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RAF Reaper drone wipes out suspected ISIS terror unit in Iraq

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raf reaper drone wipes out suspected isis terror unit in iraq

An RAF Reaper drone has wiped out a suspected ISIS terror unit who had attacked Iraqi security forces west of Baghdad. 

According to the Ministry of Defence, ‘a small group of extremists’ attacked local security forces in Anbar province west of Baghdad. 

A coalition aircraft attacked part of the ISIS force, forcing the remainder to retreat when they were targeted by the unmanned Reaper. 

An RAF Reaper drone has attacked and destroyed an ISIS terror cell outside Baghdad according to the Ministry of Defence (stock image)

An RAF Reaper drone has attacked and destroyed an ISIS terror cell outside Baghdad according to the Ministry of Defence (stock image)

An RAF Reaper drone has attacked and destroyed an ISIS terror cell outside Baghdad according to the Ministry of Defence (stock image) 

The Ministry of Defence released footage of the drone attacking the terrorists with a 500lb laser-guided smart bomb

The Ministry of Defence released footage of the drone attacking the terrorists with a 500lb laser-guided smart bomb

The Ministry of Defence released footage of the drone attacking the terrorists with a 500lb laser-guided smart bomb

The RAF drone was called in to support local Iraqi security forces who were being attacked by ISIS

The RAF drone was called in to support local Iraqi security forces who were being attacked by ISIS

The RAF drone was called in to support local Iraqi security forces who were being attacked by ISIS 

The MoD said RAF crews were flying daily missions against ISIS in Iraq and Syria

The MoD said RAF crews were flying daily missions against ISIS in Iraq and Syria

The MoD said RAF crews were flying daily missions against ISIS in Iraq and Syria

The RAF drone identified the suspected terrorists and fired a laser-guided 500lb at them. 

According to the MoD: ‘The crew of the Reaper successfully located them, and at an appropriate moment, with no sign of a strike posing any risks to friendly forces or any civilians, conducted a carefully planned attack with a GBU-12 guided bomb. The Iraqi forces subsequently reported that the threat had been eliminated.’ 

The MoD said the RAF are flying manned and unmanned missions against ISIS in Syria and Iraq. 

On August 20, a Reaper drone fired a single hellfire missile at a cave complex 85 miles west of Kirkuk, northern Iraq.  

According to the MoD: ‘The missile struck the target accurately, and the blast was observed to emerge from another part of the cave network, indicating that weapon’s effect had reached deep inside the caves.’ 

Further attacks were launched against ISIS suspects on August 26, including both Reaper drones and coalition fast jets. 

The MoD claimed no innocent civilians were injured during the attack

The MoD claimed no innocent civilians were injured during the attack

The MoD claimed no innocent civilians were injured during the attack

This post first appeared on dailymail.co.uk

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Mobile networks including EE, Vodafone and Tesco Mobile will be BANNED from selling locked phones

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mobile networks including ee vodafone and tesco mobile will be banned from selling locked phones

Ofcom will next year ban mobile phone operators from selling locking handsets.

The telecoms watchdog said the move would make it easier for customers to switch providers.

It will come into force in December 2021 and it is hoped to help people get better deals and value for money.

The move will affect BT/EE, Tesco Mobile and Vodafone, whose devices cannot be used on other networks unless a £10 unlock fee is paid.

O2, Sky, Three and Virgin already sell unlocked handsets.

Ofcom connectivity director Selina Chadha, said: ‘We know that lots of people can be put off from switching because their handset is locked.

‘So we’re banning mobile companies from selling locked phones, which will save people time, money and effort – and help them unlock better deals.’

The new move is hoped to offer more choice and better services for mobile phone users

The new move is hoped to offer more choice and better services for mobile phone users

The new move is hoped to offer more choice and better services for mobile phone users

Ofcom said people were left frustrated by the difficulties in unlocking a mobile, which can take a long amount of time.

Sky News reports it comes after the regulator’s earlier efforts to making switching easier, via the ‘text-to-switch’ service.

Ofcom will also make operators send customers full details of their contracts before they buy a mobile.

Earlier this month it said it was probing the ‘market position’ of BBC Sounds after its commercial rivals complained of the ‘adverse impact’ the service was having on business.

