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Public sector workers keeping hold of their jobs during pandemic as figures show they earn 7% MORE

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public sector workers keeping hold of their jobs during pandemic as figures show they earn 7 more

Public sector workers are keeping hold of their jobs and salaries during the pandemic as figures show they earn more than those in the private sector.

Those working in the public sector earned on average 7% more than those toiling in the private sector in 2019, according to the Office of National Statistics.

The greatest earnings difference was in the skilled jobs of the smallest firms – employing 10 or fewer staff – where public sector workers earned 24% more than their private counterparts.

It comes after inflation-busting pay increases announced by the government in July – 2.8% for medics and 3.1% for teachers – cut a deeper chasm between these ‘key workers’ and those who work in supermarkets or care homes.

These taxpayer-funded pay increases will likely take the public sector premium back up to around 10%, which it enjoyed before David Cameron’s coalition government introduced measures to cut the deficit.

The pandemic’s savaging of the private sector will, therefore, further exacerbate the differences between the sectors, as those employed privately will be paid less and be more likely to lose their jobs, while paying higher taxes to cover the increased pay for those employed by the state.

The graph above shows the percentage difference between public and private sector workers employed by companies/organisations of varying sizes. The greatest earnings difference was in the 'upper-skilled' occupations of the smallest firms – employing 10 or fewer staff – where public sector workers earned 24 percent more than their private counterparts.

The graph above shows the percentage difference between public and private sector workers employed by companies/organisations of varying sizes. The greatest earnings difference was in the 'upper-skilled' occupations of the smallest firms – employing 10 or fewer staff – where public sector workers earned 24 percent more than their private counterparts.

The graph above shows the percentage difference between public and private sector workers employed by companies/organisations of varying sizes. The greatest earnings difference was in the ‘upper-skilled’ occupations of the smallest firms – employing 10 or fewer staff – where public sector workers earned 24 percent more than their private counterparts.

NHS workers in Belfast taking part in the 'clap for carers'

NHS workers in Belfast taking part in the 'clap for carers'

NHS workers in Belfast taking part in the ‘clap for carers’

The largest difference is in the pensions afforded to the different sectors. Most in the public sector are still receiving an inflation-proof defined-benefit pension – based on salary and how long they’ve worked for their employer.

But in the private sector the increased length and diminishing rates of interest on government bonds has made such generous pensions impossible to guarantee.

Percentage public sector pay increases by profession 

School teachers 3.1%

Doctors & dentists 2.8%

Police officers 2.5%

Armed Forces 2%

National Crime Agency 2.5%

Prison officers 2.5%

Judges 2%

Senior civil servants 2%

Senior military 2% 

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Former pensions minister Baroness Altmann describes public sector workers as ‘the pensions aristocracy — and they don’t realise it.’

Pensions are a large component of the ONS workings. They found that 89% of public sector workers contributed to a pension in 2019, compared with 75% in the private sector, notwithstanding the introduction of auto-enrolment in 2012.

Of all the employees in the public sector, 82% were in defined benefit schemes, compared with just 8% of all employees in the private sector.

In the private sector, employees were predominantly either in a defined contribution scheme (21%), in a group personal pension scheme (21%) or in a National Employment Savings Trust (15%).

Of those with no pension, 11% were paid by the state and 26% by a private company.

Writing in The Sunday Times, Dominic Lawson argued that the government is staring down the barrel of strikes by teachers and medics if it moves to stem the national debt – which has soared past the £2 trillion mark – with a pay freeze.

‘There will probably be calls for industrial action from the main teachers’ union under its reliably militant leader, Mary Bousted, and from the British Medical Association.’ Mr Lawson wrote.

‘The latter will provide an even more than usually difficult opponent for a Conservative administration that has sanctified the NHS for political reasons — and because doctors and nurses had put themselves under the most extraordinary pressures when working to save patients from the coronavirus during the peak of infections.

‘But it is not just the carers (clapped every Thursday during the height of the pandemic) who enhance our lives. A tirelessly helpful waitress, a wonderful cook, a solicitous barman in a pub — all these people make us feel better. Perhaps, given their present predicament, we should have a clap for caterers.’

