Khalid bin Ahmed Al Khalifa (second right) and UAE Foreign Minister Abdullah bin Zayed al-Nahyan Abraham (right) joined Trump in Washington to sign a pact with Israel

It comes after Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu (left), Bahrain Foreign Minister Khalid bin Ahmed Al Khalifa (second right) and UAE Foreign Minister Abdullah bin Zayed al-Nahyan Abraham (right) joined Trump in Washington to sign a pact with Israel

It comes after Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu (left), Bahrain Foreign Minister Khalid bin Ahmed Al Khalifa (second right) and UAE Foreign Minister Abdullah bin Zayed al-Nahyan Abraham (right) joined Trump in Washington to sign a pact with Israel 

Palestinian leaders bitterly oppose the deal, fearing that it will prompt Israel to give up on the peace process, destroying their hopes of statehood.

Iran, a staunch supporter of the Palestinian people, also opposes the deal.

Hassan Rouhani, the Iranian President, has warned the leaders of UAE and Bahrain that they will bear ‘severe consequences’ of signing the pact.

‘How could you reach out your hands to Israel? And then you want to give them bases in the region? All the severe consequences that would arise from this are on you,’ he said in televised remarks.

The deal signing also sparked protests across Gaza, the West Bank and Ramallah, home of the Palestinian Authority.

Palestinian leaders have reacted angrily to the deal with rockets fired from Gaza into Israel, prompting Israel to launch bombing raids in return

Palestinian leaders have reacted angrily to the deal with rockets fired from Gaza into Israel, prompting Israel to launch bombing raids in return

Palestinian leaders have reacted angrily to the deal with rockets fired from Gaza into Israel, prompting Israel to launch bombing raids in return 

It also saw two rockets fired overnight from Gaza towards Israel, which were timed to coincide with the ceremony.

Two missiles were fired from Gaza, one of which was intercepted by the Iron Dome defence system, and the other of which landed in the southern city of Ashdod.

At least two people received non-life-threatening injuries, emergency services said.   

There was no immediate claim of responsibility for the rocket fire from the various Palestinian factions operating in Gaza.

But the IDF levelled blame at Hamas and warned that it would ‘bear the consequences for terror activity against Israeli civilians’.

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Elderly face wait for flu vaccine as leading chemists suspend appointments amid shortage of jabs 

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elderly face wait for flu vaccine as leading chemists suspend appointments amid shortage of jabs

Pensioners could face severe delays getting a flu vaccine this winter, with a surge in demand caused by the coronavirus pandemic leading to shortages. 

High street pharmacies Boots and Lloyds have decided to suspend bookings for those aged 65 and over at branches across the UK. 

Meanwhile, waiting lists at some GP surgeries are at high levels, leading to a potential several week wait for the jab for the elderly. 

It means that those aged 65 or above are facing the prospect of being without a flu vaccine over the winter, despite the government promising that, as the most vulnerable, they would be at the front of the queue. 

Boots and Lloyds have decided to suspend bookings for those aged 65 and over at branches across the UK amid a supply shortage (stock)

Boots and Lloyds have decided to suspend bookings for those aged 65 and over at branches across the UK amid a supply shortage (stock)

Boots and Lloyds have decided to suspend bookings for those aged 65 and over at branches across the UK amid a supply shortage (stock)

Public Health England is aiming to immunise 30 million Britons this winter, the largest flu vaccination programmer ever undertaken in the UK. 

It comes after a PHE report revealed that coronavirus patients were almost twice as likely to die if they caught the flu at the same    

The vaccination programme is open to all over 50s, for the first time, in an attempt to immunise as much of the population as possible.    

Officials have previously insisted that pensioners remained a priority – despite the sheer scale of the project meaning that it would have to be rolled out in stages.  

Greg Clark, chairman of the Commons science committee, told The Daily Telegraph: ‘Suppressing the flu helps fight Covid by reducing the number of people with Covid-like symptoms who would need to isolate and be tested, and by reducing the severity of the impact on those who do get Covid. It is essential as many people as possible are able to get a flu jab.’

Launching the vaccination programme last week, Professor Jonathan Van-Tam, the deputy chief medical officer for England, said: ‘The emphasis has always got to be on the high-risk groups.’

It means that those aged 65 or above are facing the prospect of being without a flu vaccine over the winter (stock)

It means that those aged 65 or above are facing the prospect of being without a flu vaccine over the winter (stock)

It means that those aged 65 or above are facing the prospect of being without a flu vaccine over the winter (stock)

However, surging demand has led to pharmacies already running out of their first batch of vaccinations. 

Demand is up tenfold on last year, with surgeries struggling to ensure the PHE target is met.  

The Department of Health and Social Care controls an emergency stockpile of jabs but this has yet to have been made available to surgeries. 

This is expected to change in the coming weeks.  

Graham Slesser, a 65-year-old accountant from Doncaster, tried to book a flu jab from his local GP yesterday, having been turned away by his high street pharmacy.

He said: ‘I was told there were 200 people ahead of me and I might not get an appointment until the end of October.’ 