Vodaphone is one of the companies who still sell phones whose devices are locked

Vodaphone is one of the companies who still sell phones whose devices are locked

Vodaphone is one of the companies who still sell phones whose devices are locked

BBC Sounds was launched in 2018 as a ‘digital home’ for audio content – featuring live and on-demand radio, music mixes and podcasts.

But its commercial rivals have since complained about Radio 1 Dance, a new 24-hour dance music stream that will launch on BBC Sounds on October 9, because it is not ‘distinctive’ and does not offer ‘true public service value’.

The new stream will bring together the BBC’s existing dance content in one place, making it easy for listeners to catch their favourite shows outside of traditional schedules.

Ofcom said it would ‘take stock of Sounds at an appropriate point in its evolution’ but refused to conduct a public interest test because ‘we consider the impact of the new stream on the market is likely to be small’.

This post first appeared on dailymail.co.uk

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Tanker ‘hijackers’ may face a life behind bars but ‘may claim asylum’

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tanker hijackers may face a life behind bars but may claim asylum

Seven stowaways seized in a daring operation by special forces were last night facing lengthy jail terms for hijacking an oil tanker.

The suspects were detained under maritime laws which carry a maximum sentence of life imprisonment.

They had allegedly threatened the 22-man crew of the 42,000-ton Nave Andromeda which was heading to Southampton from Lagos in Nigeria.

It was claimed they could be about to attempt to claim asylum in the UK, but it would not impact any police proceedings.

Special Boat Service commandos stormed the tanker off the Isle of Wight on Sunday evening after the ship’s terrified captain radioed for help.

They had allegedly threatened the 22-man crew of the 42,000-ton Nave Andromeda which was heading to Southampton from Lagos in Nigeria

They had allegedly threatened the 22-man crew of the 42,000-ton Nave Andromeda which was heading to Southampton from Lagos in Nigeria

They had allegedly threatened the 22-man crew of the 42,000-ton Nave Andromeda which was heading to Southampton from Lagos in Nigeria

The unnamed mariner said in broken English on an open radio channel: ‘I try to keep them calm but I need immediately, immediately agency assistance.’

He added that two intruders were on the starboard side near the bridge, although they had not managed to gain access.

In other radio messages the captain is reported to have said he feared for his life, and those of his crew.

The Greek-owned tanker, that flies the Liberian flag, had left Lagos on October 5, where the stowaways ‘illegally boarded’ the vessel, a spokesman for operator Navios Tanker Management said. 

The SBS operation was authorised by Defence Secretary Ben Wallace and Home Secretary Priti Patel. 

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34881694 8882633 image a 66 1603763695552

The heavily-armed troops descended on to the tanker by rope from four Royal Navy helicopters after nightfall

The heavily-armed troops descended on to the tanker by rope from four Royal Navy helicopters after nightfall

The heavily-armed troops descended on to the tanker by rope from four Royal Navy helicopters after nightfall

A source close to Miss Patel said the 45 minutes during which the situation was resolved ‘felt like 45 hours’.

The heavily-armed troops descended on to the tanker by rope from four Royal Navy helicopters after nightfall.

The elite soldiers quickly rounded up the suspected hijackers and ended their mission after just nine minutes.

The seven suspected hijackers seized on Sunday night were last night being questioned in separate police stations across Hampshire after the 750ft tanker moored at Southampton.

A spokesman for Hampshire Police said: ‘It was reported that a number of stowaways were on board, and they had made threats towards the crew.’

He added: ‘All 22 crew members are safe and well and the vessel is now alongside in the port of Southampton. Investigators are speaking to the crew members to establish the exact circumstances of what happened.’

Bob Sanguinetti, chief executive of the UK Chamber of Shipping, said: ‘I think this has got all the hallmarks of a situation where a number of stowaways are seeking political asylum, presumably in the UK.  At some stage they got aggressive. Clearly no one knew at the time how aggressive they were, whether they were armed or not and what their motives were.

‘In the discussions taking place between the ship’s captain and the authorities in the UK – both police and the military – they will have decided at some stage the least risky option was to board the vessel using the special forces.’

The drama echoed a previous case involving stowaways which unfolded aboard a cargo ship in the Thames Estuary in December 2018. 

Four Nigerians had hidden aboard the Grande Tema in Lagos, and became disruptive as the ship entered UK waters. 