Other major determining factors for the difference between the two sectors was the age of employees, their sex and their skill level.

A private sector key worker at a Waitrose supermarket in London

A private sector key worker at a Waitrose supermarket in London

A private sector key worker at a Waitrose supermarket in London

Young workers tend to be paid less than older workers and in 2019, the mean age of private sector employees was 40 years, while in the public sector it was 44.

As regards sex, women on average earn less per hour than men – a subject which the ONS has covered in great detail.

The disparity was smaller in the public sector where men earned 22% more than women, compared to the private where men earned 34% more.

The report also noted that the public sector employees more skilled workers than the private sector: 47% of those being paid by the state are ‘upper-skilled’, compared with a quarter of those paid privately.

‘Upper-skilled’ workers include scientists, IT engineers, medics, teachers and lawyers.

Meanwhile the lower-skilled occupations in the public sector were paid more on average than those in the private sector: £13.62 per hour versus £11.24. 

This post first appeared on dailymail.co.uk

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Essex hit-and-run: Two arrests, police officer airlifted to hospital

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essex hit and run two arrests police officer airlifted to hospital

A police officer was airlifted to hospital this morning with serious injuries after a suspected hit-and-run in Essex.

A woman, 45, and man, 22, were both arrested after the collision on Stanford Road in Grays, Essex, at around 8am.   

The driver had initially failed to stop when an officer asked her to, according to Essex Police.

A woman, 45, and man, 22, were both arrested after the collision on Stanford Road in Grays, Essex, at around 8am. A police officer was taken to hospital (file image)

A woman, 45, and man, 22, were both arrested after the collision on Stanford Road in Grays, Essex, at around 8am. A police officer was taken to hospital (file image)

A woman, 45, and man, 22, were both arrested after the collision on Stanford Road in Grays, Essex, at around 8am. A police officer was taken to hospital (file image)

A spokesman for Essex Police said: ‘It is reported that the driver did then stop and then collided with the officer as they approached the car, before driving off.’ 

The force confirmed an officer was taken to hospital via an air ambulance with serious but not life-threatening injuries.

A woman, from Chadwell St Mary, was arrested on suspicion of inflicting grievous bodily harm with intent, failing to stop and causing serious injury by dangerous driving. 

The 22-year-old man, from Grays, was arrested on suspicion on perverting the course of justice.    

This post first appeared on dailymail.co.uk

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Essex thief makes off with 6ft model of cartoon character Betty Boop

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essex thief makes off with 6ft model of cartoon character betty boop

A brazen thief has stolen a 6ft model of cartoon character Betty Boop from outside an Essex diner – on the one day the owners forgot to lock it inside.

The life-size figure of the iconic character was taken from family-run Grumpy’s Diner in Southend-on-Sea, Essex, by a man in a hooded tracksuit at 4.10am on Tuesday morning.

CCTV footage showed the effigy, which is worth up to £1,000, in its usual place on the pavement outside the restaurant when a man approached.

Taking a quick look around him, the man scooped the statue up and placed it over his shoulder. He carried it down the street and out of sight. 

The life-size figure of the iconic character was taken from family-run Grumpy's Diner in Southend-on-Sea, Essex, by a man in a hooded tracksuit at 4.10am on Tuesday morning

The life-size figure of the iconic character was taken from family-run Grumpy's Diner in Southend-on-Sea, Essex, by a man in a hooded tracksuit at 4.10am on Tuesday morning

The life-size figure of the iconic character was taken from family-run Grumpy’s Diner in Southend-on-Sea, Essex, by a man in a hooded tracksuit at 4.10am on Tuesday morning

Betty would normally be brought inside when the shop was closed up, but on Monday night the figure was forgotten.  

Kerry Malone, 34, who co-owns Grumpy’s Diner with her brother Sonny Malone, 32, and their father Gary, 56, said: ‘It’s a little bit gutting, to be honest.

‘We watched the CCTV footage and we all though it was kind of funny – but it’s also a shame, because kids love having their picture taken with her when they come in.’