This post first appeared on dailymail.co.uk

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Mother says adoptive son tricked his autistic brother into accessing information about Islamic State

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mother says adoptive son tricked his autistic brother into accessing information about islamic state

A ‘heartbroken’ mother has told how her adoptive son tricked his autistic younger brother into accessing material about Islamic State before turning him into the police as an ‘act of retaliation’.

The boy, then 17, goaded his sibling to make a dossier of information about the terrorist group using the dark web – a part of the internet which isn’t available to standard web browsers and search engines – his adoptive mother Daisy said.

He then asked his brother to show him the material he had found while they met up at a fast food restaurant, which caught the activity on CCTV, she added.

The family’s home was later searched by counter-terrorism officers, Daisy said.

She said the teenager planned the set-up over summer several years ago in retaliation after his adoptive parents returned him to care because of his violence and behaviour.

While her youngest son did not hide anything when questioned by police, and was not charged, the incident ‘broke his heart’, she added.

The boy, then 17, goaded his sibling to make a dossier of information about the terrorist group using the dark web - a part of the internet which isn't available to standard web browsers and search engines - his adoptive mother Daisy said. Library image

The boy, then 17, goaded his sibling to make a dossier of information about the terrorist group using the dark web - a part of the internet which isn't available to standard web browsers and search engines - his adoptive mother Daisy said. Library image

The boy, then 17, goaded his sibling to make a dossier of information about the terrorist group using the dark web – a part of the internet which isn’t available to standard web browsers and search engines – his adoptive mother Daisy said. Library image

The boys first came to live with the family aged four and two, and their adoption was finalised two years later.

The eldest sibling was already displaying ‘worrying, destructive and angry behaviour’ and had attachment disorder, Daisy said.

What is the dark web Tor browser? 

Tor – short for The Onion Router – is a matrix of encrypted websites that allows users to surf beneath the everyday internet with complete anonymity.

It uses numerous layers of security and encryption to render users anonymous online.

Normally, file sharing and internet browsing activity can be tracked by law enforcement through each user’s unique IP address that can be traced back to an individual computer.

The Tor network hides the IP address and the activity of the user.

Most of the web’s information is buried far down on dynamically generated sites, unable to be found or seen by traditional search engines – sites or pages don’t exist until created as the result of a specific search.

An internet search is like dragging a net across the surface of the sea – a great deal of information is caught, but a majority is deep and therefore missed. 

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She feels she and her husband were not given enough information about the degree of trauma and neglect experienced by the boys before being adopted.

At the time their eldest son was violent towards them, he falsely accused his adoptive father of assault, Daisy said.

The family had support from social services withdrawn from them, despite asking for help and respite two months prior.

She said: ‘It was just like talking to a brick wall, no-one was interested, it was all about blame, and we were to blame, and actually no, we weren’t to blame, we were trying to bring up two boys who were the centre of our lives, who we dropped everything else for because we loved them, and we didn’t stand a chance because of stuff that had happened with the birth family that was nothing to do with us.’

Daisy said she continues to struggle with her mental health and is on a waiting list for counselling, while her husband experienced a heart attack aged 55.

She added: ‘Changes have to happen at some point with the way adopters who have very difficult children are treated, because if they were treated with support, things could be a lot different.’

Adoption UK’s report found that three quarters of established adoptive families experienced challenges during 2019, and 64 per cent experienced violent or aggressive behaviour from their child.

It said prospective adopters must be made aware of this possibility, and helped to develop skills to manage it, while support must be delivered at the beginning of the process, before the situation escalates.

For those who experienced crises, there was a clear sense that it could have been avoided with earlier help, the report found.

Respondents also said procedures designed to protect children from adults were ‘not well suited’ to scenarios where children pose a risk to their adoptive family.

The family's home was later searched by counter-terrorism officers (pictured: officers from the counter-terrorism unit - library image), Daisy said.

The family's home was later searched by counter-terrorism officers (pictured: officers from the counter-terrorism unit - library image), Daisy said.

The family’s home was later searched by counter-terrorism officers (pictured: officers from the counter-terrorism unit – library image), Daisy said.

Adoption UK said: ‘This is a heartbreaking story for everyone involved.

‘It’s an extreme situation, but the ingredients, a young person haunted by a traumatic early childhood, a family left without support, are much too common.

‘Despite all the challenges, 73 per cent of adopters would encourage others to adopt.

‘Families tell us that the right support has a dramatic impact and intervening early is a wise investment.

‘In England, the Adoption Support Fund, a pot of government money that pays for specialist therapy, is literally changing people’s lives.

‘Adopters are parenting some of the most vulnerable children in the UK.

‘It’s morally and economically imperative that adoptive families are given the right support from day one.’

This post first appeared on dailymail.co.uk

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PAUL THOMAS on… students’ coronavirus lockdown

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paul thomas on students coronavirus lockdown
33737092 8783497 image a 33 1601342143456

33737092 8783497 image a 33 1601342143456

To order a print of this Paul Thomas cartoon or one by Pugh, visit Mailpictures.newsprints.co.uk or call 0191 6030 178. 

This post first appeared on dailymail.co.uk

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