The elite soldiers quickly rounded up the suspected hijackers and ended their mission after just nine minutes

The elite soldiers quickly rounded up the suspected hijackers and ended their mission after just nine minutes

The elite soldiers quickly rounded up the suspected hijackers and ended their mission after just nine minutes

The four attempted to repel an SBS boarding party by threatening to infect them with HIV, but were eventually arrested and prosecuted. 

At least one made ‘throat-slitting’ gestures to crew, CCTV footage played in court showed. 

However, after an eight week trial at the Old Bailey they were cleared of attempting to hijack the ship and convicted of affray.

Two were also found guilty of making threats to kill. They were jailed for a combined total of seven years.

That case highlights potential difficulties in securing convictions under the hijacking legislation.

Q&A

What will the police do now?

Police will build a picture of the alleged hijackers’ activities aboard the Nave Andromeda. They are also likely to study electronic systems which record communications aboard the vessel and from ship-to-shore, known as a Voyage Data Recorder, or VDR, similar to the ‘black box’ aboard commercial aircraft.

What’s the law on hijacking and piracy?

The seven were arrested under Section 9 of the Aviation and Maritime Security Act 1990, which deals with hijackings. The law states: ‘A person who unlawfully, by the use of force or by threats of any kind, seizes a ship or exercises control of it, commits the offence of hijacking a ship.’

Richard Neylon, an expert in maritime law from law firm HFW, said: ‘If you try to seize control of a vessel and you have no business being aboard that vessel, the threshold is quite low under this legislation.’ The maximum sentence under the legislation is life imprisonment.

What could happen to the suspects?

Regardless of whether the Nigerians are charged with any crime, their removal from the UK is unlikely to be swift. Previous cases have shown hijackers were able to successfully challenge the Home Office.

For example, in February 2000 nine Afghan men hijacked an Ariana Afghan Airlines Boeing 727 and forced the pilot to land at Stansted. A siege involving the hijackers and 187 passengers and crew lasted five days. The hijackers were jailed but their convictions were later quashed.

In 2006, they brought legal action which allowed them to stay in Britain.

What happens to other Nigerian asylum seekers?

There were 1,279 asylum applications by Nigerians decided by the Home Office in the year to March – but the majority were refused.

Only 398 led to grants of asylum or other leave to remain, or just over 31 per cent. The rest were refused or withdrawn, Home Office data shows.

It is unclear how many of those who were refused were removed from the UK.

According to a research paper by the House of Commons Library, there were just over 26,000 asylum applications from Nigerians decided across the European Union during 2019.

Of those, just 16 per cent – or 4,795 – were granted in the first instance.

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Storm the Andromeda! Minute by nerve-shredding minute, how SBS commandos blinded hijackers with lights before abseiling from helicopters and re-taking oil tanker

By Arthur Martin for the Daily Mail  

It was a ten-hour standoff at sea that culminated in nine minutes of ruthless, military precision.

Special Boat Service commandos used a classic pincer movement to storm the Nave Andromeda.

Two heavily-armed squads, wearing night vision goggles and thermal imaging equipment, rappelled down ropes from choppers at either end of the tanker before converging on seven Nigerian stowaways who quickly surrendered.

As police continue to question the suspects, the Mail charts the build-up to Sunday night’s flawless operation.

Two weeks ago: Three Nigerian stowaways are pictured on a tanker's rudder a fortnight ago

Two weeks ago: Three Nigerian stowaways are pictured on a tanker's rudder a fortnight ago

Two weeks ago: Three Nigerian stowaways are pictured on a tanker’s rudder a fortnight ago

Sneaking aboard

The seven stowaways slipped on board the Nave Andromeda shortly before the oil tanker left the Nigerian port of Lagos three weeks ago, on October 6.

After a brief stop off the coast of Saint-Nazaire in France it was heading to collect gasoline from Fawley Oil Refinery near Southampton when the drama unfolded.

The stowaways presence became known to the crew at some point during its 20-day voyage to Britain. 

Officials are working on the assumption that they boarded though the rudder trunk of the vessel.

‘Security in Third World ports is not as high as in the West, so it is relatively easy to get through perimeter fences,’ maritime expert David Osler said. ‘International Maritime Organisation guidelines mandate search of vessels prior to departure, but sometimes stowaways slip through.’