She revealed the figure had been in its place outside the diner since it opened five or six years ago, adding: ‘She’s a bit of an attraction – she stands outside the restaurant during the day and is definitely a talking piece.

Taking a quick look around him, the man scooped the statue up and placed it over his shoulder. He carried it down the street and out of sight

Taking a quick look around him, the man scooped the statue up and placed it over his shoulder. He carried it down the street and out of sight

Taking a quick look around him, the man scooped the statue up and placed it over his shoulder. He carried it down the street and out of sight

‘It’s just frustrating as we would usually bring her in at nighttime when we lock up – but she was forgotten on that one night.’

Ms Malone still thought it was ‘funny that someone would try and steal her’ but hoped the thief would not sell the model on. 

She said if Betty Boop was not returned she would try to find a replacement, adding: ‘I don’t think it will be easy.’

Almost 700 people have now shared the appeal on Facebook to help find Betty Boop – with Ms Malone calling the response ‘amazing’.

She said: ‘It’s been fantastic and it’s very heartwarming especially with everything going on. It’s good to see people will still support small businesses and do care.’

CCTV footage showed the effigy, which is worth up to £1,000, in its usual place on the pavement outside the restaurant when a man approached

CCTV footage showed the effigy, which is worth up to £1,000, in its usual place on the pavement outside the restaurant when a man approached

CCTV footage showed the effigy, which is worth up to £1,000, in its usual place on the pavement outside the restaurant when a man approached

Meanwhile, customers have been sharing their disappointment at the restaurant mascot’s disappearance.

One woman wrote: ‘Omg my daughter absolutely loved that… she’s gonna [sic] be crushed. Surely someone saw something.’

And another commented: ‘This makes me so sad! My girls love seeing her when we come in, I hope she’s returned in one piece.’

Betty Boop was a 1930s animated cartoon character based on a jazz ‘flapper’ girl.

This post first appeared on dailymail.co.uk

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Celebrity hairdresser reveals the common mistakes people making when wearing extensions

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celebrity hairdresser reveals the common mistakes people making when wearing

 A celebrity hair extensions expert has revealed the common mistakes made by people when trying to lengthen their hair – and the best ways to avoid damage while using extensions.

Speaking exclusively to FEMAIL, Louise Bailey, who works in the Harrods Salon and also runs  Hair Extensions London,  a salon based in Fitzrovia, revealed the common misconceptions around hair extensions, including why you should always consult a professional before attaching any hair.

Louise, who has a roster of A-listers in her client book, specialises in natural looking extensions and says getting hair from a reputable company is key.

Speaking exclusively to FEMAIL, Louise Bailey, who has runs Hair Extensions London, salon based in Fitzrovia, revealed the common misconceptions around hair extensions, including why you should always consult a professional before attaching any hair

Speaking exclusively to FEMAIL, Louise Bailey, who has runs Hair Extensions London, salon based in Fitzrovia, revealed the common misconceptions around hair extensions, including why you should always consult a professional before attaching any hair

Speaking exclusively to FEMAIL, Louise Bailey, who has runs Hair Extensions London, salon based in Fitzrovia, revealed the common misconceptions around hair extensions, including why you should always consult a professional before attaching any hair

‘Extensions are like designer handbags these days , everyone has them,’ she explained to FEMAIL.

‘But celebs are often paid to promote brands and given free hair, this doesn’t mean their good ones. My top tip would be to always consults a professional and don’t go for a Z-list endorsed brand.

Here, she explains her top tips for those looking for Rapunzel-esque locks.

PICK A BRAND TO MATCH YOUR HAIR TYPE

Louise specialises in tape hair extensions,  which are attached to the hair using a special adhesive tape. 

‘The hair is reusable and can be removed from the hair easily with zero damage to the natural hair.

She recommends using Hair Dreams, which shes describe as ‘a reputable brand within the hair extension industry’. 

The brand uses natural Indian hair, and their tape hair extension can last up to nine months if maintenance it carried out correctly and the hair is looked after well once attached.