Mayday call

The captain was lauded for his ‘exemplary response and calmness’ by the ship’s owners, Navios Tanker Management. 

At around 9am on Sunday, the captain of the 42,000-ton tanker, a Greek-owned vessel which flies the Liberian flag, sent out a mayday distress signal six miles off the Isle of Wight when the stowaways allegedly started making threats to kill the crew. Tensions flared when the crew tried to lock the seven men in a cabin, having told them that they would be following protocol and informing authorities of their presence.

Nave Andromeda oil tanker is pictured berthed at Southampton docks on October 26

Nave Andromeda oil tanker is pictured berthed at Southampton docks on October 26

Nave Andromeda oil tanker is pictured berthed at Southampton docks on October 26

In a 21-second call which was released yesterday, the Greek captain begged ‘immediate assistance’ and described how the men were on the loose.

In heavily-accented English, he said: ‘The stowaways go outside, I see four person port side, midship, near to the manifold, and I have two of them starboard side on the bridge. I try to keep them calm but I need immediately, immediately agency assistance.’

The captain and 20 other crew members took refuge in the ship’s citadel, an emergency room used during pirate attacks, after the migrants ‘smashed glass and made threats to kill’.

From here they could control the ship and communicate with the authorities. Only the engineer, another Greek national, did not retreat to the citadel. The engineer remained in the engine room taking instructions from the master. A source said: ‘The captain clearly stated he feared for their lives and needed urgent assistance, they needed rescuing. It was desperation, you could hear the fear in his voice.’

The ship’s operator, Navios Tanker Management, said: ‘Navios would also like to pay tribute to the master of the Nave Andromeda for his exemplary response and calmness and to all the crew for their fortitude in a difficult situation.’ 

Stalling for time

An hour later Hampshire Police receives reports regarding ‘concerns for the safety’ of the crew who had received ‘verbal threats’.

The ship had been due to dock at Southampton at 10.30am – but the captain decided the situation was too dangerous to approach the port. Instead, he steered the tanker on a circular and zig-zag course off the Isle of Wight to play for time.

The Nave Andromeda was built in 2011 and weighs 42,338 tonnes. It was last known to be docked in Lagos, Nigeria on October 6 (pictured: The ship off the Isle of Wight on Sunday)

The Nave Andromeda was built in 2011 and weighs 42,338 tonnes. It was last known to be docked in Lagos, Nigeria on October 6 (pictured: The ship off the Isle of Wight on Sunday)

The Nave Andromeda was built in 2011 and weighs 42,338 tonnes. It was last known to be docked in Lagos, Nigeria on October 6 (pictured: The ship off the Isle of Wight on Sunday)

An exclusion zone of three nautical miles was set up around the ship. By 5pm Hampshire constabulary had submitted a formal request to the Ministry of Defence for military support. The Royal Navy was given command of the operation and was given authorisation to use armed forces to board the tanker by Defence Secretary Ben Wallace and Home Secretary Priti Patel.

Throughout the afternoon, two coastguard helicopters flew overhead, monitoring the situation. On land, an armed unit of police set up a station on the Isle of Wight. Richard Meade, of the Lloyd’s List Intelligence maritime service, said: ‘Seven stowaways were discovered on board. The crew tried to detain them in a cabin, but the stowaways did not want to be locked away in a cabin and became violent and that raised the security alarm.’

Positioning the troops

After taking control of the mission, naval chiefs acted quickly to assemble an astonishing array of firepower.

A Chinook helicopter collected SBS troops and fast assault craft from the elite unit’s HQ in Poole in Dorset, some 15 miles away, and stationed them just out of sight of the Nave Andromeda.

The frigate HMS Richmond was put on alert in the Channel and divers were assembled in case explosive mines had been placed on the ship’s hull, sources said. Shortly before the attack the captain of the tanker was asked to put the lights out and turn into the wind to prepare for the arrival of the special forces.

Storming the tanker

At around 7.30pm – just over 10 hours after the first mayday call –military chiefs ordered the attack.

A formation of helicopters swooped in, deploying a deafening din and dazzling lights, known as ‘obscurant’ tactics, to disorientate the stowaways on board. The plan was to ‘overwhelm them with the noise of the rotor discs, and put a lot of light in to blind them’, a source said.

The Special Boat Service (SBS) raided the tanker yesterday evening off the Isle of Wight after stowaways were found on board who threatened the crew. Pictured is an official on the boat

The Special Boat Service (SBS) raided the tanker yesterday evening off the Isle of Wight after stowaways were found on board who threatened the crew. Pictured is an official on the boat

The Special Boat Service (SBS) raided the tanker yesterday evening off the Isle of Wight after stowaways were found on board who threatened the crew. Pictured is an official on the boat

At least one Wildcat helicopter, fitted with an electro-optical device to aid its night vision, swept the deck for signs of hostile behaviour. Troops on landing craft approached and scanned the tanker with sniper rifles. Two Merlin Mk 4 helicopters then approached in ‘dark mode’ and took positions above the bow and stern of the ship.

Eight SBS troopers rappelled by rope onto the deck at each end and converged on the middle of the ship in a pincer movement.

Wearing night vision goggles with thermal imaging to detect human heat sources, the units closed in on the seven stowaways who were grouped in one place on the deck.

They were not thought to be armed and surrendered swiftly.

Mission success

It took the SBS less than nine minutes to arrest the suspects, secure the tanker and lead the crew out of their panic room. Some 40 minutes later the Ministry of Defence confirmed that the forces ‘have gained control of the ship and seven individuals have been detained’. The seven Nigerians were promptly arrested on suspicion of seizing or exercising control of a ship by use of threats or force.

They all remain in custody at police stations across Hampshire.

Investigators are speaking to the crew members to establish the exact circumstances of what happened. The ship, which can carry up to 42,000 tons of crude oil, is now in the port of Southampton.

An aerial photo showing the Nave Andromeda docking at Southampton at around 2.30am following Sunday's dramatic events

An aerial photo showing the Nave Andromeda docking at Southampton at around 2.30am following Sunday's dramatic events

An aerial photo showing the Nave Andromeda docking at Southampton at around 2.30am following Sunday’s dramatic events 

Defence Secretary Ben Wallace paid tribute to the courageous personnel who braved ‘dark skies and worsening weather’ to ensure the safety of the ship’s crew.

Former Rear Admiral Chris Parry said: ‘From the time the helicopters went in and the SBS roped on to the ship, they rounded up the people pretty quickly.

‘I think the stowaways themselves accepted this was probably the end of the journey for them and there probably wasn’t any point in resisting heavily-armed men approaching them.’

A Hampshire police spokesman said: ‘The vessel had been travelling in the direction of Southampton, having sailed from Lagos in Nigeria. It was reported that a number of stowaways were on board, and they had made threats towards the crew.

‘Following a multi-agency response by police, with support from the military and other emergency service partners, seven people were detained by police. All 22 crew members are safe and well.’ 

This post first appeared on dailymail.co.uk

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American Pie singer Don McLean says ex-wife Patrisha McLean is the ‘worst’ person he’s ever known

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american pie singer don mclean says ex wife patrisha mclean is the worst person hes ever known

Don McLean revealed his feelings towards his ex-wife as he opened up about the mysteries of his hit song, American Pie.

The singer-songwriter, 75, who lives in Palm Desert, California, explained that it took him four years to get over his relationship with Patrisha McLean, who he was married to for 29 years and shares two children with.

He told The Irish Times that the love letters she sent every month for 30 years ‘immediately turned to salt’ when their relationship crumbled, following the accusations of domestic violence made against him.

Having divorced in 2016, Don said he hasn’t met anyone who compares to Patrisha, and added: ‘I can truly say that my ex-wife is the worst person I ever knew.’ 

The hitmaker added that it’s only now that their 2016 split is sinking in, despite the fact he moved on with Playboy model Paris Dylan, 25, months after his divorce finalized.