Pictured: Before hair extensions

Pictured: Before hair extensions

Pictured: After hair extensions

Pictured: After hair extensions

Pictured, natural hair (left) and right with extensions. The model wars balayage extensions from Hair Dreams, which is Indian hair

‘There’s three main types of hair sold, Russian, Chinese and Indian,’ she explained.

‘You should find the best hair for your ethnicity. Chinese hair is usually straight, while Indian hair is wavy.

‘But Chinese hair is often more heavily processed because it’s naturally darker, while Russian can be more sort after because it can be virgin and each strand is much finer.

A reputable brand is so important, and it’s always worth talking to a professional, as there’s no regulation within this industry of hair processing. 

‘But a reputable brand is so important, and it’s always worth talking to a professional, as there’s no regulation within this industry of hair processing.

‘There’s even been brands taken to court before after hair they claimed was Russian wasn’t.

‘We use Hair Dreams, which has a natural wave so it’s perfect with to style and blend easily with the natural hair making it easy to manage at home.

‘It means women can have a break from straightening and harsh heat styling, you can brush your hair and go.

‘It gives you an everlasting blow dry for a week, you can have a groomed hairstyle all the time.’

Louise specialises in tape hair extensions which are attached to the hair using a special adhesive tape. The hair is reusable and can be removed from the hair easily with zero damage to the natural hair

Louise specialises in tape hair extensions which are attached to the hair using a special adhesive tape. The hair is reusable and can be removed from the hair easily with zero damage to the natural hair

Louise specialises in tape hair extensions which are attached to the hair using a special adhesive tape. The hair is reusable and can be removed from the hair easily with zero damage to the natural hair

YOU GET WHAT YOU PAY FOR

While Louise works with a limited number of top brands, she recommends steering clear of extremely cheap ones as ‘you get what you pay for’.

‘A good way to to know about a brand is good, look for a hair extension company with years behind its belt,’ she said.

‘Look for a place with A-listers on board as top brands won’t give them away as the product is so expensive.

‘A good way to to know about a brand is good, look for a hair extension company with years behind its belt 

‘To get your hair in good condition while using extensions you have to make sure your colour process is not damaging the natural hair,’.

Louise’s works with a colour-expert and recommends making sure you have a full team on board to make sure both the hair extension and colour service protects the natural hair.

IT’S FOR ANYONE

While many see extensions as something for A-listers and influencers, many of Louise’s clients are over 50.

‘We get a lot of menopausal women come in, where there hair starts to thin and we fill out the hair and make them feel amazing again,’ she explained.

‘We get women that come to us of all ages that have had heavy bleach or even some highlights or the hair has just been over processed and it keeps breaking and doesn’t seem to grow.

‘We fill the gaps with the extensions, when hair is burned from colour we don’t want to burn it even more – we get them on a healthy hair routine allowing the hair to have rest while still looking thick shinny and groomed. 

‘We sort it so its not a wispy fluff anymore she added.

‘I’ve also had patients who have lost their hair from chemotherapy, as soon as hair is four inches, we can attach hair extensions, it saves people having to get wigs and makes them feel themselves again.

IT CAN PREVENT HAIR DAMAGE

‘We do a lot of Balayage extensions as it’s trendy and means you don’t have to colour your hair so much to achieve this look.

‘We get a lot of people that want a new colour and we can colour it all with tape hair extensions – it’s so easy to do.

We get a lot of people that want a new colour and we can do it  all with tape hair extensions – it’s so easy to do. 

‘With Balyage it places the colour properly, which you might not be able to do otherwise as dying it would take hours to do.

‘When applied right, it can prevent damage but you need to find someone really good to apply them, or it can make damage worse.

‘It’s also about them being cut properly and many hairdressers cut the natural hair away as they try to cut it, so make sure you go to a reputable place that uses good hair and knows how to cut extensions well so they don’t cut your natural hair away when trying to blend them. This is a skill in itself.

‘For a great set of hair extensions that don’t do any damage to your natural hair you need a great product and a hair extensions expert to apply and cut them.’

This post first appeared on dailymail.co.uk

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