Don McLean, 75, (pictured) who lives in Palm Desert, California, told The Irish Times, his ex-wife is the 'worst' person he's ever known

Don McLean, 75, (pictured) who lives in Palm Desert, California, told The Irish Times, his ex-wife is the 'worst' person he's ever known

Don McLean, 75, (pictured) who lives in Palm Desert, California, told The Irish Times, his ex-wife is the ‘worst’ person he’s ever known 

Don was arrested and charged for domestic violence before the divorce of his second wife Patrisha, who he was married to for 29 years. Pictured, at California's Country Music Festival at the Empire Polo Club on April 26, 2014

Don was arrested and charged for domestic violence before the divorce of his second wife Patrisha, who he was married to for 29 years. Pictured, at California's Country Music Festival at the Empire Polo Club on April 26, 2014

Don was arrested and charged for domestic violence before the divorce of his second wife Patrisha, who he was married to for 29 years. Pictured, at California’s Country Music Festival at the Empire Polo Club on April 26, 2014 

Don said the love letters Patrisha sent every month for 30 years 'immediately turned to salt' when their marriage came to an end. Pictured: Don at the Knox Count Jail in Rockland in January, 2016

Don said the love letters Patrisha sent every month for 30 years 'immediately turned to salt' when their marriage came to an end. Pictured: Don at the Knox Count Jail in Rockland in January, 2016

Don said the love letters Patrisha sent every month for 30 years ‘immediately turned to salt’ when their marriage came to an end. Pictured: Don at the Knox Count Jail in Rockland in January, 2016

Since the breakdown of their marriage, Patrisha has spoken about her relationship with Don in a travelling exhibit called Finding Our Voices, and has established a domestic violence non-profit organisation of the same name.

She filed for divorce two months after Don was arrested for domestic violence on the grounds of ‘adultery, cruel and abusive treatment, and irreconcilable differences.’ 

Patrisha McLean filed for a protection order after her husband’s arrest, but withdrew the request only days later.

In a statement supporting her request for the restraining order, she alleged that her husband had ‘terrorized’ her ‘for four hours’ on the night before he was arrested.

Don began a relationship with former Playboy model Paris Dylan, 25, (pictured) months after his divorce finalized

Don began a relationship with former Playboy model Paris Dylan, 25, (pictured) months after his divorce finalized

Don began a relationship with former Playboy model Paris Dylan, 25, (pictured) months after his divorce finalized 

Patrisha McLean also wrote that she feared for her life after the singer allegedly grabbed her forcefully and said he wanted to ‘strangle’ her.

But she said she didn’t anticipate the statement to be made public and said she felt ‘blindsided’ after her claims were publicized.

The Portland Press Herald reported she called the newspaper and defended her husband’s character, saying she stood by her charges but that the alleged abuse represented only ‘one side of him’ and that he is ‘not a monster.’

Don, who is best known for 1971 hit song American Pie, pleaded guilty to the charges and paid a fine, however his lawyer said this was ‘not because he was in fact guilty of anything, but to provide closure for his family and keep the whole process as private as possible.’

The 75-year-old began a relationship with former Playboy model Paris Dylan, 25, just months after his divorce was finalized. 

Their coupling quickly flourished when Paris was hired to manage his social media accounts in 2016. 

Don, who has been coy in the past about his relationship with Paris Dylan, who is 48 years his junior, revealed that he doesn’t read any media coverage about him regardless if it’s good or bad.

Describing it as ‘all a bunch of b*******,’ he hinted at a need for control. 

Don said he plans to auction most of his possessions before he dies – including song lyrics, weapons and guitars – because he doesn’t want to leave them for someone else to ‘figure out what to do’ with them.  

Don, who has made about $150 million over the course of his 50-year career, said his hit song American Pie is a fusion of genres. Pictured: Don in 1970s

Don, who has made about $150 million over the course of his 50-year career, said his hit song American Pie is a fusion of genres. Pictured: Don in 1970s

Don, who has made about $150 million over the course of his 50-year career, said his hit song American Pie is a fusion of genres. Pictured: Don in 1970s 

Don was aged 24 when he wrote American Pie and has avoided giving in-depth incite into the verses, although many agree the song is about the state of America in the 1960s.   

Having made about $150 million (£115, 000) over the course of his 50-year career, Don is set to mark the anniversary of his hit song with new documentary The Day the Music Died.

A Broadway show has also been planned for 2022, alongside a children’s book. 

Don who describes American pie as a fusion of folk, rock’n’roll and old-fashioned popular music, explained the folk aspect of the song is in the verse-chorus-verse composition.

Giving a vague insight into the mysteries of the song, he said: ‘I’ve never said that to anybody in 50 years.’

This post first appeared on dailymail.co.uk

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